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JOINS IN ORACLE-different joins in oracle with examples

1. The purpose of a join is to combine the data across tables.


2. A join is actually performed by the where clause which combines the specified rows of
tables.
3. If a join involves in more than two tables then Oracle joins first two tables based on the
joins condition and then compares the result with the next table and so on.
1
2
3
4
5
6

7
8

TYPES
Equi join
Non-equi join
Self join
Natural join
Cross join
Outer join
Left outer
Right outer
Full outer
Inner join
Using clause
9 On clause
Assume that we have the following tables.
SQL> select * from dept;
DEPTNO
10
20
30

DNAME
INVENTORY
FINANCE
HR

LOC
HYBD
BGLR
MUMBAI

SQL> select * from emp;


EMPNO
111
222
333

ENAME
saketh
sudha
jagan

JOB
analyst
clerk
manager

MGR
444
333
111

DEPTNO
10
20
10

444

madhu

engineer

222

40

1. EQUI JOIN
A join which contains an equal to = operator in the joins condition.
Ex:
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp e,dept d where
e.deptno=d.deptno;

EMPNO
111
333
222

ENAME
saketh
jagan
sudha

JOB
analyst
manager
clerk

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE

LOC
HYBD
HYBD
BGLR

Using clause
SQL> select empno,ename,job ,dname,loc from emp e join dept d
using(deptno);
EMPNO
111
333
222

ENAME
saketh
jagan
sudha

JOB
analyst
manager
clerk

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE

LOC
HYBD
HYBD
BGLR

On clause
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp e join dept d
on(e.deptno=d.deptno);
EMPNO
111
333
222

ENAME
saketh
jagan
sudha

JOB
analyst
manager
clerk

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE

LOC
HYBD
HYBD
BGLR

2. NON-EQUI JOIN
A join which contains an operator other than equal to = in the joins
condition.
Ex:
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp e,dept d where

e.deptno > d.deptno;


EMPNO
222
444
444
444

ENAME
sudha
madhu
madhu
madhu

JOB
clerk
engineer
engineer
engineer

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE
HR

LOC
HYBD
HYBD
BGLR
MUMBAI

3. SELF JOIN
Joining the table itself is called self join.
Ex:
SQL> select e1.empno,e2.ename,e1.job,e2.deptno from emp e1,emp
e2 where e1.empno=e2.mgr;
EMPNO
111
222
333
444

ENAME
jagan
madhu
sudha
saketh

JOB
analyst
clerk
manager
engineer

DEPTNO
10
40
20
10

4. NATURAL JOIN
Natural join compares all the common columns.
Ex:
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp natural join dept;
EMPNO
111
333
222

ENAME
saketh
jagan
sudha

JOB
analyst
manager
clerk

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE

LOC
HYBD
HYBD
BGLR

5. CROSS JOIN
This will gives the cross product.
Ex:
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp cross join dept;
EMPNO
111
222

ENAME
saketh
sudha

JOB
analyst
clerk

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY

LOC
HYBD
HYBD

333
444
111
222
333
444
111
222
333
444

jagan
madhu
saketh
sudha
jagan
madhu
saketh
sudha
jagan
madhu

manager
engineer
analyst
clerk
manager
engineer
analyst
clerk
manager
engineer

INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE
FINANCE
FINANCE
FINANCE
HR
HR
HR
HR

HYBD
HYBD
BGLR
BGLR
BGLR
BGLR
MUMBAI
MUMBAI
MUMBAI
MUMBAI

6. OUTER JOIN
Outer join gives the non-matching records along with matching
records.
LEFT OUTER JOIN
This will display the all matching records and the records which are in
left hand side table those that are not in right hand side table.
Ex:
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp e left outer join
dept d
on(e.deptno=d.deptno);
Or
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp e,dept d where
e.deptno=d.deptno(+);
EMPNO
111
333
222
444

ENAME
saketh
jagan
sudha
madhu

JOB
analyst
manager
clerk
engineer

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE

LOC
HYBD
HYBD
BGLR

RIGHT OUTER JOIN


This will display the all matching records and the records which are in
right hand side table those that are not in left hand side table.
Ex:
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp e right outer join
dept d
on(e.deptno=d.deptno);

Or
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp e,dept d where
e.deptno(+) =
d.deptno;
EMPNO
111
333
222

ENAME
saketh
jagan
sudha

JOB
analyst
manager
clerk

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE
HR

LOC
HYBD
HYBD
BGLR
MUMBAI

FULL OUTER JOIN


This will display the all matching records and the non-matching records
from both tables.
Ex:
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp e full outer join
dept d
on(e.deptno=d.deptno);
EMPNO
333
111
222
444

ENAME
jagan
saketh
sudha
madhu

JOB
manager
analyst
clerk
engineer

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE

LOC
HYBD
HYBD
BGLR

HR

MUMBAI

7. INNER JOIN
This will display all the records that have matched.
Ex:
SQL> select empno,ename,job,dname,loc from emp inner join dept
using(deptno);
EMPNO
111
333
222

ENAME
saketh
jagan
sudha

JOB
analyst
manager
clerkx`

DNAME
INVENTORY
INVENTORY
FINANCE

LOC
HYBD
HYBD
BGLR

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The SQL Joins clause is used to combine records from two or more tables in a database.
A JOIN is a means for combining fields from two tables by using values common to
each.
Consider the following two tables, (a) CUSTOMERS table is as follows:
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| ID | NAME
| AGE | ADDRESS
| SALARY
|
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| 1 | Ramesh
| 32 | Ahmedabad | 2000.00 |
| 2 | Khilan
| 25 | Delhi
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | kaushik | 23 | Kota
| 2000.00 |
| 4 | Chaitali | 25 | Mumbai
| 6500.00 |
| 5 | Hardik
| 27 | Bhopal
| 8500.00 |
| 6 | Komal
| 22 | MP
| 4500.00 |
| 7 | Muffy
| 24 | Indore
| 10000.00 |
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+

(b) Another table is ORDERS as follows:


+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
|OID | DATE
| CUSTOMER_ID | AMOUNT |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
| 102 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
3000 |
| 100 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
1500 |
| 101 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
2 |
1560 |
| 103 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
4 |
2060 |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+

Now, let us join these two tables in our SELECT statement as follows:
SQL> SELECT ID, NAME, AGE, AMOUNT
FROM CUSTOMERS, ORDERS
WHERE CUSTOMERS.ID = ORDERS.CUSTOMER_ID;

This would produce the following result:


+----+----------+-----+--------+
| ID | NAME
| AGE | AMOUNT |
+----+----------+-----+--------+
| 3 | kaushik | 23 |
3000 |
| 3 | kaushik | 23 |
1500 |
| 2 | Khilan
| 25 |
1560 |
| 4 | Chaitali | 25 |
2060 |
+----+----------+-----+--------+

Here, it is noticeable that the join is performed in the WHERE clause. Several operators
can be used to join tables, such as =, <, >, <>, <=, >=, !=, BETWEEN, LIKE, and NOT;

they can all be used to join tables. However, the most common operator is the equal
symbol.

SQL Join Types:


There are different types of joins available in SQL:

INNER JOIN: returns rows when there is a match in both tables.


LEFT JOIN: returns all rows from the left table, even if there are no matches in
the right table.

RIGHT JOIN: returns all rows from the right table, even if there are no matches in
the left table.

FULL JOIN: returns rows when there is a match in one of the tables.

SELF JOIN: is used to join a table to itself as if the table were two tables,
temporarily renaming at least one table in the SQL statement.

CARTESIAN JOIN: returns the Cartesian product of the sets of records from the
two or more joined tables.

----------------

SQL - INNER JOINS


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The most frequently used and important of the joins is the INNER JOIN. They are also
referred to as an EQUIJOIN.
The INNER JOIN creates a new result table by combining column values of two tables
(table1 and table2) based upon the join-predicate. The query compares each row of table1
with each row of table2 to find all pairs of rows which satisfy the join-predicate. When
the join-predicate is satisfied, column values for each matched pair of rows of A and B
are combined into a result row.

Syntax:
The basic syntax of INNER JOIN is as follows:
SELECT table1.column1, table2.column2...
FROM table1

INNER JOIN table2


ON table1.common_field = table2.common_field;

Example:
Consider the following two tables, (a) CUSTOMERS table is as follows:
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| ID | NAME
| AGE | ADDRESS
| SALARY
|
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| 1 | Ramesh
| 32 | Ahmedabad | 2000.00 |
| 2 | Khilan
| 25 | Delhi
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | kaushik | 23 | Kota
| 2000.00 |
| 4 | Chaitali | 25 | Mumbai
| 6500.00 |
| 5 | Hardik
| 27 | Bhopal
| 8500.00 |
| 6 | Komal
| 22 | MP
| 4500.00 |
| 7 | Muffy
| 24 | Indore
| 10000.00 |
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+

(b) Another table is ORDERS as follows:


+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
| OID | DATE
|
ID | AMOUNT |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
| 102 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
3000 |
| 100 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
1500 |
| 101 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
2 |
1560 |
| 103 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
4 |
2060 |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+

Now, let us join these two tables using INNER JOIN as follows:
SQL> SELECT ID, NAME, AMOUNT, DATE
FROM CUSTOMERS
INNER JOIN ORDERS
ON CUSTOMERS.ID = ORDERS.CUSTOMER_ID;

This would produce the following result:


+----+----------+--------+---------------------+
| ID | NAME
| AMOUNT | DATE
|
+----+----------+--------+---------------------+
| 3 | kaushik |
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 3 | kaushik |
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 2 | Khilan
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
| 4 | Chaitali |
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
+----+----------+--------+---------------------+

------------------

SQL - LEFT JOINS


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The SQL LEFT JOIN returns all rows from the left table, even if there are no matches in
the right table. This means that if the ON clause matches 0 (zero) records in right table,
the join will still return a row in the result, but with NULL in each column from right
table.
This means that a left join returns all the values from the left table, plus matched values
from the right table or NULL in case of no matching join predicate.

Syntax:
The basic syntax of LEFT JOIN is as follows:
SELECT table1.column1, table2.column2...
FROM table1
LEFT JOIN table2
ON table1.common_field = table2.common_field;

Here given condition could be any given expression based on your requirement.

Example:
Consider the following two tables, (a) CUSTOMERS table is as follows:
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| ID | NAME
| AGE | ADDRESS
| SALARY
|
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| 1 | Ramesh
| 32 | Ahmedabad | 2000.00 |
| 2 | Khilan
| 25 | Delhi
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | kaushik | 23 | Kota
| 2000.00 |
| 4 | Chaitali | 25 | Mumbai
| 6500.00 |
| 5 | Hardik
| 27 | Bhopal
| 8500.00 |
| 6 | Komal
| 22 | MP
| 4500.00 |
| 7 | Muffy
| 24 | Indore
| 10000.00 |
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+

(b) Another table is ORDERS as follows:


+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
| OID | DATE
| CUSTOMER_ID | AMOUNT |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
| 102 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
3000 |
| 100 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
1500 |
| 101 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
2 |
1560 |
| 103 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
4 |
2060 |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+

Now, let us join these two tables using LEFT JOIN as follows:
SQL> SELECT ID, NAME, AMOUNT, DATE
FROM CUSTOMERS
LEFT JOIN ORDERS
ON CUSTOMERS.ID = ORDERS.CUSTOMER_ID;

This would produce the following result:


+----+----------+--------+---------------------+
| ID | NAME
| AMOUNT | DATE
|
+----+----------+--------+---------------------+
| 1 | Ramesh
|
NULL | NULL
|
| 2 | Khilan
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
| 3 | kaushik |
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 3 | kaushik |
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 4 | Chaitali |
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
| 5 | Hardik
|
NULL | NULL
|
| 6 | Komal
|
NULL | NULL
|
| 7 | Muffy
|
NULL | NULL
|
+----+----------+--------+---------------------+

------------------

SQL - RIGHT JOINS


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The SQL RIGHT JOIN returns all rows from the right table, even if there are no
matches in the left table. This means that if the ON clause matches 0 (zero) records in left
table, the join will still return a row in the result, but with NULL in each column from left
table.
This means that a right join returns all the values from the right table, plus matched
values from the left table or NULL in case of no matching join predicate.

Syntax:
The basic syntax of RIGHT JOIN is as follows:
SELECT table1.column1, table2.column2...
FROM table1
RIGHT JOIN table2
ON table1.common_field = table2.common_field;

Example:
Consider the following two tables, (a) CUSTOMERS table is as follows:
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| ID | NAME
| AGE | ADDRESS
| SALARY
|
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| 1 | Ramesh
| 32 | Ahmedabad | 2000.00 |
| 2 | Khilan
| 25 | Delhi
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | kaushik | 23 | Kota
| 2000.00 |
| 4 | Chaitali | 25 | Mumbai
| 6500.00 |
| 5 | Hardik
| 27 | Bhopal
| 8500.00 |
| 6 | Komal
| 22 | MP
| 4500.00 |
| 7 | Muffy
| 24 | Indore
| 10000.00 |
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+

(b) Another table is ORDERS as follows:


+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
|OID | DATE
| CUSTOMER_ID | AMOUNT |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
| 102 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
3000 |
| 100 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
1500 |
| 101 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
2 |
1560 |
| 103 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
4 |
2060 |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+

Now, let us join these two tables using RIGHT JOIN as follows:
SQL> SELECT ID, NAME, AMOUNT, DATE
FROM CUSTOMERS
RIGHT JOIN ORDERS
ON CUSTOMERS.ID = ORDERS.CUSTOMER_ID;

This would produce the following result:


+------+----------+--------+---------------------+
| ID
| NAME
| AMOUNT | DATE
|
+------+----------+--------+---------------------+
|
3 | kaushik |
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
|
3 | kaushik |
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
|
2 | Khilan
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
|
4 | Chaitali |
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
+------+----------+--------+---------------------+

--------------

SQL - FULL JOINS


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The SQL FULL JOIN combines the results of both left and right outer joins.
The joined table will contain all records from both tables, and fill in NULLs for missing
matches on either side.

Syntax:
The basic syntax of FULL JOIN is as follows:
SELECT table1.column1, table2.column2...
FROM table1
FULL JOIN table2
ON table1.common_field = table2.common_field;

Here given condition could be any given expression based on your requirement.

Example:
Consider the following two tables, (a) CUSTOMERS table is as follows:
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| ID | NAME
| AGE | ADDRESS
| SALARY
|
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| 1 | Ramesh
| 32 | Ahmedabad | 2000.00 |
| 2 | Khilan
| 25 | Delhi
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | kaushik | 23 | Kota
| 2000.00 |
| 4 | Chaitali | 25 | Mumbai
| 6500.00 |
| 5 | Hardik
| 27 | Bhopal
| 8500.00 |
| 6 | Komal
| 22 | MP
| 4500.00 |
| 7 | Muffy
| 24 | Indore
| 10000.00 |
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+

(b) Another table is ORDERS as follows:


+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
|OID | DATE
| CUSTOMER_ID | AMOUNT |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
| 102 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
3000 |
| 100 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
1500 |
| 101 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
2 |
1560 |
| 103 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
4 |
2060 |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+

Now, let us join these two tables using FULL JOIN as follows:
SQL> SELECT ID, NAME, AMOUNT, DATE
FROM CUSTOMERS
FULL JOIN ORDERS

ON CUSTOMERS.ID = ORDERS.CUSTOMER_ID;

This would produce the following result:


+------+----------+--------+---------------------+
| ID
| NAME
| AMOUNT | DATE
|
+------+----------+--------+---------------------+
|
1 | Ramesh
|
NULL | NULL
|
|
2 | Khilan
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
|
3 | kaushik |
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
|
3 | kaushik |
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
|
4 | Chaitali |
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
|
5 | Hardik
|
NULL | NULL
|
|
6 | Komal
|
NULL | NULL
|
|
7 | Muffy
|
NULL | NULL
|
|
3 | kaushik |
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
|
3 | kaushik |
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
|
2 | Khilan
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
|
4 | Chaitali |
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
+------+----------+--------+---------------------+

If your Database does not support FULL JOIN like MySQL does not support FULL
JOIN, then you can use UNION ALL clause to combine two JOINS as follows:
SQL> SELECT ID, NAME,
FROM CUSTOMERS
LEFT JOIN ORDERS
ON CUSTOMERS.ID =
UNION ALL
SELECT ID, NAME,
FROM CUSTOMERS
RIGHT JOIN ORDERS
ON CUSTOMERS.ID =

AMOUNT, DATE
ORDERS.CUSTOMER_ID
AMOUNT, DATE
ORDERS.CUSTOMER_ID

-------------------------

SQL - SELF JOINS


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The SQL SELF JOIN is used to join a table to itself as if the table were two tables,
temporarily renaming at least one table in the SQL statement.

Syntax:
The basic syntax of SELF JOIN is as follows:

SELECT a.column_name, b.column_name...


FROM table1 a, table1 b
WHERE a.common_field = b.common_field;

Here, WHERE clause could be any given expression based on your requirement.

Example:
Consider the following two tables, (a) CUSTOMERS table is as follows:
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| ID | NAME
| AGE | ADDRESS
| SALARY
|
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| 1 | Ramesh
| 32 | Ahmedabad | 2000.00 |
| 2 | Khilan
| 25 | Delhi
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | kaushik | 23 | Kota
| 2000.00 |
| 4 | Chaitali | 25 | Mumbai
| 6500.00 |
| 5 | Hardik
| 27 | Bhopal
| 8500.00 |
| 6 | Komal
| 22 | MP
| 4500.00 |
| 7 | Muffy
| 24 | Indore
| 10000.00 |
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+

Now, let us join this table using SELF JOIN as follows:


SQL> SELECT a.ID, b.NAME, a.SALARY
FROM CUSTOMERS a, CUSTOMERS b
WHERE a.SALARY < b.SALARY;

This would produce the following result:


+----+----------+---------+
| ID | NAME
| SALARY |
+----+----------+---------+
| 2 | Ramesh
| 1500.00 |
| 2 | kaushik | 1500.00 |
| 1 | Chaitali | 2000.00 |
| 2 | Chaitali | 1500.00 |
| 3 | Chaitali | 2000.00 |
| 6 | Chaitali | 4500.00 |
| 1 | Hardik
| 2000.00 |
| 2 | Hardik
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | Hardik
| 2000.00 |
| 4 | Hardik
| 6500.00 |
| 6 | Hardik
| 4500.00 |
| 1 | Komal
| 2000.00 |
| 2 | Komal
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | Komal
| 2000.00 |
| 1 | Muffy
| 2000.00 |
| 2 | Muffy
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | Muffy
| 2000.00 |
| 4 | Muffy
| 6500.00 |
| 5 | Muffy
| 8500.00 |
| 6 | Muffy
| 4500.00 |

+----+----------+---------+

------------------

SQL CARTESIAN or CROSS JOINS


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The CARTESIAN JOIN or CROSS JOIN returns the Cartesian product of the sets of
records from the two or more joined tables. Thus, it equates to an inner join where the
join-condition always evaluates to True or where the join-condition is absent from the
statement.

Syntax:
The basic syntax of INNER JOIN is as follows:
SELECT table1.column1, table2.column2...
FROM table1, table2 [, table3 ]

Example:
Consider the following two tables, (a) CUSTOMERS table is as follows:
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| ID | NAME
| AGE | ADDRESS
| SALARY
|
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+
| 1 | Ramesh
| 32 | Ahmedabad | 2000.00 |
| 2 | Khilan
| 25 | Delhi
| 1500.00 |
| 3 | kaushik | 23 | Kota
| 2000.00 |
| 4 | Chaitali | 25 | Mumbai
| 6500.00 |
| 5 | Hardik
| 27 | Bhopal
| 8500.00 |
| 6 | Komal
| 22 | MP
| 4500.00 |
| 7 | Muffy
| 24 | Indore
| 10000.00 |
+----+----------+-----+-----------+----------+

(b) Another table is ORDERS as follows:


+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
|OID | DATE
| CUSTOMER_ID | AMOUNT |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+
| 102 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
3000 |
| 100 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
3 |
1500 |
| 101 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
2 |
1560 |
| 103 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
4 |
2060 |
+-----+---------------------+-------------+--------+

Now, let us join these two tables using INNER JOIN as follows:
SQL> SELECT ID, NAME, AMOUNT, DATE
FROM CUSTOMERS, ORDERS;

This would produce the following result:


+----+----------+--------+---------------------+
| ID | NAME
| AMOUNT | DATE
|
+----+----------+--------+---------------------+
| 1 | Ramesh
|
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 1 | Ramesh
|
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 1 | Ramesh
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
| 1 | Ramesh
|
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
| 2 | Khilan
|
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 2 | Khilan
|
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 2 | Khilan
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
| 2 | Khilan
|
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
| 3 | kaushik |
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 3 | kaushik |
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 3 | kaushik |
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
| 3 | kaushik |
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
| 4 | Chaitali |
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 4 | Chaitali |
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 4 | Chaitali |
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
| 4 | Chaitali |
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
| 5 | Hardik
|
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 5 | Hardik
|
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 5 | Hardik
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
| 5 | Hardik
|
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
| 6 | Komal
|
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 6 | Komal
|
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 6 | Komal
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
| 6 | Komal
|
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
| 7 | Muffy
|
3000 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 7 | Muffy
|
1500 | 2009-10-08 00:00:00 |
| 7 | Muffy
|
1560 | 2009-11-20 00:00:00 |
| 7 | Muffy
|
2060 | 2008-05-20 00:00:00 |
+----+----------+--------+---------------------+