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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 Vol XV, Edition 14
HIGHER WAGES
NATION PAGE 7
U.S.EATING HABITS
IMPROVE A LITTLE
HEALTH PAGE 17
PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA SAYS AMERICA
DESERVES A RAISE
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
This November, Half Moon Bay voters
will have the option to extend a half-cent
sales tax that ofcials say will allow the
city to continue to make vital infrastructure
improvements and build a new library.
Measure O is a three-year extension of
Measure J, which voters approved in
November 2012 and was estimated to raise
about $870,000 annually.
Opponents, however, say the citys
nances are in better shape than when the
initial measure was passed and it already has
too high of a tax rate.
Mayor John Mueller said much of the tax
will be paid by visitors since Half Moon
Bay is a tourist destination.
If you think about Half Moon Bay, we
host thousands and thousand of visitors,
and they help pay for services through the
sales tax. And thats really key for the city,
Mueller said.
The citys sales tax is currently 9.5 per-
cent and Measure O funds would go into the
citys general fund. The money would con-
tribute to a prioritized list of projects such
as substantially funding a new library,
upgrading Smith Field, improving city
parks and repaving streets, according to the
measure.
Since 2008, the city has made $3.5 mil-
lion in cuts including eliminating its local
police department by contracting with the
San Mateo County Sheriffs Ofce, reducing
full-time staff and deferring infrastructure
maintenance, according to the measure.
Half-cent sales tax extension on November ballot
Half Moon Bay officials say its necessary for maintenance, library; opponents disagree
In-law units
may receive
new guides
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Redwood City homeowners
wanting to build in-law units in
the future may nd the city less
restrictive about size, parking and
residency under a series of recom-
mendations coming before the
Planning Commission for consid-
eration.
Any changes to the existing
ordinance governing accessory
dwelling units the proper name
for buildings more commonly
referred to as in-law or granny
units is still a ways away but
the city is narrowing down possi-
bilities based on public feedback.
The city held a community work-
shop and collected more than 350
comments on 25 topics about
ADUs. On Tuesday night, the
Planning Commission will dis-
cuss that input, dene its primary
objects and give its own direction.
If the outcome is proposed amend-
ments to the current rules, the
Planning Commission will look
at a draft ordinance at a later meet-
ing to make a formal recommenda-
tion to the City Council.
The city began looking at ADUs
earlier this year to gure out if its
code was the reason why the num-
ber of illegal in-law units greatly
outweigh those permitted.
Although the city anticipated see-
ing 132 new units over a 10-year
planning period, only 30 went up
between 2000 and 2010. In the
last year, only one to three per-
Planners take up rule changes to
increase number in Redwood City
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With raising height limits in a stretch of
area north of San Brunos downtown on the
November ballot, those for and against the
measure are expressing their concerns and
support.
Measure N would modify 1977s
Ordinance 1284, which limits building
heights, potentially raising them from the
current maximum of 50 feet to 90 feet near
the San Bruno Caltrain station. The ordi-
nance was the result of a voter initiative,
which was intended to preserve the existing
character of San Bruno by requiring voter
approval for high-rise developments,
increased density in existing neighbor-
hoods and projects encroaching upon scenic
San Bruno to decide on height limits
Some argue change will revitalize city, others believe its not a smart idea
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A main San Mateo County thoroughfare
in North Fair Oaks will be converted into
three lanes of trafc with bike lanes and par-
allel parking if county supervisors ulti-
mately approve the recommended plan for
its multi-million dollar makeover.
The county is investing $12.5 million to
spruce up Middleeld Road between Pacic
and Fifth avenues a key business district
and has held a series of workshops and
meetings to winnow down possible
redesigns. On Thursday, the North Fair Oaks
Community Council signed off on the draft
recommendations which will now go back
Middlefield Road redesign recommended
Plan calls for threelanes, parallel parking and bike lanes
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/
DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateo Mayor Robert Ross,
center, joins hundreds of
bicyclists for the citys rst Labor
Day Family Fun Ride and Bike
Rodeo at Bay Meadows. The
event,sponsored by the city and
the San Mateo United
Homeowners Association,
included bike safety courses for
children and a ride with police
ofcers around the citys newest
neighborhood. Left: Children
bicycle at the rodeos safety
training course.
AND THEYRE OFF!
See HEIGHTS, Page 20 See REDESIGN, Page 18
See IN-LAWS, Page 18
See SALES TAX, Page 20
SPORTS PAGE 11
Police: Utah suspect
swallows stolen ring
OREM, Utah Two people were
arrested on suspicion of felony theft
after police said one of them swal-
lowed a stolen ring in an attempt to
hide it.
Police say an X-ray clearly showed
the ring inside the stomach of 25-
year-old Christina Schlegel.
Investigators say 29-year-old
Bryan Ford had been examining a
ring worth several thousand dollars
at a Zales jewelry store on Friday
night in Orem, about 45 miles south
of Salt Lake City, when he allegedly
left with it.
Police say he was chased by an
employee as he got into a car driven
away by Schlegel. Officers stopped
the car and arrested both suspects a
short time later.
Police say they were baffled as to
the rings whereabouts until the X-
ray of Schlegels stomach was taken.
Shaun the shaggy Aussie
sheep finally shorn smooth
SYDNEY Shaun the shaggy
Australian sheep has at last been
shorn smooth. But the woolly wan-
derer wasnt the wooliest of them all.
The sheep apparently had been hid-
ing for years on a farm on the island
state of Tasmania and had never been
shorn. The Australian Broadcasting
Corp. reported Thursday that Shaun
lost 23.5 kilograms (52 pounds) of
wool at his first haircut.
Owners Peter and Netty Hazel had
hoped Shaun would beat a record held
by a now-deceased New Zealand
sheep named Shrek.
Shrek rose to fame in 2004 after he
was found hiding in caves on his
farm, having evaded the annual
shearing roundups for seven years.
He had 27 kilograms (60 pounds) of
wool shorn off his body.
Third tourist cited for
flying drone in Yellowstone
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK,
Wyo. For the third time this sum-
mer, Yellowstone National Park
rangers have cited a tourist for ille-
gally flying a drone in the park.
Park officials said Friday that
Donald Criswell of Molalla, Oregon,
flew an unmanned aircraft over
Midway Geyser Basin and near bison
on Aug. 19.
In early August, rangers charged
Theodorus Van Vliet of the
Netherlands after his drone allegedly
crashed into Grand Prismatic Spring.
Andreas Meissner of Germany is
accused of flying a drone that crashed
into Yellowstone Lake on July 17. He
was charged earlier this week.
The Jackson Hole News & Guide
reports Grand Teton National Park
has had at least one drone citation.
Rangers say a man crashed a drone
into a tree in late June, possibly
while trying to get aerial photos of
wildlife.
Community service eyed
for Brooklyn Bridge stunt
NEW YORK A judge is suggest-
ing a Russian tourist who climbed
the Brooklyn Bridge be sentenced to
community service like cleaning a
bridge.
Yaroslav Kolchin was arrested
Sunday after he climbed to the top of
the bridge to take pictures. He was
charged with reckless endangerment,
trespassing and disorderly conduct.
The Daily News reports a judge said
Friday she wasnt condoning
Kolchins actions but didnt think
they were malicious.
Prosecutors are seeking a guilty
plea to trespassing and a 90-day jail
sentence.
Judge ShawnDya Simpson suggests
a bunch of community service
instead.
Defense lawyer Rovshan Sharifov
says hell talk with prosecutors to
bridge their differences.
The case will be called again Sept.
19.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Keanu Reeves, U.S.
actor (1964)
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1666
Great Fire of London burns for ve
days, nearly destroying the city,
including St. Pauls Cathedral, but
claims few lives.
Integrity
needs no rules
Albert Camus, French author and philosopher (1913-1960)
Jimmy Connors,
U.S. tennis player
(1952)
Salma Hayek U.S.
actress (1966)
Birthdays
REUTERS
A man falls off the gostra, a pole covered in grease, during the celebrations for the religious feast of St Julian, patron of the
town of St Julians, outside Valletta, Malta.
Tuesday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the 60s. West
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog and drizzle after midnight. Lows in
the mid 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 15
mph.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzle in the
morning. Highs in the 60s. South winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then
becoming cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzle after midnight.
Lows in the upper 50s. South winds 10 to 20
mph...Becoming 5 to 10 mph after midnight.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog and drizzle. Highs in the mid to upper 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1773, Warren Hastings, rst British governor general of
India, forms alliance with state of Oudh for campaign against
the Mahrathas.
In 1789, The U.S. Treasury Department is established.
In 1796, The September Massacres, which killed some
1,200 people, begin when an armed band attacks prisoners
being transferred between jails in Paris in the belief that they
are counterrevolutionaries.
In 1807, The British navy shells Copenhagen to force
Denmark to surrender its eet.
In 1866, Crete, after long discontent with Turkish authority,
revolts and merges with Greece.
In 1870, Emperor Napoleon III and 83,000 French troops
surrender at Sedan to encircling German troops, deciding the
Franco-German War after six weeks.
In 1898, British forces under Horatio Kitchener defeat the
Khalifas army at Omdurman, Sudan. The young Winston
Churchill takes part in a cavalry charge.
In 1935, Ahurricane slams into the Florida Keys, claiming
423 lives.
In 1945, Independent Vietnam Republic is proclaimed by Ho
Chi Minh, who becomes president.
In 1952, The U.S. Commerce Department announces an
agreement with Western Europe to tighten controls on ship-
ment of 200 strategic commodities and keep them from reach-
ing Iron Curtain countries.
In 1963, Alabama Governor George C. Wallace prevents the
racial integration of Tuskegee High School by encircling the
building with state troopers.
In 1970, The U.S. announces cutbacks in ghting strength
in Saigon as North Vietnamese and Vietcong forces continue
on the offensive.
In 1976, Riot police battle 3,000 mixed-race and black stu-
dent demonstrators in Cape Town, in the rst unrest to reach
the white area of a South African city.
In 1980, Members of the October First Revolutionary Anti-
Fascist Group ambushed the car of Gen. Enrique Briz
Armengol, killing him as he was being driven to work in
Barcelona, Spain.
In 1985, AU.S.-French expedition locates the Titanic wreck-
age, about 900 kilometers (560 miles) off Newfoundland,
Canada, where the ship sank in 1912 after hitting an iceberg
on its maiden voyage, killing some 1,500 people.
Ewald von Hertzberg, Prussian statesman (1725-1795);
John Howard, English prison reformer (1726-1798);
Hirobumi Ito, premier of Japan (1841-1909).
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
BRAWN YEAST LESSON LIZARD
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: The pregnant woman would need to leave
the cookout quickly...It was LABOR DAY
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PREIV
KEOVE
TRSITH
SURIDA
2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gold Rush,No.
1,in rst place;Eureka,No.7,in second place;and
Winning Spirit,No.9,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:40.96.
6 1 2
3 26 45 58 73 12
Mega number
Aug. 29 Mega Millions
5 28 31 52 59 27
Powerball
Aug. 30 Powerball
2 8 19 23 36
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 4 3 2
Daily Four
5 2 7
Daily three evening
9 15 31 32 46 14
Mega number
Aug. 30 Super Lotto Plus
3
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
babyexpo
sunday, october 5, 2014
11:00AM- 4:00 PM MACYS CENTERCOURT
baby photo contest
Winner will be featured in the San Mateo Daily Journal!
ENTERYOURBABY- NEWBORNTO2 YEARS
Noon- 3 PM
All baby entrants will receive a free gift!
HILLSDALE
SHOPPING CENTER
free admission
Bay Area baby services will share
a bundle of expertise with new
and expecting moms and families.
Products, gear and fashion
linanoial planning and eduoation
ealth oare
PRESENTED BY 2014 til 9pm.
Solicitation
No purchase necessary
Vote for your favorite baby on Hillsdales
Facebook Wednesday, October 8-13th,
Facebook or www.hillsdale.com.
of third party voting
prohibited. Rules and
regulations apply.
to participant.
SAN MATEO
Disturbance. Two men were found sleeping
in a laundry room on the rst block of West
Fifth Avenue before 10:51 a.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 27.
Arre s t. A man driving a green Chevrolet
Suburban with a for sale sign on it was
arrested for driving under the inuence at
South Norfolk Street and Dakota Avenue
before 2:10 p.m. Monday, Aug. 25.
Burglary. A computer was stolen from a
home on the 800 block of North Humboldt
Street before 12:38 p.m. Monday, Aug. 25.
Burglaries. A person was heard breaking
vehicle windows in a parking lot on the
3600 block of Colegrove Street before 2:58
a.m. Thursday, Aug. 21.
UNINCORPORATED
SAN MATEO COUNTY
Arre s t. Police arrested a man who was found
in possession of a glass pipe and a bag with
methamphetamine on the 500 block of
Virgina Avenue in Moss Beach before 2:01
a.m. Monday, Aug. 11.
Vandalism. Police took a report of some-
one driving through a Christmas Tree farm
causing $1,500 in damage to a sign and trees
on the 11000 block of San Mateo Road.
Sunday, Aug. 10.
Police reports
Game over
A teenager was reported to be yelling
due to his parents taking away his video
games on Columbus Avenue in
Burlingame before 1 a.m. Sunday, Aug.
24.
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After removing two controversial facets
of an ordinance aimed at protecting the pub-
lic from secondhand smoke, the Foster City
Council will reconvene Tuesday night to
discuss regulations for restaurants and
multi-unit residential buildings.
Before passing a new ordinance July 21,
the council set aside decisions on smoking
in outdoor restaurant seating areas and
whether to ban smoking in apartments,
condos or townhomes.
After more than a year of debate, the new
ordinance took affect Sept. 1 and prohibits
smoking on city-owned property such as
parks and streets, at public events and with-
in a 50-foot-buffer zone from entrances to
commercial spaces. The regulation allows
single-family home owners to smoke on
their properties.
We are going to protect our children and
our families from random exposure to smok-
ing. So a mobile person with a cigarette
walking around haphazardly, to the detri-
ment to everyone, we have precluded them
from smoking, Councilman Herb Perez
said. I think the bigger message for smok-
ers is your days are numbered. Get anoth-
er habit.
On Tuesday night, the council will discuss
further amending its new ordinance.
Private versus shared
residential properties
For councilmembers, protecting against
secondhand smoke is a priority, but some
are concerned with regulating what people
do in their homes and whether those who
own or rent should be treated differently.
I just personally think theres a limit to
what government should be regulating,
Councilman Gary Pollard said. At what
point do we draw the line? People have to
take care of themselves and they have to
make smart decisions. Government cant
protect people all the time.
Throughout hearings, Mayor Charlie
Bronitsky and councilmen Pollard and Art
Kiesel have leaned toward prohibiting
smoking in rental apartments but not in pri-
vately owned properties.
Despite the fact that those who live in
apartments, condominiums or townhomes
share walls and common areas, renters and
owners could be treated differently.
Perez said whether one rents or is able to
afford a home in a multi-unit dwelling,
smokers shouldnt infringe on their neigh-
bors.
Smoking in multi-unit dwellings should
be illegal and it should be no different
between a renter and an owner because thats
part of your contract. Youve entered into a
contract where youre part of a community,
Perez said.
Councilman Steve Okamoto said he
prefers smoking be banned in all shared
homes and at minimum in rental units.
But what I think were going to be com-
fortable doing is any rental unit and if an
owner of a condo or townhouse rents or leas-
es the property and theyre not living there,
than that rental agreement should include no
smoking [provisions], Okamoto said.
Foster City is not alone in its efforts to
ban smoking in shared residential units.
According to a city staff report, 26 cities
and counties ban smoking in shared residen-
tial units, including condominiums and
townhomes, and 12 cities and counties pro-
hibit smoking in apartments only.
Eating and smoking outdoors
Waterfront Pizza, a long-standing
Mediterranean restaurant and hookah bar, is
Foster Citys only establishment currently
using the citys provision to allow smok-
ing in up to 50 percent of outdoor seating
areas.
The restaurants owner previously said
they recently invested nearly $400,000 to
expand and remodel, have a long-term lease
and their business relies heavily on the
ability to serve hookah.
To appease the city, Waterfront Pizza has
offered to install fans and air curtains, rail-
ing on either side of its dining area to better
dene the restaurant and place additional
signs warning hookah smoking is allowed
on the premise, according to the report.
In my opinion, they have put forward a
proposal that has both signage and barriers
so people can make a choice whether to go
into that area; so its not to the detriment of
everyone. And thats consistent with our
policy, Perez said.
Initially, the council proposed grandfa-
thering in Waterfront Pizza, but according
to the staff report, it has since received a
request from a new nearby Edgewater Place
Shopping Center restaurant owner. The
owner of Le Burgeon expressed interest in
allowing smoking in part of its outdoor
seating as well, according to the report.
Perez said Le Burgeon occupies a corner
lot and is more isolated than Waterfront
Pizza. When the council creates policies,
they apply equally, Perez said.
Okamoto said the rationale for Waterfront
City relooks at smoking regulations
Foster City considers prohibitions for restaurants, apartments, condos
See SMOKE, Page 18
4
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Bicyclist robs man at gunpoint
A man was robbed at gunpoint in South
San Francisco early Monday morning,
police said.
The robbery was reported at 1:26 a.m. in
the 1000 block of Mission Road, where the
49-year-old victim was approached by a
suspect who pointed a black semi-automat-
ic handgun at him and demanded his wallet
and cellphone, according to police.
The victim handed over the items to the
suspect, who rode away on a black bicycle.
He is described as a Hispanic man around
20 years old who had short hair, was clean-
shaven with a light complexion and wore
dark clothes, police said.
The victim was not injured in the robbery
and the suspect remains at large Monday
morning. Anyone with information about
the case is asked to call South San
Francisco police at (650) 877-8900 or an
anonymous tip line at (650) 952-2244.
More than a dozen arrests,
citations in weekend DUI checkpoint
More than a dozen people were arrested
or cited in a DUI checkpoint held over the
weekend in Burlingame, police said.
The checkpoint was held between 6 p.m.
Saturday and 2 a.m. Sunday in the 400
block of California Drive, where officers
screened 744 vehicles.
The operation netted three arrests for
people driving under the influence of alco-
hol or drugs Gary Vangiersbergen, 67,
of Pacifica, Jesus Barajas, 20, of Millbrae,
and Christopher Bucks, 29, of Millbrae,
according to police.
Alejandro Diaz, 38, of Oakland, was
arrested on suspicion of felony possession
of narcotics and drug paraphernalia, police
said.
Officers also cited or arrested 12 drivers
for operating a vehicle while unlicensed or
with a suspended or revoked license.
The checkpoint was funded by a grant
from the California Office of Traffic Safety
through the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration.
Bicyclists collide,
shut down Highway 84
Two bicyclists were hospitalized after
colliding with each other near state
Highway 84 in Woodside Monday morn-
ing, shutting down the highway for more
than two hours, according to San Mateo
County sheriffs officials.
The crash was reported at 10:48 a.m. near
Highway 84 at Friars Lane, sheriffs
spokeswoman Deputy Rebecca Rosenblatt
said.
The bicyclists, a man and woman in their
50s, were taken to a hospital and are
going to be OK Rosenblatt said.
The investigation into the crash shut
down Highway 84 in both directions in the
area until about 1:20 p.m., when sheriffs
officials said the road reopened.
Police issue 61
citations on three city streets
Police in South San Francisco issued 61
citations Friday during a saturation patrol
of three city streets plagued by speeding
and many injury and fatal accidents, the
police department reported.
The department flooded Sister Cities,
Hillside and Westborough boulevards,
where a significant number of collisions
have occurred recently, with specially
trained officers targeting speeders, police
said.
The officers used high-tech Lidar devices
equipped with infrared lasers to measure the
speeds and distances of passing motorists,
according to police.
Police issued 61 citations over the one-
day saturation patrol, mostly for speed vio-
lations but one unlicensed driver and one
person driving with a suspended license
were cited and their cars confiscated, offi-
cers said.
The goal of the patrols is to get drivers to
slow down and other saturation patrols will
be conducted in the city for the remainder
of this and next year, police said.
Local briefs
Clarice (Susie) L. Rosa
Clarice (Susie) L. Rosa died of pneumo-
nia surrounded by her loving family on
Aug. 23, 2014.
She was 94.
She was the ninth of 10 children born on
Aug. 8, 1920, in Velva, North Dakota, to
homesteaders Eleanor and August Pretzer.
In 1942, she moved to Seattle,
Washington, where she met William P.
Rosa. They were married Nov. 6, 1942, and
moved to San Francisco.
Eventually they moved to South San
Francisco where he opened a popular
restaurant. She lived there until 2011 when
she moved to a retirement home. She is
predeceased by Bill Rosa her husband of
55 years and her daughter Kathleen. She
leaves behind her two daughters, Clarice
M. Rosa and Cathie (Jerry) Wentworth and
four grandchildren, Elizabeth Avi na,
Benjamin Saucedo, Emily Wentworth,
William Wentworth. She also leaves
behind great-grandchildren Ava Saucedo,
Anthony, Anna, Adam and Alexa Avina.
She will be greatly
missed by her niece and
nephew Eunice and Bob
Swink and her brother
Amos Pretzer of Rolla,
Missouri.
In lieu of flowers,
please contribute to the
charity of your choice. A
celebration of her life
will take place in the near future.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200
words or less with a photo one time on the
date of the familys choosing. To submit
obituaries, email information along with a
jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.
Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity,
length and grammar. If you would like to
have an obituary printed more than once,
longer than 200 words or without editing,
please submit an inquiry to our advertising
department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituary
CITY
GOVERNMENT
The Burlingame
Ci ty Counci l will
vote 7 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 2 on whether
to update speed lim-
its on Burlingame
roads. This would raise the speed limit from
35 to 40 mph on Skyline Boulevard
between Trousdale Drive and the south city
limit. Speed limits on California Drive
between Peninsula and Burlingame avenues
would rise from 25 to 30 mph. On Adrian
Road between El Camino Real and Alvarado
Avenue, speed limits would go from 25 to
35 mph.
At the same meeting, the council will
vote on installing two duel cord
Commerci al Level 2 electric vehicle
charging stations on city-owned property
for public use in Parking Lot V in down-
town.
REJ ELECTRIC will carry out the proj-
ect for $49,363.
The council meets at Council Chambers,
501 Primrose Road.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO San Francisco will
soon become the first city to enact a
California law giving owners who turn
empty lots into gardens the chance to get a
tax break.
The measure lets cities and towns lower
the assessed value and therefore the prop-
erty taxes on parcels of land if owners
dedicate them to growing food for at least
ve years. Among its aims is reducing urban
blight.
San Francisco will be the rst to put the
state law into effect beginning Sept. 8
because the San Francisco Board of
Supervisors already approved a local ordi-
nance. Other cities, including Fresno and
Sacramento, are watching how the law plays
out.
I have heard from literally hundreds of
residents who would like to have the oppor-
tunity to farm, but the waiting lists for a lot
of our community gardens are over two years
long, said Supervisor David Chiu, who
wrote the local legislation. There is sim-
ply not enough space.
Alot must be at least one-tenth of an acre,
no larger than three acres and have no per-
manent structures to qualify for the tax
break. The property would be reassessed at
the average price for irrigated farmland in
California.
San Franciscos ordinance limits individ-
ual property owners tax savings to
$25,000 per year. Anything higher requires
an ofcial review.
Aaron Roland expects the annual $6,000
tax bill on his double lot-turned-demonstra-
tion garden to drop signicantly.
Roland said he gets offers to buy the prop-
erty but wants to hold on to it for his chil-
dren. He also likes the garden.
Its this marvelous garden in the middle
of the city thats growing food, he said.
Hopefully there are other people like me
that eventually might want to do some
development on their land but arent in a big
rush, and meanwhile want to let it be used
for this kind of public purpose.
San Francisco to be first
to test urban farming law
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
5
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Birds on old Bay
Bridge pose challenge
SAN FRANCISCO Crews
demolishing the old eastern span of
the San Francisco-Oakland Bay
Bridge have run into an unusual chal-
lenge: birds that wont leave.
The California Department of
Transportation says cormorants that
call the defunct bridge home have
not gone away despite encourage-
ment from workers. So the agency is
switching to a new tactic that
attempts to attract the dark-colored
birds to other areas.
Caltrans spokeswoman Leah
Robinson-Leach tells KCBS the
attraction strategy is part of a con-
tract that is currently out for bid.
The birds have not delayed the
demolition so far, but Robinson-
Leach says that will change if they
are not gone by the end of the year.
The work is expected to be complet-
ed in 2018.
Minor quake hits near Gilroy
GILROY The U.S. Geological
Survey has registered a minor earth-
quake in Northern California.
The magnitude-3.5 quake struck
around 9:10 a.m. Monday about six
miles southeast of Gilroy. Gilroy is
about 30 miles south of San Jose.
A Gilroy police dispatcher says
she felt a jolt from the quake, but had
not received any reports of damage
or injuries.
Around the Bay
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Ten Sequoia Union High School
District students are seeing what its
like this week to live with very little,
while helping install a water puri-
cation system for those less fortu-
nate than them.
The students, seniors part of
Woodside High Schools Green
Academy and Redwood High
Schools REAL (Redwoods
Environmental Academy of
Leadership) cohorts, will travel to
Redwood Citys sister city, Ciudad
Guzman in Mexicos state of Jalisco
during Labor Day week. The
Peninsula Sunrise Rotary
Foundation program H2OpenDoors
is donating the SunSpring water
purication system, which will ulti-
mately benet a district of 4,000 of
the poorest citizens who receive
water from a highly chlorinated and
undrinkable city water system.
The four students and teacher
from Redwood High and the six stu-
dents and teacher from Woodside
High said they were looking for-
ward to being exposed to a new cul-
ture. The students started fundrais-
ing last year for the trip and raised
about $5,000 through car washes,
bake sales, family friends, door-to-
door solicitations and other events.
For some, its their rst time on a
plane. Others will be leaving the
United States for the rst time.
Ive never been out of the coun-
try, said Woodside student Keely
Camp. Its a great opportunity.
Water is a big issue.
This population center currently
spends 10 pesos per liter on bottled
water each day. That is about 77
cents, or more than $1 million per
year, on bottled water. This should
be alleviated with the SunSpring,
which can purify more than 20,000
liters per day from virtually any
contaminated water source, accord-
ing to Jon Kaufman, the director of
the project, who is going on the trip.
Kaufman has taken other students
on a similar trips to install purica-
tion systems in the past, including a
trip to Northern Thailand.
It was transformative, he said.
One student asked, Im thirsty, is
there a drinking fountain? There
was a pond infested with E. coli
(from which to drink). Theyll be
meeting their peers over there and
painting a mural with the theme of
water education. I hope they come
back seeing the world is bigger than
what they think.
SunSprings are solar- and wind-
powered water purication plants
that require no electricity or fuel,
and remove all bacteria, viruses and
other contaminants using mem-
brane technology. With a design life
of over 10 years, they require only
one hour of downtime for simple
maintenance procedures each
month. Manufactured in Rocky
Ford, Colorado, by Innovative
Water Technologies, the systems are
up and running within three hours.
Following the installation, the
students will tour the city govern-
ment, including the metropolitan
water company facilities which
serve more than 110,000 residents.
Mayor Jose Luis Orozco Aldana
will hold a water party to celebrate
the installation.
During the nal three days in
Mexico, the students will travel to
Guanajuato State and Centro Fox,
the international conference com-
plex headed by former Mexican
president Vicente Fox.
We are delighted to have the
opportunity to work with California
high school students in support of
H2OpenDoors and Rotary, Fox
said in a prepared statement. The
world needs to grow global citizens,
people of high character who care
about the poorest among us.
Woodside student David Bejar
noted that even though the United
States and Mexico share a border,
there is a huge barrier between the
two countries.
We just see a bunch of poverty
and can see they have a completely
different lifestyle over there, he
said. We (the U.S. and Mexico)
dont really have a great relation-
ship in my opinion. To go and see
their perspective is a great learning
Sequoia students helping install purification system
Weeklong trip to Mexico will bring clean water to more than 4,000
We are delighted to have the opportunity
to work with California high school students in support of
H2OpenDoors and Rotary....The world needs to grow global citizens,
people of high character who care about the poorest among us.
Former Mexican president Vicente Fox
See WATER, Page 18
5
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THE DAILY JOURNAL
LOCAL
Birds on old Bay
Bridge pose challenge
SAN FRANCISCO Crews
demolishing the old eastern span of
the San Francisco-Oakland Bay
Bridge have run into an unusual chal-
lenge: birds that wont leave.
The California Department of
Transportation says cormorants that
call the defunct bridge home have
not gone away despite encourage-
ment from workers. So the agency is
switching to a new tactic that
attempts to attract the dark-colored
birds to other areas.
Caltrans spokeswoman Leah
Robinson-Leach tells KCBS the
attraction strategy is part of a con-
tract that is currently out for bid.
The birds have not delayed the
demolition so far, but Robinson-
Leach says that will change if they
are not gone by the end of the year.
The work is expected to be complet-
ed in 2018.
Minor quake hits near Gilroy
GILROY The U.S. Geological
Survey has registered a minor earth-
quake in Northern California.
The magnitude-3.5 quake struck
around 9:10 a.m. Monday about six
miles southeast of Gilroy. Gilroy is
about 30 miles south of San Jose.
A Gilroy police dispatcher says
she felt a jolt from the quake, but had
not received any reports of damage
or injuries.
Around the Bay
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Ten Sequoia Union High School
District students are seeing what its
like this week to live with very little,
while helping install a water puri-
cation system for those less fortu-
nate than them.
The students, seniors part of
Woodside High Schools Green
Academy and Redwood High
Schools REAL (Redwoods
Environmental Academy of
Leadership) cohorts, will travel to
Redwood Citys sister city, Ciudad
Guzman in Mexicos state of Jalisco
during Labor Day week. The
Peninsula Sunrise Rotary
Foundation program H2OpenDoors
is donating the SunSpring water
purication system, which will ulti-
mately benet a district of 4,000 of
the poorest citizens who receive
water from a highly chlorinated and
undrinkable city water system.
The four students and teacher
from Redwood High and the six stu-
dents and teacher from Woodside
High said they were looking for-
ward to being exposed to a new cul-
ture. The students started fundrais-
ing last year for the trip and raised
about $5,000 through car washes,
bake sales, family friends, door-to-
door solicitations and other events.
For some, its their rst time on a
plane. Others will be leaving the
United States for the rst time.
Ive never been out of the coun-
try, said Woodside student Keely
Camp. Its a great opportunity.
Water is a big issue.
This population center currently
spends 10 pesos per liter on bottled
water each day. That is about 77
cents, or more than $1 million per
year, on bottled water. This should
be alleviated with the SunSpring,
which can purify more than 20,000
liters per day from virtually any
contaminated water source, accord-
ing to Jon Kaufman, the director of
the project, who is going on the trip.
Kaufman has taken other students
on a similar trips to install purica-
tion systems in the past, including a
trip to Northern Thailand.
It was transformative, he said.
One student asked, Im thirsty, is
there a drinking fountain? There
was a pond infested with E. coli
(from which to drink). Theyll be
meeting their peers over there and
painting a mural with the theme of
water education. I hope they come
back seeing the world is bigger than
what they think.
SunSprings are solar- and wind-
powered water purication plants
that require no electricity or fuel,
and remove all bacteria, viruses and
other contaminants using mem-
brane technology. With a design life
of over 10 years, they require only
one hour of downtime for simple
maintenance procedures each
month. Manufactured in Rocky
Ford, Colorado, by Innovative
Water Technologies, the systems are
up and running within three hours.
Following the installation, the
students will tour the city govern-
ment, including the metropolitan
water company facilities which
serve more than 110,000 residents.
Mayor Jose Luis Orozco Aldana
will hold a water party to celebrate
the installation.
During the nal three days in
Mexico, the students will travel to
Guanajuato State and Centro Fox,
the international conference com-
plex headed by former Mexican
president Vicente Fox.
We are delighted to have the
opportunity to work with California
high school students in support of
H2OpenDoors and Rotary, Fox
said in a prepared statement. The
world needs to grow global citizens,
people of high character who care
about the poorest among us.
Woodside student David Bejar
noted that even though the United
States and Mexico share a border,
there is a huge barrier between the
two countries.
We just see a bunch of poverty
and can see they have a completely
different lifestyle over there, he
said. We (the U.S. and Mexico)
dont really have a great relation-
ship in my opinion. To go and see
their perspective is a great learning
Sequoia students helping install purification system
Weeklong trip to Mexico will bring clean water to more than 4,000
We are delighted to have the opportunity
to work with California high school students in support of
H2OpenDoors and Rotary. ... The world needs to grow global citizens,
people of high character who care about the poorest among us.
Former Mexican president Vicente Fox
See WATER, Page 18
6
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
SENIOR CARE AT HOME
Bathing Dressing Exercises
Transfers Housekeeping Toileting
Med Reminders Social Activities
Committed to matching our clients with caregivers
who are aligned with your loved ones needs.
650-993-2345
www.companioncareservices.net
R
egistration is
open for the
School of
Italian Language and
culture of South San
Francisco. Classes
begin 10 a.m. Saturday,
Sept. 6 at the South
San Francisco Adult
School campus at 825
Southwood Drive in
South San Francisco.
Classes run until 12:30
p.m. and end on Dec.
13.
For more information and for registration forms visit
italianclasses.com, or contact Leo Pagani or Chri sti ne
at 574-3089.
Tuition is $225 per person and free parking is available.
***
The Capuchino Alumni Associ at i on, t he
Capuchino Music Boosters and Capuchino Parent
and Booster Josie McHale were honored at the San
Bruno Chamber of Commerce Excel l ence i n
Business and Community Awards on Aug. 20.
***
St. Matthews Epi scopal Day School and the
Episcopal Church of St. Matthew in San Mateo will
celebrate the opening of its newest building St .
Matthews Hal l at the corner of El Camino Real and
Baldwin Avenue with a ceremonial ribbon cutting on 3:30
p.m. Sunday, Sept. 7. The building includes state-of-the-art
classroom facilities, a gymnasium, library and a maker
lab.
The opening of St. Matthews Hall completes the second
phase of an enhancement and expansion project that began
in 2012. The new Early Childhood Center at Charles
House at the corner of Second Avenue and El Camino
Real opened in September 2013. This new building will
enable St. Matthews Episcopal Day School to grow
enrollment to meet growing demand for their education.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by
education reporter Angela Swartz. You can contact her at (650) 344-
5200, ext. 105 or at angela@smdailyjournal.com.
By Steve Peoples
and Ken Thomas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTSMOUTH, N.H. One set of
elections ends in early November as
another begins when presidential
hopefuls cross the unofficial starting
line in the 2016 race for the White
House.
With control of the Senate at stake,
the months leading up to the mid-
term elections offer a clearer window
on a crowd of potential presidential
candidates already jockeying for
position from Nevada to New
Hampshire. Their cross-country tour-
ing will intensify this fall under the
gaze of voters who will pick their
parties nominees.
Look for the would-be contenders
to road-test rhetoric, expand coali-
tions, and consider their own politi-
cal flaws-while keeping close watch
on each other.
Democrats want Hillary Rodham
Clinton to carry their flag; the
Republican field remains crowded,
and wide open.
The presidential jousting will be
most apparent in states like New
Hampshire, home to the first-in-the-
nation presidential primary and the
site of closely-watched races for
governor, Senate and the House.
Whichever party controls the
Senate after the November 4 ballot-
ing-Republicans need a six-seat gain
to win the majority-will say much
about what President Barack Obama
can accomplish in the final two years
of his presidency and the tone of the
race to succeed him.
The end of the 2014 general elec-
tion does, in a sense, commence a
beginning of the presidential pri-
mary phase, says New Hampshire
Republican operative Rich Killion.
But an informal, unofficial opening
to the process already is underway.
Presidential hopefuls jockey even
before congressional elections
HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON:
The former secretary of states every word will be
parsed for her future plans. But Clinton has been
offering plenty of hints that shes preparing for
another campaign.
Her biggest splash could come in Iowa,where shell
join her husband at Sen.Tom Harkins annual steak
fry fundraiser in Indianola on Sept. 14. The event is
billed as a tribute to Harkin, but will generate wide
interest as Clintons rst visit to Iowa since losing the
2008 caucuses.
Clinton has limited her campaign activity since
leaving the State Department, but this fall should
give voters a more concrete look at how she might
present her candidacy.Her allies are wary of a third
Obama term label, so Clintons speeches and
appearances offer a chance to distinguish herself
from the president.
She will raise money for Democrats four major
campaigncommitteesandcouldhelpseveral Senate
campaigns where Obama remains a liability.
JOE BIDEN:
Vice President Joe Biden has not ruled out a third
presidential bidandexpectstobeanactivesurrogate
for Democrats this fall. Whether hed challenge
Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination
remains the big question.
Biden headlined high-prole meetings with young
voters,liberalsandAfrican-Americans.Hesalsoraised
money for congressional candidates in Nevada and
incumbent governors in Connecticut and Illinois.
Biden is expected to visit New Hampshire,where he
maintains ties to party activists,and Iowa,where Rep.
Bruce Braley faces Joni Ernst in one of the top Senate
battlegrounds.
OTHER DEMOCRATS:
Several Democrats are building for a national
campaignincaseClintondoesntrun- orconsidering
a longshot challenge.
Maryland Gov. Martin OMalley has been the most
active,raisingmoneyforcandidatesinIowaandNew
Hampshire and traveling to states with active mid-
term contests.
Former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb recently traveled to
Iowa.Vermont Sen.Bernie Sanders,an independent
who caucuses with Democrats, plans to visit the
Hawkeye State in mid-September. Massachusetts
Sen.ElizabethWarrenhasdeniedinterestintheWhite
House but would face pressure to run if Clinton
doesnt.
JEB BUSH
More than seven years out of ofce, former Florida
Gov.JebBushhasbeenquieterthansomeof hisGOP
colleagues as he focuses on his private business
dealings.
He recently said hed begin a more aggressive
schedule to help Republicans this fall. Hes set to
headline a Florida fundraiser in late September to
benet top Republican Senate candidates, a group
expected to include Cory Gardner in Colorado,Ernst
in Iowa, Monica Wehby in Oregon and Tom Cotton
in Arkansas.
RAND PAUL
Kentucky Sen.Rand Paul has been perhaps the most
aggressive prospective candidate.
The ophthalmologist recently squeezed in a mission
to perform eye surgeries in Guatemala-and invited
newsorganizationstocoverit-betweenstopsinIowa
and South Carolina. Hes conrmed September
appearances in California and Virginia,and October
visits to North Carolina and New Hampshire,among
dozens more possible stops.
The libertarian-leaning Paul,the son of former Texas
Rep. Ron Paul, is trying to build on the small but
passionate coalition assembled by his father. The
elder Paul wasnt taken seriously by many
Republicans,butRandPaul hasemergedasaleading
GOP voice on foreign and domestic policy.
CHRIS CHRISTIE
Working to move past a bridge-clogging scandal
that shadowed his plans, New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie continues an aggressive travel schedule this
fall as chairman of the Republican Governors
Association.
Having already visited New Hampshire, hes
announced a trip to South Carolina,where hell have
a chance to test his message with more conservative
voters. Hes also planning trips to Ohio, Wisconsin
and Florida.
Christie leads a delegation of New Jersey business
and political leaders to Mexico in early September,a
trip that gives him a chance to bolster his appeal
with Latino voters and burnish his foreign policy
chops. And at home, Christie will unveil a budget
plan that is sure to draw fury from Democrats and
union leaders.
RICK PERRY
Eyeingasecondpresidential bid,TexasGov.RickPerry
wasalreadyfacingchallengesrelatedtohisdisastrous
2012 campaign before his recent felony indictments.
His advisers suggest the charges could actually help
his political prospects, and he has pressed ahead
with visits to Iowa,Washington,D.C.,New Hampshire,
and more.
PerryheadstoIowainearlySeptembershortlybefore
a weeklong economic tour across Asia.Hell turn his
attention to helping Republican governors win
reelection when he returns.
The Texas governor will launch a European tour in
October.
OTHER REPUBLICANS:
The possible GOP eld also includes Florida Sen.
MarcoRubio,LouisianaGov.BobbyJindal andIndiana
Gov.Mike Pence.Wisconsin Gov.Scott Walker hopes
to use his reelection test this fall as a springboard
into 2016. Others must convince skeptical party
leaders they have mainstream appeal a group
that includes conservative rebrand Texas Sen.Ted
Cruz and social conservative Rick Santorum.
Potential 2016 candidates
NATION 7
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
advertisement
By Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILWAUKEE President Barack Obama
renewed his push for Congress to raise the
minimum wage Monday in a buoyant
accounting of the economys revving
performance, delivered on behalf of
Democrats opening their fall campaigns for
the midterm congressional elections.
America deserves a raise, he told a
union crowd in Milwaukee, vowing to keep
a hard sell on Congress in much the way he
once courted his wife. I just wore her
down, he cracked.
Timing his push to Labor Day, the tradi-
tional start of the autumn campaign, Obama
aggressively drew attention to recent eco-
nomic gains, setting aside past caution on
that subject.
By almost every measure the American
economy and American workers are better
off than when I took ofce, he said, rat-
tling off a string of improving economic
indicators even while acknowledging not
all people are beneting. The engines, he
said, are revving a little louder.
It was, at least indirectly, a pep talk for
Democrats facing tough races in a nation
still gripped with economic anxieties.
The emphasis on the minimum wage is
designed to draw campaign contrasts with
Republicans, many of whom maintain that
an increase would hurt small businesses and
slow down hiring. No one expects
Congress to act on it before the November
elections.
Despite the absence of a federal increase,
13 states raised their minimum wages at the
beginning of this year. Those states have
added jobs at a faster pace than those that
did not raise the wage, providing a counter-
point to a Congressional Budget Office
report earlier this year that projected that a
higher minimum wage of $10.10 an hour
could cost the nation 500,000 jobs.
Until now, Obama and his White House
aides had been reluctant to draw too much
attention to positive economic trends, wor-
ried that some may prove illusory or that,
even if they hold, many working Americans
continue to live on the edge of poverty and
take no comfort in the upswing.
But in Milwaukee, Obama dared to say of
the job picture, Were on a streak.
White House aides still insist they are not
declaring full victory over the lingering
effects of a recession that ended ve years
ago.
But White House ofcials believe it is
time to highlight recent improvements, in
part to strengthen a difcult political envi-
ronment for Democrats and to counter pub-
lic perceptions that are eroding the presi-
dents public approval. Officials say
Obamas most compelling case is to com-
pare the economy now to what he inherited
in 2009 in the aftermath of a near Wall
Street meltdown.
Obama, whose public approval is at about
40 percent, has also been cautious about
making appearances in states with close
midterm political contests and where his
popularity might be even lower.
But in coming to Wisconsin, he brought
his Labor Day message to the state that was
the epicenter of a ght over the collective
bargaining rights of public employees.
Labor Secretary Tom Perez and several
national labor leaders came with him.
In Wisconsin, Republican Gov. Scott
Walker, who pushed through a law that
stripped most public sector union members
of their ability to collectively bargain, is
now in a tight re-election campaign and has
been mentioned as a potential GOP presi-
dential candidate in 2016. Polls nd that
Walker and Democrat Mary Burke are dead-
locked with the election just over two
months away.
Walker was at General Mitchell
International Airport to greet Obama upon
his arrival in Milwaukee. Walker also greet-
ed the labor leaders accompanying Obama,
including Mary Kay Henry of the Services
Employees International Union and Leo
Gerard of the United Steelworkers Union.
The White House is encouraging
Democrats to draw attention to the recovery
as they head into the November mid-term
elections.
In an August memo to House and Senate
Democrats, Obamas top two economic
advisers underscored the positive news:
more than 200,000 jobs created per month
for six consecutive months, a six-year high
in auto sales, second-quarter economic
growth that exceeded expectations and an
expanding manufacturing sector.
The unemployment rate stands at 6.2 per-
cent, dropping 1.1 points over the past
year, and the stock market has nearly tripled
in ve years.
Even so, there is still signicant weak-
ness in the labor market, underscored by the
long-term unemployed. Labor participation
has dropped. As well, real hourly wages fell
from the rst half of 2013 to the rst half of
2014 for all income groups, except for a 2-
cent increase for the lowest income level,
according to the liberal Economic Policy
Institute.
Obama:Revving economy calls for higher wages
REUTERS
Barack Obama delivers remarks at Laborfest 2014 at Maier Festival Park in Milwaukee,Wisc.
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON A surly electorate that
holds Congress in even lower regard than
unpopular President Barack Obama is willing
to keep the bums in, with at least 365
incumbents in the 435-member House and 18
of 28 senators on a glide path to another term
when ballots are counted Nov. 4.
With less than 10 weeks to the elections,
Republicans and Democrats who assess this
falls midterm contests say the power of
incumbency the decennial process of
reconguring congressional maps and hefty
fundraising trumps the sour public mood
and antipathy toward gridlocked Washington.
Despite the incredibly low polling, favor-
able ratings for Congress, its still an incum-
bents world, said Sheila Krumholz, execu-
tive director of the nonpartisan Center for
Responsive Politics that tracks political
money.
That leaves many voters angry, not only
with the political reality but their inability to
change it.
I cant get over where they say people are
going to be able to keep their seats when
theyre not doing their jobs. I just dont
understand it, said retired teacher Pauline
Legendre after voting in Minnesotas
Democratic primary last month.
The voter disgust is palpable, evident in
blistering comments at summertime town
halls and middling percentages for incum-
bents in primaries. Yet no sitting senator has
lost and only three congressmen got the pri-
mary boot. Come Election Day, only a frac-
tion of the electorate will be motivated
enough to vote if history is any guide.
Congressional hopefuls are whipsawed by
the two dynamics.
Its going to be a challenge for any candi-
date running for Congress to suggest that
they have all the answers or that somehow
theres something about them thats so
inspiring that voters are going to forget
how disenchanted or disaffected they are with
government at the federal level, said Ryan
Costello, a Republican seeking an open
House seat in southeast Pennsylvania where
just 12 percent of GOPvoters turned out in the
May primary.
Still, the candidates press ahead, with
Republicans laser-focused on gaining the six
seats necessary to grab the Senate majority
and control Congress for the remainder of
Obamas presidency. Five Democratic retire-
ments give the GOP a clear shot to capture
control. So do races in conservative-leaning
states such as Louisiana, North Carolina and
Arkansas, where white Southern Democrats
are nearly extinct.
The GOP gures its half-way to its goal,
with a solid advantage in open contests in
South Dakota, West Virginia and Montana.
Republicans are optimistic about the open
seat in Iowa, less so about Michigan, and
energized by their prospects in Colorado and
Alaska. If a GOPwave materializes, it could be
in the Senate.
In the House, Republicans are expected to
pad their majority currently 233-199 with
three vacancies with the goal of matching
or surpassing the 246 seats the GOPheld from
1947-49.
Fueling the battle is whats expected to be a
record-breaking ow of campaign cash. The
parties campaign committees and their allied
outside groups are spending at a rate certain to
exceed the $3.6 billion price tag of the 2010
midterm elections.
Surly 2014 electorate seem
poised to keep the bums in
Despite the
incredibly low polling,
favorable ratings for Congress,
its still an incumbents world.
Sheila Krumholz, executive director of the
nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics
WORLD 8
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sameer N. Yacoub
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD Iraqs outgoing prime
minster pledged Monday to turn his
country into a big grave for Sunni
militants from the Islamic State group
and commended security forces who
achieved a rare victory over insurgents
by ending the siege of a Shiite town.
Nouri al-Maliki made the comments
during an unannounced visit to the
northern community of Amirli, where
he was greeted with hugs. Aday earlier,
Iraqi forces backed by Iran-allied Shiite
militias and U.S. airstrikes broke a
two-month siege of the town where
some 15,000 Shiite Turkmens had been
stranded.
In footage aired on state TV, al-
Maliki was shown sitting at a wooden
desk in front of a large poster of Shiite
leader Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistsani,
ordering promotions and awards for
those who fought in the battle.
I salute you for your steadfastness
and patience against those beasts and
killers, he told a gathering of ghters
in a large hall as they chanted Shiite
religious slogans. He vowed to root out
Sunni militants from areas they control
in the country.
All Iraq will be a grave for those
indels, and we will send all the IS
(Islamic State) gang to death, he
added.
Hours before the visit, humanitarian
aid began owing to the town.
Four trucks loaded with food and med-
icine arrived after being sent by the
Iraqi government and the Iraqi Red
Crescent, according to Ali al-Bayati,
who heads the aid organization called
the Turkmen Saving Foundation.
Soldiers began bringing food to fami-
lies in their houses Sunday night.
The situation is getting back to nor-
mal, but gradually, al-Bayati told the
Associated Press. Some people have
come out from their houses and walked
in the street. Shops are still closed, but
people are happy to see their city
secured by Iraqi security forces.
Shiite Turkmen lawmaker Fawzi
Akram al-Tarzi said the U.S. airstrikes
and Iranian support for Iraqi forces
have played a positive role in defeat-
ing the terrorists, although he said the
airstrikes came late in the battle.
On Monday, Iraqi security forces and
Shiite militiamen retook the nearby
town of Suleiman Beg following erce
clashes with Sunni militants, Al-Tarzi
said.
The brave people of Amirli have
made their town a new Stalingrad, he
added, referring to the former name of
the Russian city of Volgograd, famous
for resisting a long siege by the
German military during World War II.
Amirli people have clearly shown that
Iraqis could not be intimidated by ter-
rorists.
Iraqi prime minister pledges to root out militants
U.N. backs inquiry of Islamic
State groups alleged crimes
By John Heilprin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GENEVA The U.N.s top human rights body on Monday
overwhelmingly approved the Iraqi governments request
for an investigation into alleged crimes against civilians
committed by the Islamic State group in its rampage across
northeastern Syria and parts of Iraq.
Diplomats agreed by unanimous consent to approve a
nearly $1.2 million U.N. fact-nding mission at a daylong
special session of the 47-nation Human Rights Council
about Iraq and the extremist group.
Iraqs request for the U.N. to investigate alleged abuses by
the IS was included in a resolution that more broadly con-
demns the groups severe tactics but also calls on Iraqs
government to protect human rights.
Its aim is to provide the Geneva-based council with a
report and evidence next March that could shed further light
on Iraqi atrocities and be used as part of any international
war crimes prosecution.
The session Monday focused on the threat posed by the
militants, who have seized cities, towns and vast tracts of
land and carried out a number of massacres and beheadings.
REUTERS
Iraqi Shiite militia ghters re their weapons as they celebrate breaking a long
siege of Amerli by Islamic State militants.
OPINION 9
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Belmont schools and tutoring
Editor,
The Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District has been
seeking voter support for a $48 mil-
lion bond issue. The district main-
tains our schools require additional
classrooms, science labs and updated
classroom technology to address
school overcrowding and to protect
high-quality education.
However, why hasnt the district
adopted a virtually free program to
improve student performances
through volunteer tutoring? Avolun-
teer tutoring program works. As a
volunteer tutor at Central Middle
School in San Carlos in my third
year, I often wonder why Belmont is
not a part of the Healthy Cities
Tutoring Program. At a San Carlos
City Council meeting in June, the
mayor congratulated the 235 volun-
teer Healthy City tutors who work
with 265 students.
When I asked the executive director
of the Healthy Cities program why
the Belmont school district was not
part of the program, she stated that
the school district never asked to take
part.
In early June, at a Belmont city
meeting, I approached a Belmont
councilmember and asked how to
encourage the school district to adopt
a volunteer tutoring program. The
councilman referred me to the princi-
pal of a Belmont middle school. I
called and left a voicemail requesting
an interview with him, and he never
returned my call.
The proceeds from a $48 million
bond issue could do wonders for the
education of our students. So would a
volunteer tutoring program that sup-
plements the high-quality education
of our Belmont students.
Joe Brennan
Belmont
What Harbor
District dysfunction?
Editor,
I served on the Harbor Districts
board of commissioners for seven
months in 2012. During this time, all
of the commissioners, as well as the
staff, worked well together. I was
reappointed June 5, 2013. Four of the
ve commissioners, as well as the
staff, continue to work well together.
The word dysfunctional is one that
has only been used in relation to the
Harbor District since Sabrina Brennan
took ofce in 2013.
The so-called dysfunction has
occurred because Brennan nds it dif-
cult to transition from being a citi-
zen activist and protester (coming out
of the Occupy America movement) to
being one member of a governing
body. For Brennan to make this tran-
sition, she needs to learn how to
work collaboratively with others,
even when there is disagreement.
While her abrasive approach may
have been effective in getting her
elected, it is unworkable as a style of
governance. She had a similar experi-
ence when she was appointed to the
Midcoast Community Council two
years before; causing her to not seek
re-election in what would otherwise
have been an uncontested race.
There is a difference between being
a progressive Democrat protesting
from the outside and being an elect-
ed representative serving on a public
body. The San Francisco Board of
Supervisors and the Berkeley City
Council are good examples. If, and
when, Sabrina Brennan learns to
work with others in a more appropri-
ate way, the dysfunctional label that
followed her to the Harbor District
will fade away.
Will Holsinger
San Mateo
The letter writer is a member of the
San Mateo County Harbor District
Board of Commissioners and is up for
re-election this November.
TSA assistance
Editor,
In her Aug. 28 column, Michele
Durand makes many good and inter-
esting points about the obvious
problems TSAis facing trying to
keep away persistent security violator
Marilyn Hartman from boarding
planes without valid tickets.
Ms. Hartman has earned her creden-
tials to become a highly paid security
advisor to TSA.
Allowing her access and ying
privileges to every airport in the
United States to discover weakness
would be a win-win solution for all.
In two or three years, after serving
her country, she could retire with a
full pension and paid health insur-
ance. It would be money well spent
instead of incarcerating and drugging
her.
Oscar Lopez-Guerra
San Mateo
Viva Mexico, Gov. Jerry Brown
Editor,
California Gov. Jerry Brown and
President Obama should jointly pro-
pose a new law that gives sovereign
authority over California back to the
country of Mexico and be done with
i t .
Not surprisingly, many Democrats
would actually vote for that law. The
Democrats selsh power-hungry
strategy to win future federal/state
elections by giving as much free U.S.
taxpayer-paid benets as possible to
illegal Mexicans (education, health
care, college money, drivers licens-
es, etc.) and not enforce border securi-
ty so that Hispanics vote Democrat is
essentially the same thing. At
Browns recent ceremony praising
Mexican President Nieto, Nieto said
California is the other Mexico;
Brown turned to illegals and said it
doesnt matter [that] you dont have
permission to be here with
Mexicans chanting Viva Mexico,
Viva Mexico at him while waiving
the Mexican ag. Nieto said free
California-paid college money and
drivers licenses for Mexicans sent a
very clear message to the U.S. and the
entire world that Mexicos recon-
quest of California has occurred. Way
to go Democrats.
Mike Brown
Burlingame
Meteors are serious business
Editor,
This is open letter to county of-
cials regarding sea level rise plan-
ning. You need to put more emphasis
on planning for the expected devas-
tating meteor strike which will cause
an un-surfable tidal wave if the meteor
strikes the ocean. The tsunami direc-
tion signs along Highway 1 that are
unreadable unless you park your auto-
mobile within 15 feet of them will be
swallowed in a nanosecond. Did some
benefactor pay for those ridiculous
signs or did our tax payments cover
the bill?
If it strikes land, the debris eld
will extinguish sunlight, and thus
solar power, as well as your big gov-
ernment. Professional government
ofcials, elected and appointed, will
be in dire straits. Asignicant meteor
strike is a real emergency compared
to the momentary sea level rise that
follows the meteor strike.
Please dont hide under your desks
in Cold War fashion like when you
were just kiddies; address the coming
meteor strike.
Oh yes, dont forget to make plans
for the next Yellowstone eruption.
M.F. Gates
El Granada
Letters to the editor
Following suit
T
he clothes may make the man, but they also
make the news. Look no further than the recent
buzz around the fact that President Barack
Obama wore gasp a tan suit. Forget Ukraine.
Forget Iraq. Things are getting real back home when
the commander-in-chief dare stray from his traditional
black and navy ensembles.
Today, this Tuesday after Labor Day, is a fitting time
to talk about fashion. Etiquette for reasons that escape
most dictates that we put away the white shoes until
next Memorial Day and pity on the folks who dont
get that memo.
But Obama did not wear white shoes or even a bit of
eyebrow-raising seer-
sucker. Instead, during
a very serious press
briefing last week he
lightened up his regu-
lar somber look with a
more summery color.
Nobody remembers
what Obama talked
about because all any-
body else talked about
was what he wore.
Call the briefing a
insert snicker pres-
idential a-dress.
What shade was it
really? Tan? Beige?
Brown? Khaki? Dark
sand or even clay? Many pundits are going with the
oddly spelled and pronounced taupe in the myriad news
stories calling into question why exactly Obama is
shaking up his wardrobe and also analyzing the suit
color choices of presidents past. Side note: I fear the
day Im assigned to parse out the fashion choices of
Peninsula mayors present and past. Call the notion
ridiculous but remember that very squarely here in
reality educated people have given up understanding
ISIS and ISIL so they can figure out the presidential
color palette.
Id nod in agreement if Obama opted for, say, a zoot
suit. Or top hat and tails. Heck, the avalanche of com-
mentary would make sense if he stole Mark
Zuckerbergs hoodie look or had gone off the deep end
and opted for no pants at all. That in itself would be
newsworthy. This just shows that to a grand majority,
presidential fashion is more widely appealing than
how the president fashions policy.
Unfortunately, head member of the fashion police
Joan Rivers is currently out of commission so cant
chime in on the political and pop culture ramifications
of Suit-gate. But everybody else is pretty chatty.
One social media analytic firm noted more than
13,800 tweets on that single subject in a 24-hour
period following the Thursday appearance. Admittedly,
some of the hashtags and comments are worth at least
a smile, The audacity of taupe and Yes we tan
among them. The suit even merited a few spoof Twitter
accounts of its own.
Thanks to the public fascination and coverage of
both the suit and the suits coverage, the public has
also been privy to important information such as the
fact that Obama also wore tan on Easter. Obama is in
good company. Seems tan and brown fans include for-
mer presidents Bush One and Two, Bill Clinton,
Ronald Reagan and Dwight Eisenhower. FDR favored
white. Who knew? Maybe now we can formulate a
spreadsheet documenting pinstripes.
Dissection of political wardrobes isnt particularly
new but is usually reserved from the female contingent
or first lady. Jackie Kennedys pillbox hats. Barbara
Bushs ever-present string of pearls. Michelle
Obamas enviable guns in sleeveless shifts. Hillary
Clintons headbands and later her power pantsuits.
The closest scrutiny most male politicians ever
received was the grilling of Clinton over boxers or
briefs. Guess Obama should count himself lucky
nobody is inquiring what came between him and those
now infamous tan slacks. Of course, dont be surprised
when thats the next question being fashioned.
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached at:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or (650) 344-5200 ext.
102. Follow Michelle on Twitter @michellemdurand
What do you think of this column? Send a letter to the
editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Exp. 9/15/14
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON Ahead of a raft of economic
developments this week, nancial markets
started the week on a lackluster note
Monday as Wall Street was closed for the
Labor Day holiday.
KEEPING SCORE:
In Europe, the FTSE 100 index of leading
British shares closed up 0.1 percent at
6,825.31 while Germanys DAX rose the
same rate to 9,479.03. The CAC-40 in
France ended a tad lower at 4,379.73.
Earlier in Asia, Chinas Shanghai
Composite rose 0.8 percent to 2,235.51
points and Tokyos Nikkei 225 added 0.3
percent to 15,476.60. Hong Kongs Hang
Seng was marginally higher, adding 0.04
percent to 24,752.09.
UKRAINE:
In Europe, the crisis in Ukraine remains
a key source of interest for traders. On
Monday, there were signs that a break-
through may be in the offing as pro-
Russian rebels appeared to soften their
demand for full independence, saying they
would respect Ukraines sovereignty in
exchange for autonomy. The insurgents
platform, released at the start of
Mondays negotiations in Minsk, the
Belarusian capital, represented a signifi-
cant change in their vision for the future
of Ukraines eastern, mainly Russian-
speaking region.
GLOBAL MANUFACTURING:
There were some worrying signs howev-
er that the global manufacturing sector is
waning. Two surveys showed Chinas
manufacturing growth slowed in August as
export demand and investment weakened,
raising expectations Beijing might
launch more stimulus. HSBC Corp. said its
purchasing manufacturers index fell to
50.2 from Julys 18-month high of 51.7
on a 100-point scale on which numbers
above 50 show an expansion. An official
industry group, the China Federation of
Logistics and Purchasing, said its separate
PMI declined to 51.1 from 51.7. Asimilar
picture emerged for the 18-country euro-
zone, with the August PMI from financial
information company Markit down at a
13-month low of 50.7. On Tuesday, the
Institute for Supply Management publish-
es its estimate for the U.S. economy.
EUROPE:
Whether the weak economic indicators
coming out of the eurozone will prompt
the European Central Bank to enact further
stimulus measures at its monthly policy
meeting on Thursday remains open to
question. Bank chief Mario Draghi called
in a speech last month for fiscal policies
to support growth, a departure from the
ECBs implicit support for austerity. No
immediate steps are expected but the bank
has begun work on a program to buy asset-
backed securities.
EURO IN RETREAT:
The crisis in Ukraine and weak eurozone
economic data have combined to hurt the
euro currency over the past few months. On
Monday, it fell to a near year-low of
$1. 3119.
U.S. ECONOMY:
After Thursdays ECB meeting, traders
will be fully focusing on the U.S. nonfarm
payrolls report for August. The release
often setts the market tone for a week or
two after its release as traders try and work
out when the Federal Reserve will start rais-
ing interest rates. Investor condence over
the U.S. economy has risen following sev-
eral months of strong growth in hiring and
corporate prots and a series of major cor-
porate acquisitions.
ENERGY MARKETS:
U.S. benchmark crude for October was
down 25 cents at $95.71 in electronic trad-
ing on the New York Mercantile Exchange.
Markets drift as Wall Street has day off
By Emery P. Dalesio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RALEIGH, N.C. North Carolina busi-
ness recruiters offered Toyota more than
$100 million in incentives for the worlds
largest carmaker to move its North
American headquarters to Charlotte rather
than a Dallas suburb, but still lost out to a
Texas offer half that size.
Only about a quarter of the nearly 3,000
jobs paying an average of $105,000 a year
were expected to move from Southern
California, meaning a golden but missed
job-creating opportunity for the region,
according to North Carolina recruiting docu-
ments and emails released to The Associated
Press last week in response to a public
records request.
State law requires the release of recruiting
documents after a company has announced a
decision on its preferred location, which
Toyota did four months ago. Since Gov. Pat
McCrory took ofce last year, state agen-
cies often take many months to comply.
North Carolinas offer had to be signi-
cantly larger than Texas to be competitive
because the Lone Star State has no corporate
or income tax, Commerce Secretary Sharon
Decker said in an interview last week.
Companies on the move compare the total
cost of its new site and the total nancial
package offered to coax them, Decker said.
Incentives were just one of many consid-
erations Toyota considered including geog-
raphy, transportation, the cost of living and
educational opportunities, Mike Michels, a
spokesman for Torrance, California-based
Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. Inc., said in an
emailed statement. Toyotas manufacturing
plants are in Texas, Kentucky, Mississippi
and Indiana.
We chose a location that better supports
our diverse geographic footprint, in a time
zone that allows us to communicate better
with most of our operations, and has direct
flights to all our operations, Michaels
said.
The availability of direct ights between
the U.S. and Japan was a key element.
Toyota executives travel to and from Asia
hundreds of times a year, Decker said.
Charlotte Douglas International Airport has
no direct ights to Asia.
North Carolina offered $100M
for Toyota HQ, twice Texas bid
HEALTH 17
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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U.S.eating habits improve a bit except among poor
By Lindsey Tanner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO Americans eating habits have improved -
except among the poor, evidence of a widening wealth gap
when it comes to diet. Yet even among wealthier adults, food
choices remain far from ideal, a 12-year study found.
On an index of healthy eating where a perfect score is
110, U.S. adults averaged just 40 points in 1999-2000,
climbing steadily to 47 points in 2009-10, the study found.
Scores for low-income adults were lower than the average
and barely budged during the years studied. They averaged
almost four points lower than those for high-income adults
at the beginning; the difference increased to more than six
points in 2009-10.
Higher scores mean greater intake of heart-healthy foods
including vegetables, fruits, whole grains and healthy fats,
and a high score means a low risk of obesity and chronic ill-
nesses including heart disease, strokes and diabetes. Low
scores mean people face greater chances for developing
those ailments.
The widening rich-poor diet gap is disconcerting and
will have important public health implications, said
study co-author Dr. Frank Hu of the Harvard School of Public
Health. Diet-linked chronic diseases such as diabetes have
become more common in Americans in general, and espe-
cially in the poor, he noted.
Declining diet quality over time may actually widen the
gap between the poor and the rich, Hu said.
Harvard School of Public Health researchers developed the
healthy diet index used for the study. It is similar to federal
dietary guidelines but features additional categories includ-
ing red and processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages and
alcohol.
The study authors used that index along with government
estimates on trans fat intake to evaluate information in
1999-2010 national health surveys that included interviews
with people about their eating habits. The results are pub-
lished Monday in JAMAInternal Medicine.
Hu said the widening diet gap reects an income gap that
deepened during the recent nancial crisis, which likely
made healthy food less affordable for many people. Hu also
noted that inexpensive highly processed foods are often
widely available in low-income neighborhoods.
The overall diet improvement was largely due to decreased
intake of foods containing trans fats but the disappointing
results point to a need for policy changes including better
nutrition education, Hu said.
In recent years the government and manufacturers have
moved to phase out use of articial trans fats in foods
including processed cookies, cakes, frozen pizza and mar-
garines. Trans fats contribute to unhealthy cholesterol lev-
els and can increase heart disease risks. These fats are made
by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil to improve texture and
shelf life.
The study authors say their results are consistent with an
earlier report showing that nearly the entire U.S. popula-
tion fell short of meeting federal dietary recommendations.
The federal guidelines are updated every ve years and new
ones will be issued next year. The current recommendations
emphasize limiting intake of trans fats, sodium, processed
foods and added sugars. They dont specify amounts but
encourage diets high in whole grains, vegetables and fruit.
In recent
years, the
government
and
manufacturers
have moved
to phase out
use of articial
trans fats in
foods
including
processed
cookies, cakes,
frozen pizza
and
margarines.
18
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HEALTH/LOCAL

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and can see they have a completely differ-
ent lifestyle over there, he said. We (the
U.S. and Mexico) dont really have a great
relationship in my opinion. To go and see
their perspective is a great learning experi-
ence.
Students at Woodside apply to be part of
the Green Academy, which offers smaller
class sizes and a science-based, project-ori-
ented learning with an interdisciplinary
approach to subjects beginning their soph-
omore year. Theres even a student garden
on campus, complete with chickens, that
replaced a vacant lot. It acts as an outdoor
classroom for horticulture lessons. The 3-
year-old program has resulted in higher
GPAs and lower suspension rates, said
Principal Diane Burbank. Green Academy
English teacher Erica St. John said she gets
to really know the students in the program.
Its really like a family, she said. Its
more student interest-based.
The students and teachers are being
joined on the trip by six Rotarians and oth-
ers. H2OpenDoors also installed systems
in the Philippines in 2013, and will be
bringing a unit to a large clinic in central
Guatemala in December.
For more information go to
H2OpenDoors.org.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 5
WATER
Pizza continuing to offer hookah was it
was vital to its business model, which
i snt the case with Le Burgeon that seeks
to permit cigar smoke.
Pollard said hes interested in hearing
from Waterfront Pizza at the meeting and
the council will need to decide if new
restaurant restrictions apply to all.
I dont think we should limit the ordi-
nance to identify one place. Either its
50 percent smoking and nonsmoking and
provide signage and make that the guide-
lines for other places. We want this to be
thoughtful, Pollard said.
According to the staff report, 73
California municipalities prohibit
smoking in all outdoor dining areas and
46 entities limit the ban to less than 100
percent of the outdoor areas.
Okamoto said hes hopeful to move for-
ward with strengthening the citys smok-
ing ordinance. With the councils direc-
tion, staff would return with the proposed
amendments for adoption at a later meet-
i ng.
I feel confident weve studied it and
discussed it amongst the council and
weve given ample time to the public to
give us their opinion, Okamoto said.
So I think we will be able to make some
resolution [Tuesday] night.
The Foster City Council meeting
begins 6:30 p.m., Sept. 2 at City Hall,
620 Foster City Blvd. For more informa-
tion about the citys smoking ordinance
visit fosterci t y.org .
samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 3
SMOKE
to the community in September and ulti-
mately the Board of Supervisors in late
October.
The goal is creating a commercial corridor
that is walkable, safer and a draw to visitors
from those outside the largely Latino area.
The favored changes include having three
trafc lanes on Middleeld Road with bike
lanes. During a walking tour of the area in
July, business owners and Supervisor
Warren Slocum, who represents the district,
pointed out the safety challenges of bike
riders sharing space with cars speeding
down the street.
Whether to have four or three lanes of traf-
c was a pretty tough decision and the coun-
cil split, said Ashley Quintana of North Fair
Oaks Forward which is implementing the
North Fair Oaks Community Plan and work-
ing on the revamp.
The biggest concern with three lanes was
that it may stop emergency vehicles. But
one of the biggest things were striving for
is a more vibrant downtown feel and three
lanes gives us the ability to make the side-
walks much wider and have bike lanes,
Quintana said.
The wider sidewalks from the existing
5.5 feet up to as much as 12 feet will
accommodate benches, trash and recycling
receptacles, street and pedestrian lighting
and public space. The sprucing up doesnt
stop there; the plan also suggests greenery
and street art.
Along with bike lanes, the renovated road
will also use parallel parking rather than the
diagonal spaces that jut out. The change
helps accommodate the sidewalks and bike
paths but also does away with 30 percent of
the parking stock, said Deputy County
Manager Peggy Jensen.
The hope is identifying an off-street lot
that can be used for parking or even
although a more expensive option build-
ing a garage.
Along with developing the draft design,
the North Fair Oaks Community Council
asked staff to prepare a report on possible
parking solutions to make up the difference.
Two other reports were also requested: one
on trafc management and another on local
business sustainability.
The next step is actually creating the
design. Although components like the num-
ber of trafc lanes is set, public comment
can still help shape elements like exactly
how wide the new sidewalks will be,
Quintana said.
Adesire to renovated Middleeld Road has
been on the county wish list for the last ve
to six years but only became a reality after
voters passed the Measure Ahalf-cent sales
tax increase.
If the Board of Supervisors signs off on
the recommendation, county ofcials esti-
mate conservatively that design and con-
struction will happen between November
2014 and 2019.
The redesign community meeting is 7
p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 23 at the Fair Oaks
Community Center, 2600 Middleeld Road,
Redwood City. The Board of Supervisors
meeting on the nal recommendation is 9
a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21 in Board Chambers,
400 County Center, Redwood City. More
information on the redesign including traf-
fic analyses is available at
nf of orward.org/ nf o-f orward/middlefield-
road-redesign.
Continued from page 1
REDESIGN
mits were actually issued by the city.
Meanwhile, nearly 20 percent of all code
enforcement cases involved illegal units
which can take up to six months to resolve.
City staff thought perhaps the current
regulations were too prohibitive but want
to balance flexibility with a neighbor-
hoods existing character, Associate
Planner Michelle Littleeld told the Daily
Journal prior to the last study session.
What they heard most from residents at
the previous study sessions were concerns
about parking, setbacks, homeowner resi-
dency requirements, height and the number
of bedrooms allowed. However, not every-
body agreed. For example, although 96 per-
cent of those commenting wanted the park-
ing requirements changed, they were fairly
evenly split between those who wanted
them tightened and those who prefer them
loosened. A similar split happened with
height limits.
In response, planning staff recommends
continuing to require on extra parking
space for the ADU but allowing it to be in
the front, side and rear yard or tandem in the
driveway.
Setback are recommended to change from
20 feet to 6 feet for one-story units but stay
at 20 feet for two-story buildings.
Currently, the homeowner is not allowed
to live in the ADU a restriction for those
who may wish to rent out the primary resi-
dence instead but the recommendation
Tuesday night will allow residency in
either.
Staff recommends keeping the 2.5-story
height limit intact for attached ADUs but
increasing it to 20 feet for detached units.
After advocates for increasing the bed-
room count to allow caregivers to live with
their elderly charges in the ADU were coun-
tered by those worried about density and
overcrowding, city staff suggested a change
to two bedrooms only for properties greater
than 10,000 square feet. Along those lines,
ADUs might get a 10 percent lot coverage
bonus if provided as housing for the elderly
or individuals with special needs.
The Planning Commission may also con-
sider the possibility of an amnesty pro-
gram for already built illegal units but
Littleeld, in her report to the council, is
not recommending the idea. Instead, she
wrote that if parking requirements are
relaxed the city should instead monitor how
that and any other changes impact the num-
ber of unpermitted structures built.
Any new ordinance will require an envi-
ronmental impact review because it is con-
sidered a project under the California
Environmental Quality Act. The city hopes
to have a draft, if desired, back before the
Planning Commission later this year.
More information is available at
www.redwoodcity.org/adu. The Planning
Commission meets 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 2
at City Hall, 1017 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City.
Continued from page 1
IN-LAWS
HEALTH 19
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
GENERAL & FAMILY
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A marijuana high generally peaks within a half hour and
dissipates within three hours, but THC can linger for days in
the bodies of habitual smokers.
By Joan Lowy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON As states liberal-
ize their marijuana laws, public of-
cials and safety advocates worry that
more drivers high on pot will lead to a
big increase in traffic deaths.
Researchers, though, are divided on
the question.
Studies of marijuanas effects show
that the drug can slow decision-mak-
ing, decrease peripheral vision and
impede multitasking, all of which are
critical driving skills. But unlike with
alcohol, drivers high on pot tend to be
aware that they are impaired and try to
compensate by driving slowly, avoid-
ing risky actions such as passing
other cars, and allowing extra room
between vehicles.
On the other hand, combining mari-
juana with alcohol appears to elimi-
nate the pot smokers exaggerated cau-
tion and seems to increase driving
impairment beyond the effects of
either substance alone.
We see the legalization of marijua-
na in Colorado and Washington as a
wake-up call for all of us in highway
safety, said Jonathan Adkins, execu-
tive director of Governors Highway
Safety Association, which represents
state highway safety ofces.
We dont know enough about the
scope of marijuana-impaired driving to
call it a big or small problem. But any-
time a driver has their ability
impaired, it is a problem.
Colorado and Washington are the
only states that allow retail sales of
marijuana for recreational use. Efforts
to legalize recreational marijuana are
underway in Alaska, Massachusetts,
New York, Oregon and the District of
Columbia. Twenty-three states and the
nations capital permit marijuana use
for medical purposes.
It is illegal in all states to drive
while impaired by marijuana.
Colorado, Washington and Montana
have set an intoxication threshold of 5
parts per billion of THC, the psy-
choactive ingredient in pot, in the
blood. A few other states have set
intoxication thresholds, but most
have not set a specific level. In
Washington, there was a jump of near-
ly 25 percent in drivers testing posi-
tive for marijuana in 2013 the rst
full year after legalization but no
corresponding increase in car acci-
dents or fatalities.
What worries highway safety
experts are cases like that of New York
teenager Joseph Beer, who in October
2012 smoked marijuana, climbed into
a Subaru Impreza with four friends and
drove more than 100 mph before los-
ing control. The car crashed into trees
with such force that the vehicle split in
half, killing his friends.
Beer pleaded guilty to aggravated
vehicular homicide and was sentenced
last week to 5 years to 15 years in
prison.
A prosecutor blamed the crash on
speed and weed, but a Yale
University Medical School expert on
drug abuse who testied at the trial said
studies of marijuana and crash risk are
highly inconclusive. Some studies
show a two- or three-fold increase,
while others show none, said Dr.
Mehmet Sofuoglu. Some studies even
showed less risk if someone was mari-
juana positive, he testied.
Teenage boys and young men are the
most likely drivers to smoke pot and
the most likely drivers to have an acci-
dent regardless of whether theyre
high, he said.
Being a teenager, a male teenager,
and being involved in reckless behav-
ior could explain both at the same time
not necessarily marijuana causing
getting into accidents, but a general
reckless behavior leading to both con-
ditions at the same time, he told
jurors.
In 2012, just over 10 percent of high
school seniors said they had smoked
pot before driving at least once in the
prior two weeks, according to
Monitoring the Future, an annual
University of Michigan survey of
50,000 middle and high school stu-
dents. Nearly twice as many male stu-
dents as female students said they had
smoked marijuana before driving.
A roadside survey by the National
Highway Trafc Safety Administration
in 2007 found 8.6 percent of drivers
tested positive for THC, but its not
possible to say how many were high at
the time because drivers were tested
only for the presence of drugs, not the
amount.
A marijuana high generally peaks
within a half hour and dissipates with-
in three hours, but THC can linger for
days in the bodies of habitual smok-
ers.
Will traffic deaths rise as states legalize pot?
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, SEPT. 2
Computer Coaching Session every
Tuesday. 10 a.m. to noon. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. For
more information call 591-0341 ext.
237.
Creating Inuence on Demand. 6
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. First Presbyterian
Church, Room 204, 1500 Easton
Drive, Burlingame. Bernie Maloney
will demonstrate how to build inu-
ence. There will be refreshments.
Free. For more information call 522-
0701.
Sees Candies: A history and tast-
ing. 6:30 p.m. South San Francisco
Main Public Library, 840 W. Orange
Ave., South San Francisco. For more
information call 829-3860.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 3
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500 or see
www. sanmateoprofessi onal al -
liance.com.
San Mateo County Mental Health
& Substance Abuse Recovery
Commission. 4 p.m. San Mateo
County Health System, Room 100,
225 W. 37th Ave., San Mateo. For
more information call Robyn Thaw
at 573-3935.
Silverados Art for Action. 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. Silverado Memory Care, 1301
Ralston Ave., Belmont. There will be
wine and appetizers, a musical per-
formance, artwork and crafts and
some pieces will be for sale. For
more information call 654-9700.
Weekly ESL Conversation Club. 5
p.m. to 6 p.m. Menlo Park Library, 800
Alma St., Menlo Park. Free. Every
Wednesday. For more information
call 330-2525.
San Mateos Taste and Talk Series.
6 p.m. Main Library. Septembers talk
is titled: Public Spaces in Complete
Streets.
Low-Cost Vaccination Clinic. 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Coyote Point Auditorium,
12 Airport Blvd., San Mateo.
Knitting with Arnie every
Wednesday evening. 6:30 p.m. to 9
p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
Simply Your Life. 6:30 p.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information call 854-5897 or
visit facebook.com/LifetreeCafeMP.
Presentation: The Pros and Cons
of Gray Water and Rainwater. 7
p.m. Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Tom
Bressan of the Urban Farmer Store
will explain why these alternative
water systems are growing in popu-
larity and which will work best for
your needs. For more information
contact John Piche at piche@plsin-
fo.org.
San Mateo County Democracy for
America meeting. 7 p.m. Woodside
Road United Methodist Church,
2000 Woodside Road, Redwood City.
An evening with progressive activist
Tom Hayden, who will present
Saving Democracy, Preventing War,
and Blocking the Right. Free admis-
sion and light refreshments. For
more information email Ashleigh
Evans at asevans2002@aol.com.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 4
Lifetree Cafe Conversations:
Simply Your Life. 9:15 a.m. Bethany
Lutheran Church, 1095 Cloud Ave.,
Menlo Park. Complimentary snacks
and beverages will be served. For
more information call 854-5897 or
visit facebook.com/LifetreeCafeMP.
Adult Chess every Thursday. 10
a.m. to noon. San Carlos Library, 610
Elm St., San Carlos. For more infor-
mation call 591-0341 ext. 237.
Rotary Club of Half Moon Bay
Lunch. Noon to 1:30 p.m.
Portuguese Center, 724 Kelly St., Half
Moon Bay. Erin Tormey speaks about
Coastside Farmers Market. $25 con-
tribution at the door. For more infor-
mation contact kflint@flintstrate-
gies.com.
Senior Center Event At
Middleton. 1 p.m. San Mateo Senior
Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Free. For more informa-
tion 522-7490.
Free Flu shots for all seniors over
65. 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. For
more information call 591-0341 ext.
237.
Happy Hour Featuring Bill
Jacksons Impermanence and
Imperfection. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Ricochet, 1600 S. El Camino Real, San
Mateo. Bills photographic work is
based on a combination of two fac-
tors: people living on or near the
fringes of society and wabi-sabi, a
Japanese worldview that nds beau-
ty in transience and imperfection.
For more information call 345-8740.
Studio Choo: Floral design demo
and book talk. 6 p.m. South San
Francisco Main Public Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
Free. For more information call 829-
3860.
My Liberty Meeting. 6 p.m to 7:30
p.m. American Legion Hall (Post 82).
130 South Blvd., San Mateo. Study
important documents in U.S. history.
Free. For more information call 449-
0088.
Vitrimont: Peninsula Women at
War, 1914. 7 p.m. Burlingame Public
Library, Lane Community Room, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame.
Historian Michael Svanevik will tell a
tale of pluck, steadfast determina-
tion and romance in one medieval
village. Free and open to the public.
For more information call 558-7444,
ext. 2.
Food Addicts in Recovery
Anonymous. 7:30 p.m. 1500 Easton
Drive, Burlingame. For more informa-
tion call 781-932-6300 or visit
www.foodaddicts.org.
Dragon Theatre presents
Moonlight and Magnolias. 8 p.m.
The Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. Celebrate the 75th
anniversary of Gone With the Wind
with Moonlight and Magnolias, a
look back at the golden age of
Hollywood and the making of an
iconic American lm. Tickets are $30
for general admission seats. For
more information and to purchase
tickets, go to http://dragonproduc-
tions.net.
Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Company presents A Midsummer
Nights Dream. 6 p.m. John L. Carter
Memorial Park, Half Moon Bay.
Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for
seniors and students, and free for
children under 12. For more informa-
tion and to purchase tickets go to
www.hmbshakespeare.org.
Michael Svanevik speaks on
Peninsula Women in World War I. 7
p.m. Burlingame Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. For
more information email John Piche
at piche@plsinfo.org.
Beyond the Basics: ZeroWaste and
the Principles of Waste Reduction
and Recycling. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. San Carlos (pre-register for loca-
tion). Three-week long course. Leave
with an understanding of the four Rs
(reduce, reuse, recycle and rot). Free.
For more information call 599-1498
and to register go to
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/prin-
ciples-of-waste-reduction-recycling-
tickets-12413835115.
The Authors Road SlideshowTalk.
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Nueva School,
6565 Skyline Blvd., Hillsborough.
George, Salli and their dog have driv-
en around the country for three
years meeting and interviewing
leading writers and experts on
noted deceased writers. For more
information email George Mason at
george@authorsroad.com.
Movies on the Square: Mr.
Peabody and Sherman. 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Rated PG-13. Free. For
more information call 780-7311 or
go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movi
es.html.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 5
Tai Chi every Monday, Friday and
Saturday. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. San
Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
First Free Friday at the San Mateo
County History Museum. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Special activities for families
and children. For more information
go to www.historysmc.org.
The San Mateo Antique Show. 11
a.m. to 6 p.m. 1346 Saratoga Drive,
San Mateo. Features rare treasures,
antiques, ne and decorative art and
vintage collectibles. General admis-
sion $8, senior citizens $5.
Senior Center Event Armchair
Travel and Adventure. 1 p.m. San
Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Free. For
more information 522-7490.
Grand Opening Exhibition of
Pacic Art League. 5:30 p.m. to 8
p.m. Pacic Art League, 668 Ramona
St., Palo Alto. For more information,
e m a i l
frontdesk@pacicartleague.org.
Movies in the Park: Frozen. 7 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m. San Bruno City Park, 251
City Park Way, San Bruno. Free.
Attendees may bring lawn chairs or
blankets. For more information call
616-7017.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
corridors and open spaces.
Proponents of the change say it will
help growth in development in San
Bruno, while others argue it will gen-
trify a working class area, while
increasing congestion and causing
water shortages.
One of the people in support of the
ballot measure is Mayor Jim Ruane
who said the ordinance is outdated and
increasing height limits in that partic-
ular area will allow for more develop-
ment.
Times have changed and the eco-
nomic outlook is much brighter,
Ruane said. We have had a lot of inter-
est from developers, but [the height
limits] really restrict what we can do.
On the advent of (Caltrain) grade sepa-
ration, its the perfect time.
He added that the change only affects
that area and residents arent going to
be moved for development.
Its just a reasonable thing and will
help the economic vitality of San
Bruno.
On the other side, Millbraes Doug
Radtke, the campaign chair against
Measure N, calls San Brunos
Downtown and Transit Corridors
Economic Enhancement Initiative a
thinly veiled attempt to promote the
Plan Bay Area goal of expanding areas
of high density pack and stack hous-
ing, eroding neighbors property val-
ues, according to his ballot argument.
Radtke lived half of his childhood in
San Bruno before moving to Millbrae.
I noticed a lot of the supporters
were business owners, he said. Its
just targeting a specic working class
area. Growing up there, its been a
working class neighborhood. I just see
the plan as arbitrarily picking a zone
for gentrication to benet the devel-
opers. Why not just repeal it? Allow
the free market to decide what gets
built and what doesnt get built. I
feel like the measure goes to benet
companies.
Some local business leaders say the
height limits need to change to give
downtown a boost, with Dennis
Sammut, CEO of the Artichoke Joes
Casino on Huntington Avenue, noting
that a lot of the buildings in the down-
town 1600 block of San Mateo Avenue
are 100 years old.
The downtown is tired; its old, he
previously said. Someday youve got
to bite the bullet. I think theyre (the
council) kind of caught. Theres a lot
of resident concerns. Its a very dif-
cult decision for the council; its
dynamic. If they want the town to
move into the next century, it has to
be an intelligently planned develop-
ment. Looking for the future of San
Bruno, the way to help move it forward
is increase height limits. You cant
go crazy and put up a 90-story building
though.
This is a turning point for San
Bruno, Radtke said.
Whatever they (voters) choose,
that wont impact my daily life, but
folks need to educate themselves on
both sides to decide what type of city
they want to live in. I dont think you
can transform San Bruno into
Burlingame Avenue overnight.
The Yes on N campaign responded to
Radtkes argument with a rebuttal that
noted the process to craft the measure
included two years of public outreach,
changes and engagement.
Unfortunately, the one individual
who signed the opposing argument did
not participate in any of our public dis-
cussion plus he lives in Millbrae,
it stated. His solution to remove all
limits in the entire city is ridiculous
and inconsistent with the thoughtful
community process that produced
Measure N.
Conversely, residents like Marty
Medina, want to see a nice, bustling,
pretty downtown, but is primarily con-
cerned adding more water users to the
city will result in a more expensive
water system for San Bruno.
Everybody else would like to have
another Burlingame Avenue, but were
not in Burlingame, he said. The
biggest issue I think I have besides the
water issue is how our council is sell-
ing this to the public. Why they are
silent on the issue? They could have
stepped down and said, Im not vot-
ing, but here is my public comment.
They (the council) keep saying we
need this because developers arent
going to come to San Bruno, but thats
a lie. Developers are going to come
here because theres no more land in
the area to build. The council should
be more upfront with whats going on
and not do the legal minimums.
Two councilmembers, Rico Medina
and Michael Salazar, recused them-
selves from the vote to put the measure
on the Nov. 4 ballot because they own
properties in close proximity.
Councilwoman Irene OConnell also
owns property in the vicinity, but
voted for the measure to get the third
vote needed for it to pass.
Continued from page 1
HEIGHTS
Opponents of Measure O say the city
has found ways to cut back through
sharing services and the city is no
longer in a dire budget decit that war-
rants Half Moon Bay having one of the
highest sales taxes in the state.
Half Moon Bay has already raised
the hotel tax to 12 percent. So tourists
are already paying their share. So this
is a sales tax ... which will impact
everyone in Half Moon Bay when they
shop downtown, buy a car, order
things online, Harland Harrison,
chair of the Libertarian Party of San
Mateo County.
Councilman Rick Kowalczyk said
the tax rate is consistent with those in
the area and Mueller said the increased
funds improve life on the coast. Even
after the election, the community
would have some discretion as part of
the measure is establishing an inde-
pendent body to ensure the funds are
spent wisely, Mueller said.
The oversight committee monitors
where this sales tax funds can go, so
whether its street improvements or
whatever projects we undertake, it will
denitely be accounted for. And were
just going to continue to make great
progress with our city, Mueller said.
Measure J was approved during the
midst of a city budget decit, deferred
infrastructure maintenance and the
Beachwood Development lawsuit, in
which the city had a $30 million bond
to settle.
Harrison said the extension is
unnecessary since the lawsuit was pri-
marily paid off through insurance.
Theyre much better off now.
Theyre paying off their long-term
debt about 10 years early, their losses
were covered by insurance and they
never really needed this tax in the rst
place, Harrison said. Basically
theyre spending all this money any
way they want because its going into
the general fund. Theyre not required
to do those projects at all.
Councilman Rick Kowalczyk said
the city outlined important community
improvement projects in Measure J,
and Measure O would do the same.
Previously, we passed Measure J to
allow the city, for the rst time, to
implement some infrastructure proj-
ects that were much needed. And we did-
nt have any exibility, Kowalczyk
said. And we said we would do certain
things and we did all of them.
Due to Measure J, Kowalczyk said
the city was able to boost tourism,
repave 17 miles of its poorly degrad-
ing streets and, with the help of
Measure O, can nish off the remain-
ing 10 miles of its street maintenance
project, Kowalczyk said. But most
importantly, he said it will assist in
building a new library.
Were faced with a new opportunity.
Measure O will fund, what I think is the
most important project in the last 30
years for the city, which is to substan-
tially fund our new library,
Kowalczyk said.
The citys aging library is the only
one on the coast between Pacica and
Santa Cruz, Kowalczyk said. After out-
reach to more than 2,000 citizens, the
common theme was a need for a desir-
able gathering place,
Kowalczyk said.
This community-driven
project is estimated to cost
about $25 million and would
include a maker lab, large
meeting room and higher vol-
ume of resources and books,
Kowalczyk said. The county
will contribute a major por-
tion and Measure O is current-
ly the citys only mechanism
to largely fund its portion of
the new library, Kowalczyk
said.
Its critical that we have
the ability to teach from a
point of innovation and col-
laboration for our kids. So the
library will be the hub of the
community for meetings, for
classes, for innovation, for
all kinds of things,
Kowalczyk said. Its impor-
tant that the community con-
nect the dots between a new
library and yes on O.
For more information visit
shapethefuture.org.
Continued from page 1
SALES TAX
COMICS/GAMES
9-2-14
MONDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n

is
a
r
e
g
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ACROSS
1 Kuwaiti leader
5 Pea soup
8 Stow cargo
12 Not here
13 Zoologists mouths
14 Charles Lamb
15 Ruled
17 Dries out, as wood
18 Speck
19 Treaty ratier
21 Diagnostic aids (hyph.)
24 Meets, in poker
25 Electric sh
26 Barked
30 Frostbitten
32 Court
33 Libras stone
37 Cathedral part
38 Oolas Alley
39 Nefertitis river
40 Buyers need
43 Fix a seam
44 A law itself
46 Sighed with delight
48 Liver and
50 Fashion accessory
51 Near-miss response
52 Capsize (2 wds.)
57 Genial
58 At all times, to Poe
59 Road rally
60 Risked a ticket
61 Heartache
62 Up above
DOWN
1 Poached edible
2 Barnyard sound
3 Mdse. bill
4 Thin, as a voice
5 Printers option
6 Miners dig it
7 Flits about
8 Coerced (2 wds.)
9 Kelp
10 Loses weight
11 Relieve tension
16 Promising
20 Wind dir.
21 TV warrior princess
22 Enlist again (hyph.)
23 Mendicants shout
27 Troop truant
28 Where to do laps
29 Bishop of Rome
31 Conferred
34 Word of contempt
35 Toward shelter
36 Raunchy
41 Long time
42 Locomotive must
44 Not cool
45 Female kin
47 Greek forum
48 Possesses
49 Distort
50 The Way We
53 Help wanted abbr.
54 Wine cask
55 Kind of system
56 Gym iteration
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
HOLY MOLE
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
GET FUZZY
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2014
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Someone close to you
will cause disappointment. Speak up if you feel youve
been taken for granted. Harboring resentment will not
solve the problem. Deal with such matters openly.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) A travel opportunity is
apparent. Check out locations that you nd interesting
or that could lead to a lifestyle change. A break from
your routine will give you a fresh start.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Be resourceful when
it comes to impressing people who can help you
further your career. Networking will lead to an
interesting conversation with someone influential.
Share your ideas.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Prepare to face
not only your troubles, but everyone elses grievances
as well. Dont allow someones bad mood to get to
you. Plan an activity that brings you joy.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Expect to face some
dishonest dealing. Keep your plans and intentions a
secret to avoid having someone take credit for your
ideas. Dont take sides if an argument breaks out.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Your ability to
absorb and utilize information is the key factor that
will help you reach your goals. Your skills, insight
and innovative approach will generate positive
attention and recognition.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Dont get drawn into
a battle of the wills today. Keep a low profile and
avoid a situation that could explode in your face.
Stick to your own agenda.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) If you join a variety of
groups or participate in numerous activities, you will
get to share your feelings and beliefs with interesting
individuals. A day trip will help you gain perspective
regarding future employment.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Moneymaking
opportunities are within your reach. An unexpected
windfall is apparent. Real estate or investment
ventures have the potential to yield a tangible return.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Dont let a negative
person dampen your spirits. Get out and socialize or
do some entertaining with lively, fun-loving people,
and see how quickly your mood turns around.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Changes are happening
in the workplace. Sign up for a business course or
conference that will help further your vocational goals.
If you want something, you have to go after it.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Participate in activities that
are conducive to expanding romantic opportunities.
Whether you want to spice up an existing relationship
or start a new one, nows the time to act.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
BUS DRIVER JOBS
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DELIVERY
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delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
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The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
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The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
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For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
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104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS WANTED -- Home Care
for Elderly - Hourly or Live-in, Day or
Night Shifts, Top Pay, Immediate Place-
ment. Required: Two years paid experi-
ence with elderly or current CNA certifi-
cation; Pass background, drug and other
tests; Drive Car; Speak and write English
Email resume to: jobs@starlightcaregiv-
ers.com Call: (650) 600-8108
Website: www.starlightcaregivers.com
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
Limo Driver and Taxi Driver, Wanted,
full time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700, (650)921-2071
110 Employment
IT -
Enome, Inc. seeks an IT Manager II in
San Mateo, CA. Send resume to 4 W.
4th Ave. STE 305, San Mateo, CA
94402. Visit https://goalbookapp.com/ for
details.
NOW HIRING
Certified Nursing Assistants
(Must have Certificate)
$12 per hour
AM-PM Shifts available
Please apply in person
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journals
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in todays paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 529727
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Brabara Jane Stogner
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner Brabara Jane Stogner filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Brabara Jane Stogner
Propsed Name: Barbara Jane Watkins
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 01,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/22/2014
(Published, 08/26/2014, 09/02/2014,
09/09/2014, 09/16/2014)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261863
The following person is doing business
as: Elite Health Care, 26 E. 25th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Shu Xiang
Sui and Zhi Peng Li, 111 N. Railroad
Ave., San Mateo, CA 94401. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Shu Xiang Sui/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/08/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/12/14, 08/19/14, 08/26/14, 09/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261878
The following person is doing business
as: Fishin Magicians, 604 Chesterton
Ave., BELMONT, CA 94002 hereby reg-
istered by the following owner:John
Stark, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ John Stark/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/12/14, 08/19/14, 08/26/14, 09/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261883
The following person is doing business
as: Black Arrow Limo Service, 2131
Pincrest Dr., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ghassan E. Bou Zaid, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Ghassan E. Bou Zaid /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/12/14, 08/19/14, 08/26/14, 09/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261865
The following person is doing business
as: RPH Const. Co., 1434 Columbus
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 hereby
registered by the following owner:
Richard P. Harber, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Richard P. Harber/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/08/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/12/14, 08/19/14, 08/26/14, 09/02/14).
23 Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journals
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But rst and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer prociency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
NOTICE TO SUBCONTRACTORS TO PREQUALIFY FOR WORK ON
BURLINGAME SCHOOL DISTRICT PROJECTS
1. Notice is hereby given that the Governing Board of the Burlingame School District
(District) has determined that, pursuant to the California Public Contract Code
section 20111.6, all mechanical or plumbing subcontractors holding C-4, C-16, C-20,
C-34, C-36, C-38, C-42, C-43, and/or C-46 licenses (MECHANICAL OR PLUMBING
Subcontractors), listed by bidders for District projects going out for bid after August 1,
2014 and involving a projected expenditure of $1 million or more that are eligible for
state bond funding, must be prequalified prior to being listed as a subcontractor by a
bidder submitting a bid on the Project.
2. Any subcontractor interested in being listed as a MECHANICAL OR PLUMBING
Subcontractor by prime contractors bidding on District projects must submit fully
completed and sealed District prequalification forms and financial information
(Prequalification Package) to the District. Prequalification Packages will be received
before 2:00 p.m. on September 11, 2014, at the Burlingame School District, 1825
Trousdale Drive, Burlingame, CA 94010 at or after which time the Prequalification
Packages will be opened and the names of subcontractors applying for
prequalification status shall be publicly read aloud.
3. All Prequalification Packages shall be on the forms provided by the District.
Prequalification forms are available for pick-up at the Burlingame School District, 1825
Trousdale Drive, Burlingame, CA 94010.
4. To prequalify, a subcontractor is required, in addition to other criteria, to possess one
or more of the aforementioned State of California Contractor Licenses, which must
remain active and in good standing throughout the term of the District project.
5. If a subcontractor performs work for a District project, the subcontractor shall pay all
workers on all work performed pursuant to a contract for the Project not less than the
general prevailing rate of per diem wages and the general prevailing rate for holiday
and overtime work as determined by the Director of the Department of Industrial
Relations, State of California, for the type of work performed and the locality in which
the work is to be performed within the boundaries of the District, pursuant to sections
1770 et seq. of the California Labor Code.
6. The Prequalification Packages submitted by subcontractors are not public records and
are not open to public inspection. All information provided will be kept confidential to
the extent permitted by law. The contents may be disclosed to third parties for
purpose of verification, or investigation of substantial allegations, or in the appeal
process, however. State law requires that the names of subcontractors applying for
prequalification status shall be public records subject to disclosure.
7. A subcontractor may be denied prequalification status for either omission of requested
information or falsification of information.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, August 27 and September 2, 2014.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261910
The following person is doing business
as: Sunny Day Spa, 148 25th Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: You Zhen Wu,
1113 College Ave., San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ You Zhen Wu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/19/14, 08/26/14, 09/02/14, 09/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261688
The following person is doing business
as: Dream Cloud Consulting, 512 7th
Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Moni-
ca Jacinto, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on07/01/2014
/s/ Monica Jacinto /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/23/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/19/14, 08/26/14, 09/02/14, 09/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261872
The following person is doing business
as: Colin Tam, 636 Bonita Ave., MILL-
BRAE, CA 94030 is hereby registered by
the following owner: C & Y Tam, LLC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 07/01/2014
/s/ Colin Tam/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/19/14, 08/26/14, 09/02/14, 09/09/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261756
The following person is doing business
as: F. Samsami Construction, 801 Mah-
ler Rd. Suite D-4, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Farshid Samsami, 1508 La
Mesa Ln., Burlingame, CA 94010. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Farshid Samsami /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/19/14, 08/26/14, 09/02/14, 09/09/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261995
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pindera, 2) Pindera Residental, 3)
Pindera Commercial, 120 S. El Camino
Real, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby
registered by the following owner: RAC
Investment Group, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Dave Lau /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/26/14, 09/02/14, 09/09/14, 09/16/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262022
The following person is doing business
as: MCK Express, 1711 Eisenhower St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cliford Ota,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Cliford Ota /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/25/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/26/14, 09/02/14, 09/09/14, 09/16/14).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Frederick Allen Pabst
Case Number: 124793
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Federick Allen Pabst. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
John F. Sherwood, Sr. in the Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo.
The Petition for Probate requests that
John F. Sherwood, Sr. be appointed as
personal representative to administer the
estate of the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ister the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: September 12,
2014 at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior
Court of California, County of San Mateo,
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
203 Public Notices
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal au-
thority may affect your rights as a cred-
itor. You may want to consult with an at-
torney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
John F. Sherwood, Sr.
10900 NE 4th St. Ste. 1850
BELLEVUE, WA 98004
(425)462-4700
Dated: Aug. 26, 2014
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on August 28, September 2, 8, 2014.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV527717
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Steven J. Norris
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): Mitchell
Chette
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
203 Public Notices
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of San Mateo, 400 Coun-
ty Center, Redwood City, CA 94063-
1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
William McGrane (Bar# 057761)
McGrane, LLP
4 Embarcadero Center, Ste. 1400
203 Public Notices
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94111
(415)580-6664
Date: (Fecha) Apr. 03, 2014
Z, Arshad
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
August 26, September 2, 9, 16, 2014.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - silver locket on May 6, Crest-
view and Club Dr. Call to describe:
(650)598-0823
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14.
Call 650 490-0921 - Leave message if no
answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Center, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
210 Lost & Found
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOKS, PAPERBACK/HARD cover,
Coonts, Higgins, Thor, Follet, Brown,
more $20.00 for 60 books,
(650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
24
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Gather for oneself
6 __ accompli
10 Bront or Boleyn
14 Video game
hedgehog
15 Up to the task
16 Cambodia
neighbor
17 1971 road film
co-starring
James Taylor
20 Cozy stopover
21 Golfer McIlroy
22 Shaggy
23 City SW of Bogot
24 Prefix meaning
loving
26 Treachery
30 Church organ
features
31 Two-masted
vessel
32 Do You Know
the __ to San
Jose?
34 Got older
35 Gets hot under
the collar
37 Taste, as of a
sandwich
38 Mangy mutt
39 Tight-knit family
40 Funeral Blues
poet W.H. __
41 Spectacles
45 Hearty meals
46 Ugh-producing
47 Assume the role of
49 Poet Pound
50 New Deal agcy.
53 Status of a
multiple passport
holder
57 Longfellows bell
town
58 Indian princess
59 R&B singer Sam
60 Flat-topped hill
61 Fencing weapon
62 County in SE
England
DOWN
1 Piedmont wine
region
2 Cut with a
Snapper, say
3 Shortly, to
Shakespeare
4 __ vous plat
5 Sacred Egyptian
beetles
6 Spensers The
__ Queene
7 Dear advice
giver
8 Feeling poorly
9 Celestial
Seasonings
offering
10 Acid neutralizer
11 Company thats
on your side
12 Jordanian queen
dowager
13 Catch sight of
18 Hall of Fame NFL
coach Chuck
19 Kick back
23 Prompted
24 Ring loudly
25 Partner of hems
26 Unearth
27 Big names at the
Met
28 Fading away
29 Garden swingers
30 Source of some
D.C. funding
33 Strong desire
35 Low __: cheap
shot
36 Clumsy sorts
37 On a tight
schedule
39 Getting gradually
louder, in mus.
40 With suspicion
42 Bolognas land
43 Tin __: Model T
44 Parcel of land
47 Sandler of
Grown Ups
films
48 Like kitten
videos
49 Berlin article
50 Start of a Knock,
knock response
51 Toll road
52 Mountain
climbers goal
54 Wrath
55 Sink feature
56 Sailors distress
signal
By Kurt Mengel and Jan-Michele Gianette
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/02/14
09/02/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Sign-
ed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SANYO REFRIGERATOR with size 33
high & 20" wide in very good condition
$85. 650-756-9516.
SEARS KENMORE sewing machine in a
good cabinet style, running smoothly
$99. 650-756-9516.
WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-867-
6042.
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18 Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
298 Collectibles
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
300 Toys
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695
LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15 boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
CASH REGISTER approximate 1930
Solid Oak Document Container with 59"
height; 33"width; 17" deep with compart-
ments. Best Offer.(650)348-3300
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden Sea Captains
Tool Chest 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD VHS Flat Screen Remote. $55. Cell
number: (650)580-6324
COMBO COLOR T.V. Panasonic with
VHS and Radio - Color: White - 2001
$25. Cell number: (650)580-6324
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
JVC - DVD Player and video cassette re-
corder. NEW. $80. (650)345-5502
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
303 Electronics
OLD STYLE 32 inch Samsung TV. Free
with pickup. Call 650-871-5078.
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
VINTAGE ZENITH stereo console record
player works good cond $50 (650) 756-
9516 Daly City.
WESTINGHOUSE 32 Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available, $175 each. (650)400-4174
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l
BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safe-
ly.$99 650-375-1414
BURGUNDY VELVET reupholstered vin-
tage chair. $75. Excellent condition.
650-861-0088
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for key-
board, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72x 21 x39 1/2
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER (5 drawers) 43" H x 36" W
$40. (650)756-9516 DC.
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169
FREE SOFA and love seat set. good
condtion (650)630-2329
GRACO 40" x28"x28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City
HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mat-
tress (twin size) in great condition. In-
cludes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with addition-
al 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LIVING & Dining Room Sets. Mission
Style, Trestle Table w/ 2 leafs & 6
Chairs, Like new $600 obo
(831)768-1680
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OCCASIONAL, END or Sofa Table. $25.
Solid wood in excellent condition. 20" x
22". (650)861-0088.
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PIANO AND various furniture pieces,
golf bag. $100-$300 Please call for info
(650)740-0687
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condi-
tion with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648
SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral
color $99 OBO (650)345-5644
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33 x 78
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STURDY OAK TV or End Table. $35.
Very good condition. 30" x 24".
(650)861-0088
TABLE OCTAGONAL SHAPE 17" high
18" width, made by Baker $75 (650)593-
8880
TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (2) stainless steel,
temperature resistent handles, 21/2 & 4
gal. $5. SOLD!
COOLER/WARMER, UNOPENED, Wor-
thy Mini Fridge/warmer, portable, handle,
plug, white $30.00 (650) 578 9208
ELECTRIC FAN Wind Machine 20in.
Portable Round Plastic Adjustable $35
Cell Number (650)580-6324
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
SINGER ELECTRONIC sewing machine
model #9022. Cord, foot controller
included. $99 O.B.O. (650)274-9601 or
(650)468-6884
SNOW WHITE Cookie Cutters Williams-
Sanoma, new, $9, 650-595-3933
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
AIR COMPRESSOR, 60 gallon, 2-stage
DeVilbiss. Very heavy. **SOLD**
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SKILL saw "craftman"7/1/4"
heavy duty never used in box $45.
(650)992-4544
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
new/warranty case $29 650-595-3933
308 Tools
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN POCKET Socket screw-
drivers wrench tape new, $25 650-595-
3933
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
HUSKY POWER inverter 750wtts.adap-
tor/cables unused AC/DC.$50.
(650)992-4544
HYDRAULIC floor botle jack 10" H.
plus.Ford like new. $25.00 botlh
(650)992-4544
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MICROMETER MEASUREMENT
brake/drum tool new in box
$25.(650)992-4544
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC" Smithso-
nian Collection of Recordings, 4 audio-
tapes, annotation booklet. $20.
(650)574-3229
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 SOLD!
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
FOLK SONG anthology: Smithsonian
Collection of Recordings, 4 audiotapes +
annotation booklet. $20 (650)574-3229
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840 leave a clear Message
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., SOLD!
leave a clear Message
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, ex-
cellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PA SYSTEM, Yamaha 8 channel hd,
Traynor spkrs.$95/OBO - 650-345-7352
ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,
with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owners manual. $500. (415)706-6216
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40 high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM, MARINA Cool 10, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
DELUX"GLASS LIZARD cage unused ,
rock open/close window Decoration
21"Wx12"Hx8"D,$20.(650)992-4544
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large, Excellent
Condition, $275 (650)245-4084
25 Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by Greenstarr
Rambo
Concrete
Works
Walkways
Driveways
Patios
Colored
Aggregate
Block Walls
Retaining walls
Stamped Concrete
Ornamental concrete
Swimming pool removal
Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
315 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY
Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
ALPINESTAR JEANS - Tags Attached.
Twin Stitched. Knee Protection. Never
Used! Blue/Grey Sz34 $65.
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DAINESE BOOTS - Zipper/Velcro Clo-
sure. Cushioned Ankle. Reflective Strip.
Excellent Condition! Unisex EU40 $65.
(650)357-7484
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
NEW MAN'S Wristwatch sweep second
hand, +3 dials, $29 650-595-3933
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
FLOORING - Carolina Pine, 1x3 T and
G, approximately 400+ sq. ft. $650. CAll
(415)516-4964
STEPPING STONES (17) pebbled ce-
ment, 12 round good condtion $20 San
Bruno (650)588-1946
318 Sports Equipment
2008 EZ GO Golf Cart, red, electric, new
Trojan batteries, new battery charger,
lights, windshield. Excellent condition.
$3,900 obo. Call (650)712-1291 or
(707)888-6025. Half Moon Bay.
3 WHEEL golf cart by Bagboy. Used
twice, New $160 great price $65
(650)200-8935
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$20.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
G.I. AMMO can, small, good cond.,
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
GERMAN ARMY Helmet WW2, 4 motor-
bike DOT $59 650-595-3933
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiber-
glass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
NORDIC TRACK Pro, $95. Call
(650)333-4400
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
SOCCER BALL, unopened, unused,
Yellow, pear shaped, unique. $5.
(650)578 9208
TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WEIGHT LIFTER'S bench and barbell
weights, located coastside, $75, 650-
867-6042
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $79
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WHEEL CHAIR, heavy duty, wide, excel-
lent condition. $99.(650)704-7025
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2012 LEXUS ISF - V-8, 420hp, 22k
miles, New Tires, Loaded! sliver exterior
red & black interior, Pristine $45,000
(650)245-6841
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
Well run it
til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE 99 Van, Good Condition,
$2,800 OBO (650)481-5296
HONDA 96 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $3500 OBO, (650)481-5296 - Joe
Fusilier
LEXUS 97 SC400, green. 165K miles,
good condition, $6,000. (650)207-6927
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUVs
DODGE 01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
FORD E150 Cargo VAN, 2007, 56k
miles, almost perfect! $12,000 (650)591-
8062
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 04 Heritage Soft
Tail ONLY 5,400 miles. $11,000. Call
(650)342-6342.
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS sales,
with mounting hardware $35.
(650)670-2888
650 RVs
COLEMAN LARAMIE pop-up camper,
Excellent Condition, $2750. Call
(415)515-6072
670 Auto Service
YAO'S AUTO SERVICES
(650)598-2801
Oil Change Special $24.99
most cars
San Carlos Smog Check
(650)593-8200
Cash special $26.75 plus cert.
96 & newer
1098 El Camino Real San Carlos
670 Auto Parts
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
SNOW CHAINS metal cambell brand
never used 2 sets multi sizes $20 each
obo (650)591-6842
USED BIG O 4 tires, All Terrain
245/70R16, $180 (650)579-0933
680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
FOR YOUR CABINET NEEDS
" TRUST EXPERIENCE"
FOCAL POINT KITCHENS & BATH
Modular & Custom cabinets
Over 30 Years in Business !
1222 So. El Camino Real
San Mateo
(650)345-0355
www.focalpointkitchens.com
Cleaning
Concrete
ASP CONCRETE
LANDSCAPING
All kinds of Concrete
Retaining Wall Tree Service
Roofing Fencing
New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435 (650)834-4495
Construction
REMODELING
Chad Heeley
(650)892-8300
David Blum
(650)207-3559
Lic#676437
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont/Castro Valley, CA
(650) 318-3993
Construction
MOE
CONSTRUCTION
Remodels- Kitchen,
Bath, New Addtions
Foundation - Driveway,
Concrete, Paver Stones
Retaining Wall - Hawai-
ian Rock Walls, Blocks,
Brick Walls
Licensed and Insured
Free Estimates
(415)215-8899
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot Decks Fences
Handyman Painting
Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
OSULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
New Construction,
Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
VICTOR FENCES
and House Painting
Interior Exterior
Power Washing
Driveways Sidewalks Gutters
FREE ESTIMATES
(650)583-1270
or (650) 296-8089
Lic #106767
Draperies
MARLAS DRAPERIES
& ALTERATIONS
Custom made drapes & pillows
Alterations for men & women
Free Estimates
(650)703-6112
(650)389-6290
2140A S. El Camino, SM
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
INSIDE OUT
ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182
(650)515-1123
Gardening
KEEP YOUR LAWN
LOOKING GREEN
Time to Aerate your lawn
We also do seed/sod of lawns
Spring planting
Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831 Lic #751832
Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business
Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit
(650)278-0157
Lic#1211534
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES
Fences Decks
Concrete Work Arbors
We can do any job big or small
Free Estimates
(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968
contrerashandy12@yahoo.com
26
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by Greenstarr
Yard Boss
0omp|ete |andscape
construct|on and remova|
Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
8eta|n|ng wa||s
0rnamenta| concrete
Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
by Greenstarr
&
Chriss Hauling
Yard clean up - attic,
basement
Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
Demolition
Concrete removal
Excavation
Swimming pool removal
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Chri s 415. 999. 1223
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
FRANKS HAULING
Junk and Debris
Furniture, bushes,
concrete and more
FREE ESTIMATES
(650)361-8773
Hauling
Landscaping
Landscaping
Moving
BAY AREA
RELOCATION SERVICES
Specializing In:
Homes, Apts, Storages
Professional, Friendly, Careful
Peninsula Personal mover
(650)248-6343
Fully Lic & Bonded Cal-T190632
Painting
CORDERO PAINTING
Commercial & Residential
Exterior & Interior
Free Estimates
(650)372-8361
Lic # 35740 Insured
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960
Plumbing
Roofing
NATE LANDSCAPING
Tree Service Pruning &
Removal Fence Deck Paint
New Lawn All concrete
Ret. Wall Pavers
Yard clean-up & Haul
Free Estimate
(650)353-6554
Lic. #973081
Screens
DONT SHARE
YOUR HOUSE
WITH BUGS!
We repair and install all types of
Window & Door Screens
Free Estimates
(650)299-9107
PENINSULA SCREEN SHOP
Mention this ad for 20% OFF!
MARTIN SCREEN SHOP
Quality Screens
Old Fashion Workmanship
New & Repair
Pick up, delivery & installation
(650)591-7010
301 Old County Rd. San Carlos
since 1957
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Windows
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Accounting
ALAN CECCHI EA
Tax Preparation
& Representation
Bookkkeeping - Accounting
Phone 650-245-7645
alancecchi@yahoo .com
Attorneys
INJURY
LAWYER
LOWER FEES
San Mateo Since 1976
650-366-5800
www.BlackmanLegal.com
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery
LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
(650)771-6564
Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.
$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO
(650)342-4171
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno
(650)583-2273
www.russodentalcare.com
Food
ALOFT SFO
invites you to mix & mingle at
replay on
Friday, August 15th
from 7pm till midnight!
Live DJs and specialty cocktails at W
XYZ bar to start your weekend!
401 East Millbrae Ave. Millbrae
(650)443-5500
Food
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRILL & VINE
Try Grill & Vines new Summer
menu and get half-off
your second entre of equal or
lesser value when mentioning
this ad! Valid on Friday and Sat-
urday through September!
1 Old Bayshore, Millbrae
(650)872-8141
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR
Lunch Dinner Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit
(650)372-0888
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650) 726-5727
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
CALIFORNIA
STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES
(650)591-3900
Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle
Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Jewelers
LOST RING?
Professional
Metal Detecting
In sand, grass or water
Serving Peninsula & Bay Area.
Contact Marshall
at (800) 214-8534 or
marshall.smith@theringfinders.com
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ACUHEALTH
Best Asian Healing Massage
$29/hr
with this ad
Free Parking
(650)692-1989
1838 El Camino #103, Burlingame
sites.google.com/site/acuhealthSFbay
ASIAN MASSAGE
$55 per Hour
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $19.99
Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame
(650)389-2468
HEALING MASSAGE
Newly remodeled
New Masseuses every two
weeks
$50/Hr. Special
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com
Pet Services
CATS, DOGS,
POCKET PETS
Mid-Peninsula Animal Hospital
Free New Client Exam
(650) 325-5671
www.midpen.com
Open Nights & Weekends
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity based direct lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-use Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate
Retirement
Independent Living, Assisted Liv-
ing, and Memory Care. full time R.N.
Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your life-
long dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com
Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY
Where every child is a gift from God
K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco
(650)588-6860
ww.hillsidechristian.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
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WORLD 28
Tuesday Sept. 2, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Zarar Khan and Asif Shahzad
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISLAMABAD Ahead of a joint session of parliament,
Pakistans prime minister and army chief held marathon meet-
ings Monday over violent anti-government protests that
could force the premier of this nuclear-armed country to
resign.
Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif again vowed he would not step
down under duress, even as protesters briey took over the
countrys state-run television broadcaster and battled security
forces in the streets. But the pressure from three days of vio-
lent protests on Sharif has intensied amid reports later
denied by the military that the countrys powerful army
chief advised him to resign.
The parliamentary session Tuesday appears to be an attempt
to rally political support to the prime ministers side. While
many politicians have backed him so far, many in the coun-
try increasingly have grown worried about the protests and
the direction of the nascent democracy in the country of 180
million people.
The turmoil comes as part of the mass demonstrations led
by cleric Tahir-ul-Qadri and opposition politician Imran
Khan, who both demand Sharif step down over their allega-
tions of fraud in last years election. Their protests, which
have been peaceful for weeks, turned ugly this weekend when
clashes between protesters and security forces killed three
people and wounded some 400 in running street battles in
Pakistans capital, Islamabad.
Monday began with more violence.
Demonstrators briey took over Pakistans state television
station, forcing the channel off the air. Senior ofcial Athar
Farooq said 20 cameras went missing as protesters overran
the station, armed with sticks and screaming. The intruders
also destroyed equipment and fought with employees.
Several protesters also took down a portrait of Sharif from
a wall, threw it on the oor and stomped on it in anger.
Soldiers and paramilitary Rangers later reached the building
and began to clear it of protesters. Some private television
stations showed footage of protesters embracing the Rangers
and agreeing to leave.
The rallies against Sharif constitute the biggest threat to
his government. Several rounds of negotiations between rep-
resentatives of Khan and Qadri and the government have
failed to resolve the crisis.
Pakistans premier challenged by raging protests
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REUTERS
Anti-government protesters beat a riot policeman after clashes
during the Revolution March in Islamabad, Pakistan.