Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 38

ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO

Lisa M. Aultman-Hall, Ph.D.


Associate Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Connecticut
















December 2004


TABLE OF CONTENTS

BRIEF BIOGRAPHY..........................................................................................................1

SUMMARY OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS............................................2

PERSONAL STATEMENTS
Research and Scholarship ........................................................................................3
Professional Activities and Service .........................................................................5
Teaching...................................................................................................................5
Administration .........................................................................................................6

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP
Research Grants .......................................................................................................8
Grants and Programs Managed..............................................................................10
Student Research Supervision................................................................................10
Peer-Reviewed Journal Publications......................................................................12
Manuscripts Under Review....................................................................................14
Book Chapters........................................................................................................14
Conference Proceedings (Full Papers Reviewed)..................................................14
Conference Proceedings (Full Paper with Abstract Reviewed).............................15
Invited Conference Presentations .........................................................................15
Conferences Presentations (Abstract Only) ..........................................................16
Academic Seminars (Invited) ...............................................................................18
Research Reports ...................................................................................................18

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES AND SERVICE
Professional Activities National Level ...............................................................21
Outreach State and Local Service.......................................................................22
University Level Service........................................................................................22
Engineering School/College Service .....................................................................23
Department Service................................................................................................23

TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Courses Taught and Evaluations............................................................................24
New Courses Developed........................................................................................25
Sample Undergraduate Syllabus............................................................................27
Sample Graduate Syllabus .....................................................................................32

REFERENCES ..................................................................................................................36


Page 1 of 35


BRIEF BIOGRAPHY

Lisa Aultman-Hall, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Director, Connecticut Transportation Institute
261 Glenbrook Road
Storrs, CT 06269
860-486-4396 fax 860-486-2298

EMPLOYMENT

University of Connecticut (August 2001 - present)
Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Director, Connecticut Transportation Institute (August 2003 present)

University of Kentucky (August 1996 - August 2001)
Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering

EDUCATION

Ph.D. 1996
Dept. of Civil Engineering (Transportation), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario
Dissertation: Commuter Bicycle Route Choice: Analysis of Major Determinants and Safety
Implications
Advisors: Drs. Fred L. Hall and Brian W. Baetz

Master of Science 1993
Dept. of Civil Engineering, Traffic Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
Thesis: An Evaluation of the Modeling of Freeways in the INTEGRATION Simulation
Model
Advisor: Dr. Michel Van Aerde

Bachelor of Engineering 1991
Dept. of Civil Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario

TEACHING EXPERTISE
! Transportation Planning
! Traffic Engineering and Transportation Safety
! Geographic Information Systems (GIS) & Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Surveying
! Professional Short Courses: Bicycle Facility Design, Highway Capacity Analysis and
Traffic Signal Optimization

AREAS OF RESEARCH SPECIALIZATION
! Travel Behavior, especially route choice and vehicle operating mode for emissions
modeling
! Freight Transportation Planning
! Transportation Safety
! Bicycle Transportation
! Spatial Analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning
Systems (GPS) for Transportation
Page 2 of 35


SUMMARY OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS


Teaching Evaluations: University of Connecticut (10 point scale)

Spring 2004 no teaching
Fall 2003 8.8
Spring 2003 9.0
Fall 2002 8.7
Spring 2002 no teaching
Fall 2001 8.7 and 8.2

Research Grants (1995 2004):

Total Number of Research Grants - 25 - $1,946,082
PI for 17 Grants - $1,353,533
Total Directly Managed by Aultman-Hall (a portion of all multiple PI grants) - $1,296,353

Dissemination of Research:

Refereed Journal Papers: 21 total, 19 in print, 2 in-press (7 additional papers in review)
Book Chapters: 1
Conference Participation: total 50
Full Papers in Conference Proceedings (full paper-reviewed) - 3
Full Papers in Conference Proceedings (abstract reviewed) - 11
Presentations by Dr. Aultman-Hall or graduate students under her supervision 20
Presentations by Other Co-authors (and not cited as papers in other categories) - 3
Invited Conference Presentations - 12
Invited Academic Seminars: 9
Technical Reports: 63

Graduate Students Supervised:

Current: 3 Ph.D. Candidates (2 graduate Spring 2005), two Masters students
Completed: 8 Masters students

Highlights of Recent Service:

! Co-host, Women in Engineering Leadership Summit (NSF funded), May 3-5 2004
! Chair, Transportation Research Board, Committee on Bicycle Transportation (2002-2004)
! Managed Review for 13-16 TRB papers each fall for the Committee on Bicycle
Transportation (2002-2004)
! NSF Panel, November 2002, CAREER, Civil and Mechanical Systems
! NSF Panel, May 2002, Division of Operations Research, Service Enterprise Engineering
! NSF IGERT(Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training) Program Review -
Content Specialist for Geographic Information Science at SUNY Buffalo, May 2002
! NCHRP (National Cooperative Highway Research Program) Panels 2 between 2001 and
present

Administrative Positions:

! Director, Connecticut Transportation Institute (2003 present)
Page 3 of 35


PERSONAL STATEMENTS

Career Goal: I plan to continue my academic career studying and teaching in
transportation engineering with brief forays into university or research center
administration. I enjoy managing research teams comprised of students, engineers and
technicians. While I take pleasure in almost all aspects of my career, I derive the most
satisfaction and personal reward from teaching and mentoring graduate students.

This section of the portfolio contains statements on the four aspects of my academic
career: 1) research and scholarship, 2) professional activities and service, 3) teaching,
and 4) administration. Subsequent sections provide the detailed documentation of the
activities and products described here (grants and papers are referred to by number).

Research and Scholarship

Sound policy choices for many complex transportation problems are hampered by the
lack of robust and relevant real-world data. In recent decades, the resources to collect
large databases for model development and decision support have become increasingly
limited. My research program addresses this need by filling knowledge gaps and
building valid models in four data-poor areas of the field: 1) travel routing (including
route choice and operating mode for emissions modeling), 2) freight transport planning,
3) bicycle transportation, and 4) traffic safety for specific drivers or circumstances. Two
fundamental approaches have been used: the design and execution of survey methods to
fill data gaps; and the careful design of analyses to extract valid and relevant results from
limited existing datasets. This summary outlines my contributions in these four areas as
well as my plans for continued research program growth.

My study of travel routes using real world route data has two foci: route choice and
vehicle emissions modeling. My vehicle route choice work grew out of the study of
bicycle route choice conducted in the late 1990s. Originally, my study of automobile
route choice involved only survey-based preferences. One such study (paper 13, grant 6),
on drivers use of telephone travel information services, were submitted in 1999 by the
Kentucky DOT to the Federal Communications Commission as evidence in their
consideration of reserving a nation-wide 3 digit number (511) for travel information. I
moved forward to real-world route data collection between March 2002 and July 2003,
when I led a field experiment to collect 10-day GPS travel route datasets from over 276
household vehicles in Lexington, Ky (grants 18 and 15). Few researchers have used GPS
for this purpose, especially at this large scale. In addition, our study included a travel log
to allow comparison of behavior between trip purposes, and a follow-up survey that
allows comparison of stated and revealed routing behavior. The methods to extract route
data from the field-measured GPS data were developed under a grant from the National
Science Foundation (NSF) (grant 13 and paper in review 7) and were key to facilitating
this current research project. A current Ph.D. candidate is comparing the actual routes
used by drivers to the shortest travel time paths. Recent grants from NSF and the New
England University Transportation Center (grants 25 and 24) have allowed me to expand
my GPS-based route work to include vehicle emissions. On-road emissions data upon
Page 4 of 35


which to develop real-world emissions models are relatively limited and second-by-
second GPS data can facilitate more wide-spread collection of vehicle operating mode.
Use of time-resolved mode results in more accurate emissions estimates than use of
average speed as conducted in practice. Consideration of the spatial distribution of
vehicle operating mode creates a key link between vehicle emissions and traffic
management strategies, land use patterns and individual driver habits such as
aggressiveness. I plan this to be a major focus of my research in the next three to five
years.

The field of freight transportation planning has suffered, compared to passenger
planning, from a relative lack of study by the public sector and academics. My research
to develop field measurement techniques for truck access (paper 10), and to evaluate the
potential for modal substitution from truck to rail or water (paper 14) was funded by the
Kentucky DOT. In addition, my research has examined the optimal location of
commercial vehicle monitoring stations (grant 8), and nationwide freight generation
models that incorporate spatial autocorrelation (USDOT grant 13, paper in review 4).
The study of freight flows within the small state of Connecticut (grant 17) resulted in a
rare comparison of a range of data sources and techniques to model statewide truck flows
(paper in review 3). Most research on this topic makes use of one data source which does
not allow relative comparison and evaluation. I have been invited to speak on a range of
freight planning topics at conferences and numerous community and professional
outreach events. While I have often been frustrated by the relatively poor data quality for
freight planning, I believe the sparse real-world freight data sources necessitate academic
involvement to ensure valid model development and use. I plan to continue my role in
this field as a link between public sector freight planners and the academic modelers and
spatial analysts.

My initial work in the area of bicycle transportation was motivated by the dearth of
crash and travel exposure data for bicycles given the relatively high fatality and crash
numbers. Started in 1994 during my Ph.D. studies, this work addressed the need for large
defensible datasets to measure the relative safety of bicycle travel on different facilities.
This Ph.D. research, funded by a proposal I wrote (grant 1), was distinct from all
previous and on-going work for my Ph.D. co-advisors and therefore I continued this work
independently with my own graduate students while I was an Assistant Professor at the
University of Kentucky (1996-2001). Several of my peer-reviewed journal papers (3, 5,
6, 7, 11, 12) have been in the field of bicycle transportation. I have presented six
conference papers (A3, B4, B5, B6, B8), made numerous invited presentations and been
very actively involved in the U.S. national bicycle transportation research community.
My most important contribution has been solid documentation of the higher crash, fall
and injury rates for bicycles on sidewalks and paths. In addition, I have used bicycle
route data for consideration of bicycle route choice and latent demand. I recently
completed a study of factors affecting bicycle and pedestrian crash rates on shared-use
paths with funding from the Connecticut Department of Transportation (grant 16). I
intend to shift my focus to the safety and ridership impacts of bicycle lanes; an emerging
critical need in the field for which there are sparse data and limited established
methodologies for solid evaluation.
Page 5 of 35



Rigorous measurement of traffic safety for specific drivers or circumstances is
particularly challenging, not due to the lack of incident data, but rather the lack of
corresponding travel exposure metrics (e.g. the amount of travel undertaken on different
types of roads or miles traveled while impaired). My strategic use of existing data to
measure travel exposure can be categorized into three groups: quasi induced exposure
analysis (journal papers 19, 15, 9 and 8), spatial analysis of crash location using GIS
(journal paper 16) and improving traffic counts as a representative measure of travel
(journal paper 18). The work to investigate the safety of special driver groups has been
and continues to be relatively well-funded (grants 20, 10, 4 and 2). However, some of
my work in this area (paper 9, for example, resulted in a key invitation to speak at a
NHTSA conference) has been unfunded. I recently completed a project on teenage
drivers as Connecticut considers implementing a more complete graduated driver
licensing system. I am also seeking to continue the study of older drivers, especially the
impact of passengers on older drivers (paper 19 and paper in review 2), as it is a critical
need given the evolving demographics of our society.

In summary, my research program has been well-funded in traffic safety, bicycle
transportation, freight transportation planning and travel behavior. The dissemination of
this research includes 21 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 14 conference papers, 63
technical reports, 49 conference presentations and 9 invited presentations. These works
are the result of collaboration with other faculty and also numerous graduate and
undergraduate student co-authors. I have specific plans to expand my research program
to address emerging needs in the four areas described here. Moreover, I am eager to
pursue any interesting transportation problem that lacks specific data and thereby requires
either rigorous new data collection techniques or robust resourceful use of limited
existing data. In the near future, my new focus will be the spatial distribution of vehicle
emissions.

Professional Activities and Service

In addition to many service activities at both the University of Connecticut and the
University of Kentucky, I have undertaken significant professional service at the national,
state and local levels. Invitations for involvement in national level activities have been a
direct result of my research in fields with limited data and analysis methods. My
interactions with young students and professionals at both the national and local level
have enhanced my research and teaching endeavors.

I am particularly active within the Transportation Research Board and served as the chair
of the Committee on Bicycle Transportation. While I attend other committee meetings
and review papers for them, my academic background and research perspective are
particularly needed on the Bicycle Committee, where only a quarter of the members are
academics and less than half are active researchers. My other recent national service has
involved ASCEs Committee on Human Powered Transportation, two NSF review panels
and one NSF on-site program review. My research contributions in bicycle and freight
transportation resulted in invitations in 2000 to participate in two national level policy
Page 6 of 35


roundtable events.

At the state and local level, my professional service often involves bringing technical
expertise and research findings directly to practitioners and community groups. The
focus of these outreach activities has most often been freight or bicycle transportation.

Within the university, in addition to the typical search and curriculum committees, I have
taken an active role and particular interest in student recruiting and lab demonstrations.
Whenever possible, I am keen to target these activities towards young women. I have
gained significantly from my involvement with the Women in Engineering Leadership
Institute, a network of American and Canadian engineering academics. This activity
included co-hosting an NSF-funded national Summit of approximately 70 engineering
leaders at the University of Connecticut in May 2004.

Teaching

I have taught 8 different courses: 3 undergraduate and 5 graduate level (some of these
included seniors). The teaching section of this portfolio contains my teaching evaluations
for these classes as well as some examples of learning activities that I have added to
classes to pursue the following teaching maxims:

! Inspire students to think about the societal context in which engineering problems
arise so that they can better understand the impacts of their design work.
! Integrate opportunities for students to continually improve communication skills
so they can effectively demonstrate their knowledge and opinions.
! Provide students with a solid grounding in the fundamentals that underlie design
techniques and computer models - i.e. the numerical and statistical basis for the
methodologies.
! Use guest speakers, case studies, field trips, video and Internet technologies to
help students understand the real-world applications of the science.

Over my eight years of learning to teach, I have come to appreciate that two-way
communication within the classroom is essential. I no longer talk at the students but
rather have successfully implemented activities that ensure student participation. Their
ideas and feedback force me to say better, more relevant things that allow me to pursue
and accomplish the teaching maxims noted above. Student comments have indicated that
students recognize the value of this two-way communication and deem it to be effective.
Page 7 of 35



The subsection on teaching in this portfolio presents components of two courses
developed by me: Civil Engineering Applications of Geographic Information Systems
and Transportation Safety. Within this context, examples of two particular teaching
activities are highlighted: 1) student proposal development, and 2) one-page position
papers. The objective of this section is to demonstrate the types of activities that I have
promoted in my courses to ensure real-world relevance, broad picture thinking and
development of communication skills. One example of an undergraduate and graduate
syllabi is also provided.

Administration

In the fall of 2003, I accepted a three-year term as director of the Connecticut
Transportation Institute (CTI). CTI is a unit in the School of Engineering reporting to the
dean. The unit conducts and manages approximately $2 million of research and
education programs each year. CTI includes 8 full-time professional staff, 3 full-time
administrative staff and two part-time staff. Most of the associated faculty are in the civil
and environmental engineering department.

Prior to 2003, CTI had a series of interim directors. Therefore, in my first year in the
position, I focused on the development of a strategic plan, production of an inaugural
annual report, re-organization of the unit (including the dismissal of some staff and the
hiring of new staff). I directed the preparation of additional research proposals to
increase funding. This year, I am focusing on CTIs administrative funding because the
unit, although poised for growth, is handicapped in that it is completely soft-funded. I
have recently developed and presented a proposal for an operating budget to the
university administration.

While I believe my professional skills have been enhanced through this administrative
position, after fulfilling my role as CTI director I hope to spend the next interval of my
career focusing on further development of my research program. I certainly leave open
the possibility of administrative positions in the future.
RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 8 of 35



Research Grants

Year

Months Agency, Title and PIs Award
25. 2004 12 New England University Transportation Center,
Development of an Optimal Nationwide Freight
Planning Zone System Aultman-Hall (PI), Guo
$39,000

24. 2003 36 National Science Foundation. Modeling the Spatial
Distribution of Fine Particulate Matter Emissions
from Transportation Vehicles Aultman-Hall (PI),
Holmn (co-PI)
$318,000

23. 2003 12 New England University Transportation Center,
Modeling Modal Transient Events for Vehicle
Emission Models Aultman-Hall (PI), Holmn
$53,421

22. 2003 12 New England University Transportation Center,
Parking Demand Management for Sustainable
Development: Learning from Innovative New
England Communities Garrick (PI) and Aultman-
Hall (co-PI)
$63,348

21. 2003 30 National Science Foundation. Women Engineering
Faculty Leadership Network Holmn (PI),
Aultman-Hall and MacKay (co-PIs)
$100,000

20. 2003 12 Connecticut Cooperative Highway Research
Program, Factors Affecting Young Drivers Safety
Aultman-Hall (PI)
$31,540

19. 2003 12 Connecticut Department of Transportation,
Program Development for the Connecticut
Transportation Institute Dougan (PI) and Aultman-
Hall (co-PI)
$105,240

18. 2002 16 New England University Transportation Center,
Route Behavior Analysis from a System Efficiency
Perspective Aultman-Hall (PI), ElDessouki and
Parkany (co-PIs)
$56,500

17. 2002 24 Connecticut Cooperative Highway Research
Program, Incorporating Truck Flows into the State-
wide Planning Traffic Model Aultman-Hall (PI)
$100,000

16. 2002 16 Connecticut Cooperative Highway Research
Program, Developing a Methodology to Evaluate
the Safety of Shared-use Paths Aultman-Hall (PI)
$25,000

15. 2001 12 University of Connecticut Research Foundation,
Route Choice Behavior in Transportation Networks,
Aultman-Hall (PI)
$20,234

14. 2001 16 Connecticut Department of Transportation,
Lateral Variation in Pavement Smoothness,
Dougan (PI) and Aultman-Hall (co-PI)
$80,125

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 9 of 35




(Continued)
Year Months

Agency, Title and PIs Award
13. 2001 16 U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of
Transportation Statistics, Development of Freight
Commodity Generation Models Aultman-Hall (PI)
$64,389

12. 2000 12 Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Designing
Dedicated Infrastructure for Non-motorized
Transportation on Rural Low Volume Roads
Aultman-Hall (PI)
$31,250

11. 2000 12 National Science Foundation Developing a Model
to Map Global Positioning System (GPS) Data onto
Transportation Networks Aultman-Hall (PI)
$65,415

10. 2000 12 Southeastern Transportation Center, Modeling
Truck Route Safety with Geometric Roadway
Characteristics Aultman-Hall (PI)
$9,140

9. 2000 12 University of Kentucky Research Committee
Grants, Modeling Traffic Route Choice Behavior -
Aultman-Hall (PI)
$4,644

8. 1999 16 Presnell Associates, Commercial Vehicle
Monitoring - Aultman-Hall (PI) and Crabtree (co-PI)
$55,000

7. 1999 24 Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Traffic Growth
Rates Pigman (PI) Allen and Aultman-Hall (co-PIs)
$135,000

6. 1998 18 Federal Highway Administration, Kentucky
Transportation Cabinet and the Ohio Department
of Transportation, Evaluation of the ARTIMIS
Telephone Traveler Information System Aultman-
Hall (PI) and Pigman (co-PI)
$75,000

5. 1998 12 Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Bicycle Cordon
Count Pilot Study Aultman-Hall (PI)
$5,000

4. 1998 12 Southeastern Transportation Center, (1998)
Development of Secondary Highway Accident
Countermeasures Through Induced Exposure
Analysis Stamatiadis (PI) and Aultman-Hall (co-PI)
$37,500

3. 1997 24 Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Freight
Movement and Intermodal Access in Kentucky
Aultman-Hall (PI) and Pigman (co-PI)
$400,000

2. 1997 12 Southeastern Transportation Center, Accidents on
Secondary Highways and Counter-Measures, -
Stamatiadis (PI) and Aultman-Hall (co-PI)
$24,932

1. 1995 24 Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Urban
Bicycle Commuter Routes and Risk Hall (PI) and
Aultman-Hall (co-PI)
$46,404

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 10 of 35



Grants and Programs Managed (as Director of Connecticut Transportation
Institute, not included in grant totals)

4. 2004 12 Connecticut Department of Transportation,
Connecticut Cooperative Highway Research
Program, Aultman-Hall (PI)
$250,000

3. 2004 12 Connecticut Department of Transportation,
Development of Internet-based Computer Databases,
Mahoney (PI) and Aultman-Hall (co-PI)
$153,621

2. 2004 8 Connecticut Department of Transportation,
Evaluating the Long-Term Performance of Pavements
Thermally Image During Construction Mahoney
(PI) and Aultman-Hall (co-PI)
$48,215

1. 2003 12 Connecticut Department of Transportation,
Connecticut Cooperative Highway Research
Program, Aultman-Hall (PI)
$250,000

Student Research Supervision

Supervision of Graduate Students

I have supervised eight graduate students to completion of Masters degrees. Each of these
students has co-authored at least one peer-reviewed journal paper. Six of these students presented
their research to regional or national conferences; a key goal in my mentoring approach for
graduate students.

Since my arrival at the University of Connecticut in the summer of 2001, I have been the sole
principle advisor to three Ph.D. students. In June 2002, the first two students both successfully
passed their comprehensive general examinations. Their Ph.D. proposals have been approved by
the Graduate School and they are expected to graduate in Spring 2005. The third student began
his Ph.D. studies in the fall of 2004.

All of the graduate students that I have supervised have been supported for the duration of their
program with research assistantships from research grants, start-up funds (4 semesters total) or
teaching assistantships (3 semesters total). A list of current and completed graduate students is
shown below.

Ph.D. Candidate Supervision

Current Students:
Jianhe Du, Dissertation Title: Factors Affecting Driver Route Choice. Expected 4/05. General
Examination Passed 06/02, Dissertation Prospectus Approved by Advisory Committee 05/03
(Ms. Du has had two conference presentations and has two journal papers in review)

Feng Guo, Dissertation Title: Nation and State Level Freight Generation Modeling. Expected
4/05. General Examination Passed 06/02, (Mr. Guo has had two conference presentations and
has two journal papers in review)

Eric Jackson, Started August 2004, Dissertation: TBD
RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 11 of 35



Masters Student Supervision

University of Connecticut - Current and Completed Students:
Chris OBrien, Started August 2004, Research Area: Hot-mix Asphalt Crack Sealing
Patrycja Padlo, Started August 2003, Research Area: Young Driver Safety and Use of Nuclear
Gauge Readings for Field-based HMA Density Determination. Two conference presentations
accepted thus far, one journal paper in review.
Eric Jackson, Completed 08/04. Current Position: PhD Program. Thesis: Determination of Real-
world Operating Mode Using Global Positioning System Receivers. One journal paper accepted
and forthcoming, one conference presentation, one journal paper in review.

University of Kentucky:
Sarah Bowling, Completed 5/01. Current Position: HMB, Louisville KY. Co-author of 2 journal
papers, 1 conference paper and two research reports. Presented research results at a national
conference, to DOT, and to state-wide Intermodal Advisory Panel

Stewart Robertson, Completed 5/01. Current Position: Kimley-Horn, Ft. Lauderdale FL. Co-
author of 1 journal paper and one research report.

Brian Aldridge, Completed 12/99. Current Position: American Consulting, Louisville KY. Co-
author of 2 journal papers and principle author of 10 research reports. Presented research results at
two conferences and several in-state meetings. Southeastern Transportation Center student of the
year 1999.

Jill Clemons Asher, Completed 5/98. Current Position: Kentucky Transportation Cabinet,
Frankfort, KY. Co-author of 1 journal paper and one research report. Presented research results
to Institute of Transportation Engineers Conference.

Sarah L. Schulte, Completed 12/98. Current Position: Jordon Jones and Goulding, Lexington,
KY. Co-author of 1 journal paper and 1 conference paper. Presented research results at state GIS
conference.

Michael F. Adams, Completed 12/97. Current Position: FMSM, Louisville KY. Co-author of 1
journal paper; currently pursuing Ph.D. part time.

Michael L. Hill, Completed 12/97. Current Position: Summit Engineering, Lexington, KY. Co-
author of 1 journal paper, 2 conference papers and one research report. Presented research results
to DOT panel and to state-wide Intermodal Advisory Panel

Advisory Committees (Completed Students Only)

Student Major Professor Graduation Date Degree
Jane Wang N. Garrick 2004 M.S.
Erika Smith J. Ivan 2004 M.S.
Kwesi Brown N. Garrick 2004 M.S.
Kari Watkins N. Garrick 2003 M.S.
Joseph Rimiller J. Ivan 2003 M.S.
Miranda Jennings A. MacKay 2002 M.S.
Jianhui Luo N. Garrick 2002 M.S.
Mohan Garakhalli N. Stamatiadis 2000 M.S.
Juan Villalba N. Stamatiadis 2000 M.S.
Giovanni Puccini N. Stamatiadis 1999 M.S.
RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 12 of 35



Steven Henderson N. Stamatiadis 1999 M.S.
Jill Swaynos N. Stamatiadis 1999 M.S.
Brian Ricks N. Stamatiadis 1998 M.S.
Samantha Jones N. Stamatiadis 1997 M.S.

Undergraduate Student Research Advising

The following undergraduate students worked in my research group during the years indicated
while they were undergraduate students in civil engineering. Several continued to graduate
school (*) and several co-authored peer-reviewed journal papers (#).

Jeffrey Lamondia (2003 - current)#
Christine Hobson (2002-2003)#
Bejay Nichols (2000)
Eric Jackson (2000-2002)*
Meredith Himmler (UK, 1999)*
Bradford Johnson (1998-1999)#
Brian Aldridge (1997)*#

Peer-Reviewed Journal Publications

An * indicates a graduate student working under my supervision while ** indicates other
students employed as research assistants. ^ indicates one of my Ph.D. advisors.

21. Aultman-Hall, Lisa, Eric Jackson*, Charlie Dougan and Soon-Nai Choi**. Models
Relating Pavement Quality Measures forthcoming Transportation Research Record.

20. Lisa Aultman-Hall, A Bicycle Transportation Primer: Dispelling the Myths and
Promoting the Realities ITE Journal on the Web, December 2004.

19. Jason Yaw Cheuk Hing**, Nikiforos Stamatiadis and Lisa Aultman-Hall, Evaluating
the Impact of Passengers on the Safety of Older Drivers Journal of Safety Research Volume
34, Number 4, 2003.

18. Sarah T. Bowling* and Lisa Aultman-Hall, The Development of a Random Sampling
Procedure for Local Road Traffic Count Locations The Journal of Transportation Statistics,
Volume 6, Number 1, 2003.

17. Charles Dougan, Lisa Aultman-Hall, Soon-Nam Choi, Bradley Overturf and Christine
Hobson**, Lateral Variation in Pavement Smoothness: Implications for Performance Based
Contracting Transportation Research Record 1860, 2003.

16. Sarah Lynn Schulte*, Lisa Aultman-Hall, Matt McCourt** and Nikiforos Stamatiadis.
Consideration of Driver Home County Prohibition and Alcohol-related Vehicle Crashes
Accident Analysis and Prevention, Volume 35, No. 5, pages 641-648, 2003.

15. Stewart Robertson* and Lisa Aultman-Hall. Impact of Road Conditions on Elderly
Drivers ASCE Journal of Transportation Engineering May/June 2001, Volume 127,
Number 3, pages 244-246.

14. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Bradford Johnson** and Brian Aldridge* Statewide Commodity
Flow Data and Assessing the Potential for Modal Substitution Transportation Research
Record the Journal of the Transportation Research Board #1719, pages 10-16, 2000.

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 13 of 35



13. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Sarah Bowling* and Jill Asher* ARTIMIS Telephone Traveler
Information Service: Current Use Patterns and User Satisfaction Transportation Research
Record the journal of the Transportation Research Board, #1739, pages 9-14, 2000.

12.
1
Sean T. Doherty, Lisa Aultman-Hall and Jill Swaynos**. Commuter Cyclist Accident
Patterns in Toronto and Ottawa, Canada American Society of Civil Engineers Journal of
Transportation Engineering Volume 126, No. 1, pages 21-26, January/February 2000.

11. Lisa Aultman-Hall and K. Georgina Kaltenecker**. Toronto Bicycle Commuter Safety
Rates, Accident Analysis and Prevention, Volume 31, pages 675-686, 1999.

10.
2
Lisa Aultman-Hall, Michael L. Hill* and Ken Agent. A Methodology for Evaluating
Large Truck Access to Intermodal and Other Facilities Transportation Research Record the
Journal of the Transportation Research Board 1653, pages 61-68, 1999.

9. Brian Aldridge*, Meredith Himmler**, Lisa Aultman-Hall, and Nikiforos Stamatiadis.
The Impact of Passengers on Young Driver Safety Transportation Research Record the
Journal of the Transportation Research Board 1693, pages 25-30, 1999.

8. Nikiforos Stamatiadis, Samantha Jones** and Lisa Aultman-Hall. Causal Factors for
Accidents on Southeast Low-volume Roads Transportation Research Record the journal of
the Transportation Research Board 1652, pages 111-117, 1999.

7. Lisa Aultman-Hall and Fred L. Hall^
3
. Research Design Insights from a Survey of Urban
Bicycle Commuters Transportation Research Record the journal of the Transportation
Research Board 1636, pages 21-28, 1998.

6. Lisa Aultman-Hall and Michael F. Adams*. Sidewalk Bicycling Safety Issues
Transportation Research Record the journal of the Transportation Research Board 1636,
pages 71-76, 1998.

5. Lisa Aultman-Hall and Fred L. Hall^. Ottawa-Carleton On- and Off-road Cyclist
Accident Rates Accident Analysis and Prevention, Volume 30, No. 1, pages 29-44, 1998.

4. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Matthew Roorda and Brian W. Baetz^. Using GIS for Evaluation of
Neighborhood Pedestrian Accessibility Journal of Urban Planning and Development,
Volume 123, Number 1, pages 10-17, 1997.

3. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Fred L. Hall^ and Brian W. Baetz^, Analysis of Bicycle Commuter
Routes Using GIS - Implications for Bicycle Planning Transportation Research Record the
Journal of the Transportation Research Board 1578, pages 102-110, 1997.

2. Fred L. Hall^ and Lisa M. Hall, Capacity and Speed-Flow Analysis of the QEW in
Ontario Transportation Research Record the journal of the Transportation Research Board
1287, pages 108-118, 1990.

1. Bhagwant Persaud, Fred L. Hall^ and Lisa M. Hall, Congestion Identification Aspects of
the McMaster Incident Detection Algorithm Transportation Research Record the journal of
the Transportation Research Board 1287, pages 167-175, 1990.


1
Institute for Transportation Engineers, Southern District, 1998 Outstanding Non-Sponsored
Technical Paper Award
2
Institute for Transportation Engineers, Southern District, 1998 Outstanding Sponsored Technical
Paper Award
3
I am not related to Dr. Fred Hall.
RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 14 of 35



Manuscripts Under Review

7. Du, Jianhe*, Lisa Aultman-Hall, Eric Jackson* and Wael ElDessouki (2004). Exploring
the Models Needed to Collect Complete Travel Route Data with GPS Transportation
Research C, submitted February 2004.

6. Du, Jianhe*, Lisa Aultman-Hall (2004). Increasing the Accuracy of Trip Rate
Information from Passive Multi-Day GPS Travel Datasets: Automatic Trip Identification
Issues. Transportation Research A, submitted November 2004.

5. Lisa Aultman-Hall and Jeffrey LaMondia. Evaluating the Safety of Shared-use Paths:
Results from Three Corridors in Connecticut submitted to the Transportation Research
Board, July 2004.

4. Feng Guo* and Lisa Aultman-Hall, Alternative Nationwide Freight Generation Models
submitted to the Transportation Research Board, July 2004.

3. Feng Guo*, Lisa Aultman-Hall and Patrycja Padlo*, Comparing and Integrating Data
Sources to Update the Truck Generation Model in a State-wide Planning Model submitted to
the Transportation Research Board, July 2004.

2. P. Padlo*, L. Aultman-Hall and N. Stamatiadis, Passengers and Other Factors Affecting
Young and Older Driver Safety submitted to the Transportation Research Board, July 2004.

1. Eric Jackson*, Lisa Aultman-Hall, Britt Holmn and Jianhe Du*, Evaluating the Ability
of Global Positioning System Receivers to Measure Real World Operating Mode for
Emissions Research submitted to the Transportation Research Board, July 2004.

Book Chapters
Lisa Aultman-Hall. Bicycle Transportation Chapter in Transportation Engineers
Handbook, Myer Kutz Editor, McGraw-Hill, 2003.

Conference Proceedings (Full Papers Reviewed)

An * indicates a graduate student working under my supervision while ** indicates other
students employed as research assistants.

A3. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Assessing the Demand for Bicycle Commuter Travel on Shared-Use
Paths, Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington, DC January 2002.

A2. Sarah T. Bowling* and Lisa Aultman-Hall, The Development of a Random Sampling
Procedure for Local Road Traffic Count Locations Transportation Research Board Annual
Meeting January 2002.

A1. M. Van Aerde, L. Aultman-Hall, P. Masters and A. Ugge, Microscopic Theory and
Modelling of Macroscopic Freeway Capacity Characteristics, presented at the 1993
Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C..

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 15 of 35



Conference Proceedings (Full Papers with Abstract Reviewed)

An * indicates a graduate student working under my supervision while ** indicates other
students employed as research assistants. ^ indicates one of my Ph.D. advisors.

B11. Feng Guo and Lisa Aultman-Hall. Towards Continental Freight Transportation Planning
Models European Transport Conference, October 8-10, 2003, Strasbourg France.

B10. Jianhe Du*, John Ivan, Per Garder and Lisa Aultman-Hall. Public Perceptions of Traffic
Calming Devices 2003 Institute of Transportation Engineers Annual Meeting and Exhibit,
August 2003.

B9. Lisa Aultman-Hall, ARTIMIS Telephone Travel Information Service: Overall Public
Awareness 2001 ITS America Meeting Conference Proceedings.

B8. Lisa Aultman-Hall, A Summary of the Safety Related Results of a Canadian Bicycle
Commuter Survey Traffic Safety on Two Continents, Malmo, Sweden, September 1999.

B7. Sarah Schulte* and Lisa Aultman-Hall. Using Geographic Information Systems to Evaluate
the Influence of County Level Alcohol Prohibition on the Distance from Home in Alcohol-
related Vehicle Crashes Traffic Safety on Two Continents, Malmo, Sweden, September
1999.

B6. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Using Route Data for Quantitative Assessment of Bicycle Use, Safety
and Exposure Pro Bike Pro Walk 98, September 8-11, 1998, Santa Barbara, CA.

B5. Lisa Aultman-Hall and Michael L. Hill*, Characterizing the Personal Attributes and Travel
Behavior of Adult Commuter Cyclists ITE International Annual Meeting, Toronto, ON,
August 1998.

B4. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Safety Issues Concerning Sidewalk Cycling Canadian
Multidisciplinary Road Safety Conference X, June 9,10,11, 1997, Toronto, Canada.

B3. B. Hellinga, M. Baker, L. Aultman-Hall and M. Van Aerde, Simulation Modelling of the
Highway 401 FTMS CITE Annual Conference Proceedings, Edmonton, Alberta, June,
1993.

B2. Fred L. Hall^, Shi Yong, Lisa Aultman-Hall and P.H. Masters, Before-after Evaluation of
the Effectiveness of the 401 Freeway Management System in Toronto Proceedings of the
Third International Conference on Applications of Advanced Technology in Transportation
Engineering, Seattle, Washington, July, 1993.

B1. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Fred L. Hall^, Yong Shi and Bradley Lyall, A Catastrophe Theory
Approach to Freeway Incident Detection Proceedings of the Second International
Conference on Applications of Advanced Technologies in Transportation Engineering, 1991.

Invited Conference Presentations

12. Commodity Flow Survey (CFS) Conference, Improving Use and Accessibility of 2002
Commodity Flow Survey Session, July 8-9, 2005.

11. Northeast Asphalt User Producer Group, Models Relating Pavement Quality Measures,
October 21, 2004

10. Sustainable Transport in Europe and Links and Liaisons with America, Third Meeting of the
STELLA Work Group 1, Globalization, E-economy and Trade. January 15-16, 2004,
RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 16 of 35



Washginton, DC. Continental Freight Planning Models: An EU/US Comparative Perspective
by Lri Tavasszy (The Netherlands), Lisa Aultman-Hall (United States), Arnaud Burgess (The
Netherlands), Jos Holguin Veras (United States).

9. American Association of State and Highway Officials Non-motorized Task Force Meeting,
Refining the Role of Non-motorized Transportation for Context Sensitive Design, Burlington
VT, September 2003.

8. Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, Professional Development Series,
Existing University Programs Making the Most of What Weve Got Cambridge MA June 24,
2003.

7. Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, Professional Development Series,
Refining the Role of Non-motorized Transportation for Context Sensitive Design Cambridge
MA June 23, 2003.

6. Connecticut Conference on Bicycling and Walking, Trail Safety What are the Facts? May
16, 2003.

5. Connecticut Conference on Bicycling and Walking, Incorporating Bicycles and Pedestrians
into Transportation Projects The Kentucky Experience May 16, 2003.

4. Uncovering Freight Trends Seminar, Reebie Associates, Cambridge MA, State Level Freight
Transportation Planning Needs October 16-17, 2001

3. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Young Drivers Safety Conference,
Atlanta, GA, The Impact of Passengers on Young Driver Safety Dec 6-8, 2000.

2. West Virginia 21 Intermodal Transportation and Economic Development Summit, Intermodal
Research Initiatives in the Appalachian Region, June 12-13, 2000.

1. Kentucky State Model Users Group - freight transportation data workshop speaker, October
2000.

Conference Presentations (Abstract only)

Conference Presentations made by me (abstract reviewed and not including those cited as
papers above):


11. Context Sensitive Design Around the Country: Route 3 over the Salmon River, New York
Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C. January 2003. (Subsequently
published in Transportation Research Circular E-C067, July 2004)

10. Refining the Role of Non-motorized Transportation for Context Sensitive Design American
Society of Civil Engineers Annual Conference and Exposition, Washington, D.C., November 3-7,
2002.

9. Where and When do Commuter Cyclists Use Paths Versus Roads Pro-Bike Pro-Walk 2000,
Philadelphia, Sept 2000.

8. The Influence of County-level Prohibition on Alcohol-related Crashes Institute for
Transportation Engineers Southern District Meeting, Montgomery AL, April 1999

7. Examples of GIS Applications in Transportation Engineering Kentucky GIS Conference,
May 17-20, 1998, Somerset, KY.

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 17 of 35



6. The Time Has Come to Base Traffic Assignment on Actual Route Data Institute for
Transportation Engineers Southern District Meeting, Memphis, TN, April 1998.

5. Embarking on Bicycle Demand Analysis Institute for Transportation Engineers Southern
District Meeting, Memphis, TN, April 1998.

4. Demonstration of GIS Applications in Transportation Kentucky TransForum 97, September
20, 1997.

3. Ottawa-Carleton On- and Off-road Commuter Cyclist Accident Rates, ITE District 5
Meeting, Louisville, KY, April 1997.

2. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Bicycle Transportation Engineering
Canadian Public Works Conference, Hamilton, Canada, June 1996.

1. Designing Cities to Encourage Non-Motorized Transportation McMaster University
International Symposium on Sustainable Development, June 7, 1995.

Conference Presentations made by Students under my Supervision and Other Co-authors
(other graduate students have made conference presentations that were either full papers or
subsequently published in journals and are therefore listed elsewhere):

12. Continental Freight Planning Models: an EU/US Comparative Perspective
Lorant Tavasszy (presenter), Lisa Aultman-Hall, Arnaud Burgess, and Jose Holguin Veras,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington,
D.C. January 2005.

11. What is the Model??? A Primer on Transportation Demand Forecasting Models presented
by Shawn Turner, Theo Petritsch, and Keith Lovan at the Pro Walk Pro Bike Conference,
Victoria, B.C., September 2004.

10. Effect of Passengers on Older Driver Crashes presented by Nikiforos Stamatiadis at the
World Conference on Transport Research, July 2004 Istanbul, Turkey.

9. An Investigation of the Distribution of Driving Speeds Using In-vehicle GPS Data presented
by Jianhe Du at the Institute for Transportation Engineers New England District Meeting,
Burlington, Vermont, May 2004.

8. The Impact of Passengers on Young Driver Safety in Connecticut presented by Pat Padlo at
the Institute for Transportation Engineers New England District Meeting, Burlington, Vermont,
May 2004.

7. User Safety on Shared-Use Paths presented by Jeff LaMondia at the Institute for
Transportation Engineers New England District Meeting, Burlington, Vermont, May 2004

6. Commuter Cyclist Accident Patterns in Toronto and Ottawa, Canada presented by Jill
Swaynos at the Institute for Transportation Engineers Texas District Meeting, College Station TX,
June 2000 (an invited repeat of the presentation listed below).

5. Adapting GIS Highway Databases for Random Sampling presented by Sarah T. Bowling at
the Kentucky GIS Conference, Bowling Green, June 7, 2000.

4. The Influence of County-level Prohibition on Alcohol-related Crashes presented by Sarah
Schulte at the Kentucky GIS Conference, Northern Kentucky, May 1999.

3. ARTIMIS Telephone Traveler Information Service: Current Use Patterns and User
Satisfaction presented by Jill Clemons Asher at the Institute for Transportation Engineers
Southern District Meeting, Montgomery AL, April 1999.
RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 18 of 35




2. Commuter Cyclist Accident Patterns in Toronto and Ottawa, Canada presented by Jill
Swaynos at the Institute for Transportation Engineers Southern District Meeting, Montgomery
AL, April 1999.

1. The Impact of Passengers on Young Driver Safety presented by Brian Aldridge at the
Institute for Transportation Engineers Southern District Meeting, Montgomery AL, April 1999.

Academic Seminars (Invited)

9. University of Central Florida, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Using
GPS for Route Choice: Challenges and Solutions April 2003.

8. University of Connecticut, Industrial and Organizational Psychology Lunch Seminar,
Challenges for Estimating Exposure for Traffic Safety Analysis, March 7, 2003.

7. Villanova University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, A Bicycle
Transportation Primer: Dispelling the Myths and Promoting the Realities March 11, 2003.

6. Bureau of Transportation Statistics, U.S. Department of Transportation, Nation-wide Freight
Generation Models December 11, 2002.

5. University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, A
Bicycle Transportation Primer May 3, 2002.

4. Carleton University, Department of Civil Engineering, Moving from Traffic Assignment to
Route Choice January 2001.

3. Michigan State University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, February
2001.

2. University of Wisconsin Madison, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
February, 2000.

1. University of California Davis, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
February, 1998.

Research Reports

An * indicates a graduate student working under my supervision while ** indicates other
students employed as research assistants.

63. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Feng Guo, Chris OBrien, Pat Padlo and Brian Hogge, Incorporating
Truck Flows into the State-wide Planning Traffic Model. Final Research Report to the
Connecticut Cooperative Highway Research Program Report #04-299, November 2004, (74
pages).

62. Lisa Aultman-Hall and Pat Padlo, Factors Affecting Young Driver Safety. Final Research
Report to the Connecticut Cooperative Highway Research Program Report #04-298, November
2004, (48 pages).

61. Lisa Aultman-Hall and Jeffrey LaMondia, Developing a Methodology to Evaluate the Safety
of Shared-use Paths: Results from Three Corridors in Connecticut. Final Research Report to the
Connecticut Cooperative Highway Research Program Report #04-297, June 2004, (66 pages).

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 19 of 35



60. Charles Dougan, Lisa Aultman-Hall, John Hudson and Eric Jackson*, CTI Program
Development: Final Report. Final Research Report submitted to Connecticut Department of
Transportation, Report, June 2004 (42 pages).

59. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Feng Guo*, Darren Scott and Ted Grossardt. Development of Freight
Commodity Generation Models. Final report to the U.S. DOT Bureau of Transportation
Statistics, December 2002, (54 pages)

58. Charles Dougan, Lisa Aultman-Hall, Soon-Nam Choi, Bradley Overturf and Christine
Hobson** Lateral Variation in Pavement Smoothness. Final Research Report submitted to
Connecticut Department of Transportation, Report # 2232-F-02-4, December 2002 (50 pages).

57. David Allen, Monica Barrett, R. Clark Graves, Jerry Pigman, Ghassan Abu Lebdeh, Lisa
Aultman-Hall and Sarah T. Bowling*. Analysis of Traffic Growth Rates. Kentucky
Transportation Center Report to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, KTC 01-15/SPR213-00,
2001 (17 of 142 pages authored by Aultman-Hall).

56. Lisa Aultman-Hall and Eric D. Jackson**. Accommodating Pedestrian and Bicycle Access on
Parkers Mill Road from New Circle Road to Man O War Boulevard in Lexington. Final Research
Report to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, 2001 (57 pages).
55. Stewart Robertson* and Lisa Aultman-Hall. Incorporating Truck Crash Modeling into a
Methodology for Evaluating the Relative Need for Truck Route Improvements. Submitted to the
Southeastern Transportation Center, June 2001, (52 pages).

54. Lisa Aultman-Hall. ARTIMIS Telephone Traveler Information Service: Overall Public
Awareness. Kentucky Transportation Research Report #99-66, 1999 (26 pages).

53. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Bradford Johnson**, and Brian Aldridge*. Freight Commodity Flow in
Kentucky. Kentucky Transportation Research Report #99-65, 1999 (89 pages).

52. Lisa Aultman-Hall and Meredith Himmler**. Bicycle Cordon Count Pilot Study. Kentucky
Transportation Research Report #99-60, 1999 (13 pages).

51. Jill Clemons*, Lisa Aultman-Hall and Sarah Bowling*. ARTIMIS Telephone Traveler
Information Service: Current Use Patterns and User Satisfaction. Kentucky Transportation
Center Research Report #99-24, 1999 (43 pages).

50. Lisa Aultman-Hall, K. Agent, B. Aldridge*, J. Weber, D. Cain, B. Johnson** and N.
Stamatiadis. Final Summary Report on Truck Route Access Evaluation (See Note
4
). KTC Report
#99-48. 1999 (52 pages).

10. through 49. not listed see note 4.

9. Lisa Aultman-Hall, K. Agent, B. Aldridge*, D. Cain, N. Stamatiadis, and J. Weber. Truck
Route Access Evaluation - Norfolk Southern Rail Facility. Kentucky Transportation Research
Report #99-33, 1999 (14 pages).

8. Lisa Aultman-Hall, K. Agent, B. Aldridge*, D. Cain, N. Stamatiadis, and J. Weber. Truck
Route Access Evaluation - Hickman Riverport Area. Kentucky Transportation Research Report
#98-35, 1999 (34 pages).


4
This truck route evaluation work involved 47 reports of which this is the final summary report. As the PI, I was the co-
author responsible for the production of the whole series of reports. Only the summary report and the five reports on which I am first
author appear in this list.
RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIP Page 20 of 35



7. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Ken Agent, Brian Aldridge*, Dave Cain, Nicole Lefever, Nick
Stamatiadis, and Joel Weber. Truck Route Access Evaluation - United Parcel Service, Louisville
Airport, and Ford Motor Company. Kentucky Transportation Research Report #99-32, 1999 (15
pages).

6. Nikiforos Stamatiadis, Giovanni Puccini** and Lisa Aultman-Hall. Development of Secondary
Highway Accident Countermeasures Through Induced Exposure Analysis with Census
Information. Submitted to the Southeastern Transportation Center, August 1999 (46 pages).

5. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Michael L. Hill* and Ken Agent. A Methodology for Evaluating Large
Truck Access to Intermodal and Other Facilities. Kentucky Transportation Center Report. 1998
(52 pages).

4. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Ken Agent, Brian Aldridge*, Dave Cain, Nicole Lefever, Nick
Stamatiadis, and Joel Weber. Truck Route Access Evaluation - Madison County Industrial Park.
Kentucky Transportation Research Report #98-31, October 1998 (26 pages).

3. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Ken Agent, Brian Aldridge*, Dave Cain, Nicole Lefever, Nick
Stamatiadis, and Joel Weber. Truck Route Access Evaluation - Edmonson County. Kentucky
Transportation Research Report #98-32, October 1998 (23 pages).

2. F. L. Hall and L. Aultman-Hall, Urban Commuter Bicycle Routes and Risk, Final Report
submitted to the Safety Policy Branch, Ontario Ministry of Transportation, January 1998 (94
pages).

1. J. Hummer, C. Hutgren, A. Khattek, T. Hao, N. Stamatiadis, S. Jones**, L. Aultman-Hall, and
M. Hill. Accidents on Secondary Highways and Counter-measures, Final report to Southeastern
Transportation Center, April 1998 (145 pages).
PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES AND SERVICE Page 21 of 35



Professional Activities National Level

! Managed review for 13-16 TRB papers each year in Fall 2002, 2003 and 2004
publication in Transportation Research Record
! Transportation Research Board - Chair of Committee on Bicycle Transportation (2002-
2004)
! NCHRP (National Cooperative Highway Research Program) Panel Project 20-07 Task
187 - Updating the AASHTO Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities (2004)
! American Society for Civil Engineering - member of national Technical Committee on
Human-Powered Transportation (2001-2003)
! Institute of Transportation Engineers - associate member (1993 present)
! Member of National Review Group for the University of North Carolina Pedestrian and
Bicycle Information Center (1999-present)
! National Science Foundation, IGERT (Integrative Graduate Education and Research
Training) program reviewer content specialist, March 2002
! NSF Review Panel, November 2002, CAREER, Civil and Mechanical Systems
! NSF Review Panel, May 2002, Division of Operations Research, Service Enterprise
Engineering
! NCHRP (National Cooperative Highway Research Program) Panel Project 5-17 Safety
Evaluation of Raised Pavement Markings (2001-2003)
! National Highway Transportation Safety Administration /Center for Disease Control
Invited Bicycle Safety Conference, July 2000 one of approximately 85 professionals
who were invited to set a national agenda for bicycle safety.
! One of 22 professionals invited by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics to a freight
data round table to discuss the future of the United States Commodity Flow Survey
(November 14, 2000)
! NHTSA/FHWA Strategic Planning Workshop Facilitator - April 2000
! Co-author and co-editor of Transportation Research Board Circular Bicycle Research
Needs (1999)

! Conference Organization
o Co-host Women in Engineering Leadership Summit, May 3-5 2004
o 70 participants, 11 speakers/panelists and numerous facilitated workshops
o NSF funded

! Journal Paper Reviewing (1996-2004):
o Accident Analysis and Prevention
o Journal of Transportation Engineering
o Transportation Research Board
o Transportation
o Journal of Transportation Statistics

! Conference Session Moderating (1996-2004):
o Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., January 2003
o Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., January 2002
o Traffic Safety on Two Continents Malmo, Sweden, September 1999

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES AND SERVICE Page 22 of 35



Outreach State and Local Service

! Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, Study Review Panel, "A Study of
Railcar Lavatories and Waste Management Systems, 2003-2004.
! Connecticuts Cooperative Highway Research Program presentation at the Connecticut
Transportation Research Showcase 2002.
! Kentucky State Task Force on Bicycle and Pedestrian Policy (2000-2001)
! Kentucky Intermodal Advisory Panel - shippers, planners and industry representatives
interested in intermodal transportation, I attend quarterly work sessions and have made
several technical presentations for the group.
! Kentucky Bicycle and Bikeway Commission - appointed by the governor 1997-2000 to
advise Department of Transportation on issues related to bicycle transportation
! Lexington Bicycle Pedestrian Technical Subcommittee - advisory committee to the MPO
(1997-2001)
! Kentucky Bicycle Coalition - founding director of state-wide advocacy group
! Transportation Enhancement Grant - I drafted a proposal on behalf of the City of
Lexington for bicycle parking, the grant was funded from the TEA 21 program (1999)
! KY Legislative Task Force on Rail Trails - presentation June 23, 1999.
! KY Legislative Committee on Vehicle Regulation - presentation Sept 7, 1999.
! Town of Berea Wellness Consortium - Guest Speaker March 1999.
! Midwest Regional Campus Parking Association, Panel Discussant, November 1999.
! INTEL International Science Fair Judge, Louisville, May 12 - 13, 1997
! Guest speaker to the Bluegrass Cycling Club on March 5, 1997 on Bicycle Transportation
Research Needs


University Level Service

! Research Advisory Committee, University of Connecticut Research and Graduate
Education (2004-2005)
! Fuel Cell Center, Chaired Faculty Search Committee (2003-2004)
! National Conference on Undergraduate Research 2001 abstract reviewer
! University of Kentucky Freshman Minority Mentor - Summer Program 2000
! Co-host (with faculty from Geography and Rural Sociology) of Vietnam National Univ.
GIS scientists visit - I provided 3 half days of activities/demonstrations (Oct 1999)
! University of Kentucky GIS Day Organizational Committee (1999 and 2000)
! University of Kentucky Bicycle Transportation Committee (1998-2001) - this committee,
which I chaired, was created at my recommendation in fall 1998 after a pedestrian was
seriously injured by a cyclist on campus
PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES AND SERVICE Page 23 of 35



Engineering School/College Service

University of Connecticut (August 2001 present):

! New England Transportation Consortium, University of Connecticut Representative to
Research Advisory Committee (2002 present)
! CT Invention Convention Booth Outreach (April 2002)
! Connecticut Transportation Research Showcase 2002 organizational committee

University of Kentucky (August 1996 - August 2001):

! Open House Popsicle Stick Bridge Competition - faculty supervisor 2000,2001
! High School Career Day Lab Demonstrations (1997,1998, 1999 and 2001)
! Order of the Engineer Iron Ring Ceremony - Guest Speaker (Fall 1998, Spring 1999, Fall
1999)
! Kentucky Transportation Department Scholarship Selection Committee (1997 - 2001)
! Women Freshman in Engineering Welcome Session -group discussion leader with an
industry partner from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (August 25, 1997)
! Society of Women Engineers Panel Discussant (career and motherhood September 30,
1997)

Department Service

University of Connecticut (August 2001 present):
! Administrative Assistant Search Committee (Fall 2004)
! Faculty Search Committee Structures and Applied Mechanics (Fall 2004)
! Faculty Search Committee Structures and Applied Mechanics (Spring 2003)
! Curriculum and Courses Committee (Fall 2002 Spring 2003)
! Faculty Search Committee Stamford campus (Fall 2001)
! Freshman Recruiting and Information Phone Calls (Spring 2002 and 2003)
! ENGR 166 and 100 Geomatics Demonstration May 2002, November 2002, October 2004
! Construction Career Day Department Demonstration Wallingford, October 8 and 9
2002 - 1200 high school students attending

University of Kentucky (August 1996-August 2001):
! Chi-Epsilon (civil engineering honor society) Faculty Advisor (1999-2001)
! Transportation System Management Program - co-faculty advisor to graduate students
from civil engineering, business, geography and public administration - organize field
trips, supervise conference travel, taught specialized courses (1997-2000)
! Transportation System Management Program weekly seminar coordinator Fall 1997
and Fall 1998
! Student Institute for Transportation Engineering Chapter Advisor (1997-1998)
! Department of Civil Engineering Education Team (curriculum re-design 1999 - 2001)
! Transportation Engineering Faculty Search Committees (Fall 1998 and Spring 1999)
! Engineering Standing Academic Appeals Committee (1998 through 2000)
! Civil Engineering Public Speaking Contest Judge (Spring 1998)
! Tates Creek High School Guest Speaker - Introduction to Civil Engineering - January
1998
TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 24 of 35


Courses Taught and Evaluations

University of Connecticut Teaching Evaluations (10-point scale)
Level Average Rating

Course (Descriptions Below)

Semesters
Taught
Aultman-
Hall
Dept
CE370 Transportation Planning Graduate S 2003 9.0 8.8
Sophomore F 2003 8.8 7.9
F 2002 8.7 8.4
CE271 Geomatics and Spatial
Measurement
F 2001 8.2 8.1
CE251 Probability and Statistics Senior F 2001 8.7 8.1

University of Kentucky Teaching Evaluations (4-point scale)
Level Overall Quality of
Teaching
Course (Descriptions Below)

Semesters
Taught
Aultman-Hall Dept
S 2001 3.5 3.2
S 2000 3.6 3.2
CE525 Civil Engineering Applications of
Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Graduate
and senior
S 1999 3.4 3.0
Graduate F 1999 3.3 3.1
S 1999 3.5 3.0
CE635 Transportation Safety
S 1998 3.1 3.1
Junior F 2000 2.9 3.1
F 1998 2.4 3.1
S 1998 3.2 3.1
S 1997 3.0 3.2
CE331 Introduction to Transportation
Engineering
F 1996 2.7 3.1
S 2001 2.5 3.2
S 2000 3.2 3.2
F 1998 3.4 3.1
CE599/631 Transportation and Land Use
Planning
Graduate
and senior
S 1997 3.6 3.2
Graduate F 1998 3.6 3.1 CE699 Transportation Systems
Management F 1997 3.6 3.1
CE539 Transportation Systems Design
(capstone design class)
Graduate
and senior
F 1997 2.9 3.1

TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 25 of 35


New Courses Developed

This section of the portfolio is subdivided to highlight two courses that I developed over the last
eight years. After describing each course, this section includes examples of two teaching
activities I developed and how each was used in the context of that one particular class.

Civil Engineering Applications of Geographic Information Systems (Civil
Engineering 525, content now in CE271)

Class Content
The applications of GIS spatial database management and analysis are widespread in civil
engineering. I designed this senior-level course in 1997 and 1998 with significant input from
local consulting engineers as well as the UK Geography Department. The class was taught in
spring 1999, 2000 and 2001 and in fall 2001 much of the material was incorporated into
Connecticuts sophomore level Geomatics and Spatial Measurement class. The GIS course
consisted of four segments: 1) GIS basics; 2) Global Positioning Systems; 3) photogrammetry,
and 4) proposal development and independent projects.

Proposal Development as a Learning Activity
It came to my attention in 1998 that the students in civil engineering were not exposed to the
problem identification and project design aspects of proposal development as part of the civil
engineering curriculum. Since then, I have integrated a proposal development project into my
senior and graduate level classes, including the GIS applications class. This activity is not only
an excellent opportunity to develop professional skills, but also a means to require critical
thinking and to evaluate higher order learning with respect to the class material. Students must
have a broad understanding of the material covered in a course in order to extend it beyond the
class core to a project or application of their own.

In CE 525 the proposal development curriculum begins half way through the semester with a
lecture that outlines when engineers write proposals and the essential components of a good
proposal. We explore the differences between research, design and consultant proposals.
Students are also taught how to develop budgets for their projects. Local engineers are invited
from the transportation department to provide insight on what they look for in a proposal when
deciding who to hire for a job. All students respond to a formal call for proposals from a
fictitious non-profit agency that wants to fund research to demonstrate how useful GIS is for
solving a range of problems in civil engineering. Example proposal topics have included coal
mine runoff into rivers, storm water overflow impacts, highway corridor selection, wildlife
preserve siting and public transit serviceability indices. Students are responsible for gathering the
data they need from MPOs, web sites, or Census sources. Alternatively, some students digitize
new data. The proposal development prepares students with a useful skill and stimulates critical
thinking. The applications reinforce the factual information covered during the first portion of
the semester.
TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 26 of 35


Graduate Level Transportation Safety Class (CE 635 and CE320)

Course Content
Transportation Safety was a new graduate class I developed at the University of Kentucky
(often co-taught with N. Stamatiadis). I will teach this class for the first time at the University of
Connecticut in Spring 2005. The course is divided into four modules. The first section focuses
on the issues and factors involved in road safety for passenger vehicles. The role of statistical
analysis and the techniques applied in safety are considered in the second section of the course.
The final two sections of the class run concurrently. Students conduct experimental analysis with
a safety-related dataset based on proposals developed by them, and lectures feature field trips,
panel discussions and guest speakers on the safety of non-highway modes as well as special
topics such as alcohol-involved crashes. The results of the students experimental analysis are
presented in both written reports and oral presentations. In the past, several student papers from
this class have been successfully published in peer-reviewed journals.

Writing Position Papers as a Learning Activity
I have found the one page position paper
5
a very effective tool that motivates critical thinking
while providing the opportunity to target written communication skills. This activity is
particularly interesting in the safety class. A writing guideline and grading scheme are provided
in advance. The activity hinges on the need to effectively communicate a position, and the
reasons supporting that position, in a single page. Questions without clear cut answers work best.
Style and substance are graded by both students and myself. The student grading results in peer
pressure which stimulates good work, but more importantly the students from different
disciplines learn different writing tricks and viewpoints from each other. I provide guidance
for student grading and then grade the grading so that they must be critical and constructive. The
short length of the paper allows one to make thorough comments and suggestions. My comments
to the students are often longer than the one page paper! The quality expectations are high and
students stretch to meet them. The short paper also provides writing practice for the long reports
due later in the semester. The exercises have, at times, led to heated debates among classmates
on exactly what constitutes a good paper. Significant learning stems from these debates, as well
as respect for those in other disciplines.

5
Modeled after Dr. Fred Halls exercises in the Department of Geography, McMaster University
TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 27 of 35


Sample Undergraduate Syllabus

Civil and Environmental Engineering 271 - Fall 2004
Geomatics and Spatial Measurement

Meetings: Lectures: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10:00-10:50 AM FLC 212
Labs: Tuesday (one of 3 three-hour slots) in Castleman room 115 (but
mostly out in the field)

Instructors: Dr. Lisa Aultman-Hall, Associate Professor, CAST 331, 486-2717 or 486-
4396, aultman@engr.uconn.edu
Ms. Rachel Hoffman, Survey Manager, Landmark Surveys LLC,
surveying@engr.uconn.edu

Lecture Office Hours: Dr. Aultman has two offices. If she is in knock. If Dr.
Aultman is not in, leave a phone message or email
including a phone number to call you back. Students will
be informed of any absences planned by the instructor and
availability information will be posted on the office door.
M and W 9-10 and 11-12

Lab Office Hours: Tuesdays, Ms. Hoffman can be contacted by email on other days.

Teaching Assistants: Jeff LaMondia (8-11 AM lab and CAD lab Office Hours TBA)
Scott Adams (11-2 PM lab and CAD lab Office Hours TBA)
Craig Jordan (2-5 PM lab and CAD lab Office Hours TBA)
Eric Jackson (N/A)

Email: Email will be used as official course communication in this class. Students are
assumed to check their email at least every two days. (WEBCT email is not used)

Main Course Objective: To introduce students to the areas of surveying, spatial analysis
and geomatics as they apply to civil engineering and related design problems.

Lecture Content: CE 271 focuses on the tools and methods used in civil engineering to
locate features in spatial terms on the surface of the earth. The central theme of the
lectures is the variety of ways to measure location and the level of accuracy and
appropriateness of each method for different civil engineering uses. After an introduction
to global positioning systems and the use of absolute geographic coordinates, the lectures
turn to planar surveying, survey control, reference datum and the calculations needed to
establish a control traverse. Students must learn to calculate area, use the state plane
coordinate system and the process of staking out a basic roadway element. The
remainder of the course focuses on photogrammetry, remote sensing and satellite imagery
and the use of the resulting spatial data in geographic information systems (GIS).

Lab Content: The lab component of the course allows students to undertake electronic
measurement of angles, distance and elevation in order to use computerize CAD software
to produce drawings of certain small areas and features on campus. Students will work in
survey crews of four students. The lab is hands on, real-world, problem based learning
you must attend. Handouts will be provided on Mondays and must be read before
TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 28 of 35


arriving to your lab on Tuesday. Labs are usually due Wed at the start of lecture the
plan is for you to complete your lab work before you leave the lab on Tuesdays.

Expected Outcomes: Students will be evaluated in this class using field survey
assignments, five CAD/GIS assignments, and five mid-term tests and a final examination
on their ability to accomplish the following course outcomes.
1. To apply mathematics for the purpose of measuring location on the
surface of the earth. (ABET
6
3a)
2. To analyze field-measured distance, angles and elevations to create a
survey document. (ABET3b)
3. To understand the differences between various spatial data measurement
techniques and the appropriate uses for the resulting data. (ABET3c)
4. To work together as a survey crew to collect data and post-process it.
(ABET3d)
5. To communicate (both create and use) technical graphical information.
(ABET3g)
6. To appreciate the changing technology and new directions in the field of
geomatics. (ABET3i)
7. To properly use the following computerized tools: electronic survey
instruments, global position system receivers, geographic information
systems and CAD software. (ABET3k)

Course Components:

A : Class Time: Lectures and Labs

Many classes in this course will be interactive and hands on. At the end of the semester,
some lecture classes will consist of laboratory exercises using software. As such,
attendance is very key to success in this class.

Almost all labs are conducted outdoors. Students are required to have proper attire
including gloves. You must purchase a proper survey field book from the bookstore and
a pencil with 3H lead with no eraser (2H would be acceptable). Attendance will be taken
in labs.

Questions and comments from students are welcome at any time during any class. In the
lectures, the instructor will use slides as well as the blackboard and document camera.

B : Readings

The attached course schedule contains readings and exercises that are taken from the
course text (info below) available at the bookstore. Students must read the readings
before class or lab. If you are not prepared class time will be lost. Other handouts may
be provided for reading as well. Note that test questions may come from the readings as
well as the lectures.


6
ABET accredits engineering programs nationally and requires that certain objectives be met throughout the full four-year curriculum.
Each course within the CE program aims to accomplish a subset of the complete set of ABET objectives.
TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 29 of 35


Elementary Surveying: An Introduction to Geomatics, tenth edition, Prentice-Hall 2002
by Paul Wolf and Charles Ghilani.

C : Tests

There will be five tests during this course (one of these will be an in-field lab mid-term
exam). Each of the four in-class tests will be worth 10% of the final grade. The lab mid-
term will be worth 12% of the final grade. The final exam will be comprehensive in that
it will cover material from the entire semester and it will comprise 20.5% of the final
grade.

D: Homework Assignments

A total of 10 homework assignments will be given throughout the semester. They have
been timed to cover different chapters of the textbook and lecture topics. Therefore, the
schedule is irregular and students should refer to the attached timetable and the WEBCT
timetable to ensure they have homework completed at the appropriate time. Homework
will NOT be graded. The solutions will be posted on WebCT on the dates indicated.

TAs are available during set office hours in the CAD lab (room 117 of Castleman) if you
need help with homework. These student TAs will not necessarily have reviewed the
homework but rather will serve as a sounding board for you. They do not have the
solutions.

E: Lab Exercises

Students will be required to hand in their field work
7
(often in their field books) at the
beginning of lectures on the days noted on the attached schedule and WebCT (usually
Wednesday). It is highly recommended that you complete your field book work on
Tuesday in your lab time when Ms Hoffman and the TAs can help you. Late work
WILL NOT be accepted. Field books can be picked up in lecture. Six of the lab
assignments will be graded in the field books and count 1.5% each of the final grade
(these are labeled field book hand in on the attached schedule. One other field book
exercise, the traverse calculations, will count 4%. The data you collect during the
semester will be used in a final AutoCAD project worth 6% of the grade. Field book
checks are also labeled on the schedule and take place before you leave the lab on
Tuesdays. There are four such checks that each count 0.25% of the final grade.

F: CAD/GIS Assignments

During the semester 3 independent AutoCAD homework assignments will be assigned as
indicated on the class schedule. These basic assignments are intended to prepare you for
the lab project at the end of the semester. The CAD lab in room 117 of Castleman can be
used at your convenience to complete the assignments. The student TAs will hold office
hours in this room to assist you. Each assignment will comprise 1.5% of your grade.
Engineering student computer accounts are used to access the computers in room 117.
Accounts for engineering students can be obtained the School of Engineering Help Desk

7
Attendance will be taken during all labs and some GIS ArcView lectures. Students who do not attend the lab or GIS class will not
be allowed to hand in the assignment from that day and therefore will receive a zero on the assignment.
TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 30 of 35


in room 306 of EII. Bring a photo ID. Non-engineering students must fill in a new
account form at this location and their account will not be active for 2-3 days.

During the final weeks of the semester Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will be
introduced. You will complete two in-class GIS assignments. Each will comprised 1.5%
of your grade.

G: Summary of Grading

Mid-term Exams 4 x 10%= 40%
Lab Mid-term 1 x 12%= 12%
Lab Field Book Hand in 6 x 1.5%= 9%
Traverse Field Book 1 x 4%= 4%
Lab Book Checks 6 x 0.25%= 1%
Lab Project 1 x 6%= 6%
CAD/GIS Assignments 5 x 1.5% = 7.5%
Final Exam 1 x 20.5%= 20.5%
100%
The following ranges will be used to assign grades in this class. Please note that grades
will not be adjusted or curved in any manner in this class. The tests will be set such that
a student who attended class, took notes, completed their own homework and understood
the material will do well. Given this fact, you may calculate your standing in this class at
any time using the above percentages.

93 100=A 90 92=A-
87 - 89=B+ 83 - 86=B 80 - 82 =B-
77 - 79=C+ 73 - 76=C 70 - 72 =C-
67 - 69=D+ 60 - 66=D <60=F

Important note: Students are requested to review the policies of the university with
respect to discrimination, sexual harassment, academic dishonesty, excused absences and
the final examination schedule.
TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 31 of 35



TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 32 of 35


Sample Graduate Syllabus

Civil Engineering 370 - Transportation Planning - Spring 2003

Meetings: Wednesday 6:00-9:00 PM Castleman 204

Instructor: Dr. Lisa Aultman-Hall, CAST 331, 486-2717,
email:aultman@engr.uconn.edu

Office Hours: Tues. 10-noon Students may knock on the office door for
questions at any other time. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday are
generally best to find me on campus.

Email will be used for official course communication. Students are
assumed to check email at least once every 2 days. Email is an
excellent way to find me.

Main Course Goal: To introduce students to some main topics, issues and
modeling procedures in transportation planning.

Course Content: The topics of CE 370 stem from the land use / transportation
interaction. We will be studying the spatial organization and interaction within
regions. Furthermore, we will consider a selection of models and quantitative
methods that are used to predict travel demand based on land use and the
transportation network configuration. The topic of travel data collection and
survey design is introduced. Students will use a transportation planning software
package.

Objectives: Students will be evaluated through quizzes, class presentations,
projects, short papers, homework and in-class activities on the following course
objectives.

1. To critically examine the urban form of a region and the role of
transportation in its development, operation and future.

2. To develop common urban transportation planning models by hand
and using software.

3. To understand the issues and factors that impact transportation data
collection and survey design. To design and administer a basic
transportation survey.

4. To appreciate the different issues facing site, regional, state-wide and
freight transportation planners.

Course Components:

A : Lectures

Lectures will include presentation of background information, directions for
calculation procedures, and discussions. Attendance and participation in
discussions will be considered in assigning the final grade. Questions and
comments from students are welcome at any time during class.
TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 33 of 35


B : Readings

There are two types of readings in this course. The book Edge City by Joel
Garreau is available in the bookstore and will be used to motivate class
discussion. Students will prepare a short paper based on this book. The class will
discuss the assigned portion of the book during the lectures noted. A second set
of readings are provided from the textbook Modelling Transport. These readings
should be read in advance of each lecture to supplement the material
presented by the instructor and to provide guidance on how to perform class
projects. Homework assignments will be taken from this text in some cases.

C : Class Projects

There will be two planning model projects conducted by the students (one
individually and one in pairs). In the first project students will design and conduct
a transportation choice survey. In the second project students will use the
planning software Transcad to model the transportation system of one
Connecticut town. These projects will be graded on technical content as well as
writing/presentation quality. Students will be expected to prepare a short written
report and to make a class presentation on the results of both projects.

D : Quizzes

There will be two 20-25 minute class quizzes. The first one on March 12 will cover
the first half of the course. The second quiz held April 23 will cover the second
half. There will be no final examination in this class.

E : Short Papers

There will be four short papers prepared for this class. Explicit writing style
guidance will be provided. Three of these papers will be one page long and
one will be two pages long.

F : Homework

Three traditional-style homework assignments will be undertaken in this class. The
assignments will be graded and are intended to provide the students with
practice with the numerical details of the modeling approaches.

G : In-class Activities

Three grades for in-class activities will be given in this course. First, on March 12
all students will review and provide comments on the draft surveys designed by
all other students. The quality of your constructive criticism to your peers will be
graded. Second, on April 9 we will prepare panel questions for the professionals
who will participate in class on April 16. Preparation of these questions in groups
will be graded. Finally, overall attendance and participation in all classes will be
the third in-class grade.

F: Grading

Quizzes 2 x 7%= 14%
Short Papers 4 x 4%= 16%
TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 34 of 35


Projects 2 x 18% = 36%
Class Presentations 2 x 5% = 10%
Homework 3 x 5% = 15%
In-Class Activities 3 x 3% = 9%
100%

Many course components will be graded using a plus/minus letter scheme.
Grades will not be adjusted (curved) in any way. Note that a final grade of A+ is
assigned as an A in the UConn system.
97 100=A+ 93 96=A 90 92=A-
87 89=B+ 83 86=B 80 82=B-
77 79=C+ 73 76=C 70 72=C-
67 69=D+ 60 66=D <60=F
Important note: Students are requested to review the university policies on
discrimination and sexual harassment, academic dishonesty, and excused
absences. Be aware in particular of PLAGUARISM.

TEACHING ACTIVITY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Page 35 of 35


Date Lecture Activities Readings Assignment Out Assignment Due
22-Jan The Transportation Land Use
Interaction
Land Use Paper
Urban Form and Land Use
Planning Terms
The Four Step Planning Process
29-Jan History of Transportation
Planning in the US
http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/tea
21/sumcov.htm
Reauthorization
Paper
Land Use Paper
Modeling Transport Chapter 1.1 1.4 & 1.5
Data Collection Chapter 3.3 Edge City Paper
5-Feb Model Network and Zones Chapter 3.4 Trip Generation HW Reauthorization Paper
Trip Generation Chapter 4
Garreau Intro & Ch 1
12-Feb Trip Distribution - Spatial
Interaction
Chapter 5 Trip Generation HW
19-Feb Trip Distribution - Spatial
Interaction
Chapter 5 Trip Dist. HW
Garreau Ch. 2
26-Feb Choice Models Chapter 7.1 - 7.3 Choice HW Trip Dist. HW
Skim Chapter 8
Garreau Ch. 3
5-Mar Choice Models Survey Project Choice HW Due
Factors Affecting Mode Choice Chapter 6.2 7-Mar
Survey Design
12-Mar Midterm Quiz Draft Surveys &
Draft Survey Review Memo
Traffic Assignment and Network
Modeling
Chapter 10.1 - 10.5
19-Mar Spring Break
26-Mar Traffic Assignment and Network
Modeling
Chapter 10.1 - 10.5
Garreau Ch. 4
2-Apr Student Presentations Transcad Project Survey Report
Transcad
9-Apr Retail Location Processes Panel Paper Edge City Paper
Site / Traffic Impact Studies Panel Questions
In-class Panel Prep
16-Apr Class Trip / Panel Activity
23-Apr Final Quiz Panel Paper Due
Freight Transportation Planning 25-Apr
Activity Analysis
30-Apr Student Presentations Transcad Project