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August 18, 2014

Secretary Richard K. Sullivan, Jr.


Executive Office of Energy & Environmental Affairs
Attn: MEPA Office
100 Cambridge Street, Suite 900
Boston, MA 02114

Re: Corrective Action Design Documents
Sohier Road and Brimbal Avenue
Beverly, Massachusetts

Dear Secretary Sullivan:

The attached documents were submitted to Massachusetts Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP) Bureau of Waste Prevention Solid Waste Division as part of a Corrective
Action Design (CAD) application in 2009. Massachusetts DEP approved the CAD and provided
Authorization to Construct on December 31, 2009. The currently proposed project is a similar
commercial development on the same parcel. The following documents are attached with this
letter:
Engineering Design Report, Tetra Tech, March 5, 2009
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization, Tetra Tech, March 5, 2009
Corrective Action Design Plans, Tetra Tech, March 5, 2009, Revised November 24, 2009
Corrective Action Design Specifications, Tetra Tech, November 24, 2009
Approval of the Corrective Action Design and Authorization to Construct, December 31,
2009.
Please let me know if you have questions.

Very truly yours,

Matthew T. Madden, P.E., L.S.P.
Senior Project Manager





civil engineers structural engineers land surveyors environmental consultants landscape architects
www.allenmajor.com

SECTION 8.0 CORRECTIVE ACTION
DESIGN DOCUMENTS





























Engineering Design Report
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road
Beverly, Massachusetts
Submitted to:
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection
Northeast Regional Office
March 5, 2009
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road
Beverly, Massachusetts
Submitted to:
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection
March 5, 2009
["it:) TETRA TECH RIZZO
March 5, 2009
Mr. John Morey
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection
Northeast Regional Office
205B Lowell Street
Wilmington, MA 01887
Re: Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road
Beverly, Massachusetts
Dear Mr. Morey:
Tetra Tech Rizzo (TTR) prepared this Human Health and Environmental Risk
Characterization report for the above referenced property (the Site) in order to assess the
potential health and environmental risks due to contamination in soil and groundwater
and exposure to landfill gas at the Site. The purpose of this risk characterization is to
assess the potential impact of oil and hazardous materials (OHM) in those media on
potential human receptors and ecological receptors at the Site. We found a condition of
"No Significant Risk" of harm to public safety, public welfare and the environment
associated with the exposures evaluated at the Site. However, there is a condition of
"Significant Risk" of potential harm to human health (hypothetical future residents) at the
Site for the conditions evaluated.
Please contact us if you have any questions concerning this project.
Very truly yours,

Project Environmental Scientist
/!t;kJ E. 3;/L
Michael E. Billa, P.E., P.G., L.S.P.
Director,
Remediation Assessment and Compliance
Matthew T. Madden, P.E.
Senior Project Manager
P \PRE-FY2008\ 12700000\ 12700961 \RlSK ASSESSMENT\BEVERL Y RA _ CW & UW\BEVERL Y LANDF!LL_MTHD 3 RA RPRT 030509 _FrNALDOC
Table of Contents
Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................................ i
1.0 Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... I
1.1 Site Background .................................................................................................................. !
2.0 Groundwater Characterization .......................................................................................................... 2
3.0 Hazard Identification ........................................................................................................................ 2
3 .I Analytical Data Used in the Risk Characterization ............................................................. 2
3.2 Selection of the Compounds of Concern ............................................................................. 3
3.3 Physical and Chemical Properties of the Constituents ........................................................ 3
3.4 Comparison to Natural and Anthropogenic Background Concentrations .......................... .4
3.5 Toxicity Profiles .................................................................................................................. 4
3.6 Applicable or Suitably Analogous Standards and Guidelines ............................................ .4
4.0 Dose Response Assessment .............................................................................................................. 4
4.1 Toxicological Properties ...................................................................................................... 4
4.1.1 Noncarcinogenic Effects ........................................................................................ 5
4.1.2 Carcinogenic Effects .............................................................................................. 5
4.2 Bioavailability of Study Compounds .................................................................................. 6
5.0 Exposure Assessment ....................................................................................................................... 6
5 .l Human Receptors ................................................................................................................ 7
5.2 Exposure Routes .................................................................................................................. 7
5.3 Exposures Not Evaluated .................................................................................................... 7
5.4 Exposure Profiles ................................................................................................................ 8
5.5 Estimation of Exposure Point Concentrations ..................................................................... &
5.5.1 Hot Spots ............................................................................................................... 8
5.5.2 Groundwater- Dermal Contact ............................................................................. &
5.6 Estimation of Receptor-Specific Exposure Factors ............................................................. 9
6.0 Risk Characterization ....................................................................................................................... 9
6.1 Noncancer Health Hazards .................................................................................................. 9
6.2 Cancer Risks ...................................................................................................................... l 0
6.3 Applicable or Suitably Analogous Standards .................................................................... !!
6.4 Estimated Noncancer Health Hazards and Cancer Risks .................................................. 12
6.4.1 Summary of His and ELCRs ................................................................................ l2
7.0 Characterization of Risk to Public Safety and Public Welfare ....................................................... l2
7.1 Public Safety Risk Characterization .................................................................................. l2
Tetra Tech Rizzo
7.2 Public Welfare Risk Characterization ............................................................................... 13
8.0 Environmental Risk Characterization ............................................................................................. l3
8.1 Stage I Screening Assessment ........................................................................................... l4
9.0 Uncertainty in the Analysis ............................................................................................................ 15
9.1 Sampling Plan, Analytical Data, and Exposure Point Concentrations .............................. 15
9.2 Toxicity Information ......................................................................................................... IS
9.3 Exposure Assumptions ...................................................................................................... 16
9.4 Methods to Estimate Potential Health Effects ................................................................... 16
10.0 Conclusions .................................................................................................................................... 16
11.0 Abbreviations and Acronyms ......................................................................................................... 18
12.0 References ...................................................................................................................................... 19
Tetra Tech Rizzo
List of Tables
Table I
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Table 5
Table 6
Table 7
Table 8
Table 9
Groundwater Analytical Data
Physical and Chemical Properties of Site Compounds of Concern
Comparison to Natural and Anthropogenic Background Concentrations
Toxicity Values for Site Compounds of Concern
Relative Absorption Factors of Site Compounds of Concern
Exposure Assumptions
Risk Summary
Upper Concentration Limits (UCLs) for Compounds of Concern
Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) for Compounds of Concern
List of Figures
Site Location Map Figure I
Figure 2
Figure 3
Site Plan with Sampling Locations
MassGIS Site Scoring Map
List of Appendices
Appendix A Limitations
Appendix B Short Toxicological Profiles for Site Compounds
Appendix C Exposure Profiles and Calculations
Appendix D Risk Calculations
Appendix E Soil Analytical Data
Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment of Potential Indoor and Outdoor Inhalation Exposure to Landfill
Gas Emissions From the Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill Relative to Future Development of the
Site prepared by Tetra Tech EC, Inc. September 2008
Tetra Tech Rizzo
Executive Summary
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
Tetra Tech Rizzo (TTR) has conducted a Method 3 Human Health and Environmental Risk
Characterization for the former landfill property located at Brimbal A venue and Sohier Road in
Beverly, Massachusetts (the Site). This Risk Characterization was conducted in conformance
with the requirements of the Massachusetts Solid Waste Regulations 310 CMR 19.000, the
Landfill Technical Guidance Manual, and the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP), 310
CMR 40.0000. The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Guidance
document for risk characterization, Guidance for Disposal Site Risk Characterization -In
Support of the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (the "Guidance"), and related guidance, such as
Characterizing Risks Posed by Petroleum Contaminated Sites: Implementation ofVPHIEPH
Approach, has been followed in this analysis.
A portion of the human health risk characterization which evaluates potential exposures and risks
to Site receptors due to the inhalation of volatile vapors emitted from the inactive landfill (inside
the proposed new buildings and outside the buildings in the near-field ambient air) was
conducted by our Tetra Tech EC (TTEC) office. The risk characterization report prepared by
TTEC is included as Appendix F.
The Site consists of approximately 6.5-acres of vacant land located between Brimbal A venue and
Sohier Road immediately south of Route 128 in Beverly, Massachusetts. The Site.is identified
by the Town of Beverly (the Town) Tax Assessor's Office as Map 55 Lot 29 and is currently
owned by Brimbal Avenue Development LLC. The Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM)
Coordinators for the Site are Zone 19 East 345470 North 4715300. The Site locus is shown on
Figure 1. A Site Plan is included as Figure 2. The Site is an inactive landfill that was used by the
Town of Beverly from approximately 1946 through 1961. The footprint of the landfill extends
beyond the property boundary primarily to the south of the subject property. When operations
ceased, the landfill was reportedly covered with 2-3 feet of clean sand and gravel and left fallow
for more than 40 years. The Site had been allowed to re-vegetate, but has been largely cleared in
anticipation of future development. Brush and shrubs are still present along portions of the Site's
perimeter. The Site is proposed to be developed into a mixed use property called the North Shore
Commons upon closure of the inactive landfill.
Observations during borings at the Site indicated that shallow soil at the Site is primarily sand
and gravel fill. Solid waste including brick fragments, wood, plastic, and glass was observed
mixed with sand and gravel fill at deeper elevations. Tetra Tech Rizzo reviewed available soil
analytical data from previous investigations, and collected soil samples during soil borings
advanced as part of the assessment. Soil samples were collected from the Site by Vanasse
Hangen Brustlin, Inc. (VHB) and TTR in 2007. A summary of the Site soil data and the
laboratory certificates of analyses are presented in Appendix E. The results of the soil sampling
and analysis were typical of a heterogeneous matrix of soil and solid waste. Metals, petroleum
hydrocarbons, and other contaminants were detected in some samples. Because of the
heterogeneous nature of the matrix, it was not feasible to obtain a representative set of soil
concentration data. Furthermore, the Corrective Action Design and Post-Closure Use plans
include provisions for maintaining physical separation from the waste, limitations on post-
Tetra Tech Rizzo
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
closure use, and requirements for Health and Safety plans for work during construction and
subsurface work during the post-closure. For these reasons, we have evaluated the soil data
qualitatively, but have not included a quantitative evaluation of soil data as part of the Method 3
Risk Characterization.
As shown on the soil data summary table (Appendix E), the average concentrations of analytes
detected in Site soil are for the most part below the MCP Method 1 S-1/GW-2 and S-1/GW-3
standards. The average concentrations ofbenzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, lead, nickel
and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) exceed the Method 1 S-1/GW-2 and S-1/GW-3
standards. These elevated average concentrations are generally due to high concentrations of the
analytes detected in a few of the soil samples, which indicates the heterogeneity of Site soils. The
plarmed development of the Site will generally prohibit access to the landfill material currently
located at the Site. Construction and utility workers at the Site will likely have direct contact
with Site soils and/or solid waste containing oil and/or hazardous materials (OHM) during Site
development activities. A Health and Safety plan for Site workers handling OHM impacted
soils/solid waste during construction and utility repair activities at the Site will be developed for
the Site by a qualified enviromnental professional. Additionally, we recommend that a soils
.. management plan which addresses the characterization, segregation, handling, transportation and
disposal of contaminated soils, hazardous substances and solid waste encountered during
earthwork operations be prepared for the Site prior to the commencement of development
activities at the Site.
The following potential receptors were selected for evaluation. These receptors were chosen
based on our assessment of the current and foreseeable future use of the Site for evaluation:
Trespasser
Commercial/retail worker
Commercial/retail customer
Day Care worker/toddler
Maintenance worker
Landscape worker
On-Site adult/child resident, and
Off-Site adult/child resident
Construction worker
Utility worker
The data used in the risk characterization represent groundwater samples collected from the Site
by TTR in April, May, July and October 2007 and January and April2008; soil gas samples
Tetra Tech Rizzo
ii
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
collected from the Site by Griffin Engineering Group, LLC (Griffin Engineering) in 2007 and
2008. A summary of the groundwater data collected from the Site and used to evaluate risks is
presented in Table 1. The landfill gas data is presented in Table I of the TTEC report included in
Appendix F.
Landfill gas (LFG) analytical data from on-site and off-site sampling performed in 2007 and
2008 were compiled and evaluated with regard to spatial trends by TTEC. Based on differences
in the detected sets ofLFG contaminants, the overall site was broken down into a Western
Inhalation Exposure Area (where a Day Care facility is proposed to be built), an Eastern
Inhalation Exposure Area (where Commercial/Retail and Residential facilities are proposed to be
built), and a Site-Wide Inhalation Exposure Area (i.e., the whole site). The landfill gas
characteristics for each Inhalation Exposure Area were used in combination with conservative
indoor air vapor intrusion modeling and outdoor air atmospheric mixing and dispersion modeling
to estimate the concentrations of the landfill gas constituents that may be present in the air at
potential future exposure points associated with site development. These concentrations were
then combined with inhalation toxicity values to project the potential cancer and non-cancer risks
for the persons that may access and use this area in the future.
The findings of the risk assessment conducted by TTEC were as follows:
The analyses indicated that there is "No Significant Risk" of harm to human health for
any of the evaluated receptors in any portion of the Site with the exception of a potential
future resident with lifelong exposure to the released LFG constituents in the western
portion of the site. The projected Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk (ELCR) for this scenario
exceeded the DEP threshold of 1.0 E-5, due to potential vapor intrusion into the indoor
air of a hypothetical new slab-on-grade residence in this area. The LFG constituent
tetrachloroethene was the principal risk driver. No inhalation risk concerns were
identified for the other receptors in the Western Inhalation Exposure Area, or for any of
the evaluated receptors in the Eastern Inhalation Exposure Area. The tetrachloroethene in
the western portion of the site also caused the projected cancer risk for a potential future
resident with lifelong Site-Wide exposure to exceed the DEP threshold. The
tetrachloroethene was only detected in the landfill gas at one location in the Western
Inhalation Exposure Area. No inhalation risk issues were identified relative to exposure
to the outdoor air under any of the evaluated scenarios.
Regarding the potential significance of hydrogen sulfide (H
2
S) relative to development,
no sampling was performed for HzS in the Eastern Inhalation Exposure Area, and only 2
of 3 samples collected in the Western Inhalation Exposure Area were analyzed for H
2
S.
The detection of H
2
S in the Western Inhalation Exposure Area (at a maximum
concentration of 4.2 parts per million (ppm)) exceeded a number of published odor
thresholds (which ranged between 0.13 ppm and 8.1 ppm). As such, it is likely that
people would be able to smell H
2
S in the Western Inhalation Exposure Area if no
mitigative steps are taken. HzS levels in the landfill gas in the eastern portion of the Site
have not been quantified. Therefore, it is not known whether H
2
S may pose an odor
problem or a potential health concern in this area. There are no known complaints of
ambient air odors at the Site. In addition, no evidence of strong, pungent or noxious odors
Tetra Tech Rizzo
iii
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Schier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
was noted by TTR personnel during investigations conducted at the Site. We anticipate
that any potential issues associated with H
2
S at the Site will be addressed with mitigating
measures such as vapor barriers and gas venting systems during the development of the
Site.
While the off-site sampling associated with Building K of the neighboring residential
complex did not quantifY the levels of specific toxic VOCs, the lack of methane at any
significant level on the residential side of the off-site interceptor trench and no indication
of methane in Building K (the residence closest to the former landfill) supports the
position that other toxic LFG constituents are unlikely to be migrating to and into this
building. As such, a condition of"No Significant Risk" is indicated relative to the
potential inhalation of LFG constituents by an Off-Site Resident.
TTR included all compounds identified in the groundwater samples collected from then Site with
the exception of calcium, which is considered a nutrient in human diet, in the risk
characterization as Compounds of Concern (COCs) for the Site. We conservatively used the
maximum detected concentration of each groundwater COC as the exposure point concentration
(EPC). The groundwater EPCs estimated for the Site are presented in Table 1.
TTR assessed risks to potential future construction workers and utility workers dermal exposure
to groundwater at the Site. We compared estimated Total Hazard Indices (His) for each receptor
for noncarcinogenic effects to the DEP acceptable noncancer risk limit of 1.0. We compared
ELCR for each receptor to the DEP-acceptable cancer risk limit of 1.0E-05 (or 1 in I 00,000).
The HI and ELCR estimated for construction and utility workers at the Site were below MCP
regulatory risk limits for human health (see Table 7).
TTR also conducted a Stage I Screening environmental risk characterization in accordance with
the MCP to evaluate potential risks to the environment from compounds detected in Site
groundwater. We determined that "No Significant Risk" of harm to the environment exists at the
Site for conditions observed.
Threats to public welfare include any conditions that may result in the existence of nuisance
conditions, loss of property value, or the unilateral restriction of the use of other people's
property, and other societal costs due to the degradation of public or private resources, both
physical and intangible. As stated in the Guidance, for a threat to exist, these conditions must
preclude the full use of the resources at the Site under existing conditions or conditions about to
occur. HzS has been detected in the western area ofthe Site above the three odor thresholds listed
in Table 17 of Appendix F, but below the lowest occupational health limit of 10 ppm. However,
there are no known complaints of ambient air odors at the Site. In addition, no evidence of
strong, pungent or noxious odors was noted by TTR personnel during investigations conducted at
the Site. It should also be noted that no H
2
S was detected inside the residential building located
on the property that abuts the Site to the southwest. Potential odor issues will be addressed with
mitigating measures such as vapor barriers and gas venting systems during the development of
the Site. The DEP defines Upper Concentration Limits (UCLs) as concentrations of OHM, which
if exceeded by the average concentration in the area of the release, indicate the potential for
significant risk of harm to public welfare and the environment under future conditions. The
Tetra Tech Rizzo
iv
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
average groundwater concentrations ofCOCs do not exceed the UCLs.
Based on the above information, we find a condition of"No Significant Risk" of harm to public
welfare exists at the Site for the conditions observed at the Site.
The general definition of harm to safety in the MCP (31 0 CMR 40.0992( 4) and 310 CMR
40.0960) states that a level of no significant risk to safety exists or has been achieved if the
conditions at a site which are related to a release of oil and/or hazardous material do not
currently and will not in the foreseeable future pose a threat of physical harm or bodily injury to
people. Threats to public safety include physical conditions and chemical agents that may cause
bodily harm or injury (e.g., bums or fractures) as opposed to illness. No uncontained materials
exhibiting characteristics of corrosivity, reactivity, or flammability were found on the Site. No
open pits, lagoons, drums, dangerous structures, or other apparent threats to public safety and no
danger of fire from the conditions evaluated in this report have been observed. Methane was
detected above the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) in some gas wells located at the Site. No
methane was detected in the building on the abutting residential complex, or in the soil gas in the
vicinity of the building. Indoor air methane levels were not measured at the Site since there are
no buildings currently located at the Site. Thus, we find a condition of"No Significant Risk" of
harm to public safety exists for the conditions observed at the Site.
The proposed development includes the construction of several buildings for retail, office,
restaurant, and childcare use. The presence of methane gas above the LEL in the subsurface
could pose a potential risk to public safety. However, the Corrective Action Design includes
mitigating measures such as vapor barrier and gas venting systems to be implemented during the
development of the Site to prevent potential entrainment of methane in future Site buildings.
Once the Site is developed, the condition of "No Significant Risk" will depend on maintenance
of the mitigating measures mentioned above. The proposed mitigation measures and plans for
maintenance and monitoring during the post-closure period are described in the Engineering
Design Report and Corrective Action Design plans.
In conclusion, a condition of"No Significant Risk" of harm to public safety, public welfare and
the environment has been found to exist on the Site for the conditions evaluated. However, there
is a condition of "Significant Risk" of potential harm to human health at the Site for the
conditions evaluated. Specifically, the ELCR estimated for potential future residents with
lifelong exposure to the released LFGs was above the DEP risk limit of 1.0 E-5, due to potential
vapor intrusion into the indoor air of a hypothetical new slab-on-grade residence in this area. The
LFG constituent tetrachloroethene was the principal risk driver.
We have prepared these risk assessment estimates using conservative (i.e., health-protective)
assumptions. Thus, the hazard indices and cancer risks presented herein provide an upper-bound
estimate of health risks from quantified Site compounds to the groups of potentially exposed
individuals considered in the assessment. Health risks resulting from differing durations or
frequencies from those described in this report could increase or decrease proportionately in
accordance with particular changes in exposure patterns.
Tetra Tech Rizzo
v
1.0 Introduction
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
Tetra Tech Rizzo (TTR) has conducted a Method 3 Human Health and Environmental Risk
Characterization for the former landfill property located at Brimbal A venue and Sohier Road in
Beverly, Massachusetts (the Site). This Risk Characterization was conducted in conformance
with the requirements of the Massachusetts Contingency Plan (MCP), 310 CMR 40.0000. The
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Guidance document for risk
characterization, Guidance for Disposal Site Risk Characterization - In Support of the
Massachusetts Contingency Plan (the "Guidance"), and related guidance, such as Characterizing
Risks Posed by Petroleum Contaminated Sites: Implementation ofVPHIEPH Approach, has been
followed in this analysis.
A portion of the human health risk characterization which evaluates potential exposures and risks
to Site receptors due to the inhalation of volatile vapors emitted from the inactive landfill was
conducted by our Tetra Tech EC (TTEC) office and is appended to this report as Appendix F.
Observations during advancement of borings at the Site indicated that shallow soil at the Site is
primarily sand and gravel fill. Solid waste including brick fragments, wood, plastic, and glass
was observed mixed with sand and gravel fill at deeper elevations. TTR reviewed available soil
analytical data from previous investigations, and collected soil samples during soil borings
advanced as part of the assessment. Soil samples were collected from the Site by Vanasse
Hangen Brustlin, Inc. (VHB) and TTR in 2007. A summary of the Site soil data and the
laboratory certificates of analyses are presented in Appendix E. The results of the soil sampling
and analysis were typical of a heterogeneous matrix of soil and solid waste. Metals, petroleum
hydrocarbons, and other contaminants were detected in some samples. Because of the
heterogeneous nature ofthe matrix, it was not feasible to obtain a representative set of soil
concentration data. Furthermore, the Corrective Action Design and Post-Closure Use plans
include provisions for maintaining physical separation from the waste, limitations on post-
closure use, and requirements for Health and Safety plans for work during construction and
subsurface work during the post-closure. For these reasons, we have evaluated the soil data
qualitatively, but have not included a quantitative evaluation of soil data as part of the Method 3
Risk Characterization.
This risk characterization evaluates noncancer health hazards and cancer risks to groups of
people with assumed potential exposures, and to potential ecological receptors at the Site, as
described herein. The assessment considers both current and reasonably foreseeable future land
uses of the Site. The MCP defines the reasonably foreseeable future as up to 30 years when
evaluating a risk characterization, in this case, until the year 2038. This report is subject to the
limitations described in Appendix A.
1.1 Site Background
The Site consists of approximately 6.5-acres of vacant land located between Brimbal Avenue and
Sohier Road immediately south of Route 128 in Beverly, Massachusetts. The Site is identified
by the Town of Beverly (the Town) Tax Assessor's Office as Map 55 Lot 29 and is currently
Tetra Tech Rizzo
1
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
owned by Brimbal Avenue Development LLC. The Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM)
Coordinators for the Site are Zone 19 East 345470 North 47!5300. The Site locus is shown on
Figure I. A Site Plan is included as Figure 2. The Site is an inactive landfill that was used by the
Town of Beverly from approximately 1946 through !96!. The footprint of the landfill extends
beyond the property boundary primarily to the south of the subject property. When operations
ceased, the landfill was reportedly covered with 2-3 feet of clean sand and gravel and left fallow
for more than 40 years. The Site had been allowed to re-vegetate, but has been largely cleared in
anticipation of future development. Brush and shrubs are still present along portions of the Site's
perimeter.
2.0 Groundwater Characterization
Groundwater at the Site is characterized in accordance with 310 CMR 40.0933(2) as required for
Method 3 Risk Characterization. Groundwater at a site may be classified as one or all of the
groundwater categories presented in the MCP.
The Massachusetts Geographic Information System (MassGIS) Site Scoring map for the Site
(Figure 3) shows that the Site is not within a Current Drinking Water Source Area or Potential
Drinking Water Source Area as defined in the MCP. There are no private water supply wells at or
in the inunediate vicinity of the Site. Thus, groundwater at the Site is not considered to be GW-l.
Although there are no buildings currently located on the Site, the Site is proposed to be
developed into a mixed use property. Additionally, the depth to the water table at the Site is less
than 15 feet on portions of the Site. Therefore, groundwater at the Site is classified as GW-2.
Groundwater at the Site is also classified as GW-3, since, by definition, all groundwater in the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts is considered GW-3.
3.0 Hazard Identification
In this section we present the data used in the risk characterization. From these data we identify
the compounds of concern (COCs) at the Site and chemical and physical data relevant to the
behavior of these compounds in the environment.
3.1 Analytical Data Used in the Risk Characterization
The data used in the risk characterization represent groundwater samples collected from the Site
by TTR in April, May, July and October 2007 and January and April 2008; landfill gas samples
collected from the Site by Griffin Engineering Group, LLC (Griffin Engineering) in August
2008. A summary of the groundwater data collected from the Site and used to evaluate risks is
presented in Table I. The landfill gas data is presented in Table I of the TTEC report included in
Appendix F.
The laboratory certificates of analyses for Site groundwater samples were provided with previous
submittals to DEP. Laboratory certificates of analysis for the landfill gas data are attached to the
TTEC report included in Appendix F.
Tetra Tech Rizzo
2
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
3.2 Selection of the Compounds of Concern
COCs were selected from the compounds detected in the groundwater at the Site. The
compounds detected in Site groundwater during the referenced investigations and sampling
periods are considered in the risk characterization as COCs. As shown in Table 1, calcium was
detected in Site ground water, which is considered an essential human nutrient. Therefore,
calcium is not included as a COC in this risk characterization.
3.3 Physical and Chemical Properties of the Constituents
This section summarizes the physical and chemical properties of the substances evaluated. These
values can be used to model a compound's behavior in a given situation. For example, vapor
pressure can be used to estimate the amount of a compound that is present in the air based on the
concentration of that compound found in the soil at a given location. The physical and chemical
constants listed below are used in this assessment. Chemical-specific constants are listed in Table
2.
Molecular and Atomic Weight (MW, measured in grams per mole). Weights are a
measure of the mass and size of a compound. In general, the heavier substances are less
soluble in water and are more likely to have a higher Henry's Law constant, a higher water-
carbon partition coefficient, and a lower octanol-water coefficient. These properties are
described below.
Water Solubility (S, measured in milligrams per liter). Solubility is a measure of the
amount of a substance that will dissolve in water. Compounds that have a high solubility are
likely to migrate via water pathways, and compounds with a low solubility are more likely to
remain in soil.
Vapor Pressure (Vp, measured in millimeters of mercury, or torr). Vapor pressure
measures the tendency of a molecule to volatilize or evaporate from a pure phase at a given
temperature.
Henry's Law constant (He, measured in atmosphere-cubic meters per mole). The
Henry's Law constant for an organic compound measures its tendency to volatilize from an
aqueous solution. The higher the constant, the more completely a compound volatilizes from
water. Experiments suggest that compounds with a higher Henry's Law constant volatilize
from a pure phase more rapidly as well.
Water-Carbon Partition Coefficient (Koc. milliliters per gram or unitless). This
coefficient is a measure of a compound's tendency to adsorb to carbon from water. It can be
used to predict whether a compound will remain in solution or bind to soils or sediments. The
greater the coefficient, the higher the probability that a compound will bind with soils rather
than remain dissolved in surface water or groundwater.
Octanoi-Water Partition Coefficient (Kow. log
10
of a dimensionless ratio). This
coefficient is a measure of a compound's tendency to dissolve preferentially in either water
Tetra Tech Rizzo
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or an organic or oily phase. A compound with a greater octanol-water partition coefficient is
more likely to pass from the water phase into the oily phase and is also more likely to
accumulate in fish or animal fats.
3.4 Comparison to Natural and Anthropogenic Background Concentrations
Table 3 presents common ranges of concentrations found in groundwater for the identified Site
groundwater COCs, where available. The maximum reported concentrations of all COCs
detected in Site groundwater with the exception of mercury and toluene are above the available
lowest concentrations commonly found in groundwater. In order to be conservative, all Site
groundwater COCs including mercury and toluene were carried through the risk characterization.
3.5 Toxicity Profiles
Toxicity Profiles have been prepared for groundwater COCs evaluated in this report. The toxicity
profiles are included in Appendix B.
3.6 Applicable or Suitably Analogous Standards and Guidelines
As required by 310 CMR 40.0900, we compared COC exposure point concentrations to public
health standards or guidelines that may provide a context for Site conditions. In Section 2.0 of
this risk characterization, we classified Site groundwater with respect to exposure potential.
Groundwater at the Site is not considered GW-1 according to 310 CMR 40.0993(3). Therefore,
the Site groundwater concentrations are not compared to Massachusetts drinking water
standards. Groundwater exposure point concentrations (EPCs) are estimated and used to assess
risk as described in this report.
4.0 Dose Response Assessment
This section discusses toxicological data associated with exposure to COCs. These data are used
to estimate carcinogenic risks and noncarcinogenic hazards.
4.1 Toxicological Properties
This section summarizes reference doses and the toxicological properties of the substances that
are evaluated in this report. The information presented has been obtained from the
Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database,
the Environmental Protection Agency's Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables (HEAST),
and other sources as referenced in Table 4. We obtained information from current IRIS files and
from the 1997 HEAST for this report. We also utilized toxicity information from the Background
Documentation for the Development of the MCP Numerical Standards (DEP, 1994) and the
October 2002 Final Policy, Characterizing Risks Posed by Petroleum Contaminated Sites:
Implementation ofMADEP VPH/EPH Approach.
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Compounds of concern were evaluated for both carcinogenic toxicity and chronic or subchronic
systemic toxicity, depending upon the duration of exposure. Carcinogenic toxicity always refers
to a lifetime cumulative effect of a given substance, while systemic (noncarcinogenic) toxicity
may refer to several exposure durations. Subchronic, or short -term, exposures generally occur
over a period of two weeks to seven years, while chronic exposures generally occur over a
greater period of time. In this report, we evaluated chronic systemic exposures for hypothetical
future utility workers that perform utility repair and maintenance who may be exposed for longer
than seven years. Similarly, we evaluated subchronic systemic exposures for construction
workers on the Site who may be exposed for approximately one year.
4.1.1 Noncarcinogenic Effects
The systemic toxicity of noncarcinogenic substances can be estimated using Reference Doses
(RIDs). A chronic RID is an estimate of the daily exposure to an individual human that may
occur without an appreciable risk of harmful effects during a lifetime of exposure. The units of
the reference dose for humans are milligrams of compound per kilogram of body weight over
one day of exposure (mg/(kgday)). For inhalation exposures, EPA establishes chronic
Reference Concentrations (RfCs), from which benchmark doses may be derived using standard
exposure assumptions: an inhalation rate of 20 cubic meters per hour and a body weight of 70 kg.
RIDs and RfCs are derived from No Observed Adverse Effect Levels (NOAELs) measured in
animal experiments and extrapolated to human dose. RIDs and RfCs are inversely proportional
to toxicity; that is, a lower RID or RfC signifies a greater toxicity.
The EPA also derives subchronic RIDs and RfCs, which estimate the daily exposure to an
individual human that may occur without an appreciable risk of harmful effects from an exposure
ranging from two weeks to seven years. Whenever possible, EPA estimates these subchronic
toxicity values using studies comparable to subchronic exposures. However, when appropriate
studies are unavailable, EPA adopts the chronic RID as the subchronic RID or does not publish a
subchronic toxicity value. EPA publishes subchronic RIDs and RfCs in HEAST.
The subchronic and chronic effect(s) of a compound measured by RIDs do not include
carcinogenic effects of the compound. RIDs and RfCs for the Site COCs are presented in Table
4. Carcinogenic effects are considered separately and are discussed below.
4.1.2 Carcinogenic Effects
The toxic effect of carcinogenic substances can be estimated using a Cancer Potency Factor
(CPF). The CPF is the result of a low-dose extrapolation procedure and is presented as the risk
per dose of compound (mg/(kgday)r
1
From the CPF, risk per concentration in air (J.!g/m
3
r
1
or
unit risks for the inhalation pathway have been derived. EPA has not developed cancer potency
factors for dermal exposures, and we apply ingestion CPFs for dermal exposures in this
assessment.
The EPA classifies carcinogenic compounds using a Weight of Evidence classification. In
general, EPA's classification is as follows:
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Group A
Group 81
Group 82
Group C
Group D
GroupE
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Human carcinogen
Probable human carcinogen
Probable human carcinogen; sufficient evidence in animals and limited or no
evidence in humans
Possible human carcinogen; limited evidence in animals and limited or no
evidence in humans
Not classifiable as to human carcinogenicity; insufficient tests for
carcinogenesis or mutagenesis are available.
Evidence of noncarcinogenicity in humans; Group E is rarely used and does not
apply to the compounds used in this risk
Because CPFs measure risk per dose, they are directly proportional to carcinogenicity; that is, a
greater CPF signifies greater carcinogenicity. CPFs are presented in Table 4.
4.2 Bioavailability of Study Compounds
Relative Absorption Factors (RAFs) represent the bioavailability of each compound to humans in
natural settings relative to their bioavailability to animals under the laboratory conditions from
which the toxicological potency value was prepared. The formulas for estimating dose provide
for differences in RAFs for carcinogenic and.noncarcinogenic effects and for different pathways.
Depending on the exposure pathway used in an animal experiment (inhalation, ingestion in
drinking water, ingestion in food, forced feeding) and the human exposure pathway of concern
(e.g., inhalation, ingestion of or dermal contact with soil), the compound may be more or less
bioavailable to humans than to experimental animals. Further, because RIDs and CPFs for the
same compound are derived from separate animal experiments that may not have used the same
exposure pathway, the RAFs for carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic effects for a given compound
may be different. Relative Absorption Factors used in this Risk Characterization are provided in
Table 5.
5.0 Exposure Assessment
The exposure assessment models the potential for receptors at the Site to contact contaminants in
Site media. Exposure is the measure of the amount of a substance that a human will take into the
body over a period of time. This can be expressed as a dose (e.g. in milligrams of substance per
kilogram, mg/kg, per kilogram of human body weight over time). The exposure dose will be
directly proportional to the amount of the compound that is present for human intake and is
dependent on the route of introduction into the body. The toxicity of a compound is measured in
terms of dose as discussed previously.
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An exposure profile describes possible exposures to a given receptor and consists of the
following segments: (1) a receptor, (2) a source, and (3) a route of exposure. If any of these
segments is not present, the exposure pathway is incomplete and need not be evaluated.
5.1 Human Receptors
In this risk characterization, we considered potential direct contact groundwater exposures to the
groups of receptors listed below.
Construction workers. Construction workers redeveloping the Site are expected to come
into intense short-term contact with Site groundwater.
Utility workers. Utility workers who may need to make repairs to underground utilities are
assumed to come into short-term contact with Site groundwater.
Construction and utility workers at the Site will also likely have direct contact with Site soils
and/or solid waste containing OHM during Site development activities. As shown on the soil
data summary table (Appendix E), the average concentrations of analytes detected in Site soil are
for the most part below the MCP Method 1 S-1/GW-2 and S-1/GW-3 standards. However, the
average concentrations ofbenzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, lead, nickel and TPH exceed
the Method 1 S-1/GW-2 and S-1/GW-3 standards. A Health and Safety plan for Site workers
handling OHM impacted soils/solid waste during construction and utility repair activities at the
Site will be developed for the Site by a qualified enviromnental professional. Additionally, we
recommend that a soils management plan which addresses the characterization, segregation,
handling, transportation and disposal of contaminated soils, hazardous substances and solid
waste encountered during earthwork operations be prepared for the Site prior to the
commencement of development activities at the Site.
5.2 Exposure Routes
The potential receptors identified above may be exposed to COCs in Site groundwater via dermal
contact with groundwater in a trench. The baseline risk characterization evaluates risks to the
receptors listed above from COCs that have not been remediated. Additionally, we assume that
potentially exposed individuals are unaware of the potential hazards and do not wear any
protective clothing beyond street apparel or work clothes.
5.3 Exposures Not Evaluated
The following exposures are not evaluated because they are unlikely to occur due to lack of
exposure points or exposure mechanisms; therefore, the exposure pathways are incomplete.
We did not evaluate exposures to groundwater via a drinking water pathway because Site
groundwater is not classified as GW-1.
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5.4 Exposure Profiles
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The exposure experienced by any receptor is dependent on the activity of that receptor. In this
risk characterization, we evaluate dermal exposure to Site groundwater for potential future
construction workers and utility workers.
Profiles for each receptor evaluated in this risk characterization are described in Appendix C. A
summary of the values and assumptions used to quantifY exposure to these receptors is presented
in Table 6. The exposure assumptions are health-protective based on current and foreseeable
conditions at the Site.
5.5 Estimation of Exposure Point Concentrations
Exposure point concentrations (EPCs) represent the estimated concentration of a compound to
which a receptor may be exposed at the point of exposure. The exposure point concentration of a
compound in air may be estimated from the source concentration of that compound in
groundwater. The following assumptions are made in the risk characterization, in keeping with
the Guidance:
For compounds detected at least once above detection limit, samples reported as not detected
(ND) by the laboratory are assumed to have a concentration of one-half of the method
detection limit (MDL) for that sample.
Concentrations on the Site remain unchanged over time.
In order to be conservative, the maximum concentrations of COCs detected in Site groundwater
are used as the EPCs in this risk characterization. The groundwater EPCs are presented in Table
1. We used these EPCs to estimate exposures and risks to construction workers and utility
workers.
5.5.1 Hot Spots
We evaluated the groundwater data to determine whether the contamination found in Site
groundwater could be classified as a hot spot. As defined in the Guidance, a hot spot is "a
discrete area where.the concentrations of oil or hazardous materials are substantially higher than
those concentrations in the surrounding area". None of the concentrations detected in Site
groundwater were found to be consistent with the definition of a hot spot.
5.5.2 Groundwater- Dermal Contact
We assumed that a construction worker and a utility worker at the Site may come into contact
with the groundwater at the Site because it is at a shallow depth in some areas of the Site. During
future construction activities, such as excavation of trenches and foundations, a construction
worker may come in contact with groundwater. As discussed above, we used the maximum
detected concentration for each groundwater COCas the EPC (see Table 1).
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5.6 Estimation of Receptor-Specific Exposure Factors
After estimating EPCs, we estimate exposure doses to humans. We first estimate an average
daily dose on a day of exposure [ADD (d)] separately for each compound and pathway for each
receptor. Generally, we calculate dose via the following equation:
Dose= EPC * Receptor-specific Exposure Factor * RAF
The RAF is the Relative Absorption Factor, a percentage representing the how readily a
compound is absorbed into the body. RAFs are specific to the route of exposure and the medium
to which exposure occurs.
In general, the Receptor-specific Exposure Factors incorporate the following similar features:
Rate of exposure or intake
Frequency of exposure(# events/time)
Duration of exposure events (time/event, i.e., hours exposed)
Duration of exposure period (time, years)
An averaging period (70 years for carcinogenic exposures, shorter periods for
noncarcinogenic exposures [1 to 25 years])
Conversion factor to reconcile the units
Body weight of the receptor (kg)
The exposure calculations are presented in Tables C-1 and C-2 in Appendix C.
6.0 Risk Characterization
This section combines information on chemical toxicity with modeled exposures to estimate
risks and hazards associated with compounds detected in environmental media at the Site.
6.1 Noncancer Health Hazards
The Hazard Index (HI) is a measure of systemic (noncancer) toxicity and is defined as the ratio
of an estimated dose of a compound to its RfD. We estimate the chronic or subchronic HI as the
ratio of the Average Daily Dose to the chronic or subchronic RID for each compound and each
pathway.
We estimate His separately for each COC and pathway from the equation below. In the absence
of specific information on possible synergisms or antagonisms, we sum across all compounds
and all exposure pathways to obtain a Total Site HI for each receptor. We calculate His for the
most sensitive receptor. As stated, for the resident receptors, the HI is calculated for the child.
The following general equations are used to calculate hazard indices for each exposure.
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ADD(y)( mg )=EPC(mg)xRSF(-'-)
kg day kg day
ADD(y)( mg )xRAF"'
HI= kgday
RjD( mg )
kgday
Where:
ADD(y)
= Average daily dose over 1 year (mg/kgday)
EPC
= Exposure Point Concentration (usually in mg/kg, IJQ/L, or flQ/m3)
RSF
=
Receptor-Specific Exposure Factor (1/day)
HI
=
Hazard Index
RAF,c
=
Relative Absorption Factor for noncarcinogenic effects
RID = Chronic or subchronic compounds- and pathway- specific reference dose
(mg/kgday)
Strictly, the assumption of additivity to obtain a Total Site HI holds only for compounds that act
on the same target organ or system by the same mechanism. According to the Guidance, if the
sum of His over all compounds for a receptor is less than 1.0, no assessment of organ-specific
effects is necessary. On the other hand, if the sum of His is greater than 1.0, further assessment
of organ-specific effects may be needed.
6.2 Cancer Risks
The Cancer Risk represents a probability of increased incidence of cancer occurring in a given
population and is defined as the dose of a given compound times its Cancer Potency Factor
(CPF). We estimate this probability as the ADD (averaged over the receptor's lifetime) times the
CPF for each compound and each pathway, as shown in the following equations:
ADD(life { mg ) = EPC(mg)x RSF(-'-)
\kgday kg day
ELCR = ADD(life)( mg )xCPF(kgday)x RAF'c:
kgday mg
Where:
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ADD(Iife) =
EPC =
RSF =
ELCR =
CPF =
RAFc =
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Average Daily Dose over a lifetime (mg/kgday)
Exposure Point Concentration (usually in mg/kg, f.lg/L, or flg/m
3
)
Receptor-Specific Exposure Factor (1/day)
Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk
Compound- and pathway-specific cancer potency factor (mg/kgday)-1
Relative Absorption Factor for carcinogenic effects
We estimate Cancer Risks separately for each contaminant and pathway. We then sum across
compounds to obtain a Cancer Risk for each pathway for each receptor. Finally, we sum across
all pathways for each receptor to obtain a Total Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk (ELCR) for each
receptor. The Total Cancer Risk is compared to the DEP Cancer Risk Limit of l.OE-05, as
discussed below.
6.3 Applicable or Suitably Analogous Standards
The MCP requires the comparison of all current and foreseeable exposure point concentrations to
applicable or suitably analogous standards (310 CMR 40.0993(3)). In Section 2.0 of this risk
characterization, we classifY Site soil and groundwater with respect to exposure potential.
Groundwater at the Site is not considered GW-1 according to 310 CMR 40.0993(3); therefore,
the Site groundwater concentrations are not compared to Massachusetts drinking water
standards. The following paragraphs describe the applicable standards.
Regulators and others have generally considered incremental lifetime cancer risks ofless than 1
x 10'
6
(i.e., one in one million) acceptable or de minimus risks and have generally considered
risks greater than 1 x 1 o-
4
(i.e., 1 in 1 0,000) unacceptable or de manifestis risks. State and federal
agencies now offer specific guidance on the interpretation of numerical estimates for both cancer
risks and noncancer health hazards, which we summarize below.
The DEP previously issued and revised a key regulation (MCP, 1988, 310 CMR 40.0000, revised
1993) containing risk management numbers. It offers benchmarks for assessing the importance
of lifetime risks at a site using a Method 3 Risk Characterization:
The Cumulative Receptor Cancer Risks shall be compared to a Cumulative Cancer Risk
Limit which is an Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk equal to one-in-one hundred thousand.
Cumulative Receptor Non-cancer Risks shall be compared to a Cumulative Non-cancer Risk
Limit, which is a Hazard Index equal to one.
A condition of no significant risk of harm to human health exists or has been achieved if: (a)
no Exposure Point Concentration of oil and/or hazardous material is greater than an
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applicable or suitably analogous public health standard; (b) no Cumulative Receptor Cancer
Risk calculated is greater than the Cumulative Cancer Risk Limit; and (c) no Cumulative
Receptor Non-cancer Risk is greater than the Cumulative Receptor Non-cancer Risk Limit.
[310 CMR 40.0993(6) and (7), emphasis added]
Rephrasing, the DEP has established benchmarks of one in one hundred thousand (equal to 1 x
1 o-
5
or 1 in 1 00,000) as the total risk limit for carcinogenic exposures; and 1.0 as the HI limit for
total noncancer health effects.
6.4 Estimated Noncancer Health Hazards and Cancer Risks
His and ELCRs for the potential construction workers and utility workers are calculated in
Tables D-1 and D-2 in Appendix D.
6.4.1 Summary of His and ELCRs
Table 7 summarizes the risks to the receptors evaluated for the Site in this risk characterization.
The His and ELCRs estimated for all receptors are below the DEP limits for conditions
evaluated at the Site. Therefore, we determined that a condition of"No Significant Risk" to
human health exists at the Site for the conditions evaluated.
7.0 Characterization of Risk to Public Safety and Public Welfare
In addition to evaluating short- and long-term health risks to individuals potentially exposed to
compounds detected at the Site, the MCP requires an evaluation of risks to public safety and
welfare. We characterize these risks as specified in the MCP, and we present our findings below.
7.1 Public Safety Risk Characterization
The general definition of harm to safety in the MCP (310 CMR 40.0992(4) and 310 CMR
40.0960) states that a level of no significant risk to safety exists or has been achieved if the
conditions at a site which are related to a release of oil and/or hazardous material do not
currently and will not in the foreseeable future pose a threat of physical harm or bodily injury to
people.
Threats to public safety include physical conditions and chemical agents that may cause bodily
harm or injury (e.g., burns or fractures) as opposed to illness. No uncontained materials
exhibiting characteristics of corrosivity, reactivity, or flammability were found on the Site. No
open pits, lagoons, drums, dangerous structures, or other apparent threats to public safety and no
danger of fire from the conditions evaluated in this report have been observed. Methane was
detected above the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) in some gas wells located at the Site. No
methane was detected in the building on the abutting residential complex, or in the soil gas in the
vicinity ofthe building. Indoor air methane levels were not measured at the Site since there are
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no buildings currently located atthe Site. Thus, we find a condition of"No Significant Risk" of
harm to public safety exists for the conditions observed at the Site.
The proposed development includes the construction of several buildings for retail, office,
restaurant, and childcare use. The presence of methane gas above the LEL in the subsurface
could pose a potential risk to public safety. However, the Corrective Action Design includes
mitigating measures such as vapor barrier and gas venting systems to be implemented during the
development of the Site to prevent potential entraimnent of methane in future Site buildings.
Once the Site is developed, the condition of"No Significant Risk" will depend on maintenance
of the mitigating measures mentioned above. The proposed mitigation measures and plans for
maintenance and monitoring during the post-closure period are described in the Engineering
Design Report and Corrective Action Design plans.
7.2 Public Welfare Risk Characterization
Threats to public welfare include any conditions that may result in the existence of nuisance
conditions, loss of property value, or the unilateral restriction of the use of other people's
property, and other societal costs due to the degradation of public or private resources, both
physical and intangible. As stated in the Guidance, for a threat to exist, these conditions must
preclude the full use of the resources at the Site under existing conditions or conditions about to
occur. Hydrogen sulfide (H
2
S) has been detected in the western area of the Site above the three
odor thresholds listed in Table 17 of Appendix F, but below the lowest occupational health limit
of 10 ppm. However, there are no known complaints of ambient air odors at the Site. In addition,
no evidence of strong, pungent or noxious odors was noted by TTR personnel during
investigations conducted at the Site. It should also be noted that no H
2
S was detected inside the
residential building located on the property that abuts the Site to the southwest. Any potential
odor issues will be addressed with mitigating measures such as vapor barriers and gas venting
systems during the development of the Site.
The DEP defines Upper Concentration Limits (UCLs) as concentrations of OHM, which if
exceeded by the average concentration in the area of the release, indicate the potential for
significant risk of harm to public welfare and the enviromnent under future conditions. Table 8
presents UCLs for groundwater for the COCs, where available. The average detected
groundwater concentrations of site COCs do not exceed the UCLs. For the reasons discussed in
this Section, we find a condition of"No Significant Risk" of harm to public welfare exists for the
conditions observed at the Site.
8.0 Environmental Risk Characterization
Potential risks to the enviromnent were evaluated using the Method 3 Stage I Screening
Assessment (Section 9.0 of the Guidance). The MCP requires that an ecological risk
characterization be performed for any disposal site, such as the subject of this analysis, at which
a Method 3 human health risk characterization is performed. The Stage I Screening Assessment
identifies whether there is potential for exposure and assesses whether "apparent significant
harm" has occurred to enviromnental receptors at a disposal site. The objective of the Screening
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Assessment is to eliminate from further evaluation those situations that are unlikely to result in
ecological harm. For sites for which either potential for exposure has not been identified or at
which "apparent significant harm" is not likely to occur, a condition of "no significant risk of
harm to the environment" exists. However, for sites at which the potential for exposure exists
and "apparent significant harm" may occur, a quantitative assessment (Method 1 or 2) for that
site must be performed.
8.1 Stage I Screening Assessment
The Site setting was reviewed to determine if potential environmental receptors, exposure
pathways, and exposure points were situated on and near the Site. Potential receptors were
defined as those receptors situated within 500 feet of the Site and exposed to oil and/or
hazardous materials in groundwater. The Massachusetts Natural Heritage Atlas (11th Edition-
valid from July 1, 2003) and the Massachusetts Surface Water Quality Standards, Basin
Classification and Maps (314 CMR 4.06) were also inspected to determine the presence of rare
wetlands wildlife habitat and the DEP-assigned surface water classification in the area of the
Site.
Potential environmental receptors identified within 500 feet of the site include resident and
transient wildlife. Potential exposure pathway at the Site is identified as groundwater flow. The
potential exposure point identified for the Site is contact with groundwater. According to the
Massachusetts Geographic Information System (MassGIS) map of the Site area (Figure 3), no
Areas of Critical Environmental Concern or Outstanding Resource Waters are located within 500
feet of the Site. The MassGIS map shows wetlands and an intermittent brook within 500 feet of
the Site to the east/southeast. The Massachusetts Natural Heritage Atlas (11th Edition) 'shows no
Priority Habitat for Rare Species, Estimated Habitat of Rare Wildlife or Certified Vernal Pools
within 500 feet of the Site.
The potential for adverse effects on environmental receptors within 500 feet of the Site that are
potentially exposed to OHM in groundwater was evaluated using an effects-based screening
approach. The EPCs for groundwater were compared to DEP UCLs as shown in Table 8. In
addition, the groundwater EPCs were diluted by a factor of 10 corresponding to the percentage
used by DEP to calculate GW-3 groundwater standards from EPA surface water Ambient Water
Quality Criteria (A WQC). These adjusted data were then compared to the A WQC chronic
values for freshwater, where available (Table 9). No exceedences ofUCLs or A WQCs were
identified. Therefore, we find a condition of"No Significant Risk" of harm to the environment
exists for the Site conditions evaluated.
Therefore, it is determined that a condition of"No Significant Risk" of harm to the environment
Based on the Stage I Screening Assessment, a Stage II Environmental Risk Characterization is
not required for this Site.
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9.0 Uncertainty in the Analysis
As in any risk assessment, the estimated health risks entail many uncertainties. In general, we
have selected conservative assumptions to err on the side of public health and safety and protect
from the effects of these uncertainties. While it is unlikely that the uncertainties inherent in each
step of this analysis will combine in a strictly additive fashion, the overall uncertainty can never
be smaller than the least certain step in the series of calculations. Some uncertainty is associated
with the sampling and analysis plan, with the available information on toxicity, with our
exposure assumptions, and with the methods used to estimate the health effects. We discuss these
uncertainties in greater detail below.
9.1 Sampling Plan, Analytical Data, and Exposure Point Concentrations
Some uncertainty is associated with the sampling methodology and the analysis of samples used
in this assessment. The fact that some wells were sampled more than once reduces the
uncertainty of our results. A larger data set allows us to average concentrations over time and to
represent groundwater concentrations more accurately. Technology and state-of-the art sampling
procedures usually improve over time; therefore, some data results could be improved by more
sophisticated sampling techniques.
Additionally, this risk characterization assumes that compound concentrations remain constant
over time. This overestimates actual concentrations over time (provided the source has been
removed) because processes such as biodegradation, volatilization, transport, and other physical,
chemical, and biological processes will likely diminish the compound concentrations for most of
the evaluated contaminants.
Specific assumptions and input parameters are explained in the exposure and risk calcuhltion in
Appendices (C and D).
9.2 Toxicity Information
The toxicity information (RIDs and CPFs) developed by the EPA is conservative and contributes
to the overall degree of uncertainty of the risk assessment. To develop the RIDs, the EPA divides
a published NOAEL or LOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level or Lowest Observed
Adverse Effect Level) for a sensitive effect in a sensitive subspecies by several factors of I 0 to
account for differences between exposure route, species, and sensitivity of the study. The EPA
stresses that RIDs do not represent doses where adverse health effects will occur. Nonetheless,
both the EPA and DEP regulate sites when a Hazard Index exceeds one.
The EPA estimates the Cancer Potency Factor as the 95th percentile upper bound on the slope of
the linear multistage model fit to animal data and then extrapolated to humans. This method
assumes that any dose, no matter how small, results in some incremental risk. However, recent
toxicological studies suggest that some compounds require some threshold dose before an
adverse or pre-carcinogenic effect is observed. The toxicity data developed by EPA are very
conservative. This conservatism is incorporated into the risk calculations.
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9.3 Exposure Assumptions
Some uncertainty is inherent in our exposure assumptions. When we lack reliable data for a
receptor's frequency and duration of exposure, we choose conservative estimates based on
published population information.
9.4 Methods to Estimate Potential Health Effects
The methods used in this assessment to estimate health effects, although widely used and
accepted, do not account for transport, metabolism, storage, and excretion of compounds in or
from the body. As such, the dose estimates presented represent a dose of a compound effectively
applied to the body at the bloodstream interface; they do not represent a physiologically active or
effective dose and thus likely overestimate risk. Further, lacking specific information on
synergisms and antagonisms between compounds, we do not account for these interactions.
10.0 Conclusions
We compared estimated His for each receptor to the DEP acceptable noncancer risk limit of 1.0,
and we compared estimated ELCRs for each receptor to the DEP acceptable cancer risk limit of
l.Ox!0"
5
(or ten in I million).
The His and ELCRs estimated for the construction worker and utility worker are below the DEP
risk limits for conditions evaluated at the Site. Therefore, a condition of "No Significant Risk" of
harm to human health currently exists at the Site for conditions evaluated in this risk
characterization (i.e. dermal contact with Site groundwater). However, as noted in Appendix F
there is a condition of "Significant Risk" of potential harm to human health at the Site due to the
fact the ELCR estimated for potential future residents with lifelong exposure to the released
LFGs was above the DEP risk limit of 1.0 E-5, due to potential vapor intrusion into the indoor air
of a hypothetical new slab-on-grade residence in this area. The LFG constituent
tetrachloroethene was the principal risk driver.
Based on the results of a Stage I Screening Assessment, we determined that a condition of"No
Significant Risk" of harm to the environment exists for the Site conditions evaluated and a Stage
II Environmental Risk Characterization is not required for this Site.
Threats to public welfare include any conditions that may result in the existence of nuisance
conditions, loss of property value, or the unilateral restriction ofthe use of other people's
property, and other societal costs due to the degradation of public or private resources, both
physical and intangible. As stated in the Guidance, for a threat to exist, these conditions must
preclude the full use of the resources at the Site under existing conditions or conditions about to
occur. H
2
S has been detected in the western area of the Site above the three odor thresholds listed
in Table 17 of Appendix F, but below the lowest occupational health limit of 10 ppm. However,
there are no known complaints of ambient air odors at the Site. In addition, no evidence of
strong, pungent or noxious odors was noted by TTR personnel during investigations conducted at
the Site. It should also be noted that no HzS was detected inside the residential building located
Tetra Tech Rizzo
16
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
on the property that abuts the Site to the southwest. Any potential odor issues will be addressed
with mitigating measures such as vapor barriers and gas venting systems during the development
of the Site. The DEP defines UCLs as concentrations of OHM, which if exceeded by the average
concentration in the area of the release, indicate the potential for significant risk of harm to
public welfare and the environment under future conditions. The average groundwater
concentrations of COCs do not exceed the UCLs. Thus, we find a condition of "No Significant
Risk" of harm to public welfare exists at the Site for the conditions observed at the Site.
The general definition of harm to safety in the MCP (31 0 CMR 40.0992( 4) and 310 CMR
40.0960) states that a level of no significant risk to safety exists or has been achieved if the
conditions at a site which are related to a release of oil and/or hazardous material do not
currently and will not in the foreseeable future pose a threat of physical harm or bodily injury to
people. Threats to public safety include physical conditions and chemical agents that may cause
bodily harm or injury (e.g., bums or fractures) as opposed to illness. No uncontained materials
exhibiting characteristics of corrosivity, reactivity, or flammability were found on the Site. No
open pits, lagoons, drums, dangerous structures, or other apparent threats to public safety and no
danger of fire from the conditions evaluated in this report have been observed. Methane was
detected above the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) in some gas wells located at the Site. No
methane was detected in the building on the abutting residential complex, or in the soil gas in the
vicinity of the building. Indoor air methane levels were not measured at the Site since there are
no buildings currently located at the Site. For current and future uses of the Site, groundwater
contamination does not present a threat to public safety. Thus, we find a condition of "No
Significant Risk" of harm to public safety exists for the conditions observed at the Site.
The proposed development includes the construction of several buildings for retail, office,
restaurant, and childcare use. The presence of methane gas above the LEL in the subsurface
could pose a potential risk to public safety. However, the Corrective Action Design includes
mitigating measures such as vapor barrier and gas venting systems to be implemented during the
development of the Site to prevent potential entrainment of methane in future Site buildings.
Once the Site is developed, the condition of"No Significant Risk" will depend on maintenance
of the mitigating measures mentioned above. The proposed mitigation measures and plans for
maintenance and monitoring during the post-closure period are described in the Engineering
Design Report and Corrective Action Design plans.
In conclusion, a condition of"No Significant Risk" of harm to public safety, public welfare and
the environment has been found to exist on the Site for the conditions evaluated. However, as
discussed in Appendix F, there is a condition of"Significant Risk" of potential harm to human
health atthe Site for the conditions evaluated. Specifically, the ELCR estimated for potential
future residents with lifelong exposure to the released LFGs was above the DEP risk limit of 1.0
E-5, due to potential vapor intrusion into the indoor air of a hypothetical new slab-on-grade
residence in this area.
The current development plans do not include residential construction. We anticipate that the
approved post-closure use will not include residences, thus restricting residential development
and mitigating the risk to hypothetical future site residences. Furthermore, the proposed
Tetra Tech Rizzo
17
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
commercial buildings will incorporate vapor barriers and a passive venting system to prevent
vapor entrainment in the proposed buildings.
Construction and utility workers at the Site will likely have direct contact with Site soils and/or
solid waste containing OHM during Site development activities. A Health and Safety plan for
Site workers handling OHM impacted soils/solid waste during construction and utility repair
activities at the Site will be developed for the Site by a qualified environmental professional.
Additionally, we recommend that a soils management plan which addresses the characterization,
segregation, handling, transportation and disposal of contaminated soils, hazardous substances
and solid waste encountered during earthwork operations be prepared for the Site prior to the
commencement of development activities at the Site.
We have prepared these estimates using conservative (i.e., health-protective) assumptions. Thus,
the hazard indices and cancer risks presented above provide an upper-bound estimate of health
risks from quantified Site compounds to the groups of potentially exposed individuals considered
in the assessment. Health risks resulting from differing durations or frequencies from those
described in this report would increase or decrease proportionately in accordance with the
particular changes in exposure patterns.
11.0 Abbreviations and Acronyms
The following list defines the abbreviations and acronyms used in this report and associated
tables.
ADD
ADD( d)
ADD (Life)
ADD(y)
ATSDR
AWQC
COG
CPF
D
DEP
ELCR
EPA
EPC
G
He
HEAST
HI
IRIS
Kg
Koc
Kow
Average Daily Dose
Average Daily Dose averaged over a day on which exposure occurs
Average Daily Dose averaged over a lifetime of 70 years
Average Daily Dose averaged over a year in which exposure occurs
Agency of Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
Ambient Water Quality Criteria
Compound of Concern
Cancer Potency Factor
Day
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection
Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Exposure point concentration
Gram
Henry's Law Constant
Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables
Hazard Index
Integrated Risk Information System
Kilogram
Partition coefficient between water and organic carbon
Partition coefficient between water and octanol
Tetra Tech Rizzo
18
LEL
LFG
LOAEL
L
MCP
MMCL
MDL
M
Mg
flg
MW
ND
NOAEL
OHM
PPB
PPM
PRG
RAF
RAO
RIC
RID
RSF
s
UCLs
VOCs
Vp
y
Lower Explosive Limit
Landfill Gas
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Schier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
Lowest Observed Adverse Effects Level
Liter
Massachusetts Contingency Plan
Massachusetts Maximum Contaminant Level
Method Detection Limit
Meter
Milligram
Microgram
Molecular weight
Not detected
No Observed Adverse Effect Level
Oil and Hazardous Material
Parts Per Billion
Parts Per Million
Preliminary Remediation Goal
Relative Absorption Factor
Response Action Outcome
Reference Concentration
Reference Dose
Receptor-Specific Factor
Solubility (aqueous)
Upper Concentration Limits
Volatile Organic Compounds
Vapor pressure
Year
12.0 References
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Toxicological Profiles for Chemicals.
Bodek, I., W. J. Lyman, W. F. Reehl, and D. H. Rosenblatt. Environmental Inorganic Chemistry,
Properties, Processes, and Estimation Methods, Pergamon Press, New York. 1988.
Bowen, H. J. M. Environmental Chemistry of the Elements, Academic Press, London. 1979.
Dean, J. A. Lange's Handbook of Chemistry, 13th Edition, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New
York. Ed. 1985.
GCA Corporation. Development of Statistical Distributions or Ranges of Standard Factors Used
in Exposure Assessments (EPA 68-02-351 0), Septem\Jer 1984.
Howard, P. H. Handbook of Environmental Fate and Exposure Data for Organic Chemicals,
Lewis Publishers, Chelsea, Missouri. 1990.
Tetra Tech Rizzo
19
Human Health and Environmental Risk Characterization
Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road, Beverly, Massachusetts
Lyman, W. J., W. F. Reehl, and D. H. Rosenblatt. Handbook of Chemical Property Estimation
Methods- Environmental Behavior of Organic Compounds, McGraw-Hill Book Company,
New York. 1982 .
. Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. Characterizing Risks Posed by
Petroleum Contaminated Sites: Implementation ofVPH/EPH Approach, Final, October, 2002.
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. Guidance for Site Risk Characterization
and Related Phase II Activities In Support of the Massachusetts Contingency Plan. May 17,
1989, updated July 1995.
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. Documentation for the Risk Assessment
Shortform Residential Scenario. Policy #WSC/ORS-142-92. October 1992.
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. Natural Heritage and Endangered Species
Program. Massachusetts Natural Heritage Atlas. JJ'h Edition. Part 1 -Eastern Massachusetts.
Valid from July 1, 2003.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. Handbook ofRCRA Ground-water Monitoring
Constituents: Chemical & Physical Properties ( 40 CFR Part 264, Appendix 9). Office of Solid
Waste EPA530-R-92-022. September 1992.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. EPA-ECAO Regional Support Provisional
Values published in the EPA Region III Risk Based Concentration document, 1999.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables,
FY 1997. OERR 9200.6-303(97-1), March 1997.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. Exposure Factors Handbook. Office of Health
and Environmental Assessment, EPA/600/C-99/001. May 1999.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund,
Volume I, Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part A), Interim Final, EP A/540/1-89-002,
December 1989.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2000 Database Documented in Integrated Risk
Information System, Volume 1 and Electronic Information System. Office of Health and
Environmental Assessment. November, 2000.
United States Environmental Protection Agency. Method for Estimating Fugitive Particulate
Emissions from Hazardous Waste Sites. Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory,
Cincinnati, Ohio. EPA/600/2-87/066. 1987.
Verschueren, K. Handbook of Environmental Data on Organic Chemicals, Second Edition. Van
Nostrand Reinhold, New York. 1983.
Tetra Tech Rizzo
20
Sheet 1 of2
Table 1 Groundwater Analytical Data (\!91'L) Former Brimbal Avenue andfill, Massachusetts
Location: MW-2 MW-2 MW-2 RIZ-1 RIZ-1 RIZ-1 RIZ-1 RIZ-1 RIZ-2 RIZ-2 RIZ-2 RIZ-2
Sample Name: MW-2 MW-2 052207 MW-2 RIZ-1 052207 RIZ-1 RIZ-1102207 RIZ-1 RIZ-1 RIZ-2 052207 RIZ-2 102207 RIZ-2 RIZ-2
Laboratory: ALPHA ALPHA Spectrum MW-2 ALPHA PHOENIX Spectrum Spectrum Spectrum RIZ-1 ALPHA Spectrum Spectrum Spectrum RIZ-2
. Laboratory I.D.: L0705840-01 L0707 45801 SA73761-06 Well L0707458-02 AJ36116 SA69905-04RE1 SA73761-01 SA7797701 Well L0707458-03 SA69905-01 SA73761-0S SA77977-02 Well
Sample Date: 24-Apr-07 22-May-07 23-Jan-08 Average 22-May-07 26-Jul-07 22-0ct-07 23-Jan-08 30-Apr-08 Average 22-May-07 22-0ct-07 23-Jan-08 30-Apr-08 Average
Consultant: Rluo Rizzo Rizzo Rizzo VHB Rizzo Rizzo Rizzo Rizzo Rizzo Rizzo Rizzo
Benzene <0_5 <0.5 <1.0 0.3 <0.5 <1.0 <50.0 <1.0 <5.0 5.8 <0.5 <1.0 <1.0 <1.0 0.4
8u\y! .li.!cohcl <10.0 5.0 1,790 2,890 257 1,645.7 <10.0 <10.0 <10.0 5.0
Butylbenzene, n- <0.5 <0.5 <1.0 0.3 <0.5 <1.0 <50.0 <1.0 <5.0 5.8 <0.5 <1.0 <1.0 <1.0 0.4
Butylbenzene, tert- <1.0 0.5 <1.0 <50_0 <1.0 <5.0 7.1 <1.0 <1.0 <1.0 0.5
Ethyi tert-butyl ether <2.0 <2.0 <1_0 0.8 <2.0 <50_0 18 <5.0 11.6 <2_0 <1_0 <1.0 <1.0 0.6
lsopropyltoluene, p- <0.5 <0.5 <1_0 0.3 <0.5 <1.0 <50_0 <1.0 <5.0 5.8 <0_5 <1.0 <1.0 <1.0 0.4
Methyl tert-butyl ether <1.0 <1.0 <1_0 0.5 86 73 2,050 3,870 520 1,319.8 <1_0 <1.0 <1.0 <1.0 0.5
Naphthalene <2.5 <2.5 <1_0 1.0 <2.5 <1.0 <50.0 <1.0 <5.0 6.0 <2_5 <1_0 <1.0 <1.0 0.7
Tert-amyi methyl ether(TAME) <2.0 <2.0 <1_0 0.8 <2.0 <50.0 33.7 5.8 16_4 <2.0 <1_0 <1.0 <1.0 0.6
Toluene <0.75 <0.75 <1.0 0.4 <0.75 <1.0 <50.0 <1.0 <5.0 5.8 <0_75 <1.0 <1.0 <1.0 0.5
T nchlorotriiluoroe!hane 1.1.2 (Freon
113) <'1.0 0.5 <1.0 <50.0 <1.0 <5.0 7.1 <1.0 <1_0 <1.0 0.5
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4- <2.5 <2.5 <1.0 1.0 <2_5 <1.0 <50.0 <1.0 <1_0 5.6 <2.5 <1.0 <1_0 <1.0 0.7
Xylene (total) <1.0 <1.0 <2.0 0.7 <1.0 <0.5 <100 <2.0 <2.0 10.6 <1.0 <2.0 <2_0 <2.0 0.9
Acenaphthene <0.435 <11.4 3.0 <11.6 <10.0 <5.56 4.5 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Anthracene <0.435 <11.4 3.0 <11.6 <10.0 <5.56 4.5 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Benzo(a)anthracene <0.435 <11.4 3.0 <11.6 <10.0 <5.56 4.5 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Benzo(b)fluoranthene <0_435 <11.4 3.0 <11.6 <10.0 <5.56 4.5 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Fluoranthene <0_435 <11.4 3.0 <11.6 <10.0 <5.56 4.5 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Fluorene <0_435 <11.4 3.0 <11.6 <10.0 <5.56 4.5 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Methylnaphthalene, 2- <0.435 <11.4 3.0 <11.6 <10.0 <5.56 4.5 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Naphthalene 0.53 <11.4 3.1 <11.6 <10.0 <5.56 4.5 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Phenanthrene <0.435 <11.4 3.0 <11.6 <0.3 <5.56 2.9 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Pyrene <0.435 <11.4 3.0 <11.6 <10.0 <5.56 4.5 <11.9 <5.88 4.4
Carbazole <5.56 2.8 <5.88 2.9
Dibenzofuran <4.8 2.4 <4.8 <5.56 2.6 <4.8 <5.88 2.7
Dimethylphenol, 2,4- <9.7 4.9 <9.6 <5.56 3.8 <9.7 <5.88 3.9
Methylphenol, 2- <5.8 29 <5.7 <5.56 2.8 <5.8 <5.88 2.9
Methylphenol, 3- <5.8 2.9 <5.7 <11.1 4.2 <5.8 <11.8 4.4
Phenol <6.8 3.4 <6.7 <5.56 3.1 <6.8 <5.88 3.2
Antimony, Dissolved <5.0 2.5
Arsenic, Dissolved 18 31 47.3 32.1 7 <4.0 <4.0 <4.0 <4.0 3.0 <5.0 4.5 <4.0 <4.0 2.8
Barium, Dissolved 892 892.0 45 58.1 54.2 49.2 51.6 229 438 542 403.0
Ca!ciur!\ o;ssolved 49,400 49,400 33,800 33,800 138,000 138,000
Chromium, Dissolved <10.0 <10.0 6.3 5.4 <10.0 <1.0 <5.0 <5.0 <5.0 2.6 <10_0 <5.0 <5.0 <6.0 3.1
Manganese_ Dissofved 2,280 2,280 4,460 3,010 3,735 638 1,470 1,054
Mercury, Dissolved <0.2 <0.2 <0.2 0.1 <0.2 <0.2 <0.2 <0.2 <0.2 0.1 <0.2 <0_2 <0.2 <0.2 0.1
Nickel, Dissolved 17 17.0
Zinc, Dissolved <50.0 <50_0 <20 20.0 <50.0 10 18.5 <20 15.9 99 <5.0 52.1 51.2
TPH <581 <200 195.3 <595 <300 223.8
CwC22 Aromat'1cs <109.0 <114.0 55.8 <116.0 <104.0 55.0 <119.0 59.5
Notes: For compounds detected at least once above the detection limit, samples reported as not detected (ND) by the laboratory are assumed to have a concentration
of one-half of the method detection limit for that sample.
Concentrations entered as < indicate that they were below the detection limit.
P:\Pre--FY2008\12700000\12700961\RiskAssessment\Bever1y RA_CW & UW\DATA_CW & UWGW_DATA
Table 1
Location:
Sample Name:
Laboratory:
Laboratory I.D.:
Sample Date:
Consultant:
Benzene
8u!yl Aicohol
Butylbenzene, n
Butylbenzene, tert-
Eihyl iert-butyl ether
lsopropy!to!uene, p-
Methy! lert-butyl ether
Naphthalene
Tert-<myl methyl ether (TAME)
Toluene
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1, 1.2- {Freon
113)
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-
Xy!ene (total)
Acenaphthene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(b)ftuoranthene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Methylnaphthalene, 2-
Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Pyrene
Camazole
Dibenzofuran
Din:tethylphenol, 2,4
Methylphenol, 2-
Methylphenol, 3-
Phenol
Antimony, Dissolved
Arsenic, Dissolved
Barium, Dissolved
Caicium, Dissolved
Chromium, Dissolved
Manganese, Dissolved
Mercuty, Dissolved
Nickel, Dissolved
Zinc, Dissolved
TPH
CwC22 Aromatics
Notes:
Groundwater Analytical Data (JJg/L) - Brimbal and Sohier Road, Beverly, MA
RIZ-3 RIZ-3 RIZ-3 RIZ-3 RIZ-3
RIZ-3 052207 RIZ-03 102207 RIZ-3 RIZ-3{DUP) RIZ-3
ALPHA
L0707458-04
22-May-07
Rluo
1.3
<0_5
<2.0
2.7
<1.0
180
<2.0
0.93
<2.5
6
12.4
6.4
8.9
12
14.8
92
32.9
6.4
12
12
11
28
8.8
<5_0
<>10.0
<0.2
94
747
203.0
Spectrum
SA69905-02
22-0ct-07
Rluo
<1.0
<10.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
39.4
<1.0
<1.0
<1_0
<1_0
<2.0
6.8
<6.25
<6_25
<6.25
<6.25
8.01
<6.25
14.2
18.6
<6.25
16.3
8.29
<6.25
<6.25
<12.5
<6.25
12.6
121
<5.0
11,500
<0.2
<5.0
<200
Spectrum
SA73761-03
23-Jan-08
Rizzo
1.00
<10_0
<1_0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
6.6
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<2.0
26.1
211
116,000
<5.0
4,480
<0.2
<20
Spectrum
SA73761-04
23-Jan-08
Rizzo
<1.0
<10.0
<1.0
<1_0
<1_0
<1_0
<1.0
7.3
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<2.0
24.4
219
119,000
<5.0
4,440
<0.2
<20
Spectrum
SA77977-03
30-Apr-08
Rizzo
<1.0
<10.0
<1_0
<1_0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
42.5
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<2.0
19.9
235
<5.0
0.26
RIZ-3
RIZ3(DUP)
Spectrum
SA77977-05
30-Apr-08
Rizzo
<1.0
<10.0
<1.0
<1.0
'<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
41.2
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<2.0
21.2
239
<5.0
<0.2
RIZ-3
Well
Average
0.7
5.0
0.5
0.5
0.6
0.9
0.5
52.8
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.6
1.8
9.6
4.8
3.1
3.1
6.0
10.0
9.0
53.1
25.8
4.8
16.3
10.1
7.6
7.1
17.1
6.0
17.8
205.0
117,500
2.9
6,807
0.1
29.1
423.5
203.0
RIZ-4
RIZ-4 052207
ALPHA
L0707 458-05
22-May-07
Rizzo
0.74
<0.5
<2.0
<0.5
<1.0
<2.5
<2.0
<0.75
<2.5
<1.0
<10.9
<10.9
<10.9
<10.9
<10.9
<10.9
<10.9
<10.9
<10.9
<10.9
<4.9
<4.9
<5.9
<5.9
<6.9
46
<10.0
<0.2
<50.0
<575
<109.0
RIZ-4
RJZ-4
Spectrum
SA73761-02
23-Jan-08
Rizzo
1.0
23.1
1.3
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
1.3
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<2.0
24.2
173
50,800
<5.0
6,360
<0.2
<20
RIZ-4
RIZ-4
Spectrum
SA77977-04
30-Apr-08
Rizzo
1.5
28.6
<1.0
1.2
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
1.6
<2.0
20.3
116
<5.0
<0.2
RIZ-4
Well
Average
1.1
25_9
0.7
0.9
0.7
0.4
0.5
1.0
0.7
0.5
0.5
1.1
0.8
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.5
2.5
2.5
3.0
3.0
3.5
30.2
144_5
50,800
3.3
6360_0
0.1
17_5
287_5
54.5
VHB-101
VHB-101
PHOENIX
AJ36114
26-Jul-07
VHB
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
470.0
<1.0
1.9
<1.0
<1.0
<0.5
<10.0
<10.0
0.10
0.12
<10.0
<10.0
<10.0
<10.0
1.6
<10.0
6.0
<4_0
149_0
<1_0
<0.2
7.0
16.0
<111.0
VHB-102
VHB-102
PHOENIX
AJ36115
26-Jul-07
VHB
<1.0
<1_0
<1_0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
1.3
<1.0
<0.5
<10.0
<10_0
<0_06
<0_08
<10_0
<10_0
<10_0
<10_0
0.55
<10_0
<5_0
<4_0
72_0
<1_0
<0.2
14_0
38_0
<112.0
VHB-102
VHB-102102207
Spectrum
SA69905-03
22-0ct-07
Rizzo
<1_0
<10.0
<1_0
<1_0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
5.1
<1.0
<1.0
4.4
<1.0
<2.0
<5.88
<5.88
<5.88
<5.88
<5_88
<5_88
<5.88
<5_88
<5_88
<5_88
<5_88
<5_88
<5_88
<5_88
<11_8
<5_88
5.2
39_4
<5.0
2,760
<0.2
14.8
<200
VHB-102
VHB102 102207 DUP
Spectrum
SA69905-05
22-0ct-07
Rizzo
<1.0
<10.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1.0
<1_0
<1_0
<1_0
<1.0
<1.0
<2.0
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<5.56
<11.1
<5.56
<4.0
39.8
<5.0
2,780
<0.2
46.8
VHB-102
Well
Average
0.5
5.0
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
2.0
0.5
0.5
2.1
0.5
0.8
3.6
3.6
1.9
1.9
3.6
3.6
3.6
3.6
2.1
3.6
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
5.7
2.9
2.5
3.1
50.4
1.8
2770.0
0.1
14.0
33.2
100.0
56.0
Number
of Times
Detected
5
5
1
1
1
1
6
8
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
14
19
6
1
11
1
3
9
Number Minimum
of Times Concentration
Sought Detected
25
16
25
19
22
25
25
25
22
25
19
25
25
14
14
13
13
14
14
14
14
14
14
5
10
10
10
10
10
3
25
19
6
25
11
25
3
20
8
9
0.74
23.1
1.3
1.2
18.0
2.7
73.0
1.3
5.8
0.9
1.3
1.6
6.0
6.8
6.4
0.1
0.1
8.9
8.0
14.8
0.5
0.6
6.4
16.3
8.3
12.0
11.0
28.0
8.8
6.0
4.5
39.4
33,800.0
6.3
638.0
0.3
7.0
10.0
747.0
203.0
Maximum
Concentration
Detected
1.5
2,890.0
1.3
1.2
18.0
2.7
3,870.0
180.0
33.7
1.9
4.4
1.6
6.0
12.4
6.4
0.1
0.1
8.9
12.0
14.8
92.0
32.9
6.4
16.3
12.0
12.0
11.0
28.0
8.8
6.0
47.3
892.0
138,000.0
6.3
11,500.0
0.3
17.0
99.0
747.0
203.0
Sheet2 of2
Average
Concentration
Detected
1.3
281.9
1.2
1.5
2.5
1.3
256.0
9.1
3.3
1.4
1.7
1.4
2.3
5.1
4.4
3.2
3.2
4.6
- 5.1
5.0
11.3
6.5
4.4
6.2
3.9
4.2
3.6
6.2
3.7
3.7
13_0
270.8
77900.0
2.8
3834.3
0.1
12.7
26.1
246.0
77.0
Groundwater
EPCs
1.5
2,890.0
1.3
1.2
18.0
2.7
3,870.0
180.0
33.7
1.9
4.4
1.6
6.0
12.4
6.4
0.1
0.1
8.9
12.0
14.8
92.0
32.9
6.4
16.3
12.0
12.0
11.0
28.0
8.8
6.0
47.3
892.0
NC
6.3
11,500
0.3
17.0
99.0
747.0
203.0
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UW\DATA_CW & UWGW_DATA
Table 2 Physical and Chemical Properties of Site Compounds of Concern
Molecular R Water R Vapor R Henry's R
Weight e Solubility e Pressure e Law e
Compound name CASRN f f f Constant f
(g/mole) (mg/l) (mm Hg) (atm
Benzene
Butyl Alcohol
Butylbenzene, n-
Butylbenzene, tert-
Ethyl tert-butyl ether
lsopropyltoluene, p-
Methyl tert-butyl ether
Naphthalene
'
Tert-amyl methyl ether
Toluene
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1, 1,2-
(Freon 113)
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-
Xylene (total)
Acenaphthene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Methylnaphthalene, 2-
Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Pyrene
Carbazole
Oibenzofuran
Dimelhylphenol, 2,4-
Melhylphenol, 2-
Melhylphenol, 3-
Phenol
Antimony, Total
Arsenic, Total
Barium, Total
Chromium, Total
Manganese, Total
Mercury, Total
Nickel, Total
Zinc, Total
C 11-C22 Aromatics
References:
71-43-2
71-36-3
104-51-8
98-06-6
637-92-3
99-87-6
1634-04-4
91-20-3
994-05-8
108-88-3
76-13-1
95-63-6
1330-20-7
83-32-9
120-12-7
56-55-3
205-99-2
206-44-0
86-73-7
91-57-6
91-20-3
85-01-8
129-00-0
86-74-8
132-64-9
105-67-9
95-48-7
108-39-4
108-95-2
7440-36-0
7440-3S-2
7440-39-3
7440-47-3
7439-96-5
7439-97-6
7440-02-0
7440-66-6
NA
78
74
134
134
102
120
88
128
102
92
187
120
106
154
178
228
252
202
166
142
t28
178
202
167
168
122
108
108
94
122
75
137
52
55
201
59
65
150
'
h
'
'
'
'
'
'
h
'
'
b
b
b
d
b
b
'
b
b
b
h
'
'
'
'
b
b
b
1.8E+03
6.3E+04
1.4E+01
2.9E+02
NA
5.0E+01
4.8E+04
3.0E+01
1.2E+04
5.2E+02
1.7E+02
5.7E+01
2.0E+02
3.4E+03
1.3E+OO
1.0E-02
1.2E-03
1.9E+03
2.7E-01
2.6E+01
3.0E+01
8.2E-01
1.6E-01
1.8E+OO
1.0E+01
7.9E+03
3.1E+04
2.5E+04
8.0E+04
INS
INS
'
h
'
'
'
'
'
'
h
'
'
b
b
b
d
b
b
' b
b
b
h
'
'
'
'
b
'
'
a Hydrolyzes a
b INS a
h INS h
b 5.6E-02 a
b INS a
b INS a
1.6E-01
9.5E+01
6.7E+OO
1.0E+OO
1.5E+OO
NA
3.2E+OO
2.5E+02
8.2E-02
7.5E+01
2.8E+01
3.6E+02
1.0E+OO
1.0E+01
NA
2.0E-04
S.OE-09
S.OE-07
NA
S.OE-06
6.8E-02
8.2E-02
6.8E-04
2.5E-06
7.5E-07
4.4E-03
9.8E+01
2.4E-01
1.1E-01
3.5E-01
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
2.4E-02
'
h
'
'
'
'
'
'
h
'
'
b
b
b
d
b
e
b
b
b
h
..
a
'
a
b
a
a
'
'
h
'
'
'
a- Handbook of RCRA Ground-Water Monitoring Constituents Chemical Physical Properties (Sep. 92)
b- Background Documentation for the Development of the MCP Numerical Standards (Apri194)
c- Department of Health & Human Services, Toxicological Profiles
d- HSDB {Hazardous Substance Database)
e- Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications- Interim Report. EPA/600/8-91/011 B
f- Implementation of MADEP VPHIEPH Approach Final Policy, October 31, 2002.
g- Handbook of Environmental Data on Organic Chemicals, Verschueren 3rd. ed. 1996
h - Risk Assessment Information System. On-line database for chemical properties. May 2007.
5.5E-03
8.8E-06
1.3E-02
1.2E-02
NA
1.5E-02
5.9E-04
1.2E-03
8.8E-04
6.7E-03
5.3E-01
5.6E-03
5.3E-03
2.4E-04
8.6E-05
1.0E-06
1.4E-04
6.5E-06
1.2&04
2.9E-04
1.2E-03
3.9E-05
s."tE-06
8.7E-08
9.7E-05
6.6E-06
8.4E-07
7.1E-07
1.3E-06
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
1.1E-02
NA
NA
7.2E-04
b
d
'
'
b
b
b
b
'
b
b
b
b
d
b
b
'
b
b
b
d
d
'
'
'
b
b
b
'
b
h
'
b
b
Koe
.(mllg)
8.3E+01
2.4E+OO
NA
NA
NA
NA
2.7E+01
1.3E+03
2.8E+04
2.7E+02
2.2E+02
1.0E+03
3.0E+02
4.6E+03
1.4E+04
2.0E+05
7.6E+05
3.8E+04
7 .3E+03
3.4E+OO
1.3E+03
1.4E+04
3.8E+04
f.1E+04
5.5E+03
4.0E+01
9.1E+01
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
5.0E+03
R log 10
e Kow
f
b
h
b
b
b
h
b
b
b
b
b
d
b
b
e
b
b
b
h
b
b
b
b
'
b
h
b
b
b
(-)
2.13
0.88
4.20
4.11
NA
3.66
1.05
3.29
1.6
2.79
3.16
3.63
3.33
3.98
4.45
5.61
6.12
4.90
4.18
3.86
3.29
4.45
4.88
3.72
4.12
2.42
1.95
1.96
1.46
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
4.88
calc- Calculated using equation 5.8 (page 5-38) from Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications- Interim Report. EPA1600/8-91/011B
INS- Insoluble: NA- Not Available
Page 1 of 1
R Skin
e Permeability
R

f Kp
b
h
b
'
b
b
b
b
h
b
b
b
b
b
d
b
b
'
b
b
b
h
'
'
'
'
b
b
b
'
b
h
b
b
b
b
lcm/hr)
2.1E-02
2.8E-03
2.8E-01
2.4E-01
4.5E-04
1.4E-01
3.1E-03
6.8E-02
6.2E-03
4.5E-02
2.4E-02
1.3E-01
8.0E-02
1.5E-01


1.2E+OO
3.6E-01
1.7E-01
1.4E-01
6.9E-02
2.7E-01
3.3E-01
8.0E-02
1.5E-01
1.5E-02
1.0E-02

S.SE-03
1.0E03
f.OE-03
1.0E-03
1.0E-03
1.0E-03
1.0E-03
1.0E-04
6.0E-04
6.8E-01

h
cole
cole
cole
cole
cole
cole
cole

h
cole

cole
cole



cole
cole


cole
h
cole

calc'
cole
cole

e
e
e
h
e

e
cole
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverty RA_CW & UW\CHEM_CW & UWPHYSCHEM
Table 3
Compound name
Benzene
Butyl Alcohol
Butylbenzene, n-
Butylbenzene, tert-
Ethyl tert-butyl ether
lsopropyltoluene, p-
Methyl tert-butyl ether
Naphthalene
Tert-amyl methyl ether
(TAME)
Toluene
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1,1 ,2J
(Freon 113)
Trimethylbenzene, 1 ,2,4-
Xylene (total)
Acenaphthene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Methylnaphthalene, 2-
Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Pyrene
Carbazole
Dibenzofuran
Dimethylphenol, 2,4-
Methylphenol, 2-
Methylphenol, 3-
Phenol
Antimony, Total
Arsenic, Total
Barium, Total
Chromium, Total
Manganese, Total
Mercury, Total
Nickel, Total
Zinc, Total
C11-C22 Aromatics
Page 1 of 1
Natural and Anthropogenic Concentrations for Site Compounds of Concern
Maximum Detected
Concentration in
Site Groundwater

1.5
2,890.0
1.3
1.2
18.0
2.7
3,870.0
180.0
33.7
1.9
4.4
1.6
6.0
12.4
6.4
0.10
0.12
8.9
12.0
14.8
92.0
32.9
6.4
16.3
12.0
12.0
11.0
28.0
8.8
6.0
47.3
892.0
6.3
11,500.0
0.3
17.0
99.0
203.0
Low

0.5
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
0.005
NA
1
NA
NA
0.2
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
0
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
0.95
<1
3
NA
Common Ranges
Found in Water

High

80
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
17
NA
3,500
NA
NA
9.9
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
1
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
20
2,000
NA
Sources. ATSDR, Toxicological Profiles for Chemicals
Bradley et al., 1993
DEP Documentation for the Risk Assessment Shortform Residential Scenario, 1992
USGS Professional Paper 1270, 1984.
Notes: Bold print indicates the maximum detected concentration of the COG is less than or equal to
the lowest concentration commonly found in groundwater.
NA = Not Available
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000112700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UW\CHEM_CW & UWAnthro
Table4
Compound name
Benzene
Butyl Alcohol
Bu!ylbenzene, n-
Butylbenzene. tart-
Ethyl tart-butyl ether
lsopropyHoluene, P
Methyl tart-butyl ether
Naphthalene
Tart-amyl methyl ether (TAME)
Toluene
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1,1,2 (I
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-
Xylene (total)
Acenaphthene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)enthracene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Methylnaphthatene. 2-
Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Pyrena
Carbazole
Dlbenzofuran
Dimethylphenot, 2.4
Methylphenol, 2-
Methylphenol, 3-
Phenol
Antimony, Total
Arsenic, Total
Barium, Total
Chromium. Total
Manganese, Total
Mercury, Total
Nickel, Total
Zinc, Total
C11-C22 Aromatics
Toxicity Values for Site Compounds of Concern
Cancer Potenc;t Factors
R R R
oral

Inhalation

Unit

Weight
(mg/(kgdj)"'
'
(mgl(kgdJ)"'
'
Risks
'
,,
lm''' Evidence
5.5E02 I 2.9E02 I 7.8E-06 I A
none RAIS none RAIS none RAIS
none none none
none none none
none none none
none I none I none I D
none I none I none I
none I none I none DEP c
none none none
none I none I none I D
none RAIS none RAIS none RAIS
none I none I none I D
none I none none I D
none I none I none I D
none I none I none I D
7.3E-01 DEP 3.1E01 RBC/E 2.1E-04 DEP06 B2
7.3E-01 DEP 3.1E-01 RBCIE 2.1E04 DEP06 B2
none I none I none I D
none I none I none I D
none I none I none DEP D
none I none I none DEP c
none I none I none I D
none I none I none I D
2.0E-02 HO? none RAtS none RAIS
none none none I D
none none none I D
none none none I c
none none none I c
none none none I D
none none none I D
1.5E+OO 1.5E+01 4.30E-03 I A
none none none I D
none 4.1E+01 1.2E02 DEP06 A
none none none I
none none none I D
none 8.4E-01 4.8E04 DEP A
none none none I D
none DEP02 none DEP02 none DEP02 D
Notes:
1
Because total chromium was reported, we assumed that all chromium detected is Chromium VI.
2
CPF for Nickel is based on refinery dust.
1- IRIS, 2008.
H97- USEPA. HE.t>.ST, 1997.
PEP- MADEP, 1992. Documentation for the Risk Assessment Shortform Residential Scenario.
DEP02 - Implementation of MADEP VPHIEPH Approach Fine/ Polley, October, 2002
S1udy
Information
Human occupational via inhalation-leukemia. rodent exposure via gavage and inhalation
None
None
None
No human data: Inadequate animal data
None
Respiratory tumors In female mice
No human data: inadequate animal data
No human data: Inadequate animal data
No human data: inadequate animal data
No human data: inadequate animal date
No human data; Inadequate animal data
No human data: sufficient animal data
No human date: sufficient animal data
No human data: Inadequate animal data
No human data: inadequate animal data
No human data: inadequate animal data
Respiratory tumors in female mice
No human data: inadequate animal data
No human data: inadequate animal data
No human data; inadequate animal data
No human data: inadequate animal data
No human data and limited evidence of carcinogenicity in mice.
No human data and limited evidence of carcinogenicity In mice
No human data: Inadequate animal data
No human data; inadequate animal data
Lung tumors by lnhai .. muHipie organ and skin cancers by drinking water.
No human data; Inadequate animal data
Occupational epidemiologic studies of chromium-exposed workers.
Inadequate human and animal data.
Human carcinogen. Lung and nasal tumors (I).Sased on nickel subsulflde.
Inadequate human and animal data.
No human data; inadequate animal data
DEP 06- 2006 MCP Numerical Standards Derivation spreadsheet. January 9, 2006. http://WWW.mass.gov/dep/cleanup/iawslpubnoto4.htm
RAtS Risk Assessment Information System, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
(D)- Oral exposure reference; (i) Inhalation exposure reference.
Page 1 of 3
P:ll're-FY2008\12700000112700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW 8 UW\CHEM_CW & UWTOX
Table4
Compound name
Benzene
Butyl Alcchcl
Butylbenzene, n-
Butylbenzene, tart-
Ethyl tart-butyl ether
lsopropyttoluene. p-
Methyl tert-butyl ether
Naphthalene
Tart-amyl methyl ether {TAME)
Toluene
Trlchlorotrifiuorcethane 1,1,2- (I
Trlmethylbenzene, 1,2,4-
Xylene (total)
Acenaphthene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(b)fiuoranthene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Methylnaphthalene, 2-
Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Pyrena
Carbazole
Dibenzofuran
Dimethylphencl. 2.4-
Methylphenol, 2-
Methylphenol, 3-
Phenol
Antimony, Total
Arsenic, Total
Barium. Total
Chromium, Total
Manganese, Total
Mercury, Total
Nickel, Total
Zinc, Total
C11-C22 Aromatics
Toxicity Values for Site Compounds of Concern
Chronic Reference Doses
Level of
Ornl R Inhalation R Reference R Confidence study
(mg/(kg"dl
'
{mg/(kg"dl

Concentration
'
RID Information
f f lm' f
4.0E-03 DEP06 1.7E-03 RBCIE 3,0E+01 DEPOE Ncne
1.0E-01 I none RAIS ncne RAIS
1.0E-02 RBCIE none none None
1.0E-02 RBCIE none none Ncne
ncne none none None
none none none Ncne
1.0E-01 DEP06 8.6E-01 I 3.0E+03 I Medium {i) Rat chronic inhalation study
2.0E-02 I S.SE-04 calc 3.0E+OO I Low (c); Medium (i) Subchronic oral rat study (o): Chronic mouse inhalation {i)
1.3E-01 1.3E-01 calc 4.4E+02
2.0E-01 I 1.\E-01 I 4.0E+02 DEPOE Medium Rats gavage and Inhalation study {c), human occupational (i)
3.0E+01 I S.eE+OO RAIS 3.0E+04 H97
S.OE-02 RBCIE 1.7E-03 RBCIE e.OE+OO calc None
2.0E-01 RAIS 2.9E-02 RAIS 1.0E+02 RAIS Med. (o), low (i) Rats and mice by gavage (o)
e.OE-02 I none I 5.0E+01 DEPOE Meuse oral subchronic study
3.0E-01 I ncne I 5.0E+01 DEPOE Mouse subchronlc gavage study
3.0E-02 DEP06 none I S.OE+01 DEPOE None
3.0E-02 DEPOe none I 5.0E+01 DEPOE None
4.0E-02 I none I S.OE+01 DEPOE Meuse subchronic gavage
4.0E-02 I none I S.OE+01 DEP 0 Mouse subchronic study
4.0E-03 I 7.1E-01 DEP 5.0E+01 DEP 0 None
2.0E02 I 9.0E-04 I 3.0E+OO I Low (o): Medium (I) Subchronic oral rat study (o); Chronic mouse inhalation (i)
3.0E02 DEP 06 none I 5.0E+01 DEPOE
3.0E-02 I none I 5.0E+01 DEPOE Low (C)
none RAIS none RAIS none RAIS
4.0E-03 RBC none none
2.0E-02 I none 7.0E+01 DEPOE Low (o)
S.OE-02 I none none Medium
S.OE-02 I none none Medium
3.0E-01 DEPOe 2.6E+02 DEP 2.6E+02 DEP LOW(O)
4.0E-04 I none I 1.0E+01 DEPOE Low (o)
3.0E-04 I none I 2.5E-03 DEPOE Medium
7.0E-02 I 1.4E04 H97 S.4E-01 DEPOE Medium
3.0E-03 I 2.9E-05 RAIS 1.0E-01 I Low
4.eE-02 RAIS 1.4E-OS RAIS S.OE-02 I
3.0E-04 DEP 8.eE-OS I 3.0E-01 DEPOE Medium
2.0E-02 I ncne I 1.0E+OO DEPOE Medium
3.0E-01 I none 1.4E+OO DEP 0 Medium
3.oE-02 DEP02 1.4E-02

S.OE+01 DEP02
Notes:
1
Because total chromium was reported, we assumed that all chromium detected Is Chromium VI
1- IRIS, 2008.
H97- USEPA, HEAST, 1997
DEP- MADEP, 1992. Documentation for the Risk Assessment Shortform Residential Scenario.
DEP02 -Implementation ofMADEP VPHIEPH Approar:h Final Polley, October, 2002
None
Mouse subchronic gavage
None
None
Rat, subchronic oral gavge
90-day oral subchronlc neurctoxicrty study in rats
90-day oral subchronic neurotoxictty study in rats
Rat, oral development study
Rat chronic oral drinking water
Human chronic oral exposure
Subchrcnic tc chrcnic human drinking water studies
Rat chronic drinking water study
Rat oral sudy (o): Human occup. inhal. studies (i)
Rat chronic oral (o)
Hurnan dietary supplement test
None
DEP 06- 2006 MCP Numerical Standards Derivation spreadsheet, January 9, 2006. http:/twww.mass.gov/dep/cleanup/laws/pubnot04.htm
RBC- USEPA Region Ill Risk Based Ccncentrallon, Aplil2000
RAtS- Risk Assessment Information System, Oak Ridge National Labcratory
E- EPA-NCEA Regional support provlsicnal value.
W- Value presented In RBC, but withdrawn from IRIS and HEAST
calc- Calculated frorn apprcpriate values (See text.)
{o)- Oral exposure reference; (i) -lnhalaticn exposure reference
Page2 of 3
Critical
Effect
Ncne
None
None
None
None
Increased relative liver and kidney weights, renal lesions
Decreased body weight {o); nasal effects m
Liver & kidney wt changes(o)/neurotoglcal effects & degen. of nasal epithellum{l)
None
Hyperactivity, decreased body weight. inc. mortality (o)
Hepatotcxicity
No effects observed
None
Ncne
Nephropathy: incr. liver weight; Hematologic alterations
Deer. RBC count. packed cell volume and hemoglobin
None
Decreased body weight(o): nasal effects(i)
None
Kidney effects
None
None
Nervous system effects, blood alternations
Decreased body weights and
Decreased body weights and neurotoxicity
Reduced fetal body weight in rats
logevity, blood glucose and cholesterol
Hyperpigmentation, keratosis. poss. vascular effects
Increased blood pressure
No effects observed
Autoimmune effects (o): Neurotoxicity (i)
Decreased body and organ weights
Decreased RBC superoxide dlsmutase concentration
None
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\127009611Rik Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UW\CHEM_CW & UWTOX
Table4
Compound name
Benzene
Butyl 1\jcohol
Butylbenzene, n-
Butylbenzene, tart-
Ethyl tert-butyl ether
lsopropyltoluene, p-
Methyl tert-butyl ether
Naphthalene
Tart-amyl methyl ether (fAME)
Toluene
Trichlorotrtnuoroethane 1.1.2- (F
Trimethylbenzene, 1 ,2,4-
Xylene (total)
Acenaphthene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Methytnaphthatene, 2-
Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Pyrena
Carbazole
Oibenzofuran
Dimethylphenot, 2.4
Meth)'lphenot, 2-
Meth)'lphenot. 3-
Phenol
Antimony, Total
Arsenic, Total
Barium, Total
Chromium. Total
Manganese, Total
Mercury, Total
Nickel. Total
Zinc, Total
C11-C22 Aromatics
Toxicity Values for Site Compounds of Concern
Subchronic Reference Doses
Level of
Oral R Inhalation R Reference R Confidence Study
(mg/(kgd)

(mgl(kgdJ

Concentration

RIO Information
f f fm' f
I.OE-02 DEP06 1.7E-04 xc/10 9.0E+01 DEPOE None
t.OE+OO H97 none RAtS none RAIS
1.0E-02 RBC/E none none None
t.OE-02 RBC/E none none None
none none none None
4.0E-01 2.6E-02 9.0E+01 calc None
1.0E+OO DEP06 6.6E-01
"
3.0E+03 DEPO None
2.0E-01 DEP06 8.6E-04
"
3.0E+OO DEPOE Uf:t,OOO 13-wk. rat gavage study
1.3E-01
"
1.3E-01 calc 4.4E+02
" 2.0E+OO H97 1.1E+OO DEP xc/H 4.0E+02 DEPOE UF=100 (o), 300 (i) 13-wk rat study by gavage (o); rat inhalation study (I)
3.0E+OO H97 8.6E+OO RAIS 3.0E+04 H97
5.0E02
"
1.7E-04 xc/10 6.0E-01 calc None
2.0E-01 DEPOB 2.9E02 RAIS 3.0E+02 DEPOE UF=300(i) 3-6 months Inhalation study in male rats.
S.OE-01 I none I 5.0E+02 DEP 0 UF:3QO 90-day mouse gavage study
3.0E+OO DEP none I 5.0E+02 DEPOE Mouse subchronic gavage study
3.0E-01 DEP06 none I 5.0E+02 DEP 0 None
3.0E01 DEP06 none I 5.0E+02 DEP 0 None
4.0E-01 H97 none I 5.0E+02 DEPOE UF:3QO 90-dey mouse gavage
4.0E-01 H97 none I 5.0E+02 DEPOE UF:3QO 13-wk mouse gavage study
4.0E-02 DEP 06 7.1E+01
"
5.0E+02 DEPOE None
2.0E01 DEP 06 8.6E04
"
3.0E+00 DEPOE UF:1,000 13-wk rat gavage study
3.0E-01 DEP 06 none I 5.0E+02 DEPOE Data Inadequate for risk assessment
3.0E-01 H97 none I 5.0E+02 DEPOE UF:3QO 13-week mouse gavage study
none RAIS none RAIS none RAIS None
4.0E-03
"
none none None
2.0E-01 H97 none 7.0E+02 DEP 0 UF:100 Rat, subchronic oral gavge
5.0E-01 I none none UF:too
5.0E-01 I none none UF:100 90-day oral subchronlc neurotoxicity study in rats
3.0E-01 DEP06 3.0E-01 o 1.1E+03 calc Uf:tOO Rat, oral development study
4.0E-04 DEP none I 1.0E+01 DEP 0 UF:t,OOO Rat chronic oral drinking water
3.0E-04 DEP none I 2.5E-03 DEPOe UF:3 Human studies by oral administration
7.0E-02 H97 1.4E-03 calc 5.0E+OO I UF=3 10-wk human study by drinking water
2.0E02 DEP06 none I 3.0E-01 DEP 0 UF:tOO Rat drinking water study
S.OE-03 RAIS none RAIS none RAIS
3.0E-04
""
S.SE-05 H97 3.0E-01 DEPoe Uf'=1,000 (o), 30 (I) Rat study by oral admin. (o); human lnhal. study 0)
2.0E-02 H97 none I 1.0E+OO DEP Of UF:300
3.0E-01 H97 none I 1.4E+OO DEPOE UF:1,000
3.0E-01 DEP02 1.4E02 calc 5.0E+01
"
Notes:
' Because total chromium was reported, we assumed that all chromium detected Is Chromium VI.
I-IRIS. 2008.
H97- USEPA. HEAST, 1997.
DEP- MADEP, 1992. Documentation for the Risk Assessment Shortform Residential Scenario.
DEP02- Implementation of MADEP VPHIEPH Approach Final Policy. October. 2002
Rat chronic oral (o)
Human 10 week diet study
None
DEP 06 2006 MCP Numerical standards Derivation spraadsheat, January 9, 2006.
RBC- USEPA Region Ill Risk Based Concentration, April2000.
RAIS- Risk Assessment Information System. Oak Ridge National Laboratory
E- EPANCEA Regional support provisional value
W- Value presented In RBC. but withdrawn from IRIS and HEAST
calc- Calculated from appropriate values (See text,)
(o) Oral exposure reference; (i)-Inhalation exposure reference.
xo- Cross-assigned from oral values; xc- Cross-assigned from chronic values (See text.)
Page3of 3
Critical
Effect
None
None
None
None
None
None
Decreased body weight: nasal effects
None
Impaired motor coordination. {i)
Hepatotoxicity
No effects observed
None
None
Nephropathy; incr.llverweight: Hematologic alterations
Decreased RBC counts
None
Decreased body weight; nasal effects
None
Kidney effects
None
None
Nervous system effects. blood aHernatlons
Decreased body weights and neurotoxicity
Reduced fetal body weight in rats
Logevity, blood glucose and cholesterol
No adverse effects observed
Autoimmune effects {o); Neurotoxicity (I)
Decreased body and organ weights
Decreased blood enzymes
None
P:IPre-FY200S\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessmenl\lleverty RA_CW & UW\CHEM_CW & UWTOX
Table 5
Compound name
Benzene
Butyl Alcohol
Butylbenzene, n-
Butylbenzene, tert-
Ethyl tert-butyl ether
lsopropyltoluene, p-
Methyl tert-butyl ether
Naphthalene
Tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME)
Toluene
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1,1 ,2-
(Freon 113)
Trimethylbenzene, 1 ,2,4-
Xylene (total)
Acenaphthene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(b )fluoranthene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Methylnaphthalene, 2-
Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Pyrene
Carbazole
Dibenzofuran
Dimethylphenol, 2,4-
Methylphenol, 2-
Methylphenol, 3-
Phenol
Antimony, Dissolved
Arsenic, Dissolved
Barium, Dissolved
Cadmium, Dissolved
Chromium, Dissolved
Manganese, Dissolved
Mercury, Dissolved
Nickel, Dissolved
Zinc, Dissolved
TPH
C 11-C22 Aromatics
NA Not Available
NC = Non Carcinogenic
Page 1 of 1
Relative Absorption Factors (RAFs) for Site Compounds of Concern
Dermal Water
Non-Carcinogen Carcinogen
NA NA
NA NC
NA NA
NA NA
NA NA
NA NC
NA NA
1.00 NC
NA NA
1.00 NC
NA NA
NA NA
1.00 NC
1.10 NC
1.10 NC
1.00 1.10
1.00 1.10
1.10 NC
1.10 NC
1.00 NC
1.00 NC
1.00 NC
1.10 NC
NA NA
NC NC
NA NA
NA NA
NA NA
NA NA
NA NA
1.0 1.00
1.0 NC
20 NC
250 NC
NA NA
6.7 NC
10 NC
2.2 NC
NA NA
1.10 NA
Note: NA and NC values are automatically given a value of 1 in the risk calculation in order to calculate the most conservative
estimation.
Sources:
a. Background Documentation for the Development of the MCP Numerical Standards, April 1994.
b. Implementation of MADEP VPHIEPH Approach Final Policy, October 2002
c. 2006 MCP Numerical Standards Derivation spreadsheet, January 9, 2006. http:/lwww.mass.govldeplcleanupllawslpubnot04.htm
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UW\CHEM_CW & UWRAFS
Page 1 of 1
Table 6 Exposure Assumptions
Construction
Receptor: Worker Utility Worker
Occurrence: Future Future
Existence: Potential Potential
Location: Outdoors Outdoors
Exposure: Subchronic Chronic
Age: Adult (18+) Adult (18+)
BodyWeight(kg)
1
: 58 58
Surface Area (m
2
)
1
: 1.82 1.82
Lifetime (y): 70 70
Groundwater Exposures
Dermal Contact
Fraction exposed
1
(frac.) 0.05 0.05
Time Exposed
1
(h/d) 8 8
Days of Exposure (d/wk) 5 5
Weeks of Exposure (wkly) 8 1
Years of Exposure (y) 25
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Exposure Factors Handbook, 1999.
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Bever1y RA_CW & UW\EXP _CW & UWExposure Assumptions
Page 1 of 1
Table 7 Risk Summary
Noncarcinogenic Excess Lifetime
Receptor Exposure Media/Route Hazard Index Cancer Risk Estimate
Construction Worker
Dermal Contact Groundwater 5.3E-02 S.OE-08
DEP Risk Limit 1.0E+OO 1.0E-05
Utility Worker
Dermal Contact Groundwater 1.2E-01 5.6E-08
DEP Risk Limit 1.0E+OO 1.0E-05
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000112700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UWIRISK_CW & UWSummary
Table 8
Compound name
Benzene
Butyl Alcohol
Butylbenzene, n-
Butylbenzene, tart-
Ethyl tert-butyl ether
lsopropyltoluene, p-
Methyl tert-butyl ether
Naphthalene
Tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME)
Toluene
Trichlorotriffuoroethane 1,1 ,2-
{Freon 113)
Trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-
Xylene (total)
Acenaphthene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Methylnaphthalene, 2
Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Pyrene
Carbazole
Dibenzofuran
Dimethylphenol, 2,4-
Methylphenol, 2-
Methylphenol, 3-
Phenol
Antimony, Dissolved
Arsenic, Dissolved
Barium, Dissolved
Chromium, Dissolved
Manganese, Dissolved
Mercury, Dissolved
Nickel, Dissolved
Zinc, Dissolved
C11-C22 Aromatics
Upper Concentration Limits for Site Compounds of Concern
MCP Method 3
Upper Concentration Limits (UCls)
310 CMR 40.0996(5)
Average Groundwater Groundwater UCls
Concentrations (pg/l) (pg/l)
1.3
281.9
1.2
1.5
2.5
1.3
256.0
9.1
3.3
1.4
1.7
1.4
2.3
5.1
4.4
32
3.2
4.6
5.1
5.0
11.3
6.5
4.4
6.2
3.9
4.2
3.6
6.2
3.7
3.7
13.0
270.8
2.8
3,834.3
0.1
12.7
26.1
77.0
NA - Not Available
100,000
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
100,000
100,000
NA
80,000
NA
NA
100,000
50,000
30,000
10,000
4,000
2,000
30,000
100,000
100,000
3,000
BOO
NA
NA
100,000
NA
NA
100,000
80,000
9,000
100,000
3,000
NA
200
2,000
50,000
100,000
Page 1 of 1
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UW\CHEM_CW & UWUCl
Page 1 of 1
Table 9 Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Site Compounds of Concern
Site AWQC, Aquatic Organisms
Groundwater Fresh
Compound name EPCs Acute Chronic

Benzene 0.15 NA NA
Butyl Alcohol 289.0 NA NA
Butylbenzene, n- 0.13 NA NA
Butylbenzene, tert- 0.12 NA NA
Ethyl tert-butyl ether 1.80 NA NA
lsopropyltoluene, p- 0.27 NA NA
Methyl tert-butyl ether 387.0 NA NA
Naphthalene 18.0 NA NA
Tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) 3.37 NA NA
Toluene 0.19 NA NA
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1,1 ,2-
(Freon 113) 0.44 NA NA
Trimethylbenzene, 1 .2.4- 0.16 NA NA
Xylene (total) 0.60 NA NA
Acenaphthene 1.24 NA NA
Anthracene 0.64 NA NA
Benzo(a)anthracene 0.01 NA NA
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 0.01 NA NA
Fluoranthene 0.89 NA NA
Fluorene 1.20 NA NA
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 1.48 NA NA
Naphthalene 9.20 NA NA
Phenanthrene 3.29 NA NA
Pyrene 0.64 NA NA
Carbazole 1.63 NA NA
Dibenzofuran 1.20 NA NA
Dimethylphenol, 2.4- 1.20 NA NA
Methylphenol, 2- 1.10 NA NA
Methylphenol, 3- 2.80 NA NA
Phenol 0.88 NA NA
Antimony, Dissolved 0.60 NA NA
Arsenic, Dissolved 4.73 340 150
Barium, Dissolved 89.2 NA NA
Chromium, Dissolved 0.63 16 11
Manganese, Dissolved 1,150.0 NA NA
Mercury, Dissolved 0.03 1.4 0.77
Nickel, Dissolved 1.70 470 52
Zinc, Dissolved 9.9 120 120
C11-C22 Aromatics 20.3 NA NA
Note: EPCs are divided by 10 to represent dilution into surface water.
NA = Not Available
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverty RA_CW & U\1\o\CHEM_CW & UWAWOC
12700961 figures.cdr
Approximate Scale In Feet
["it;) TETRATECH RIZZO
One Grant Street
Framingham, MA 01 701 -9005
508.903.2000
www.tetratechrizzo.com
Base Map:
USGS Topographic Map,
Salem, MA Quadrangle, 1985
Brimbal Avenue and Sohier Road
Beverly, Massachusetts
Site Location Map Figure 1
.::;.-...

/
}
...... :j ..
N/ f
COMMUNICATION & PO\oVER INDUSTRY
150 SOHIER ROAD
55 LOT 12
R!C.LOC.
c"""
< .....


/
.;;;.:
. 0 '11iz-.J
TOP CASIHC>BO.ir
TOP PVC: 80.17
GHO
cw ClCV: 61.72

0 RfZ-2,
TOP CASIHC> 7J, 76


"'
.(

: ... ';:.
MW'-:iR
[Jf-26 0
0 TOP CASINC:80.'6
: .
.....
'; ' . 0 UNK-2
.;')
l ...... .::.
a79J9
{J
... "18089" ' ./, t:."::".'->'.';1.1..'"-([."(;j
/
;: . 81. 43 '....
19-.J Wltf.O. ..,_
INC
O'O(LUHG 125 SOHIER ROAD
"'AP 55 LOT 28
DEED BOOK 7569 PACE 5
/
/
0""".J
TOP CASJHC; !J. '7
TOP P>C 82.66
GHO fLCV-!fO.O
l;f I J
0 CP-24
0mz-4
TOP cASINC:/12.67
TOPi PVC: 81.5J .>O '
GHO fli:V:BO.J . '
CWtLCV:6H4
......
0 CP-61?
.--
f/fSf:{(}[{'...'
. .
e..y
N/F
VlTTORI-ROCCI POST 56
143 BRIMBAL AVE
"'AP 55 LOT 19

)-
\_,. . 84.60
;/ ?!J (;
/.<_'f"Sik('"!{D;
VHB-102-1 +VHII-I0
2
-
6
VHB-102-5f- 't -tYHII-102-2
VHB-102-4 t -tme-102-7
H VHB-102-.J
VHB-102-8+
', VHB-: 102
YHB-104
+ TOP CASING: 3. '4
TOP P>C lll97
CNO tL11:81.>
'0P . CASIHC> 84.24
. TOP P;,:: 84. 1J
CNO [L[V:80.3
0 '"
Rf2-l 0
TOP CASIHC>M15
TOP PVC: 84.0J
CNO CLCV: 81. ' UW-1
c. lt(\'- 74. 66
0 TOP CASWC:Ill19
TOP PVC: 81. JO
GHO [L[V:B0.5
, 0 LCP-1
0VHB-101
0
TOP CASwC./ll75
TOP P>C 83.01
GHQi [L[V: 79.J

R=
' .
0 LCP'1Ji
. ,.; .
-.... /'
' >
17.82,.
....... / ll78.2i
. '

CNO HC'i81.1
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.. 7&..iJ '- ..{:,\n;r<'{"IVI :;;
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0 CP-22
'

('t:lf,C' ,,
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/
N/f
ERNEST M. SANTIN
141 BRIMBAL AV[
"'AP 55 LOT 20
\/
\suN REriN &: MARKETING
131 8RII.18AL AVE.
'-lAP 55 LOT 21
N/F
NORTHRIDGE HOIAES COOPERATIVE. INC.
125 SOHIER ROAD
MAP 55 LOT 28
DEED BOOK 7589 PAGE 5
0 X/STING MON/TOI?INC WELL
0 X/STING CAS POINT
0 OST/?OY0 CAS POINT
I. TH FOLLOWING SAMPLE LOCATIONS AI?
APPI?OXIMAT:
VHB-102-1
VHB-102-2
VHB-102-J
VHB-102-4
VHB-102-5
VHB-102-6
VHB-102-7
VHB-102-8
LCP-1
LCP-2
SS-1
SS-2
SS-J
2. TH LOCATION OF SOil SAMPLE SS-4,
WHICH WAS COLLECT0 BY VHB ON JULr
25, 2007, IS UNKNOWN.
"Aioniloring Well Cxhibil Pion of Land in
Ai'A " by Honcoclt
Associol11s dol.-d Nov11mb11r 2, 2007
( TETRA TECH RIZZO
One Grant Street
Framingham, MA 01701-9005
508.903. 2000
www. tetrotechrizzo com
North Shore
Commons
Site Plan with
Sampling Locations
80
Scale in Feet
Job No 12700961
Date. December 9, 2006
2
File Name. 12700961GESLP

Figure 3 MA DEP - Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup
SITE NAME: Site Scoring Map: 500 feet & 0.5 Mile Radii
Sohier Road and Brimbal Avenue
Beverly, MA 01915
423424n 705246ew
Roads: limited kcess, Divided, Major Road, Connector, Street, Track, rail
is the best available at the date jdtii-= GIS Grographic and
The information shown on this map I I Office uf
of printing. Please refer to the i.v
data source descriptions document. MJIIMkowtu Ertc11tilllt Dffic of Afflli,. _ 2001
EPA Sole Source Aquifer; FEMA 100-year floodplain ...... ITIIJ I<:;:;:::J
Pubtic Water Supplies: Ground,Surface,Non Comm.mity 0 0
Boundaries: lOwn, County, DEP Region; Train; A:lwertine; l>queduct Approved Zone
2
; IWPA; Surface Water Supply Zone A E3
-- 118 8 -
Basins: Major, Sub; Streams: Perennial, Intermittent, Man Made Shore, Dams Water Features, Public Surface Water Supply c::::::::J -
---- _ _ W!tlands: Fresh,Salt,NHESP Wetlands Habitat [Ii]
A:ltentiaUy Productive Aquifers: Medium,High Yield , , , c::::::::Jc::::::::J Protected Open Space; ACEC [[]]]] I22Z.J
Non-A:ltential Drinking Water Source Area: Medium, High Yield. c::::::::J DEP

Sofid Waste Certified Vernal A:lols MILP


SCALE1:15000
W*E
-.-
s
April 11 , 2007
Appendix A
Limitations
Appendix A: Limitations
I. The observations described in this report were made under the conditions stated therein. The
conclusions presented in the report were based solely upon the services described therein, and
not on scientific tasks or procedures beyond the scope of described services or the time and
budgetary constraints imposed by the CLIENT. The work described in this report was
carried out in accordance with the Terms and Conditions in our contract.
2. In preparing this report, ENGINEER has relied on certain information provided by state and
local officials and other parties referenced therein, and on information contained in the files
of state and/or local agencies available to ENGINEER at the time of the site assessment.
Although there may have been some degree of overlap in the information provided by these
various sources, ENGINEER did not attempt to independently verify the accuracy or
completeness of all information reviewed or received during the course of this site
assessment.
3. Observations were made of the Site and of structures on the Site as indicated within the
report. Where access to portions of the Site or to structures on the Site was unavailable or
limited, ENGINEER renders no opinion as to the presence of hazardous materials or oil, or to
the presence of indirect evidence relating to hazardous material or oil, in that portion of the
Site or structure. In addition, ENGINEER renders no opinion as to the presence of hazardous
material or oil, or the presence of indirect evidence relating to hazardous material or oil,
where direct observation of the interior walls, floor, or ceiling of a structure on a Site was
obstructed by objects or coverings on or over these surfaces.
4. ENGINEER did not perform testing or analyses to determine the presence or concentration of
asbestos at the Site or in the environment at the Site.
5. It is ENGINEER's understanding that the purpose of this report is to assess the physical
characteristics of the subject Site with respect to the presence on the Site of hazardous
material or oil. This stated purpose has been a significant factor in determining the scope and
level of services provided for in the Agreement. Should the purpose for which the Report is
to be used or the proposed use ofthe site( s) change, this Report is no longer valid and use of
this Report by CLIENT or others without ENGINEER's review and written authorization
shall be at the user's sole risk. Should ENGINEER be required to review the Report after its
date of submission, ENGINEER shall be entitled to additional compensation at then existing
rates or such other terms as agreed between ENGINEER and the CLIENT.
6. The conclusions and recommendations contained in this report are based in part, where
noted, upon the data obtained from a limited number of soil samples obtained from widely
spaced subsurface explorations. The nature and extent of variations between these
explorations may not become evident until further exploration. If variations or other latent
conditions then appear evident, it will be necessary to reevaluate the conclusions and
recommendations of this report.
7. Any water level readings made in test pits, borings, and/or observation wells were made at
the times and under the conditions stated on the report. However, it must be noted that
fluctuations in the level of groundwater may occur due to variations in rainfall and other
factors different from those prevailing at the time measurements were made.
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8. Except as noted within the text of the report, no quantitative laboratory testing was performed
as part of the site assessment. Where such analyses have been conducted by an outside
laboratory, ENGINEER has relied upon the data provided and has not conducted an
independent evaluation of the reliability ofthese data.
9. The conclusions and recommendations contained in this report are based in part, where
noted, upon various types of chemical data and are contingent upon their validity. These data
have been reviewed and interpretations made in the report. As indicated within the report,
some ofthese data may be preliminary screening level data and should be confirmed with
quantitative analyses if more specific information is necessary. Moreover, it should be noted
that variations in the types and concentrations of contaminants and variations in their flow
paths may occur due to seasonal water table fluctuations, past disposal practices, the passage
of time, and other factors. Should additional chemical data become available in the future,
these data should be reviewed, and the conclusions and recommendations presented herein
modified accordingly.
l 0. Chemical analyses have been performed for specific constituents during the course ofthis
site assessment, as described in the text. However, it should be noted that additional chemical
constituents not searched for during the current study may be present in soil and/or
groundwater at the Site.
II. This Report was prepared for the exclusive use of the CLIENT. No other party is entitled to
rely on the conclusions, observations, specifications, or data contained therein without the
express written consent of ENGINEER.
12. The observations and conclusions described in this Report are based solely on the Scope of
Services provided pursuant to the Agreement. ENGINEER has not performed any additional
observations, investigations, studies, or testing not specifically stated therein. ENGINEER
shall not be liable for the existence of any condition, the discovery of which required the
performance of services not authorized under the Agreement.
13. The passage of time may result in significant changes in technology, economic conditions, or
site variations that would render the Report inaccurate. Accordingly, neither the CLIENT,
nor any other party, shall rely on the information or conclusions contained in this Report after
six months from its date of submission without the express written consent of ENGINEER.
Reliance on the Report after such period of time shall be at the user's sole risk. Should
ENGINEER be required to review the Report after six months from its date of submission,
ENGINEER shall be entitled to additional compensation at then existing rates or such other
terms as may be agreed upon between ENGINEER and the CLIENT.
14. ENGINEER has endeavored to perform its services based upon engineering practices
accepted at the time they were performed. ENGINEER makes no other representations,
express or implied, regarding the information, data, analysis, calculations, and conclusions
contained herein.
15. The services provided by ENGINEER do not include legal advice. Legal counsel should be
consulted regarding interpretation of applicable and relevant federal, state, and local statutes
and regulations and other legal matters.
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Appendix 8
Short Toxicological Profiles for Site Compounds
Appendix 8:
Benzene
Appendix B
Short Toxicological Profiles
Short Toxicological Profiles for Site Compounds
Benzene contains six carbon atoms and six hydrogen atoms and is the parent compound of a
class of chemicals known as monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. As a pure chemical, it is a
colorless to light liquid with an aromatic odor. It has a low molecular weight and displays high
water solubility, a medium volatility, and a low affinity to organic carbons in soils. It is a
naturally occurring substance produced by volcanoes and forest fires and is present in plants and
animals, but benzene is also a major industrial chemical obtained from coal and oil. In industry it
is used to make other chemicals, as well as some types of plastics, detergents, and pesticides. It is
also a component of gasoline. The highest exposure area is in the workplace; however, humans
are commonly exposed to benzene in tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust. Environmental
sources of benzene include gasoline filling stations, leaking underground storage tanks,
wastewater and landfills containing benzene, and possibly food products. People living near
industries such as petroleum refineries and chemical manufacturing plants may be affected by
benzene released to the air. Consumer products containing benzene include glues, cleaning
products, and paint strippers. Since benzene evaporates rapidly, the most common exposure
method route is through inhalation of air containing benzene. However, absorption, ingestion,
and contact with the skin are also other possible routes of exposure. Death may occur in humans
after brief ingestion or inhalation exposures to high doses of benzene; however, the main effects
of this type of exposure are dizziness, drowsiness, and headaches. Benzene is known to attack
the blood, central nervous system, skin, bone marrow, eyes, and respiratory system. Benzene is
known to be a human carcinogen, and the EPA categorizes benzene as Class A Human
Carcinogen, with sufficient evidence from epidemiological studies.
Butyl Alcohol
Butyl alcohol (CASRN 71-36-3), also commonly referred to as Butanol, is a colorless liquid with
a slightly rancid, sweet odor. Butyl alcohol is primarily used as a solvent and is commonly
found in paint removers and industrial cleaners. It is a corrosive compound, and can break down
some forms of plastics, rubber and coatings. Occupational exposure to Burtyl alcohol may occur
through inhalation or dermal contact; however, the general population is commonly exposed
through the ingestion of foods that contain Butyl alcohol or the inhalation of vapors. Short-term
exposure of humans to Butanol can cause a variety of affects, including headaches, giddiness,
ataxia, confusion, delirium and possible coma. Additionally, vapors from Butyl alcohol can
cause irritation to the eyes and skin. Brief, repeated overexposures with the skin can cause
depression of the central nervous system, and in extreme cases may cause death. EPA considers
Butyl alcohol to be not classifiable as a carcinogen (Class D).
Butylbenzene, n-
n-Butyl benzene is a liquid at room temperature and is not soluble in water. No toxicity
information was available from IRIS, HSDB, or ATSDR.
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Butylbenzene, tert-
Appendix 8
Short Toxicological Profiles
tert-Butylbenzene is a liquid a room temperature and is not soluble in water. A toxicity value was
available from the Region III Risk-Based Concentration Table, however this was the only
toxicity information identified after searching IRIS, HSDB and ATSDR.
Carbazole
Pure carbazole (CASRN: 86-74-8) appears at room temperature as white crystals. It is an
extremely weak base and exhibits strong fluorescence and long phosphorescence on exposure to
ultraviolet light. Carbazole is an important dye intermediate, in making photographic plates
sensitive to ultraviolet light. It is a reagent for lignin, carbohydrates and used in formaldehyde
manufacture of insecticides, lubricants, rubber antioxidants and as an odor inhibitor in
detergents. There is mo known commercial production of this compound. Carbazole is naturally
contained in coal, petroleum, and peat indicating that it will be released to the environment from
the incomplete combustion of these materials. Carbazole may be released to the environment in
emissions from waste incineration, tobacco smoke, aluminum manufacturing, and rubber
combustion. Carbazole may be released to the environment ineffluents from coal processing, and
wood-treatment facilities. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, such as carbazole, are found in
food as a result of char-broiling and smoking. Carbazole is released to the atmosphere in
emissions from waste incineration, tobacco smoke, aluminum manufacturing, and rubber,
petroleum, coal, and wood combustion. If released to the atmosphere, vapor-phase carbazole is
rapidly degraded by photochemically-produced hydroxyl radicals (estimated half-life of3 hr). In
the particulate phase, the rate of degradation depends upon the adsorbing substrate. Substrates
containing carbon ( > 5%) stabilize carbazole and permit long-range atmospheric transport.
Physical removal via wet and dry deposition is important. If released to soil, environmental
substrates that commonly adsorb carbazole may limit or prevent photolysis. Biodegradation in
soil should be the dominant fate process providing the presence of specific degrading bacteria in
the microbial community (biodegradation half-life of 4.3 min-6.2 hr in screening studies).
Carbazole may partition from the water column to sediment and suspended matter. limiting the
rate of photolysis. Human exposure to carbazole occurs through inhalation of contaminated air
and consumption of water and char-broiled food. High exposure occurs through smoking
cigarettes. No carcinogenicity data are available in humans. There is limited evidence of
carcinogenicity in animals. Carbazole is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans.
Dibenzofuran
Dibenzofuran is a manmade white crystalline solid with a medium molecular weight. It is
released into the air during the combustion of coal, biomass, refuse and diesel fuel and
wastewater emissions can occur from coal tar, coal gasification and shale oil operations. Once in
the air, dibenzofuran will exist primarily in the gas phase where it can be degraded by
photochemical processes. Dibenzofuran released into the water will tend to sorb to sediment and
suspended material. In soils, dibenzofuran will be sorbed and is not expected to leach in most
soil types. The general population is primarily exposed to dibenzofurans through inhalation of air
which has been contaminated with a variety of combustion sources; dibenzofurans have been
identified in tobacco smoke. There is no available toxicity information of dibenzofuran alone.
The U.S. EPA considers dibenzofuran to be not classifiable as a carcinogen (Class D).
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Dimethylphenol, 2, 4-
Appendix 8
Short Toxicological Profiles
2, 4-dimethylphenol contains eight carbon and ten hydrogen atoms and an oxygen atom. It is a
colorless crystal used as an intermediate in the manufacturing of phenolic antioxidants,
pharmaceuticals, plastics and resins, disinfectants (microbicide), solvents, insecticides and
fungicides, and dyestuffs. 2, 4-Dimethylphenol has been found to occur naturally in tobacco and
marijuana smoke and in black tea. In addition, 2,4-Dimethylphenol's production and use for the
preparation of coal tar disinfectants, in the manufacture of artificial resins, as a constituent of
coal tar creosote, and as a component of gasoline, rubber, and automobile and diesel exhaust may
result in its release to the environment through various waste streams. The general population
may be exposed to 2, 4-dimethylphenol via inhalation of ambient air (i.e., tobacco smoke and
automobile exhaust), ingestion of food, and contact with other products that may contain 2, 4-
dimethylphenol. The U.S. EPA classifies 2, 4-dimethylphenol as a Class D compound; not
classifiable as to human carcinogenicity.
Ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE)
Ethyl tert-butyl ether (CASRN 637-92-3), is a colorless liquid with mild odor. ETBE is a highly
flammable liquid and vapor, and is commonly used as an additive in gasoline. Exposure to ethyl
tert-butyl ether can cause irritation to the skin and eyes, and symptoms may include pain, tearing,
redness, swelling and impaired vision. It can also cause drowsiness or dizziness and respiratory
irritation. If ingested, ethyl tert-butyl ether can be very difficult to remove, and can cause severe
injury or death; however, ETBE is not expected to be harmful if inhaled. The U.S. EPA does not
classifY the carcinogenic potential of ETBE and does not present a noncarcinogenic toxicity
value on IRIS.
lsopropyltoluene, p-
p-Isopropyltoluene, also called p-cumene, is a colorless liquid with a mild, pleasant, sweetish
odor. It is primarily used as a solvent and thinner for lacquers and varnishes. It is released in the
environment from motor vehicle exhaust, solvent evaporation, and industrial waste waters. p-
Isopropyltoluene is only slightly sorbed to soil and can leach into groundwater, but it is unlikely
to sorb to sediments. There is limited toxicity information available for p-isopropyltoluene.
However, people exposed to p-isopropyltoluene have experienced headaches, nausea, and
vomiting as well as skin irritation. Animals exposed to p-isopropyltoluene showed changes in the
blood with and increase of white blood cells an decrease in red blood cells. The U.S. EPA does
not classifY the carcinogenic potential of p-isopropyltoluene and does not present a
noncarcinogenic toxicity value on IRIS.
Methylphenol, 2-
2-Methylphenol (CASRN 95-48-7), oro-Cresol, is a white crystal with a sweet tarry odor.
Above 88 degrees Fahrenheit, it occurs as crystals in liquid that becomes dark with age and
exposure to light and air. 2-Methylphenol is an industrial solvent, commonly used for making
synthetic resins and also found in disinfectants and fumigants .. Probable routes of human
exposure are through inhalation or dermal contact to workers exposed via manufacturing
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Appendix B
Short Toxico'logical Profiles
processes. Exposure to 2-Methylphenol may cause respiratory tract irritation, including dryness,
nasal constriction and throat irritation. It is a corrosive material that can cause severe eye and
skin burns - if large areas of skin are wetted by 2-Methylphenol, serious or even fatal poisoning
may occur. The EPA categorizes 2-Methylphenol as Class C- a possible human carcinogen,
based on an increased incidence of skin papillomas in mice and an initiation-promotion study.
Methylphenol, 3-
3-Methylphenol occurs as a colorless to yellow liquid with a phenolic odor; below 54 degrees
Farenheight it is a solid. 3-Methylphenol is used as a textile scouring agent, industrial solvent,
for synthetic resins, disinfectants and fumigants, in explosives and in insecticides. Because of
the wide use of 3-Methylphenol, it can be released to the environment through various waste
streams, incuding through automobile exhaust and tobacco smoke. Exposure to 3-Methylphenol
can cause irritation of eyes, nose and throat, with symptoms including tearing, conjunctivitis and
corneal edema. The EPA categorizes 2-Methylphenol as Class C -a possible human carcinogen,
based on an increased incidence of skin papillomas in mice and an initiation-promotion study.
Methyl tert-butyl ether
Methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a clear liquid with a disagreeable odor. It is a volatile organic
ether with extensive water solubility and lipophilicity. It is used clinically in the treatment of
gallstones, as an industrial solvent, and as a gasoline-oxygenated octane enhancer. MTBE is
expected to be very mobile in the soil, subject to volatilization and leach to groundwater. MTBE
is not expected to adsorb to sediment or suspended particles in water bodies or to bioaccumulate
in aquatic organisms. MTBE in air produces local irritation of the nose, throat, and eyes. High
acute exposures produce central nervous system depression, including sedation, slowed reflexes,
tremors, incoordination, and altered behavior. Long-term exposure has resulted in minor changes
in the blood, kidneys, liver, and nervous system. The EPA does not classifY MTBE with regard
to human carcinogenicity.
Naphthalene
Naphthalene is a white solid at room temperature. It has a distinct odor of mothballs or tar.
Humidity and sunshine cause evaporation into the air within a few hours. When placed in water
or soil, bacteria will destroy naphthalene or will render it airborne within a few hours. Tobacco
smoke is known to release 3 of naphthalene per cigarette. The compound is used in the
production of dyes, solvents, lubricants, and motor fuels and is a major component of many
mothball preparations.
Humans can absorb naphthalene by dermal, inhalation, and oral routes. Adults and children
experience vomiting, abdominal pain, and anemia. Most of the data is for inhalation of
naphthalene from mothballs. The primary site of toxicity is the erythrocyte resulting in hemolytic
crisis. Jaundice is seen upon dermal, inhalation, and oral exposures, as are kidney effects. Near-
blindness resulted in male and female subjects with a 5 gram ingestion.
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Phenol
Appendix B
Short Toxicological Profiles
Phenol appears as a colorless, acicular crystals or white, crystalline mass, colorless to light pink,
interlaced, or separate, needle-shaped crystals. Phenol in this form has a distinct, aromatic,
somewhat sickening sweet and acrid odor. It is used as a general disinfectant in solution or
mixed with slaked lime, etc., for toilets, stables, cesspools, floors, drains, etc; manufacture of
colorless or light-colored artificial resins, many medical and industrial organic compound and
dyes, also used as a reagent in chemical analysis.
Phenol is bacteriostatic in concentrations of approximately 0.2 percent, bactericidal above 1
percent, and fungicidal above 1.3 percent. Phenols are subjected to oxidative metabolism
leading to ortho- and para-hydroxylated products. These metabolites are then transformed into
equimolar amounts of two conjugates, sulfates and glucuronides. The predominant acute action
of a toxic dose in man appears to be to the central nervous system, leading to sudden collapse
and unconsciousness. Phenol is nephrotoxic to humans and animals, especially following chronic
exposure. Humans have experienced nephritis following toxic dermal exposure. A probable oral
lethal dose of phenol to humans is 50-500 mg/kg. Some individuals may be hypersensitive, with
lethality or serious effects at very low exposures. Rapid absorption and severe systemic toxicity
can occur after any route of exposure including dermal. Death and severe toxicity are usually due
to effects on the CNS, heart, blood vessels, lung, and kidneys. However, toxic manifestations
may vary somewhat with the route. Observed effects from acute exposure may include: shock,
delirium, coma, pulmonary distress, phenolic breath, scanty/dark urine, and death. Protracted or
chronic exposure usually results in major damage to the liver, kidneys and eyes. Pigmentary
changes of the skin have also been noted. Consumption of water contaminated with phenol
resulted in diarrhea, mouth sores, burning of the mouth, and dark urine. Phenol is highly caustic
to tissues. Skin exposure results in pain, then numbness, blanching, severe bums, and eschar
formation. Ingestion leads to burning of throat and severe gastrointestinal inflammation.
Inhalation can result in pulmonary irritation and edema.
Toxicity in animals is similar to that of humans, although additional effects have been observed.
LD50's in animals range from 250-500 mg/kg, differing very little with route of exposure or
species, except for the cat which is unusually susceptible with an oral lethal dose of 80 mg/kg.
Additional reported toxic effects include irritation and corrosivity of skin and eyes in rabbits,
induction of skin tumors in mice, reproductive effects in rats, and mutagenicity with Salmonella,
E coli and Drosophila. Phenol is also highly toxic to aquatic life and frogs. Phenol is metabolized
and excreted principally by the kidneys as the sulfate or glucuronide, although some phenol may
be excreted unchanged, especially at high doses. Reported metabolites include hydroquinone,
other quinones and catechols. There is inadequate evidence for the carcinogenicity of phenol in
humans. There is inadequate evidence for the carcinogenicity of phenol in experimental animals.
Overall evaluation: Phenol is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans - EPA
Classification D, based on inadequate human and animal carcinogenicity data.
Tertiary-Amyl Methyl Ether
Tertiary-amyl methyl ether (TAME) is a clear, colorless flammable liquid with an ether odor.
TAME is an ether which contains an oxygen atom bonded to two carbon atoms. In TAME, one
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Appendix B
Short Toxicological Profiles
carbon atom is that of a methyl group and the other is the central atom in a tertiary amyl group.
TAME has low viscosity and is slightly soluble in water and highly soluble in most organic
solvents including hydro carbons. TAME is mainly used as an oxygenate to gasoline. It is added
to gasoline to increase octane enhancement, replace banned tetraethyllead and raise the oxygen
content in gasoline. TAME is also used as a reaction medium and extraction solvent to replace
. methylene chloride, aromatics, and other ethers. TAME is a non-chlorinated process solvent. It is
used as a solvent for chromatographic techniques. It is used as a paraffin-removing agent alone
or in combination with other solvents. It is not readily biodegradable. TAME vapor irritates the
eyes and the respiratory tract. Exposure to high concentrations of TAME in air may cause
nausea, headache and narcotic effects. Prolonged or repeated exposure to TAME causes drying
and irritation of the skin and aspiration of ingested product into lungs can cause fatal chemical
pneumonitis. The EPA does not classify TAME with regard to human carcinogenicity.
Toluene
Toluene belongs to a group of compounds known as monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and is a
constituent of automobile and aviation fuels, asphalt, and naphtha. Toluene is commonly used as
a solvent and plant extraction agent and in producing other organic chemicals and detergents.
Toluene has a low molecular weight and is a clear, colorless liquid with a sweet smell at room
temperature. It further displays medium solubility in water, high volatility, medium affinity for
organic carbons (e.g., in soils), and medium tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms. In
the home, humans are exposed to toluene in gasoline, nail polish, rubber cement, paint brush
cleaners, stain removers, and adhesives. Smokers are exposed to toluene in cigarette smoke.
Although effects from toluene vary with the duration and intensity of exposure, the main effect
occurs on the nervous system. The liver, kidneys, and lungs may also be affected. The National
Toxicology Program found that toluene did not cause cancer in a long-term study in rats and
mice, and the U.S. EPA does not classify toluene with regard to human carcinogenicity.
Trichloroethane
Trichloroethene contains two carbon atoms, one hydrogen atom, and three chlorine atoms. It is
most employed as a solvent and as an extraction agent, dry cleaning agent, fumigant, and
chemical intermediate. Trichloroethene has a medium molecular weight and is a liquid at room
temperature. It is characterized by medium solubility in water, high volatility, .a medium affinity
for organic carbon (e.g., in soils), and a medium tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic
organisms. Trichloroethene is known to be acutely toxic to animals and humans, and animal data
indicate trichloroethene may be carcinogenic. short and long-term exposure of people to
trichloroethene produced central nervous system effects. The U.S. EPA does not have any
noncarcinogenic toxicity values for trichloroethene. In 1988 the U.S. EPA's Science Advisory
Board proposed that the weight of evidence classification for trichloroethene lie between Class C
(Possible Human Carcinogen) and Class B2 (Probable Human Carcinogen). At the present time,
the EPA has not adopted a final position on the classification of trichloroethene.
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1, 2, 2-Trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113)
Appendix B
Short Toxicological Profiles
Freon 113 (CASRN 76-13-1) is a colorless to water-white liquid (a gas above 118 F) with a
faint solvent odor at high concentrations. It is used as a dry-cleaning solvent, in fire
extinguishers, as a blowing agent, polymer intermediate, and in drying electronic parts.
Exposure to Freon 113 generally has little to no adverse human health affects; however,
prolonged or repeated contact with high concentrations Freon 113 may cause slight skin irritation
or mild irritation of the eyes and throat. The EPA categorizes Freon 113 as Class A4- not
classifiable as a human carcinogen.
1, 2, 4-Trimethylbenzene
I ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene is a liquid used as a solvent and paint thinner and in the manufacture of
dyes, perfumes, resins, and pharmaceuticals. Exposure occurs primarily through inhalation and
dermal contact. Effects from exposure may include skin, eye, and nasal irritation, nausea, central
nervous system depression, and asthmatic bronchitis.
Xylenes
Xylenes belong to a class of compounds called monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. They occur
naturally in petroleum and coal tar and are formed during forest fires. The ortho-, meta-, and
para-isomers of :xylene are typically mixed in commercial-grade products as solvents and
chemical intermediates and are also constituents of paint thinners, varnishes, and lacquers.
Xylenes have medium molecular weights and are liquids at room temperature. They are also
characterized by medium solubility in water, high volatility, medium affinity for organic carbons
(e.g., in soils), and high ability to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms. Exposure to high levels of
xylenes over a long period of time impairs the liver, kidneys, lungs, heart, and nervous system.
Additionally, exposing pregnant women to xylenes may harm the fetus. Information from animal
studies is not adequate to determine whether xylenes may cause cancer in humans, and the U.S.
EPA has not classified xylenes with regard to human carcinogenicity.
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)
The P AHs detected on the Site include: acenaphthene, acenaphthylene, anthracene,
benzo( a)anthracene, benzo( a)pyrene, benzo(b )fluoranthene, benzo(g,h,i)perylene,
benzo(k)fluoranthene, chrysene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorine, indeno(1,2,3-
cd)pyrene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphtha!tbne, naphthalene, phenathrene, and pyrene.
P AHs are a family of chemicals widely distributed in the environment and commonly formed as
by-products of incomplete combustion. They are found, although not exclusively, in coal, coal
tar, asphalt, and cigarette smoke, and they also occur in charred food. P AHs strongly absorb to
particulates and other carbonaceous matter including soils and sediments.
Not all PAHs are carcinogenic; however, the following PARs have demonstrated carcinogenicity
in laboratory animals and are considered probable human carcinogens: benzo(a)anthracene,
benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(b )fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, chrysene,
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Appendix 8
Short Toxicological Profiles
and indeno(l,2,3-cd)pyrene. Recent studies have related the carcinogenic activity of these PAHs
to their molecular and electronic structure. Specifically, carcinogenic PAH molecules are
characterized by a Bay region, a space created by the angular arrangement of three consecutive
benzene rings. Figure B-1 illustrates the Bay region in the benzo(a)pyrene and
dibenzo(a,h)anthracene molecules. This characteristic shape is apparently critical for the
metabolic activation of these compounds. P AH molecules lacking this Bay region, such as
anthracene and fluoranthene (Figure B-2) do not display carcinogenic activity.
Figure B1-1 Bay Region
Bay Reg;an\
Bay Reg;an\
\_Bay Region
Benzo(a)pyrene Dibenzo( a,h)anthracene
Figure B1-2 No "Bay" Region
Anthracene Fluoranthene
Important systemic effects ofbenzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and other carcinogenic PAHs are primarily
caused by inhalation and ingestion. Dermal penetration with potential systemic uptake is of
secondary importance at normal environmental concentrations. Fed to mice, B(a)P has resulted
in adverse reproductive effects in both the parent and the offspring generations (ATSDR,
October 1987).
The primary exposure routes for naphthalene and other non-carcinogenic P AHs are also
inhalation and ingestion. Non-carcinogenic P AHs can cause systemic effects including
hemolysis, or destruction of red blood cells. Adverse changes to the retina, lens, and cornea of
the eye have also been reported in experimental animals (Cassarett and Doull, 3rd edition).
Antimony
Antimony is a naturally occurring silvery-white metal that is alloyed with other metals producing
solder, bearings, casting, type metal, ammunition, and pewter. One form of antimony, antimony
oxide, may be added to textiles and plastics as a flame retardant. Antimony is a medium
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Appendix B
Short Toxicological Profiles
molecular weight element; its solubility in water, affinity for organic carbon (e.g., in soil), and
tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms depends on the particular compound present.
Since antimony belongs to the same periodic grouping as arsenic, it is thought to be similar
metabolically. Like arsenic, antimony has beneficial effects and is used to treat people infected
with parasites. However, long-term exposure to antimony may cause heart problems, vomiting,
and diarrhea. The U.S. EPA does not classifY antimony with regard to human carcinogenicity.
Arsenic
Arsenic is a metallic element that is commonly present in its elemental form and in inorganic and
organic compounds. Arsenic and arsenic compounds are commonly used in metal alloys, in the
production of agricultural pesticides, pharmaceuticals, pigments, glass, and textiles, and in
tanning and taxidermy. Elemental arsenic has low molecular weight, is a solid at room
temperature, and displays low volatility. Its solubility in water, affinity for organic carbon (e.g.,
in soils), and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms depend on the particular
compound present. Information on the crustal abundance of arsenic and its potential essentiality
for humans is provided in the main report. Organic arsenic complexed with carbon and hydrogen
is generally less toxic than inorganic arsenic. In this report, we conservatively assume that all
reported arsenic is inorganic. Oral ingestion results in such effects as irritation of the
gastrointestinal tract, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Arsenic affects several organs, including
the skin, blood, heart, circulatory system, liver, and kidneys. Neurological effects in the
extremities have also been reported. Arsenic is a likely fetotoxic agent in animals. Carcinogenic
effects have been demonstrated in humans from inhalation of airborne arsenic containing dusts
near smelters. The U.S. EPA has noncarcinogenic and (inhalation) carcinogenic toxicity values
for arsenic and classifies it as a Human Carcinogen (Class A).
Barium
Barium is a somewhat soft, silver white metal that occurs naturally in the minerals barite and
witherite. It is a medium molecular weight element that, in its pure form, may ignite
spontaneously in air. Barium occurs in many different forms in the environment, and its
solubility in water, affinity for organic carbon (e.g., in soil), and tendency to bioaccumulate in
aquatic organisms depend on the specific compound. Barium has many uses including in metal
alloys, paints, pesticides, soaps, rubber, ceramics, glass, and x-ray diagnostics. Ingested soluble
forms of barium may affect the heart, lungs, liver, kidney, spleen, central nervous system, and
respiratory system, although barium poisoning is virtually unknown. The U.S. EPA has not
classified barium with regard to human carcinogenicity.
Chromium
Chromium is a metallic element that may be present in its elemental form or in inorganic and
organic compounds. Typical uses of chromium and chromium compounds include chrome
plating, copper stripping, organic synthesis, photography, and the production of metal alloys.
Chromium is a low molecular weight element and is a solid at room temperature. Its solubility in
water, affinity for organic carbon (e.g., in soils and sediments), and tendency to bioaccumulate in
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Appendix B.
Short Toxicological Profiles
aquatic organisms depend strongly on the compound type. Information on the crustal abundance
of chromium is provided in the main report. Most chromium is found in the environment in two
valence forms: trivalent chromium(III) and hexavalent chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) is much
more toxic than chromium(III), which is the form found in foods. The predominant
environmental form is chromium(III). Inhalation exposures to chromium(III) are reported to
adversely affect the immune systems of experimental animals, and injected doses (typically into
the area around the intestines) have adverse developmental and reproductive effects. Animal
studies suggest that chromium(III) probably is not a genotoxic agent. Extremely high oral doses
of chromium(III) can be lethal to laboratory animals. Chromium(III) is not thought to be
carcinogenic. In fact, small amounts of chromium are regularly ingested by people as a natural
component of many foods, and in these quantities it is considered an essential nutrient. However,
the U.S. EPA classifies chromium(VI) as a Human Carcinogen (Class A).
Lead
Lead is a naturally occurring metal that is widely distributed throughout the environment and is
found in small quantities in food and drinking water. Common uses include the manufacture of
electrical storage batteries and ammunition. Lead was formerly commonly used in gasoline,
solders, pipes, and paints. Inhalation exposure to dusts containing lead is common, particularly in
urban areas. Lead is released as a result of the combustion of coal, petroleum products, and solid
waste. Elemental lead has a medium molecular weight, is a solid at room temperature, and
displays low volatility. Its solubility in water, affinity for organic carbon (e.g., in soils), and
ability to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms depend on the compound type. Soils in urban areas
are usually contaminated with some lead, which may result in exposure due to soil contact.
Children are at particular risk for lead toxemia both because their characteristic mouthing
behavior may increase their potential for lead ingestion and because they are more susceptible to
neurologic damage. Lead, by any exposure route, is highly toxic to the developing fetus a:nd can
result in premature birth, lowered birth weight, and reduced intelligence in the offspring. Lead
can adversely affect organs such as the brain and kidneys, and it also has adverse reproductive
effects. Studies in animals suggest that lead may be a carcinogen, and U.S. EPA classifies lead as
a Probable Human Carcinogen (Class B2).
Manganese
Manganese is a naturally occurring metal that is found in various types of rocks. It is an essential
trace element and is necessary for good health. Manganese can be found in several food items,
including grains and cereals, and is found in high amounts in other foods, such as tea. Pure
manganese is silver-colored, but does not occur naturally. It combines with other substances such
as oxygen, sulfur, or chlorine. Manganese can also be combined with carbon to make organic
manganese compounds. Common organic manganese compounds include pesticides, such as
maneb or mancozeb, and methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), a fuel additive
in gasoline. Manganese is used in the iron and steel industry in steel alloys and is in the
manufacture of dry cell batteries (Mn02), paints, varnishes, inks, dyes, matches and fireworks,
as a fertilizer, disinfectant, bleaching agent, laboratory reagent, drier for oils, an oxidizing agent
in the chemical industry particularly in the synthesis of potassium permanganate, and as a
decolorizer and coloring agent in the glass and ceramics industry. Manganese can cause a variety
Tetra Tech Rizzo
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Appendix B
Short Toxicological Profiles
of serious toxic responses upon prolonged exposure to elevated concentrations either orally or by
inhalation. The central nervous system is the primary target. Initial symptoms include headache,
lethargy, insomnia, disorientation, anxiety, and memory loss. These symptoms progress with
continued exposure and eventually include motor disturbances, tremors, and difficulty in
walking, symptoms similar to those seen with Parkinsonism. These motor difficulties are often
irreversible. Effects on reproduction (decreased fertility, impotence) have been observed in
humans with inhalation exposure and in animals with oral exposure at the same or similar doses
that initiate the central nervous system effects. An increased incidence of coughs, colds, dyspnea
during exercise, bronchitis, and altered lung ventilatory parameters have also been seen in
humans and animals with inhalation exposure. A possible effect on the immune system may
account for some of these respiratory symptoms. The U.S. EPA weight-of-evidence classification
is: D, not classifiable as to human carcinogenicity based on no evidence in humans and
inadequate evidence in animals.
Mercury
Mercury is a naturally occurring element often found associated with other chemicals in
compounds. Exposures to mercury occur from dental fillings and during production in the
automotive, chemical, and electrical industries. Mercury may exist in soils as organic or
inorganic mercury, and bacterial processes may convert mercury from one form to the other.
Mercury complexed with carbon, known as organic mercury, bioaccumulates in the tissues of
exposed organisms. Elemental mercury is a medium molecular weight element and is a liquid at
room temperature. Its volatility, solubility in water, affinity for organic carbon (e.g., in soils and
sediments), and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms depend strongly on the
compound. While the toxicological criteria for mercury used in this risk assessment are based
upon inorganic mercury, we note that exposures to both inorganic and organic mercury have
been shown to damage the brain and kidneys and to have adverse reproductive effects in both
animals and humans. The U.S. EPA does not categorize mercury with respect to human
carcinogenicity.
Nickel
Nickel is a naturally occurring metal that may be an essential nutrient; it may be present in its
elemental form or in inorganic and organic compounds. Nickel and nickel compounds are
commonly used to produce metal alloys with other metals such as copper, manganese, and zinc,
in manufacturing magnets, in electroplating, metal casting, and synthetic oil production, and as a
catalyst in halogenation reactions. Nickel is a low molecular weight element and is a solid at
room temperature. Its volatility, solubility in water, affinity for organic carbon (e.g., in soils and
sediments), and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms depend strongly on the
compound. Adverse effects, including lung cancer and even death, have been reported from
exposures to nickel refinery dust and to nickel carbonyl, which occurs during the refining of
nickel. These forms of nickel are not expected at the Site, and the nickel at the Site is expected to
be combined at very low concentration with many soil constituents. Under these conditions there
is no compelling evidence in the literature of adverse effects other than cancer from nickel
exposure. The U.S. EPA has noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic toxicity values for nickel and
classifies it as a Human Carcinogen (Class A).
Tetra Tech Rizzo
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Zinc
Appendix 8
Short Toxicological Profiles
Zinc is a metallic element that may be present in its elemental form or in inorganic and organic
compounds. Zinc and zinc compounds are utilized as wood preservatives, in batteries, textiles,
paints, metal alloys, and protective coatings for electrical equipment, in the production of paper,
dyes, activated carbon, and chemicals, and for reclaiming rubber and purifYing fats for soaps.
Elemental zinc has a low molecular weight, is a solid at room temperature, and is characterized
by low volatility. Its solubility in water, affinity for organic carbon (e.g., in soils and sediments),
and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms depend on the compound. Zinc is an
essential nutrient for humans that, at high exposure levels, affects the gastrointestinal system,
blood, liver, and kidneys. The U.S. EPA does not categorize zinc with respect to human
carcinogenicity.
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons
The term Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is an analytical parameter referring to a complex
mixture of a variety of organic compounds. Many of these organic compounds are components
of petroleum products (e.g., gasoline, diesel fuel, motor oil, or heating oil), while others may
result from the degradation of these components as the mixture ages or "weathers." It is very
difficult to accurately assess the toxicity of these petroleum mixtures in the environment because
their composition is largely unknown. Even if the composition ofthe pure product released is
known, the composition of the weathered product may be quite different, as some compounds
volatilize to soil gas, others break down into degradation products, and others undergo some
other physical or chemical transformation. Furthermore, toxicity data is not available for many of
the organic chemicals that compose these mixtures.
For toxicity purposes, petroleum mixtures can be divided roughly into two classes:
alkanes/cycloalkanes and aromatic compounds. Alkanes, such as propane, butane, and hexane,
are straight- or branched-chain organic compounds, and cycloalkanes are organic compounds
characterized by a ring structure. Exposure to both alkanes and cycloalkanes can cause irritation
of the eyes, nose, and skin. Chronic exposure to lower molecular weight alkanes and
cycloalkanes can disrupt the central nervous system. There is insufficient evidence regarding the
carcinogenicity of alkanes and cycloalkanes.
Aromatic compounds include benzene and its derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
(PAHs). In general, chronic exposure to benzene and its alkyl derivatives (e.g., ethylbenzene,
toluene, and xylenes) can cause central nervous system depression and possibly can affect kidney
and liver function. Benzene derivatives may also cause eye, nose, throat, and skin irritation.
Chronic exposure to P AHs such as naphthalene can cause dermal irritation, blood toxicities, and
kidney and liver effects. In addition, benzene is a well-known carcinogen, as are benzo(a)pyrene
and other PAHs with similar chemical. structures.
Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPH)
Extractable petroleum hydrocarbons represent the extractable fraction of hydrocarbons in soil
and water corresponding to carbon number ranges of approximately Cro to C3
2
. The toxicity of
Tetra Tech Rizzo
12
Appendix B
Short Toxicological Profiles
EPH is evaluated by grouping the extracted hydrocarbons by size, i.e. number of carbons, and
general chemical structure. Each group of extractable hydrocarbons is represented by a single
chemical based on the availability of toxicity information and its ability to represent the group as
a whole (MDEP). The three groups composing the EPH are aliphatic (C
9
-C
18
) represented by n-
nonane, aliphatic (CwC32) represented by eicosane, and aromatic (C
12
-C
32
) represented by
pyrene.
The aliphatic (C9-C
18
) are represented by n-nonane (C9), a compound affecting the central
nervous system (CNS) with effects including mild tremors and incoordination, as well as
irritation of the eyes. The CNS effects decrease as the compounds increase in size beyond C9;
however, the irritant effects increase as the size increases. The aliphatic (C
19
-C
32
) are represented
by eicosane, a compound causing little neurotoxicity, whose toxicity is represented by mineral
oil (CwCso). No effects have been reported in humans after medicinal use of mineral oil. In rats,
a localized inflammatory reaction in the liver resulting from accumulation of the inert
hydrocarbons in the liver was seen in some studies; however, this reaction is not thought to
represent a potential for pathological effects in humans. The aromatic (C
12
-C
32
) are represented
by pyrene, a compound that is a human skin irritant and has induced liver and kidney effects
after exposure in rats and mice.
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Research and Standards. Interim Petroleum Policy: Development ofHeaJth-
based Alternative to the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) Parameter. August 1994.
Tetra Tech Rizzo
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Appendix C
Exposure Profiles and Calculations
Appendix C
Exposure Profiles and Calculations
Appendix C: Exposure Profiles and Calculations
This attachment provides exposure profiles for the receptors that are evaluated in this risk
characterization. Tables C-1 and C-2 present the calculations of the receptor-specific factors.
Construction Worker
Construction workers working at the Site may be exposed to compounds via dermal contact with
groundwater during trenching or excavating. Construction workers are assumed to come into
contact with groundwater 8 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 8 weeks of one year at the Site.
We consider workers to be 18 years of age and older, with a life span of 70 years, average body
weight of 58 kg and body surface area of 1.82 m
2
. We assume construction workers will work in
long pants and short-sleeved shirts, leaving their head, lower arms, and hands exposed.
Utility Worker
Utility workers repairing utilities at the Site may be exposed to groundwater COCs via dermal
contact during trenching or excavating. Utility workers are assumed to come into contact with
groundwater at the Site 8 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 1 week per year for 25 years. We
consider workers to be 18 years of age and older, with a life span of 70 years, average body
weight of 58 kg and body surface area of 1.82 m
2
. We assume construction workers will work in
long pants and short-sleeved shirts, leaving their head, lower arms, and hands exposed.
Exposure Equations
After estimating exposure point concentrations, we estimate exposure doses to humans. We first
estimate an average daily dose on a day of exposure [ADD( d)] separately for each compound
and pathway for each receptor. We then estimate an average daily dose averaged over a year in
which exposure occurs and, finally, averaged over the lifetime of the receptor.
In general, the formulas to estimate dose incorporate the following similar features:
Exposure point concentration
Rate of exposure
Term of exposure (if measured in hours rather than days)
Conversion factor to reconcile the units
Body weight of the receptor
Tetra Tech Rizzo
1
Appendix C
Exposure Profiles and Calculations
Estimations of doses averaged over a year or a lifetime also include a frequency and duration of
exposure in terms of days, weeks, and years exposed.
We estimate an average daily dose over one day of exposure using the equations that follow.
Exposure equations for each receptor and exposure pathway are presented.
Tetra Tech Rizzo
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Table C-1 Construction Worker- Dermal Contact with Groundwater
Notes:
Variables
Receptor- CW
Age
Average body weight (BW)
Frequency of Exposure (EF)
Duration of Exposure Event (ED)
Duraf1on of Exposure Period (EP)
Averaging Period (AP)
for noncancer risk
for cancer risk.
Skin surface area in contact with soil on days exposed (SA)
Skin surface area
Fraction of skin exposed
Skin Permeability Coefficient (Kp)
Dermal Relative Adsorption Factor (RAF)
Exposure Point Concentration (EPCgw)
Construction Worker
Adult(18+) years
58 kilograms
40 events/year
8 hours/event
1 year
year
70 years
910 cm
2
/day
18,200 cm
2
0.05
Contaminant-specific em/hour
contaminant- specific
arithmetic mean !Jg/L
Note:
(1)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(B)
(9)
(10)
Subchronic Noncarcinogenic Effects
Construction Worker Noncancer
Dermal Groundwater (CWNCDGW) Factor (Ukg-day)
CWNCDGW Factor
Subchronic Average Daily Dose (mg/kg-day)
SA {cm
2
) x Kp (em/hour) x EF (events/year) xED (hours/event) x EP (years)
x (1/1 ,000 Ucm
3
) x (1 year/ 365 days) x (1/BW (kg)) x (1/AP (years))
1.4E-02 Uk.g-day
EPCgw {!Jg/L) x CWNCDGW Factor (Ukg-day) x dermal RAF x 1/1,000 (mg/!Jg)
Carcinogenic Effects
Construction Worker Cancer
Dermal Groundwater (CWCDGW) Factor (Ukg-day)
CWCDGW Factor
Lifetime Average Daily Dose (mg/kg-day)
SA (cm
2
) x Kp (em/hour) x EF (events/year) xED (hours/event) x EP (years)
x (1/1,000 Ucm
3
) x (1 year/365 days) x (1/BW (kg)) x (1/AP (years))
2.0E-04 L!kg-day
EPCgw (!Jg/L) x CWCDGW Factor (Uk.g-day) x dermal RAF x 1/1,000 (mg/!Jg)
(1) Adults, 18 to 65 years of age, were used to represent Potential Future on-site construction workers. These potential receptors may be exposed to
contaminants in groundwater at the Site during development activities.
(2) Average body weight of receptor population obtained from U.S. EPA Exposure Factors Handbook, Volume I of II, Office of the Health and Environmental Assessment,
Washington, D.C., EPA 600/C-99/001, February 1999.
(3) Frequency of exposure describes how often each event occurs over a given period of time. It was assumed that workers would be exposed to contaminants
in groundwater while trenching 5 days per week for 8 weeks, for a total of 40 events per year.
(4) The duration of each exposure describes how long each individual exposure event might last. For dermal exposure to groundwater, exposure duration is
8 hours/event. During this event, the construction worker is assumed to dermally contact contaminants in groundwater.
(5) The exposure period describes the length of time over which the construction worker may contact contaminants in groundwater within a trench.
We assume that construction workers will be exposed to contaminants in groundwater while trenching outdoors so we evaluate a 1 year exposure.
(6) For noncancer risks, the averaging period is set equal to the exposure period. The averaging period is equal to a lifetime (i.e., 70 years) when estimating cancer risks.
(7) Skin surface areas are based on U.S. EPA Exposure Factors Handbook., Office of the Health and Environmental Assessment, Washington, D.C., EPA 600/C-99/001, February 1999.
Fraction exposed assumes head, forearms, and hands exposed based on assumption in DEP Documentation for Risk Assessment Shortform Residential
Scenario- October, 1992.
(8) Skin permeability values were obtained from Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications Interim Report EPA 600/8-91/011 B.
(9) Refer to Table 5 for contaminant-specific dermal groundwater contact RAFs.
(1 0) Please refer to Section 5.5 for the derivation of exposure point concentrations.
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UW\EXP _CW & UWConst. Worker Dermal GW
Table C-2 Utility Worker- Dermal Contact with Groundwater
Notes:
Variables
Receptor- UW
Age
Average body weight (BW)
Frequency of Exposure (EF)
Duration of Exposure Event (ED)
Duration of Exposure Period (EP)
Averaging Period (AP)
for noncancer risk
for cancer risk
Skin surtace area in contact with soil on days exposed (SA)
Skin surface area
Fraction of skin exposed
Skin Permeability Coefficient (Kp)
Dermal Relative Adsorption Factor (RAF)
Exposure Point Concentration (EPCgw)
Exposure Assumptions
Utility Worker
Adult(18+) years
58 kilograms
5 events/year
a hours/event
25 years
25 years
70 years
910 cm
2
/day
18,200 cm
2
0.05
Contaminant-specific em/hour
contaminant- specific
arithmetic mean tJg/L
Note:
(1)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(B)
(9)
(10)
Subchronic Noncarcinogenic Effects
Utility Worker Noncancer
Dermal Groundwater (UWNCDGW) Factor (Ukg-day)
UWNCDGW Factor
Subchronic Average Daily Dose (mg/kg-day)
SA (cm
2
) x Kp (em/hour) x EF (events/year) xED ( hours/event) x EP (years)
x (1/1,000 Ucm
3
) x (1 year/365 days) x (1/BW (kg)) x (1/AP (years))
1.7E-03 Ukg-day
EPCgw (tJg/L) x UWNCDGW Factor (Ukg-day) x dermal RAF X 1/1,000 (mg/f.Jg)
Carcinogenic Effects
Utility Worker Cancer
Dermal Groundwater (UWCDGW) Factor (Ukg-day)
UWCDGW Factor
Lifetime Average Daily Dose (mg/kg-day)
SA (cm
2
) x Kp (em/hour) x EF (events/year) xED (hours/event) x EP (years)
x (1/1 ,000 Ucm
3
) x (1 year/365 days) x (1/BW (kg)) x (1/AP (years))
EPCgw {f.Jg/L) x UWCDGW Factor (Ukg-day) x dermal RAF x 1/1,000 (mg/f.Jg)
(1) Adults, 18 to 65 years of age, were used to represent Potential Future on-site utility workers. These potential receptors may be exposed to
contaminants in groundwater during underground utility repair and maintenance work at the Site.
(2) Average body weight of receptor population obtained from U.S. EPA Exposure Factors Handbook, Volume I of II, Office of the Health and Environmental Assessment,
Washington, D.C., EPA 600/C-99/001, February 1999.
(3) Frequency of exposure describes how often each event occurs over a given period of time. It was assumed that workers would be exposed to contaminants
in groundwater while working on underground utilites at the Site 5 days per week for 1 week, for a total of 5 events per year.
(4) The duration of each exposure describes how long each individual exposure event might last For dermal exposure to groundwater, exposure duration is
a hours/event. During this event, the utility worker is assumed to dermally contact contaminants in groundwater.
(5) The exposure period describes the length of time over which the utility worker may contact contaminants in groundwater within a trench.
We a.ssume that utility workers will be exposed to contaminants in groundwater while repairing/maintaining underground utilities at the Site so we evaluate a 25 year exposure.
{6) For noncancer risks, the averaging period is set equal to the exposure period. The averaging period is equal to a lifetime (i.e., 70 years) when estimating cancer risks.
(7) Skin surface areas are based on U.S. EPA Exposure Factors Handbook, Office of the Health and Environmental Assessment, Washington, D.C., EPA 600/C-99/001, February 1999.
Fraction exposed assumes head, forearms, and hands exposed based on assumption in DEP Documentation for Risk Assessment Shortform Residential
Scenario- October, 1992.
(8) Skin permeability values were obtained from Dermal Exposure Assessment: Principles and Applications 1 nterim Report EPA 600/8-91/011 B.
(9) Refer to Table 5 for contaminant-specific dermal groundwater contact RAFs.
(1 0) Please refer to Section 5.5 for the derivation of exposure point concentrations.
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UW\EXP _CW & UWUtil. Worker Dennal GW
Appendix D
Risk Calculations
Appendix D: Risk Calculations
Appendix D
Risk Calculations
Table 7 summarizes the risks calculated for tbe Site. Tables D-1 and D-2 provide the calculations
for tbe risk characterization.
Tetra Tech Rizzo
1
TABLE D-1
CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES
FOR DERMAL CONTACT WITH GROUNDWATER
RECEPTOR: Constrution Worker
SUBCHRONIC NONCARCINOGENIC EFFECTS
Exposure Subchronic Oral
Point Dermal Skin Average Subchronic Hazard
Contaminant Concentration X Relative X Permeability X CWNCDGW = Daily Reference = Index
EPCgw Absorption Constant Factor Dose Dose

Factor {Ucm
2
(Ukg-da;t} (mg/kg-da;t} {mg/kg-da;t}
Benzene 1.5 1.00 2.1E-02 1.4E-02 4.3E-07 1.0E-02 4.3E-05
Butyl Alcohol 2,890.0 1.00 2.8E-03 1.4E-02 1.1E-04 1.0E+OO 1.1E-04
Butylbenzene, n- 1.3 1.00 2.8E-01 1.4E-02 5.0E-06 1.0E-02 5.0E-04
Ethyl tert-butyl ether 18.0 1.00 4.5E-04 1.4E-02 1.1E-07 none NC
lsopropyltoluene, p- 2.7 1.00 1.4E-01 1.4E-02 5.2E-06 4.0E-01 1.3E-05
Methyl tert-butyl ether 3,870.0 1.00 3.1E-03 1.4E-02 1.7E-04 1.0E+OO 1.7E-04
Naphthalene 180.0 1.00 6.8E-02 1.4E-02 1.7E-04 2.0E-01 8.5E-04
Tert-amyl methyl ether
(TAME) 33.7 1.00 6.2E-03 1.4E-02 2.9E-06 1.3E-01 2.2E-05
Toluene 1.9 1.00 4.5E-02 1.4E-02 1.2E-06 2.0E+OO 5.9E-07
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1,1 ,2-
(Freon 113) 4.4 1.00 2.4E-02 1.4E-02 1.5E-06 3.0E+OO 4.8E-07
Trimethylbenzene, 1 ,2,4- 1.6 1.00 1.3E-01 1.4E-02 2.9E-06 5.0E-02 5.9E-05
Xylene (total) 6.0 1.00 8.0E-02 1.4E-02 6.6E-06 2.0E-01 3.3E-05
Acenaphthene 12.4 1.10 1.5E-01 1.4E-02 2.8E-05 6.0E-01 4.6E-05
Anthracene 6.4 1.10 2.3E-01 1.4E-02 2.2E-05 3.0E+OO 7.3E-06
Benzo(a)anthracene 0.1 1.00 8.1 E-01 1.4E-02 1.1E-06 3.0E-01 3.7E-06
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 0.1 1.00 1.2E+OO 1.4E-02 2.0E-06 3.0E-01 6.8E-06
Fluoranthene 8.9 1.10 3.6E-01 1.4E-02 4.8E-05 4.0E-01 1.2E-04
Fluorene 12.0 1.10 1.7E-01 1.4E-02 3.1E-05 4.0E-01 7.8E-05
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 14.8 1.00 1.4E-01 1.4E-02 2.9E-05 4.0E-02 7.3E-04
Naphthalene 92.0 1.00 6.9E-02 1.4E-02 8.7E-05 2.0E-01 4.4E-04
Phenanthrene 32.9 1.00 2.7E-01 1.4E-02 1.2E-04 3.0E-01 4.1E-04
Pyrene 6.4 1.10 3.3E-01 1.4E-02 3.2E-05 3.0E-01 1.1E-04
Carbazole 16.3 1.00 8.0E-02 1.4E-02 1.8E-05 none NC
Dibenzofuran 12.0 1.00 1.5E-01 1.4E-02 2.5E-05 4.0E-03 6.3E-03
Dimethylphenol, 2,4- 12.0 1.00 1.5E-02 1.4E-02 2.5E-06 2.0E-01 1.2E-05
Methylphenol, 2- 11.0 1.00 1.0E-02 1.4E-02 1.5E-06 5.0E-01 3.1E-06
Methylphenol, 3- 28.0 1.00 1.0E-02 1.4E-02 4.0E-06 5.0E-01 7.9E-06
Phenol 8.8 1.00 5.5E-03 1.4E-02 6.7E-07 3.0E-01 2.2E-06
Antimony, Total 6.0 1.00 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 8.3E-08 4.0E-04 2.1E-04
Arsenic, Total 47.3 1.00 1.0E{J3 1.4E-02 6.5E-07 3.0E-04 2.2E-03
Barium, Total 892.0 1.00 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 1.2E-05 7.0E-02 1.8E-04
Chromium, Total 6.3 250.00 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 2.2E-05 2.0E-02 1.1E-03
Manganese, Total 11,500.0 1.00 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 1.6E-04 S.OE-03 3.2E-02
Mercury, Total 0.3 6.70 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 2.4E-08 3.0E-04 8.0E-05
Nickel, Total 17.0 10.00 1.0E-04 1.4E-02 2.3E-07 2.0E-02 1.2E-05
Zinc, Total 99.0 2.20 6.0E-04 1.4E-02 1.8E-06 3.0E-01 S.OE-06
C11-C22 Aromatics 203.0 1.10 6.8E-01 1.4E-02 2.1E-03 3.0E-01 6.9E-03
SUBTOTAL: 5.3E-02
Notes:
NA = Not Analyzed/Not Applicable; NC = Not Calculated; NO= Not Determined.
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UW\RISK_CW & UWConst Worker Dermal GW
TABLE D-1
CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES
FOR DERMAL CONTACT WITH GROUNDWATER
RECEPTOR: Constrution Worker
CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS
Exposure Lifetime Oral Excess
Point Dermal Skin Average Cancer Lifetime
Contaminant Concentration X Relative X Permeability X CWCDGW
=
Daily X Slope
=
Cancer
EPCgw Absorption Constant Factor Dose Factor Risk

Factor (Ucm
2
h)

Estimate
Benzene 1.5 1.00 2.1E-02 2.0E-04 6.2E-09 5.5E-02 3.4E-10
Butyl Alcohol 2,890.0 1.00 2.8E-03 2.0E-04 1.6E-06 none NC
Butylbenzene, n- 1.3 1.00 2.8E-01 2.0E-04 7.1E-08 none NC
Ethyl tert-butyl ether 18.0 1.00 4.5E-04 2.0E-04 1.6E-09 none NC
lsopropyltoluene, p- 2.7 1.00 1.4E-01 2.0E-04 7.4E-08 none NC
Methyl tert-butyl ether 3,870.0 1.00 3.1E-03 2.0E-04 2.4E-06 none NC
Naphthalene 180.0 1.00 6.8E-02 2.0E-04 2.4E-06 none NC
Tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) 33.7 1.00 6.2E-03 2.0E-04 4.1E-08 none NC
Toluene 1.9 1.00 4.5E-02 2.0E-04 1.7E-08 none NC
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1,1 ,2-
(Freon 113) 4.4 1.00 2.4E-02 2.0E-04 2.1E-08 none NC
Trimethylbenzene, 1 ,2.4- 1.6 1.00 1.3E-01 2.0E-04 4.2E-08 none NC
Xylene (total) 6.0 1.00 8.0E-02 2.0E-04 9.4E-08 none NC
Acenaphthene 12.4 1.00 1.5E-01 2.0E-04 3.6E-07 none NC
Anthracene 6.4 1.00 2.3E-01 2.0E-04 2.8E-07 none NC
Benzo(a)anthracene 0.1 1.10 8.1 E-01 2.0E-04 1.8E-08 7.3E-01 1.3E-08
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 0.1 1.10 1.2E+OO 2.0E-04 3.2E-08 7.3E-01 2.3E-08
Fluoranthene 8.9 1.00 3:6E-01 2.0E-04 6.3E-07 none NC
Fluorene 12.0 1.00 1.7E-01 2.0E-04 4.1E-07 none NC
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 14.8 1.00 1.4E-01 2.0E-04 4.1E-07 none NC
Naphthalene 92.0 1.00 6.9E-02 2.0E-04 1.2E-06 none NC
Phenanthrene 32.9 1.00 2.7E-01 2.0E-04 1.7E-06 none NC
Pyrene 6.4 1.00 3.3E-01 2.0E-04 4.1E-07 none NC
Carbazole 16.3 1.00 8.0E-02 2.0E-04 2.6E-07 2.0E-02
Dibenzofuran 12.0 1.00 1.5E-01 2.0E-04 3.6E-07 none NC
Oimethylphenol, 2,4- 12.0 1.00 1.5E-02 2.0E-04 3.5E-08 none NC
Methylphenol, 2- 11.0 1.00 1.0E-02 2.0E-04 2.2E-08 none NC
Methylphenol, 3- 28.0 1.00 1.0E-02 2.0E-04 5.7E-08 none NC
Phenol 8.8 1.00 5.5E-03 2.0E-04 9.5E-09 none NC
Antimony, Total 6.0 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 1.2E-09 none NC
Arsenic, Total 47.3 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 9.3E-09 1.5E+OO 1.4E-08
Barium, Total 892.0 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 1.8E-07 none NC
Chromium, Total 6.3 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 1.2E-09 none NC
Manganese, Total 11,500.0 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 2.3E-06 none NC
Mercury, Total 0.3 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 5.1E-11 none NC
Nickel, Total 17.0 1.00 1.0E-04 2.0E-04 3.3E-10 none NC
Zinc, Total 99.0 1.00 6.0E-04 2.0E-04 1.2E-08 none NC
C11-C22 Aromatics 203.0 1.00 6.8E-01 2.0E-04 2.7E-05 none NC
SUBTOTAL: S.OE-08
Notes:
NA = Not Analyzed/Not Applicable; NC = Not Calculated; NO= Not Determined.
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Bever!y RA_CW & UW\RISK_CW & UWConst. Worker Dermal GW
TABLE D-2
CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES
FOR DERMAL CONTACT WITH GROUNDWATER
RECEPTOR: Utlility Worker
SUBCHRONIC NONCARCINOGENIC EFFECTS
Exposure Chronic Oral
Point Dermal Skin Average Chronic Hazard
Contaminant Concentration X Relative X Penneability X UWNCDGW = Daily Reference Index
EPCgw Absorption Constant Factor Dose Dose

Factor iUcm
2
{mg/kg-day) (mg/kg-day)
Benzene 1.5 1.00 2.1E-02 1.4E-02 4.3E-07 4.0E-03 1.1E-04
Butyl Alcohol 2,890.0 1.00 2.8E-03 1.4E-02 1.1 E-04 1.0E-01 1.1E-03
Butylbenzene, n- 1.3 1.00 2.8E-01 1.4E-02 5.0E-06 1.0E-02 5.0E-04
Butylbenzene, tert- 1.2 1.00 2.4E-01 1.4E-02 4.0E-06 1.0E-02 4.0E-04
Ethyl tert-butyl ether 18.0 1.00 4.5E-04 1.4E-02 1.1E-07 none NC
lsopropyltoluene, p- 2.7 1.00 1.4E-01 1.4E-02 5.2E-06 none NC
Methyl tert-butyl ether 3,870.0 1.00 3.1E-03 1.4E-02 1.7E-04 1.0E-01 1.7E-03
Naphthalene 180.0 1.00 6.8E-02 1.4E-02 1.7E-04 2.0E-02 8.5E-03
Tert-amyl methyl ether
(TAME) 33.7 1.00 6.2E-03 1.4E-02 2.9E-06 1.3E-01 2.2E-05
Toluene 1.9 1.00 4.5E-02 1.4E-02 1.2E-06 2.0E-01 5.9E-06
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1,1 ,2-
(Freon 113) 4.4 1.00 2.4E-02 1.4E-02 1.5E-06 3.0E+01 4.8E-08
Trimethylbenzene, 1 ,2,4- 1.6 1.00 1.3E-01 1.4E-02 2.9E-06 5.0E-02 5.9E-05
Xylene (total) 6.0 1.00 8.0E-02 1.4E-02 6.6E-06 2.0E-01 3.3E-05
AcenaJ)hthene 12.4 1.10 1.5E-01 1.4E-02 2.8E-05 6.0E-02 4.6E-04
Anthracene 6.4 1.10 2.3E-01 1.4E-02 2.2E-05 3.0E-01 7.3E-05
Benzo(a)anthracene 0.1 1.00 8.1 E-01 1.4E-02 1.1E-06 3.0E-02 3.7E-05
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 0.1 1.00 1.2E+OO 1.4E-02 2.0E-06 3.0E-02 6.8E-05
Fluoranthene 8.9 1.10 3.6E-01 1.4E-02 4.8E-05 4.0E-02 1.2E-03
Fluorene 12.0 1.10 1.7E-01 1.4E-02 3.1E-05 4.0E-02 7.8E-04
Methylnaphthalene, 2- 14.8 1.00 1.4E-01 1.4E-02 2.9E-05 4.0E-03 7.3E-03
Naphthalene 92.0 1.00 6.9E-02 1.4E-02 8.7E-05 2.0E-02 4.4E-03
Phenanthrene 32.9 1.00 2.7E-01 1.4E-02 1.2E-04 3.0E-02 4.1E-03
Pyrene 6.4 1.10 3.3E-01 1.4E-02 3.2E-05 3.0E-02 1.1E-03
Carbazole 16.3 1.00 B.OE-02 1.4E-02 1.8E-05 none NC
Dibenzofuran 12.0 1.00 1.5E-01 1.4E-02 2.5E-05 4.0E-03 6.3E-03
Dimethylphenol, 2,4- 12.0 1.00 1.5E-02 1.4E-02 2.5E-06 2.0E-02 1.2E-04
Methylphenol, 2- 11.0 1.00 1.0E-02 1.4E-02 1.5E-06 5.0E-02 3.1E-05
Methylphenol, 3- 28.0 1.00 1.0E-02 1.4E-02 4.0E-06 5.0E-02 7.9E-05
Phenol 8.8 1.00 5.5E-03 1.4E-02 6.7E-07 3.0E-01 2.2E-06
Antimony, Total 6.0 1.00 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 8.3E-08 4.0E-04 2.1E-04
Arsenic, Total 47.3 1.00 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 6.5E-07 3.0E-04 2.2E-03
Barium, Total 892.0 1.00 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 1.2E-05 7.0E-02 1.8E-04
Chromium, Total 6.3 250.00 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 2.2E-05 3.0E-03 7.2E-03
Manganese, Total 11,500.0 1.00 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 1.6E-04 4.6E-02 3.4E-03
Mercury, Total 0.3 6.70 1.0E-03 1.4E-02 2.4E-08 3.0E-04 8.0E-05
Nickel, Total 17.0 10.00 1.0E-04 1.4E-02 2.3E-07 2.0E-02 1.2E-05
Zinc, Total 99.0 2.20 6.0E-04 1.4E-02 1.8E-06 3.0E-01 6.0E-06
C11-C22 Aromatics 203.0 1.10 6.8E-01 f4E-02 2.1E-03 3.0E-02 6.9E-02
SUBTOTAL: 1.2E.01
Notes:
NA = Not Analyzed/Not Applicable; NC = Not Calculated; NO= Not Determined.
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly & UW\RISK._ CW & UWU!ilily Worker Dermal GW
TABLE D-2
CALCULATION OF AVERAGE DAILY DOSES AND RISK ESTIMATES
FOR DERMAL CONTACT WITH GROUNDWATER
RECEPTOR: Utlility Worker
CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS
Exposure Lifetime Oral Excess
Point Dermal Skin Average Cancer lifetime
Contaminant Concentration X Relative X Permeability X UWCDGW
=
Daily X Slope
=
Cancer
EPCgw Absorption Constant Factor Dose Factor Risk
Factor {Ucm
2
h)

Estimate
Benzene 1.5 1.00 2.1E-02 2.0E-04 6.2E-09 5.5E-02 3.4E-10
Butyl Alcohol 2,890.0 1.00 2.8E-03 2.0E-04 1.6E-06 none NC
Butylbenzene, n- 1.3 1.00 2.8E-01 2.0E-04 7.1E-08 none NC
Butylbenzene, tert- 1.2 1.00 2.4E-01 2.0E-04 5.7E-08 none NC
Ethyl tert-butyl ether 18.0 1.00 4.5E-04 2.0E-04 1.6E-09 none NC
lsopropyltoluene, p- 2.7 1.00 1.4E-01 2.0E-04 7.4E-08 none NC
Methyl tert-butyl ether 3,870.0 1.00 3.1E-03 2.0E-04 2.4E-06 none NC
Naphthalene 180.0 1.00 6.8E-02 2.0E-04 2.4E-06 none NC
Tert-amyl methyl ether
(TAME) 33.7 1.00 6.2E-03 2.0E-04 4.1E-08 none NC
Toluene 1.9 1.00 4.5E-02 2.0E-04 1.7E-08 none NC
Trichlorotrifluoroethane 1,1 ,2-
(Freon 113) 4.4 1.00 2.4E-02 2.0E-04 2.1E-08 none NC
Trimethylbenzene, 1 ,2,4- 1.6 1.00 1.3E-01 2.0E-04 4.2E-08 none NC
Xylene (total) 6.0 1.00 8.0E-02 2.0E-04 9.4E-08 none NC
Acenaphthene 12.4 1.00 1.5E-01 2.0E-04 3.6E-07 none NC
Anthracene 6.4 1.00 2.3E-01 2.0E-04 2.8E-07 none NC
Benzo(a)anthracene 0.1 1.10 8.1 E-01 2.0E-04 1.8E-08 7.3E-01 1.3E-08
Benzo(b)fluoranthene 0.1 1.10 1.2E+OO 2.0E-04 3.2E-08 7.3E-01 2.3E-08
Fluoranthene 8.9 1.00 3.6E-01 2.0E-04 6.3E-07 none NC
Fluorene 12.0 1.00 1.7E-01 2.0E-04 4.1E-07 none NC
Methylnaphthafene, 2- 14.8 1.00 1.4E-01 2.0E-04 4.1E-07 none NC
Naphthalene 92.0 1.00 6.9E-02 2.0E-04 1.2E-06 none NC
Phenanthrene 32.9 1.00 2.7E-01 2.0E-04 1.7E-06 none NC
Pyrene 6.4 1.00 3.3E-01 2.0E-04 4.1E-07 none NC
Carbazole 16.3 1.00 8.0E-02 2.0E-04 2.6E-07 2.0E-02 5.1E-09
Dibenzofuran 12.0 1.00 1.5E-01 2.0E-04 3.6E-07 none NC
Dimethylphenol, 2,4- 12.0 1.00 1.5E-02 2.0E-04 3.5E-08 none NC
Methylphenol, 2- 11.0 1.00 1.0E-02 2.0E-04 2.2E-08 none NC
Methylphenol, 3- 28.0 1.00 1.0E-02 2.0E-04 5.7E-08 none NC
Phenol 8.8 1.00 5.5E-03 2.0E-04 9.5E-09 none NC
Antimony, Total 6.0 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 1.2E-09 none NC
Arsenic, Total 47.3 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 9.3E-09 1.5E+OO 1.4E-08
Barium, Total 892.0 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 1.8E-07 none NC
Chromium, Total 6.3 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 1.2E-09 none NC
Manganese, Total 11,500.0 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 2.3E-06 none NC
Mercury, Total 0.3 1.00 1.0E-03 2.0E-04 5.1E-11 none NC
Nickel, Total 17.0 1.00 1.0E-04 2.0E-04 3.3E-10 none NC
Zinc, Total 99.0 1.00 6.0E-04 2.0E-04 1.2E-08 none NC
C11-C22 Aromatics 203.0 1.00 6.8E-01 2.0E-04 2.7E-05 none NC
SUBTOTAL: 5.6E-08
Notes:
NA = Not Analyzed/Not Applicable; NC = Not Calculated; ND = Not Determined.
P:\Pre-FY2008\12700000\12700961\Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW & UW\RISK_CW & UWUtility Worker Dermal GW
Appendix E
Soil Analytical Data
APIH!ndix E Soil Anal
Location:
Sample Name:
Sample Depth:
laboTatory:
Laborntol)'LD.:
Sample Date:
Consultant:
Aoenaphlhylene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anlhracene
Benzo(a)wene
Benzo(b)Huoranthene
Benzo(g,h,i)peoylene
Benzo(k)ftuornnlhene
Chrysene
Dit>enzo(a.h)anthrncene
Fluornnthene
Fluorene
lndeno(1,2,3-cd)PYfene
Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Pyrene
p,p"-DDD
P.P"DDE
p,p"-DDT
Arochlor 1254
Arochlor 1260
Antimony, Total
Arsenic. Total
Bartum. Total
Beryllium, Total
Cadmium. Total
ChromTum, Total
Copper, Total
Iron. Total
Lead. Total
Manganese. Total
Mertul)'. Total
Total
SWer. Total
Vanadium. Total
Zinc, Total
""
c,.c,.
C1,C,Aiiphabcs
C11-C22 Aromatics
c,-c,,
C0-C10 Aromatics
Cyanide
:leal Data /mQ/k!ll- Former Brimbal Avenue landfill, Beverlv. Massachusetts
Beverly, MA Beverly, MA Beverly, MA Beve1ly, MA Beverly, MA Beverly, MA
RIZ-1 (5"-7") RIZ-2 (5'-7') RIZ-3 (1G'-121 RIZ-4(5"-7") SS-1 SS-2
5'-7" 5"-7" 1G'-12' 5"-7" Surface Surface
ALPHA ALPHA ALPHA ALPHA PHOENIX PHOENIX
LG706797-G1 L0706797-G2 L0706797-Gl L070B797-G4 AJ36104 AJ36105
9-May-G7
=o
<0.0037
<0.0037
<0.0037
<0.037
<0.037
.,,
,,,
" 00
<0.44
16.0
11.0
16,000
"
'" '<0.08
12.0
<0.44
'"
<"
3.160
"" 2,290
<3.5
<3.5
<1_0
9-May-G7
Rizzo
0.85
0.60
o_ae
0.17
0.12
<"
" M
<U
<20
"
'" 75.000
;oo
'" 0.57
45.0
<2.5
'"
1.260
'" 132.0
108.0
<4.15
<4.15
<1_2
9-May-G7
"'""
<{1_0913
<0_0913
<0_0913
<0183
<Q.183
''
"
'" 0.74
"
'" oo
36,000
"0
"0
0.33
" <0.54
'"
8,490
<9.13
14.5
'"'
<652

<1.2
9-May-G7
Rizzo
<0.0216
<0 0216
<0.0216
<0.0433
<0.0433
<2.6
'' "0
OM
<0.52
"
' 13,000
,00
"0
<0.11
'' <0_52
"
"'
<8.66
'" 25.5
"' 16.2
<1_2
25.Jui-G7
'"'
25-Jui-G7
'"'
1.3 0.45
1.2 0.87
2.6 1.4
2.9 1.4
3.9 2.4
20 1.1
0.70 0.41
3.8 1.9
22 1.1
6.4 3.2
0.40 <0.34
0 95 <0.34
<0 36 <Q.34
2.90 1.30
5.90 2.70
<0_360
<0.360
<3.82
''
" 0"
<036
"
47.7
<0.10
" <0.38
'"
'"
<359
<359
51.0
<0.380
<0.380
<3_32
"'
" <0_27
<0.33
10.6
52.3
<0.10
8.68
<0_33
'"
'"
<3.43
<3.43
16.0
BeveTiy, MA Bev..rly, MA Beverly, MA
SS-3 SS-4 LGP-1 {0-1)
Sur1ace Sur1aee 0-1"
PHOENIX PHOENIX PHOENIX
AJ36106 AJ36107 AJ36108
25-Jui-G7 25-Jui-G7 25.Jui-G7
VHB VIiS VliB
"
"
''
''
''
''
'' '0
"
"' 0.70
'' 0.39
4.00
11.00
<3.63
5.89
28.5
<0.29
"" 10.7
53.2
0.11
'" <0_36
'"
"'
<3.29
<3.29
89.0

"'
" <Q_29
<OY
"
85.1
0.11
14.0
<0.37
47.5
95.8
0.93
"
''
''
'0
''
"
"
''
'' 0.45
0.41
<0.35
3.70
'"
<3.71
"
" o;o
<0_37
''
'"'
<0.10
7.86
<OY
40.2
66.5
<3.47
<3.47
40.0
Beverly,MA
LGP-2(0-1)
0-1'
PHOENIX
AJ36109
25.Ju1-G7
"'"
0.68
"
''
"
'' '0
0"
'0
"
" 0.50
0.62
<0.42
"
"
<Q_310
<0.310
4.,
''
" 0.43
<0.42
13.6
"'
<0.13
14.6
1.42
29.4
74.4
<4.23
4"
27.0
BeveTiy,MA
VliB-101 (0-2)

PHOENIX
AJ36110
25.Ju1-G7
'"'
0.80
''
''
'' '0
''
"
''
"
" 0.49
" <035
"
''
<3_32
"
"
"" <0.33
"
81.6
"'
'" <0.33
23.2
73.4
<3.52
<3.52
27.0
Notes: For compounds detected at least once above the deteGtion samples reported as not detected (NO) by the laboratory are assumed to have a concentraton
of one-half of the method detectkm limit for that sample.
entered as< indk:ate that they were below the detection limit_
Bolding indicates that the concentration exceeds Method 1 S-1 standards and shading indicates exceedence of Method 1 S-2 and S-3 standards.
BeveriY,MA
VHB-101 {15-17)
15-17"
PHOENIX
AJ3Bt12
25-Jui-G7
'"'
<0"
<0"
<0"
"" 1.34
"" <0.34
<0.34
<0.34
<'" <0.34
<0"
<0.34
<0.34
<0.34
<3.56
,,
30.4
0.50
<0.36
18.6
,,
<0.10
'" <0"
24_1
35_4
<3.42
<3.42
''
Baverly.MA
VHB-102 (0-2)
M
PHOENIX
AJ36111
25.Jui-G7
'"'
0.61
0.89
''
''
''
''
''
"
"
"
"" 0.82

''
''
13.0
<3.80
14.0
''
'"' <0.28
1.00
'"
26.600
0.42
177.0
3.24
26.3
551.0
'' 1200
16.0
BeveTiy,MA
VHB-102(10-12)
10-12"
PHOENIX
AJ36113
25-Jui-G7
'"'
<3.39
'' 31.7
0.45
<0"
''
"
<0.10
" <0_34
'"
'"
'<354
<3_54
''
aeveil)-; MA Beverly, MA
VHB-102-1 VHB-102-2
0-10" G-7""
SPECTRUM SPECTRUM
SA70267-G1 SA70267-G2
26-0ct-G7 26-0ct-07
Rizzo Rizzo
'<0.35
<0.35
<035
<0_35
<0_35
<0_35
"" '<035
'<0.35
'<0.35
'<0.35
<0.35
<0.35
<0.35
<0.35
0.170 <0.0347
0 [)49 <0.0347
297.0 113_0
Beverly. MA
VHS..102-3
0-10""
SPECTRUM
SA70267-G3
26-0<>t-G7
R<=
0.094
<0.031
56.9
Beverly, MA Beverly, MA Beverly, MA Beverly, MA
VliB-102-4 VHB-102-5 VHB-102-6 VHB-102-7
0-9"" 0-12"" 0-5"" 0-7""
SPECTRUM SPECTRUM SPECTRUM SPECTRUM
SA70267-G4 SA70287-G5 SA70267.00 SA70267-G7
26-0ct-G7 26-0ct-G7 26.0ct-G7 26.0ct-G7
Rizzo Rizzo Rizzo Rizzo
0.060 0.256 0.161 0.[)48
0041 0.101 <0.035 <0.034
"'
929.0
"'
36,000
1080
<1_2
Beverly. MA
VHB-102-6
0-11""
SPECTRUM
SA70267-GB
26-0ct-G7
Rizzo
<0.0345
<0.0345
72.4
Beverly,MA
OUP-1G2607
SPECTRUM
SA70267-G9
26-0ct-07
R<=
0.064
0053
13,000
723_0
<1.2
Number
of Times

'
"
"
'
'
"
0
"
"
"
"
'
'
"
Number Minimum Maximum
o1 Times Concentration ConcentraUon
Sought Detected Detected
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
'
'
"
'
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
05 3.2
u 31
u u
u u
u
10 4.9
o u
'' "
'' "
" - u u

u u
u "
u '"
00
"
" 0.05

''
''
"' OA
''
''
"' 13,000
'0
110.0
0'
"
" 14.4
31.3
00
''
'' 13_0
0.12
14.0
21.0
"''
" '0
111.0
400.0
75,000
26,600.0
530.0
0'
177.0
'' 47.5
551.0
138.0 8,490.0
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ND NO
Average Method 1
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P.IPro-FY2006\127000CI0\127009611Risk Assessment\Beverly RA_CW S UWIOATA_CW S UWAppondO< E_So1l Oat. Table
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,-,}\ \
Lab Number:
Client:
ATTN:
Project Name:
Project Number:
Report Date:
ANALYTICAL REPORT
L0706797
Tetra Tech Rizzo
1 Grant Street
Framingham, MA 01701-9005
Matt Madden
Not Specified
12700960
05/18/07
------
05180713:48
Certifications & Approvals: MA (M-MA086), NY NELAC (11148), CT (PH-0574), NH (200305), NJ (MA935), Rl (LA000065), ME (2006012),
PA (Registration #68-03671), USDA (Permit #S-72578), US Army Corps of Engineers, Naval FESC.

Eight Walkup Drive, Westborough, MA 01581-1019
508-898-9220 (Fax) 508-898-9193 800-624-9220 - www.alphalab.com
Page 1 of 83
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Alpha Sample 10 Client 10
L0706797-01 RIZ-1 (5'-7')
L0706797 -02 RIZ-2 (5'-7')
L0706797 -03 RIZ-3 (10'-12')
L0706797 -04 RIZ-4 (5'-7')
L0706797 -05 TRIP BLANK
Page 2 of 83
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Sample Location
BEVERLY,MA
BEVERLY, MA
BEVERLY, MA
BEVERLY, MA
BEVERLY, MA
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
"\\,'
...
.. u
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab Number:
Report Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
MADEP MCP Response Action Analytical Report Certification
This form provides certifications for all samples performed by MCP methods. Please refer to
the Sample Results and Container Information sections of this report for specification of
MCP methods used for each analysis. The following questions pertain only to MCP
Analytical Methods.
An affirmative response to questions A, B, C & 0 is required for "Presumptive Certainty" status
A YES
'
'
Were all samples received by the laboratory in a condition consistent with those described on
their Chain-of-Custody documentation for thE) data set? ..
--------i
B
c
D
Were all QAIQC procedures required for the specified analytical methods(s) included in this
report followed, including the requirement to note and discuss in a narrative QC data that did not
meet appropriate performance standards org.uidelines?
Does the analytical data included in this report meet all the requirements for "Presumptive
Certainty", as described in section 2.0 of the MADEP document CAM VII A, "Quality Assurance
and Quality Control Guidelines for the Acquisition and Reporting of Analytical Data"?
VPH and EPH methods only: Was the VPH or EPH method run without significant modifications,
as specified in Section 11.3?
YES
YES
YES
A response to questions E and F is required for "Presumptive Certainty" status

E Were all QC performance standards and recommendations for the specified method(s)
-----'a"'c..,hieved?
F Were results for all analyte-list compounds/elements for the specified method(s) reported?
NO
------j
NO I
_____ __j
For any questions answered "No", please refer to the case narrative section on the following page(s).
Please note that sample matrix information is located in the Sample Results section of this report.
Page 3 of83
05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified Lab Number:
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date:
Case Narrative
The samples were received in accordance with the chain of custody and no significant deviations were
encountered during preparation or analysis unless otherwise noted below.
MCP Related Narratives
VPH
L0706797 -03 and -04 fell short of the recommended 1 :1 methanol:soil ratio.
In reference to question F:
L0706797
05/18/07
At the client's request, all submitted samples were not analyzed for the full MCP list of compounds specified for
the Method.
EPH
L0706797-01: The C9-C18 and C19-C36 Aliphatic range results were obtained from re-analysis on dilution
due to the elevated concentrations of these compounds present in the sample.
L0706797-03: The C11-C22 Aromatic range results were obtained from re-analysis on dilution due to the
elevated concentrations of these compounds present in the sample.
The WG279975-1 method blank was re-fractionated due to a low surrogate recovery on the original analysis.
The results of the re-fractionation are reported.
In reference to question E:
The surrogate% recovery for o-Terphenyl is above method acceptance criteria on L0706797-01, possibly due
to co-elution. The chromatogram of the sample is provided as an attachment.
The surrogate% recoveries for Chloro-Octadecane and o-Terphenyl are below method acceptance criteria on
L0706797 -02. Re-extraction and re-analysis confirmed possible matrix interference. Both analyses are
reported.
The surrogate% recovery for o-Terphenyl is above method acceptance criteria on L0706797-03, possibly due
to co-elution. The chromatogram of the sample is provided as an attachment.
The surrogate % recovery for Chloro-Octadecane is below method acceptance criteria on L0706797 -03. Re-
extraction and re-analysis confirmed possible matrix interference. Both analyses are reported.
The surrogate% recovery for Chloro-Octadecane is below method acceptance criteria on L0706797-04. Re-
extraction and re-analysis confirmed possible matrix interference. Both analyses are reported.
Page4 of 83
05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Case Narrative (continued)
In reference to question F:
Lab Number:
Report Date:
L0706797
05/18/07
At the client's request, all submitted samples were not analyzed for the full MCP list of compounds specified for
the Method.
PCB
L0706797 -03 has elevated detection limits due to the dilution required by the matrix interferences encountered
during the concentration of the sample.
In reference to question E:
L0706797-02: Aroclors 1254 and 1260 are reported using fewer than the three peaks required by the method.
They were quantitated with two peaks due to multiple Aroclors and other interferences present in the sample
and was done to prevent excess quantitatation of concentration. No further actions were taken.
Pesticides
L0706797 -02, -03, and -04 have elevated detection limits due to the dilutions required by the matrix of the
samples.
L0706797 -02 required re-analysis on dilution in order to quantitate the sample within the range of the
calibration. The result is reported as a greater than value for the compound that exceeded the calibration on the
initial analysis. The re-analysis was performed only for the compound which exceeded the range of the
calibration.
In reference to question E:
The surrogates could not be recovered on L0706797 -02 and -03, due to the dilutions required to quantitate the
samples.
All LCS/LCSD RPDs are above method acceptance criteria.
Metals
L0706797-02 has elevated detection limits due to the dilution required to reduce matrix interference.
L0706797-03 required a 2x dilution for the analysis of Iron in order to quantitate the sample within the
calibration curve and to reduce spectral interference.
Non-MCP Related Narratives
TPH-DRO
L0706797 -02 and -03 have elevated detection limits due to the dilution required by the matrix interferences
encountered during the concentration of the samples.
Page 5 of 83
Project Name:
Project Number:
Not Specified
12700960
Case Narrative (continued)
Lab Number:
Report Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
L0706797 -03 has an elevated detection limit due to the dilution required by the elevated concentrations of
target compounds in the sample.
The surrogate % recovery is above method acceptance criteria on L0706797 -03, possibly due to co-elution
with sample matrix.
I, the undersigned, attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that, to the best of my knowledge and
belief and based upon my personal inquiry of those responsible for providing the information contained
in this analytical report, such information is accurate and complete. This certificate of analysis is not
complete unless this page accompanies any and all pages of this report.
Authorized Signature:
Title: Technical Director Date: 05/18/07
Page 6 of83
05180713:48
ORGANICS
Page 7 of 83
Page 8 of 83
PETROLEUM
HYDROCARBONS
05180713:48
&?nA
,..,
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797-01
Client ID: RIZ-1 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 1,8015B(M)
Analytical Date: 05/14/07 18:35
Analyst: RT
Percent Solids: 90%
TPH
Surrogate
o-Terphenyl
Page 9 of 83
SAMPLE RESULTS
NO
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 08:30
05/10/07
Extraction Method:
Not Specified
EPA3545
05/11/07 20:30 Extraction Date:
ug/kg 37000
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
72 40-140
Project Name:
Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
LabiD: L0706797 -02
Client ID: RIZ-2 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 1 ,8015B(M)
Analytical Date: 05/17/07 02:04
Analyst: MF
Percent Solids: 80%
TPH
Surrogate
o-Terphenyl
Page 10 of 83
Lab Number:
Report Date:
SAMPLE RESULTS
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 1 0:50
05/10/07
Extraction Method:
Not Specified
EPA 3540C
05/11/07 22:20 Extraction Date:
1260000 ug/kg 208000 5
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
100 40-140
Project Name:
Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797-03
Client ID: RIZ -3 ( 1 0'-12')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 1,8015B(M)
Analytical Date: 05/17/07 12:53
Analyst: MF
Percent Solids: 73%
TPH
Surrogate
o-Terphenyl
Page 11 of 83
Lab Number:
Report Date:
SAMPLE RESULTS
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 13:00
05/10/07
Extraction Method:
Not Specified
EPA3540C
05/11/07 22:20 Extraction Date:
8490000 ug/kg 1140000 25
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
186 40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797-04
Client ID: RIZ-4 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 1 ,8015B(M)
Analytical Date: 05/17/07 04:12
Analyst: MF
Percent Solids: 77%
TPH
Surrogate
o-Terphenyl
Page 12 of 83
SAMPLE RESULTS
138000
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 14:45
05/10/07
Extraction Method:
Not Specified
EPA3540C
05/11/07 22:20 Extraction Date:
ug/kg 43300
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
72 40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Analytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
TPH
1 ,8015B(M)
05/14/07 13:22
RT
Surrogate
o-Terphenyl
Page 13 of 83
Method Blank Analysis
Batch Quality Control
NO ug/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
Extraction Method: EPA 3545
Extraction Date: 05/11/07 20:30
33300
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
89 40-140
Project Name:
Project Number:
Analytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
TPH
Not Specified
12700960
1 ,8015B(M)
05/16/0714:12
MF
Surrogate
o-Terphenyt
Page 14 of 83
Method Blank. Analysis
Batch Quality Control
NO ug/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
Extraction Method: EPA 3540C
Extraction Date: 05/11/07 22:20
33300
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
90 40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
TPH
Surrogate
oMTerphenyl
TPH
Surrogate
o-Terphenyl
Page 15 of 83
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
%Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
40-140
LCS LCSD
%Recovery Qualifier %Recovery Qualifier
61
40-140
LCS LCSD
%Recovery Qualifier %Recovery Qualifier
101
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
Acceptance
Criteria
40-140
Acceptance
Criteria
40-140
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
\\


Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Lab Duplicate Analysis
Batch Quality Control
Native Sample Duplicate Sample Units
Acceptance
Surro!late %Recoverv Qualifier %Recoverv Qualifier Criteria
o-Terphenyl 79 78 40-140
Acceptance
Surro!late %Recoverv Qualifier %Recoverv __ Qualifier Criteria
o-Terphenyl 96 89 40-140
Page 16 of 83
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
',<\
...

Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID:
Client 10:
Sample Location:
L0706797-01
RIZ-1 (5'-7')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
59,VPH-04-1.1
05/11/07 16:26
n
Matrix:
Anaylical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids: 90%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Were samples received in methanol?
Methanol ratio:
Parameter
C5-C8 Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9-C12 Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9-C10 Aromatics
C5-C8 Aliphatics, Adjusted
C9-C12 Aliphatics, Adjusted
Surrogate
2,5-Dibromotoluene-PID
2,5-Dibromotoluene-FID
Page 17 of 83
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result Qualifier
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
%Recovery Qualifier
--------------
100
110
Units
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 08:30
05/10/07
Not Specified
Satisfactory
Received on Ice
Yes (Covering the Soil)
1:1 +/- 25%
RDL Dilution Factor
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50
Acceptance
Criteria
70-130
70-130
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
L0706797-01
RIZ-1 (5'-7')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
61,EPH-04-1
05/14/07 23:11
BN
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids: 90%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Sample Extraction method:
Parameter
C11-C22 Aromatics, Unadjusted
C11-C22 Aromatics, Adjusted
Page 18 of83
Surrogate
-------
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fiuorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result
2320
2290
mg/kg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
Extraction Method:
Extraction Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 08:30
05/10/07
Not Specified
EPA 3545
05/11/07 09:00
Satisfactory
7.41
7.41
Received on Ice
Extracted Per the Method
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
67
141
127
70
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids:
L0706797-01 R
RIZ-1 (5'-7')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
61 ,EPH-04-1
05/16/07 00:33
BN
90%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt
Sample Extraction method:
C9-C18 Aliphatics
C19-C36 Aliphatics
Page 19 of 83
SAMPLE RESULTS
3160
750
mg/kg
mglkg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
Extraction Method:
Extraction Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 08:30
05/10/07
Not Specified
EPA 3545
05/11/07 09:00
Satisfactory
37.0
37.0
Received on Ice
Extracted Per the Method
5
5
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab 10:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
L0706797-02
RIZ-2 (5'-7')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
59,VPH-04-1.1
05/11/0717:18
TT
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids: 80%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Were samples received in methanol?
Methanol ratio:
Parameter
CS-CB Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9-C12 Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9-C10 Aromatics
C5-C8 Aliphatics, Adjusted
C9-C12 Aliphatics, Adjusted
Surrogate
-----
2,5-Dibromotoluene-PID
2,5-0ibromotoluene-FID
Page 20 of83
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result Qualifier
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
%Recovery Qualifier
105
115
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 10:50
05/10/07
Not Specified
Satisfactory
Received on Ice
Yes (Covering the Soil)
1:1 +/- 25%
Units RDL Dilution Factor
mg/kg 4.15
mg/kg 4.15
mg/kg 4.15
mg/kg 4.15
mg/kg 4.15
Acceptance
Criteria
--- ----- ---
70-130
70-130
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797 -02
ClientiD: RIZ-2 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 61,EPH-04-1
Analytical Date: 05/14/07 23:44
Analyst: BN
Percent Solids: 80%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Sample Extraction method:
Parameter
C9-C18 Aliphatics
C1 9-C36 Aliphatics
C11-C22 Aromatics, Unadjusted
C11-C22 Aromatics, Adjusted
Page 21 of 83
Surrogate
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fiuorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result Qualifier
8.99
114
85.6
82.1
%Recovery Qualifier
23
37
92
91
Units
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 10:50
05/10/07
Extraction Method:
Not Specified
EPA 3545
05/11/07 09:00 Extraction Date:
Satisfactory
Received on Ice
Extracted Per the Method
RDL Dilution Factor
8.33
8.33
8.33
8.33
Acceptance
Criteria

40-140
40-140
40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
L0706797 -02 RE
RIZ-2 (5'-7')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil Matrix:
Anaytical Method: 61,EPH-04-1
05/17/07 04:50
BN
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids: 80%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Sample Extraction method:
Parameter
C9-C18 Aliphatics
C19-C36 Aliphatics
C11-C22 Aromatics, Unadjusted
C11-C22 Aromatics, Adjusted
Page 22 of83
Surrogate
---
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fiuorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result Qualifier
9.83
132
125
108
%Recovery Qualifier
36
62
71
74
Units
mg/kg
mglkg
mg/kg
mglkg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 10:50
05/10/07
Extraction Method:
Not Specified
EPA 3545
05/16/07 12:30 Extraction Date:
Satisfactory
Received on Ice
Extracted Per the Method
RDL Dilution Factor
8.33
8.33
8.33
8.33
Acceptance
Criteria

40-140
40-140
40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
L0706797-03
RIZ-3 (10'-12')
BEVERLY,MA
Soil
59,VPH-04-1.1
05/11/07 18:09
TT
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids: 73%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt
Were samples received in methanol?
Methanol ratio:
Parameter
C5-CB Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9-C12 Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9-C10 Aromatics
C5-C8 Aliphatics, Adjusted
C9-C12 Aliphatics, Adjusted
Surrogate
2,5-Dibromotoluene-PID
2,5-Dibromotoluene-FID
Page 23 of83
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result Qualifier
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
%Recovery Qualifier
90
100
Units
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 13:00
05/10/07
Not Specified
Satisfactory
Received on Ice
Yes (Covering the Soil)
1.5:1
RDL Dilution Factor
6.52
6.52
6.52
6.52
6.52
Acceptance
Criteria
70-130
70-130
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
L0706797 -03
RIZ-3 (10'-12')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
61,EPH-04-1
05/14/07 22:37
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst: BN
Percent Solids: 73%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Sample Extraction method:
Parameter
C9-C18 Aliphatics
C19-C36 Aliphatics
Page 24 of83
Surrogate
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fluorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result Qualifier
ND
26.6
%Recovery Qualifier
23
340
85
89
Units
mg/kg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 13:00
05/10/07
Extraction Method:
Not Specified
EPA 3545
05/11/07 09:00 Extraction Date:
Satisfactory
Received on lee
Extracted Per the Method
RDL Dilution Factor
9.13
9.13
Acceptance
Criteria
40M140
40-140
40-140
40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
Matrix:
Anaylical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids:
L0706797 -03 RE
RIZ-3 (10'-12')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
61 ,EPH-04-1
05/17/07 05:23
BN
73%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Sample Extraction method:
Parameter
C9-C18 Aliphatics
C19-C36 Aliphatics
Surrogate
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result Qualifier
ND
14.5
%Recovery Qualifier
----------------
Page 25 of 83
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fiuorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
7
110
66
73
Units
mglkg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 13:00
05/10/07
Extraction Method:
Not Specified
EPA 3545
05/16/07 12:30 Extraction Date:
Satisfactory
Received on Ice
Extracted Per the Method
RDL Dilution Factor
9.13
9.13
Acceptance
Criteria
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids:
L0706797 -03 R2
RIZ-3 (10'-12')
BEVERLY,MA
Soil
61,EPH-04-1
05/17/0711:51
BN
73%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Sample Extraction method:
Parameter
C11-C22 Aromatics, Unadjusted
C11-C22 Aromatics, Adjusted
Page 26 of83
SAMPLE RESULTS
466
261
mg/kg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
Extraction Method:
Extraction Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 13:00
05/10/07
Not Specified
EPA 3545
05/16/07 12:30
Satisfactory
45.7
45.7
Received on Ice
Extracted Per the Method
5
5
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids:
L0706797 -03 R
RIZ-3 (10'-12')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
61 ,EPH-04-1
05/15/07 22:54
BN
73%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Sample Extraction method:
C11wC22 Aromatics, Unadjusted
C11-C22 Aromatics, Adjusted
Page 27 of 83
SAMPLE RESULTS
1420
775
mgfkg
mgfkg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
Extraction Method:
Extraction Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 13:00
05/10/07
Not Specified
EPA 3545
05/11/07 09:00
Satisfactory
91.3
91.3
Received on Ice
Extracted Per the Method
10
10
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab 10:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
L0706797 -04
RIZ-4 (5'-7')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
59,VPH-04-1.1
05/11/07 19:01
n
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids: 77%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Were samples received in methanol?
Methanol ratio:
Parameter
C5-C8 Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9-C12 Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9-C10 Aromatics
C5-C8 Aliphatics, Adjusted
C9-C12 Aliphatics, Adjusted
Page 28 of 83
Surrogate
2,5-Dibromotoluene-PID
2,5-Dibromotoluene-FID
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result
NO
36.6
18.2
NO
17.5
Units
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 14:45
05/10/07
Not Specified
Satisfactory
Received on Ice
Yes (Covering the Soil)
1.6:1
RDL Dilution Factor
6.33
6.33
6.33
6.33
6.33
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
102
109
70-130
70-130
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797-04
Client ID: RIZ-4 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 61,EPH-04-1
Analytical Date: 05/14/07 21:31
Analyst: BN
Percent Solids: 77%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Sample Extraction method:
C9-C18 Aliphatics
C19-C36 Aliphatics
C11-C22 Aromatics, Unadjusted
C11-C22 Aromatics, Adjusted
Page 29 of83
Surrogate
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fiuorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result Qualifier
10.4
28.5
35.2
29.7
%Recovery Qualifier
29
50
78
77
Units
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 14:45
05/10/07
Extraction Method:
Not Specified
EPA3545
05/11/07 09:00 Extraction Date:
Satisfactory
Received on Ice
Extracted Per the Method
RDL Dilution Factor
8.66
8.66
8.66
8.66
Acceptance
Criteria
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797 -04 RE
Client ID: RIZ-4 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 61,EPH-04-1
Analytical Date: 05/17/07 04:16
Analyst: BN
Percent Solids: 77%
Condition of sample received:
Sample Temperature upon receipt:
Sample Extraction method:
Parameter
C9-C18 Aliphatics
C19-C36 Aliphatics
C11-C22 Aromatics, Unadjusted
C11-C22 Aromatics, Adjusted
Page 30 of 83
Surrogate
----
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fiuorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
SAMPLE RESULTS
Result Qualifier
NO
29.1
31.1
25.5
%Recovery Qualifier
25
36
75
73
Units
mglkg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mglkg
05180713:48
Lab Number: L0706797
Report Date: 05/18/07
Date Collected: 05/09/07 14:45
Date Received: 05/10/07
Field Prep: Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA 3545
Extraction Date: 05/16/07 12:30
Satisfactory
Received on Ice
Extracted Per the Method
RDL Dilution Factor
8.66
8.66
8.66
8.66
Acceptance
Criteria
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Analytical Method: 59,VPH-04-1.1
05/11/07 07:29
TT
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Page 31 of 83
Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9C12 Aliphatics, Unadjusted
C9-C10 Aromatics
C5-C8 Aliphatics, Adjusted
C9-C12 Aliphatics, Adjusted
Surrogate
2,5-0ibromotoluene-PID
2,5-Dibromotoluene-FID
Method Blank Analysis
Batch Quality Control
NO mg/kg
NO mg/kg
NO mg/kg
NO mg/kg
NO mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
2.67
2.67
2.67
2.67
2.67
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
79
85
70-130
70-130
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Analytical Method: 61 ,EPH-04-1
05/14/07 08:54
BN
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Page 32 of 83
Aliphatics
C19C36 Aliphatics
C11-C22 Aromatics, Unadjusted
C11-C22 Aromatics, Adjusted
Surrogate
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fiuorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
Method Blank Analysis
Batch Quality Control
NO
NO
NO
NO
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
mg/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
Extraction Method: EPA 3545
Extraction Date: 05/11/07 03:00
6.67
6.67
6.67
6.67
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria
43 40-140
41 40-140
63 40-140
61 40-140
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
C5C8 Aliphatics
C9-C12 Aliphatics
C9-C 10 Aromatics
Benzene
Toluerie
Ethylbenzene
p/m-Xylene
a-Xylene
Methyl tert butyl ether
Naphthalene
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene
Pentane
2-Methylpentane
2,2,4-Trimethylpentane
n-Nonane
n-Decane
n-Butylcyclohexane
Page 33 of 83
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
%Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
30-130
70-130
)[;; :;rmm 70-130
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25

,: w;;;;?:(nl;<w
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Surrogate
2,5-Dibromotoluene-P!D
2,5-Dibromotoluene-FID
C9-C18 Aliphatics
C19-C36 A!iphatics
C11-C22 Aromatics
Naphthalene
2-Methylnaphthalene
Acenaphthylene
Acenaphthene
Fluorene
Phenanthrene
Page 34 of 83
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
%Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
LCS LCSD
%Recovery Qualifier %Recovery Qualifier
98 99
106 107
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
Acceptance
Criteria
70-130
70-130
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25

' '-h
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Anthracene
Fluoranthene
Pyrene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Chrysene
Benzo(b )fluoranthene
Benzo(k)fluoranthene
Benzo(a)pyrene
lndeno(1 ,2,3-cd)Pyrene
Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene
Benzo(ghi)perylene
Nonane (C9)
Decane (C10)
Dodecane (C12)
Tetradecane (C14)
Hexadecane (C16)
Octadecane (C18)
Nonadecane (C19)
Eicosane (C20)
Docosane (C22)
Tetracosane (C24)
Page 35 of 83
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
%Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
30-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
'\)

,:_
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
Parameter %Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
Hexacosane (C26)
Octacosane (C28)
Triacontane (C30)
Hexatriaconlane (C36)
Page 36 of 83
Surrogate
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fiuorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
% Naphthalene Breakthrough
% 2-Methylnaphthalene Breakthrough
LCS
%Recovery Qualifier
58
73
81
82
0
0
LCSD
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
%Recovery Qualifier
57
73
70
71
0
0
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
Acceptance
Criteria
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
25
25
25
25

Project Name: Not Specified
12700960 Project Number:
Parameter
C9-C18 Aliphatics
C19-C36 Aliphatics
C11-C22 Aromatics
N"aphthalene
2-Methylnaphthalene
Acenaphthylene
Acenaphthene
Fluorene
Phenanthrene
Anthracene
Fluoranthene
Pyrene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Chrysene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Benzo(k)fluoranthene
Benzo(a)pyrene
1 ndeno( 1,2,3-cd)Pyrene
Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene
Benzo(g,h,i)perylene
Nonane
Decane
Dodecane
Tetradecane
Hexadecane
Octadecane
Nonadecane
Eicosane
Docosane
Tetracosane
Hexacosane
Octacosane
Triacontane
Hexatriacontane
Page 37 of 83
Fractionation Check Standard
Quality Control
%Recovery
78
82
101
91
90
96
94
95
99
104
102
103
102
102
93
103
96
88
95
95
65
70
73
74
75
76
78
79
84
86
86
84
83
86
Lab Number:
Report Date:
QC Criteria
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
30-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Surrogate
Chloro-Octadecane
o-Terphenyl
2-Fiuorobiphenyl
2-Bromonaphthalene
Page 38 of 83
Fractionation Check Standard
Quality Control
%Recovery QC Criteria
74 40-140
95 40-140
90 40-140
97 40-140
Lab Number:
Report Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05180713:48
PCBS
Page 39 of83
05180713:48
Project Name:
Not Specified
Lab Number: L0706797
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date: 05/18/07
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797 -01 Date Collected: 05/09/07 08:30
Client ID: RIZ-1 (5'-7') Date Received: 05/10/07
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA Field Prep: Not Specified
Matrix: Soil Extraction Method: EPA3540C
Anaytical Method: 64,8082 Extraction Date: 05/14/07 20:50
Analytical Date: 05/16/07 11 :33 Cleanup Method!: EPA3665A
Analyst: ss Cleanup Date1: 05/16/07
Percent Solids: 90%
Aroclor 1016 NO ug/kg 37.0
Aroclor 1221 NO ug/kg 37.0
Aroclor 1232 NO ug/kg 37.0
Aroclor 1242 NO ug/kg 37.0
Aroclor 1248 NO ug/kg 37.0
Aroclor 1254 NO ug/kg 37.0
Aroclor 1260 NO ug/kg 37.0
Aroclor 1262 NO ug/kg 37.0
Aroclor 1268 NO ug/kg 37.0
Acceptance
Surrogate %Recovery Qualifier Criteria Column
-----
2,4 ,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene 101 30-150 A
Oecachlorobiphenyl 97 30-150 A
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene 87 30-150 B
Decachlorobiphenyl 99 30-150 B
Page 40 of83
Project Name:
Project Number:
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids:
Aroclor 1254
Aroclor 1260
Not Specified
12700960
L0706797-02
RIZ-2 (5'-7')
BEVERLY,MA
Soil
64,8082
05/16/07 12:01
ss
80%
Surrogate
Page 41 of 83
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
SAMPLE RESULTS
165
119
%Recovery Qualifier
81
126
63
138
05180713:48
Lab Number: L0706797
Report Date: 05/18/07
Date Collected: 05/09/07 10:50
Date Received: 05/10/07
Field Prep: Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA 3540C
Extraction Date: 05/14/07 20:50
Cleanup Method1: EPA3665A
Cleanup Date1: 05/16/07
ug/kg 41.7
ug/kg 41.7
Acceptance
Criteria Column
-------
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 B
30-150 B
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797 -02
Client ID: RIZ-2 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 64,8082
Analytical Date: 05/16/07 12:01
Analyst: ss
Percent Solids: 80%
Aroclor 1016 ND
Aroclor 1221 ND
Aroclor 1232 ND
Aroclor 1242 ND
Aroclor 1248 ND
Aroclor 1262 ND
Aroclor 12-68 ND
Surrogate %Recovery Qualifier
---
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene 81
Decachlorobiphenyl 126
2,4,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene 63
Decachlorobiphenyl 138
Page 42 of83
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 10:50
05/10/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3540C
Extraction Date: 05/14/07 20:50
Cleanup Method1: EPA3665A
Cleanup Date1: 05/16/07
ug/kg 41.7
ug/kg 41.7
ug/kg 41.7
ug/kg 41.7
ug/kg 41.7
ug/kg 41.7
ug/kg 41.7
Acceptance
Criteria Column
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 8
30-150 8
Project Name:
Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797 -03
Client ID: RIZ-3 (10'-12')
Sample Location: BEVERLY,MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 64,8082
Analytical Date: 05/16/07 12:30
Analyst: ss
Percent Solids: 73%
Aroclor 1016 ND
Aroclor 1221 ND
Aroclor 1232 ND
Aroctor 1242 ND
Aroclor 1248 ND
Aroclor 1254 ND
Aroclor 1260 ND
Aroclor 1262 ND
Aroclbr 1268 ND
Surrogate %Recovery Qualifier
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene 118
Decachlorobiphenyl 90
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene 77
Decachlorobiphenyl 104
Page 43 of83
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 13:00
05/10/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3540C
Extraction Date: 05/14/07 20:50
Cleanup Method1: EPA3665A
Cleanup Date1: 05/16/07
ug/kg 183 4
ug/kg 183 4
ug/kg 183 4
ug/kg 183 4
ug/kg 183 4
ug/kg 183 4
ug/kg 183 4
ug/kg 183 4
ug/kg 183 4
Acceptance
Criteria Column
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 8
30-150 8
Project Name:
Project Number:
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids:
Aroclor 1016
Aroclor 1221
Aroclor 1232
Aroclor 1242
Aroclor 1248
Aroclor 1254
Aroclor 1260
Aroclor 1262
Aroclor 1268
Not Specified
12700960
L0706797 -04
RIZ-4 (5'-7')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
64,8082
05/16/07 12:58
ss
77%
Surrogate
Page 44 of83
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
2,4 ,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
SAMPLE RESULTS
ND
ND
ND
NO
ND
NO
NO
NO
ND
%Recovery Qualifier
64
59
51
53
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 14:45
05/10/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA 3540C
Extraction Date: 05/14/07 20:50
Cleanup Method1: EPA 3665A
Cleanup Date1: 05/16/07
ug/kg 43.3
ug/kg 43.3
ug/kg 43.3
ug/kg 43.3
ug/kg 43.3
ug/kg 43.3
ug/kg 43.3
ug/kg 43.3
ug/kg 43.3
Acceptance
Criteria Column
--------
30-150 A
30-150
A
30-150 B
30-150 B
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Analytical Method: 64,8082
05/16/07 14:24
ss
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Aroclor 1016
Aroclor 1221
Aroclor 1232
Aroclor 1242
Aroclor 1248
Aroclor 1254
Aroclor 1260
Aroclor 1262
Aroclor 1268
Surrogate
2,4 ,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
2,4 ,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
Page 45 of83
Method Blank Analysis
Batch Quality Control
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
Extraction Method: EPA 3540C
Extraction Date: 05/14/07 20:50
Cleanup Method1: EPA 3665A
Cleanup Date1: 05/16/07
33.3
33.3
33.3
33.3
33.3
33.3
33.3
33.3
33.3
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria Column
112 30-150 A
64 30-150 A
83 30-150 B
91 30-150 B
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Aroclor 1016
Aroclor 1260
Surrogate
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Oecachlorobiphenyl
2 ,4 ,5, 6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
Page 46 of 83
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
%Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
LCS
%Recovery Qualifier
107
68
81
83
LCSD
40-140
40-140
%Recovery Qualifier
105
70
83
82
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
Acceptance
Criteria
Column
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 8
30-150 8
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
30
30
<"'


05180713:48
PESTICIDES
Page 47 of 83
Project Name:
Project Number:
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids:
4,4'-000
Endosulfan II
Not Specified
12700960
L0706797-01
RIZ-1 (5'-7')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
64,8081A
05115107 19:47
JB
90%
Surrogate
Page 48 of83
----
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobi phenyl
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xyJene
Decachlorobiphenyl
SAMPLE RESULTS
NO
NO
%Recovery Qualifier
60
81
56
84
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05118107
05/09107 08:30
05110/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA 3545
Extraction Date: 05111107 14:45
Cleanup Method!: EPA3620B
Cleanup Date!: 05115107
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
Acceptance
Criteria Column
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 B
30-150 B
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797 -01
Client ID: RIZ-1 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 64,8081A
Analytical Date: 05/15/07 19:47
Analyst: JB
Percent Solids: 90%
Delta-BHC
Lindane
Alpha-BHC
Beta-BHC
Heptachlor
Aldrin
Heptachlor epoxide
Endrin
Endrin ketone
Dieldrin
4,4'-DDE
4,4'-DDT
Endosulfan I
Endosulfan sulfate
Methoxychlor
Chlordane
Hexachlorobenzene
Surrogate
2,4,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
2,4,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
Page 49 of 83
SAMPLE RESULTS
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
%Recovery Qualifier
60
81
56
84
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 08:30
05/10/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3545
Extraction Date: 05/11/07 14:45
Cleanup Method1: EPA 36208
Cleanup Date1: 05/15/07
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 2.96
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 3.70
ug/kg 14.8
ug/kg 14.8
ug/kg 3.70
Acceptance
Criteria Column
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 B
30-150 B
Project Name:
Project Number:
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids:
Delta-BHC
Lindane
Alpha-BHC
Beta-BHC
Heptachlor
Aldrin
Heptachlor epoxide
Endrin
Endrin ketone
Dieldrin
4,4'-DDE
Endosulfan I
Endosulfan sulfate
Methoxychlor
Chlordane
Hexachlorobenzene
Not Specified
12700960
L0706797 -02
RIZ-2 (5'-7')
BEVERLY,MA
Soil
64,8081A
05/15/07 22:11
JB
80%
Surrogate
Page 50 of 83
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xytene
Decachlorobiphenyf
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
SAMPLE RESULTS
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
602
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
%Recovery
0
0
0
0
Qualifier
05180713:48
Lab Number: L0706797
Report Date: 05/18/07
Date Collected: 05/09/07 1 0:50
Date Received: 05/10/07
Field Prep: Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3545
Extraction Date: 05/11/0714:45
Cleanup Method1: EPA3620B
Cleanup Date1: 05/15/07
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 66.7 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 333 20
ug/kg 333 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
Acceptance
Criteria Column
30150 A
30150 A
30150 B
30150 B
Project Name:
Project Number:
Lab ID:
Client ID:
Sample Location:
Matrix:
Anaytical Method:
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
Percent Solids:
4,4'-DDO
4,4'-DDT
Endosulfan II
Not Specified
12700960
L0706797 -02
RIZ-2 (5'-7')
BEVERLY, MA
Soil
64,8081A
05/15/07 22:11
JB
80%
2,4,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
Page 51 of 83
SAMPLE RESULTS
>853
875
ND
%Recovery Qualifier
0
0
0
0
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 1 0:50
05/10/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3545
Extraction Date: 05/11/07 14:45
Cleanup Method1: EPA3620B
Cleanup Date1: 05/15/07
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
ug/kg 83.3 20
Acceptance
Criteria Column
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 B
30-150 B
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797 -02 R
Client ID: RIZ-2 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 64,8081A
Analytical Date: 05/15/07 20:15
Analyst: JB
Percent Solids: 80%
4,4'-000
Page 52 of83
SAMPLE RESULTS
2610 ug/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 10:50
05/10/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3545
Extraction Date: 05/11/07 14:45
Cleanup Method1: EPA3620B
Cleanup Date1: 05/15/07
417 100
Project Name:
Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797-03
Client ID: RIZ-3 (10'-12')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 64,8081A
Analytical Date: 05/15/07 22:39
Analyst: JB
Percent Solids: 73%
Delta-BHC NO
Lindane NO
Alpha-BHC NO
Beta-BHC NO
Heptachlor NO
Aldrin NO
Heptachlor epoxide NO
Endrin NO
Endrin ketone NO
Dieldrin NO
4,4'-DDE NO
4,4'-0DT NO
Endosulfan I NO
Endosulfan sulfate NO
Methoxychlor NO
Chlordane NO
Hexachlorobenzene NO
Surrogate %Recovery Qualifier
---- -- ---
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene 0
Decachlorobiphenyl 0
2,4,5,6-T etrach loro-m-xylene 0
Decachlorobiphenyl 0
Page 53 of83
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 13:00
05/10/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3545
Extraction Date: 05/11/0714:45
Cleanup Method1: EPA 36208
Cleanup Date1: 05/15/07
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 73.0 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
ug/kg 365 20
ug/kg 365 20
ug/kg 91.3 20
Acceptance
Criteria Column
.. -----------
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 B
30-150 B
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797-03
Client ID: RIZ-3 (10'-12')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 64,8081A
Analytical Date: 05/15/07 22:39
Analyst: JB
Percent Solids: 73%
4,4'-DDD
Endosulfan II
Surrogate
Page 54 of83
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Decachtorobiphenyl
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
Lab Number:
Report Date:
SAMPLE RESULTS
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 13:00
05/10/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3545
ND
ND
%Recovery
0
0
0
0
ug/kg
ug/kg
Extraction Date:
Cleanup Method1:
Cleanup Date1:
91.3
91.3
Acceptance
Qualifier Criteria
30-150
30-150
30-150
30-150
Column
A
A
8
8
05/11/07 14:45
EPA3620B
05/15/07
20
20
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797 -04
Client ID: RIZ-4 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 64,8081A
Analytical Date: 05/15/07 23:08
Analyst: JB
Percent Solids: 77%
4,4'-DDD
Endosulfan II
Surrogate
Page 55 of83
-----
2,4,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xytene
Decachlorobiphenyl
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xytene
Decachlorobiphenyl
SAMPLE RESULTS
ND
ND
%Recovery Qualifier
43
67
34
41
05180713:48
Lab Number: L0706797
Report Date: 05/18/07
Date Collected: 05/09/07 14:45
Date Received: 05/10/07
Field Prep: Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3545
Extraction Date: 05/11/07 14:45
Cleanup Method!: EPA3620B
Cleanup Date!: 05/15/07
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
Acceptance
Criteria Column

30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 B
30-150 B
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab ID: L0706797 -04
Client ID: RIZ-4 (5'-7')
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA
Matrix: Soil
Anaytical Method: 64,8081A
Analytical Date: 05/15/07 23:08
Analyst: JB
Percent Solids: 77%
Delta-BHC
Lindane
Alpha-BHC
Beta-BHC
Heptachlor
Aldrin
Heptachlor epoxide
Endrin
Endrin ketone
Dieldrin
4,4'-DDE
4,4'-DDT
Endosulfan I
Endosulfan sulfate
Methoxychlor
Chlordane
Hexachlorobenzene
Surrogate
----
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
2,4,5,6-Tetrachforo-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
Page 56 of 83
SAMPLE RESULTS
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
%Recovery Qualifier
43
67
34
41
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date Collected:
Date Received:
Field Prep:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 14:45
05/10/07
Not Specified
Extraction Method: EPA3545
Extraction Date: 05/11/07 14:45
Cleanup Method!: EPA 36208
Cleanup Date1: 05/15/07
ug/kg 21.6 5
ugfkg 17.3 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
ug/kg 86.6 5
ug/kg 86.6 5
ug/kg 21.6 5
Acceptance
Criteria Column
-------------
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 B
30-150 B
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Analytical Method: 64,8081A
05/15/07 18:21
JB
Analytical Date:
Analyst:

Lindane
Alpha-BHC
Beta-BHC
Heptachlor
Aldrin
Heptachlor epoxide
Endrin
Endrin ketone
Dieldrin
4,4'-DDE
4.4'-DDT
Endosulfan I
Endosulfan sulfate
Methoxychlor
Chlordane
Hexachlorobenzene
Surrogate
2,4,5,6-Tetrachloro-m-xylene
Oecachlorobiphenyl
2,4,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
Page 57 of 83
Method Blank Analysis
Batch Quality Control
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
ND ug/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Extraction Method:
Extraction Date:
Cleanup Method1:
Cleanup Date1:
3.33
2.67
3.33
3.33
3.33
3.33
3.33
3.33
3.33
3.33
3.33
3.33
3.33
3.33
13.3
13.3
3.33
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria Column
56 30-150 A
75 30-150 A
50 30-150 8
78 30-150 8
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
EPA3545
05/11/07 14:45
EPA3620B
05/15/07
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Analytical Method: 64,8081A
05/15/07 18:21
JB
Analytical Date:
Analyst:
4,4'-000
Endosulfan II
Surrogate
2,4,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
2,4 ,5,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
Page 58 of 83
Method Blank Analysis
Batch Quality Control
NO
NO
ug/kg
ug/kg
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Extraction Method:
Extraction Date:
Cleanup Method1:
Cleanup Date1:
3.33
3.33
Acceptance
%Recovery Qualifier Criteria Column
56 30-150 A
75 30-150 A
50 30-150 B
78 30-150 B
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
EPA 3545
05/11/07 14:45
EPA3620B
05/15/07
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Oelta-BHC
Lindane
Alpha-BHC
Beta-BHC
Heptachlor
Aldrin
Heptachlor epoxide
Endrin
Endrin ketone
Dieldrin
4,4'-DDE
4,4'-DDT
Endosulfan I
Endosulfan sulfate
Methoxychlor
Hexachlorobenzene
Page 59 of 83
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
%Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
40-140
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD

05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

/_
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
4,4'-DDO
Endosulfan II
Page 60 of 83
Surrogate
2 T etrachforo-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
2,4 ,5 ,6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
Surrogate
2 ,4,5, 6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Oecachlorobiphenyl
2,4 ,5, 6-T etrachloro-m-xylene
Decachlorobiphenyl
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
%Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
LCS
%Recovery Qualifier
41
56
37
57
LCS
%Recovery Qualifier
41
56
37
57
LCSD
%Recovery Qualifier
65
82
61
86
LCSD
40-140
40-140
%Recovery Qualifier
65
82
61
86
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
Acceptance
Criteria
Column
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 8
30-150 8
Acceptance
Criteria
CQiumn
30-150 A
30-150 A
30-150 8
30-150 8
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
30
30
'\\

05180713:48
METALS
Page 61 of 83
05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified Lab Number: L0706797
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date: 05/18/07
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797-01 Date Collected: 05/09/07 08:30
Client ID: RIZ-1 (5'-7') Date Received: 05/10/07
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA Field Prep: Not Specified
Matrix: Soil
Percent Solids: 90%
Dilution Date Date Prep Analytical
Parameter Result Qualifier Units RDL
Factor Prepared Analyzed Method Method
Analyst
Antimony, Total ND mg/kg 2.2 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:22 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Arsenic, Total 7.8 mg/kg 0.44 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:22 EPA3050B 60,60108
MG
Barium, Total 55 mg/kg 0.44 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:22 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Beryllium, Total 0.85 mg/kg 0.22 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:22 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Cadmium, Total ND mg/kg 0.44 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:22 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Chromium, Total 16 mg/kg 0.44 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:22 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Copper, Total 11 mg/kg 0.44 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:22 EPA3050B 60,60108
MG
Iron, Total 16000 mg/kg 2.2 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:22 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Lead, Total 6.8 mg/kg 2.2 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:22 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Manganese, Total 170 mg/kg 0.44 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:22 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Mercury, Total ND mg/kg 0.08 05/14/07 18:30 05/15/0714:45 EPA 7471A 64,7471A
DM
Nickel, Total 12 mg/kg 1.1 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:22 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Selenium, Total ND mg/kg 2.2 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:22 EPA30508
60,60108
MG
Silver, Total ND mg/kg 0.44 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:22 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Thallium, Total ND mg/kg 2.2 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:22 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Zinc, Total 39 mg/kg 2.2 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:22 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Page 62 of 83
05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified Lab Number: L0706797
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date: 05/18/07
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797 -02 Date Collected: 05/09/07 10:50
Client ID: RIZ-2 (5'-7') Date Received: 05/10/07
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA Field Prep: Not Specified
Matrix: Soil
Percent Solids: 80%
Dilution Date Date Prep Analytical
Parameter Result Qualifier Units RDL
Factor Prepared Analyzed Method Method
Analyst
---- ----------
Antimony, Total NO mg/kg 12 5 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:29 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Arsenic, Total 21 mg/kg 2.5 5 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/0716:29 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Barium, Total 96 mg/kg 2.5 5 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/0716:29 EPA3050B 60,60108
MG
Beryllium, Total NO mg/kg 1.2 5 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/0716:29 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Cadmium, T a tal NO mg/kg 2.5 5 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:29 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Chromium, Total 49 mg/kg 2.5 5 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:29 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Copper, Total 210 mg/kg 2.5 5 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:29 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Iron, Total 75000 mg/kg 12 5 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:29 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Lead, Total 590 mg/kg 12 5 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/0716:29 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Manganese, Total 530 mgfkg 2.5 5 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/0716:29 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Mercury, Total 0.57 mg/kg 0.10 05/14/0718:30 05/15/0714:47 EPA 7471A 64,7471A
OM
Nickel, Total 45 mg/kg 6.2 5 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:29 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Selenium, Total ND mg/kg 12 5 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:29 EPA30508
60,60108
MG
Silver, Total NO mg/kg 2.5 5 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:29 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Thallium, Total NO mg/kg 12 5 05/15/0716:10 05117/0716:29 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Zinc, Total 380 mg/kg 12 5 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/0716:29 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Page 63 of 83
05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified Lab Number: L0706797
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date: 05/18/07
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797 -03 Date Collected: 05/09/07 13:00
Client ID: RIZ-3 (10'-12') Date Received: 05/10/07
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA Field Prep: Not Specified
Matrix: Soil
Percent Solids: 73%
Dilution Date Date Prep Analytical
Parameter Result Qualifier Units RDL
Factor Prepared Analyzed Method Method
Analyst
------------------
Antimony, Total 3.5 mg/kg 2.7 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Arsenic, Total 13 mg/kg 0.54 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Barium, Total 230 mg/kg 0.54 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA30508 60,60108
MG
Beryllium, Total 0.74 mg/kg 0.27 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Cadmium, Total 2.6 mg/kg 0.54 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Chromium, Total 56 mg/kg 0.54 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:24 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Copper, Total 400 mg/kg 0.54 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:24 EPA 30508 60,60108 MG
Iron, Total 36000 mg/kg 5.4 2 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 17:08 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Lead, Total 610 mg/kg 2.7 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Manganese, Total 380 mg/kg 0.54 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:24 EPA 30508 60,60108 MG
Mercury, Total 0.33 mg/kg 0.11 05/14/0718:30 05/15/07 14:49 EPA 7471A 64,7471A
OM
Nickel, Total 38 mg/kg 1.3 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Selenium, Total NO mg/kg 2.7 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Silver, Total NO mg/kg 0.54 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA30508 60,60108
MG
Thallium, Total NO mg/kg 2.7 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Zinc, Total 360 mg/kg 2.7 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:24 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Page 64 of 83
05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified Lab Number: L0706797
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date: 05/18/07
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797 -04 Date Collected: 05/09/07 14:45
Client ID: RIZ-4 (5'-7') Date Received: 05/10/07
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA Field Prep: Not Specified
Matrix: Soil
Percent Solids: 77%
Dilution Date Date Prep Analytical
Parameter Result Qualifier Units RDL
Factor Prepared Analyzed Method Method
Analyst
---
Antimony, Total NO mg/kg 2.6 05115/07 16:10 05/17/0716:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Arsenic, Total 8.6 mg/kg 0.52 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Barium, Total 100 rna/kg 0.52 05/15/0716:10 05117/07 16:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Beryllium, Total 0.66 mg/kg 0.26 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Cadmium, Total NO mg/kg 0.52 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Chromium, Total 16 mg/kg 0.52 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Copper, Total 9.0 mg/kg 0.52 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Iron, Total 13000 mg/kg 2.6 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Lead, Total 100 mg/kg 2.6 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Manganese, Total 110 mg/kg 0.52 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:27 EPA 30508 60,60108 MG
Mercury, Total NO mg/kg 0.11 05/14/07 18:30 05/15/07 14:50 EPA 7471A 64,7471A
OM
Nickel, Total 9.8 mg/kg 1.3 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Selenium, Total ND mg/kg 2.6 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/0716:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Silver, Total ND mg/kg 0.52 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:27 EPA30508 60,60108
MG
Thallium, Total NO mg/kg 2.6 0511510716:10 05/17/07 16:27 EPA 30508 60,60108
MG
Zinc, Total 70 mg/kg 2.6 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:27 EPA 30508
60,60108
MG
Page 65 of83
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Mercury, Total NO
Method Blank Analysis
Batch Quality Control
Lab Number:
Report Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
Dilution
Factor
Date
Prepared
Date Analytical
Analyzed Method Analyst

mg/kg 0.08 05/14/0718:30 05/15/0714:16 64,7471A OM
Prep __ _
Digestion Method: EPA 7471A
Dilution Date Date Analytical
Parameter Result Qualifier Units RDL Factor Prepared Analyzed Method Analyst
Antimony, Total NO mg/kg 2.0 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:07 60,60108 MG
Arsenic, Total NO mg/kg 0.40 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:07 60,60108 MG
Barium, Total NO mg/kg 0.40 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:07 60,6010B MG
Beryllium, Total NO mg/kg 0.20 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:07 60,60108 MG
Cadmium, Total NO mg/kg 0.40 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:07 60,60108 MG
Chromium, Total NO mg/kg 0.40 05/15/0716:10 05117/0716:07 60,60108 MG
Copper, Total NO mg/kg 0.40 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:07 60,60108 MG
Iron, Total NO mg/kg 2.0 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:07 60,6010B MG
lead, Total NO mg/kg 2.0 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:07 60,60108 MG
Manganese, Total NO mg/kg 0.40 05/15/07 16:10 05/17/07 16:07 60,60108 MG
Nickel, Total NO mg/kg 1.0 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:07 60,6010B MG
Selenium, Total NO mg/kg 2.0 05/15/0716:10 05/17/07 16:07 60,60108 MG
Silver, Total NO mg/kg 0.40 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:07 60,60108 MG
Thallium, Total NO mg/kg 2.0 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:07 60,6010B MG
Zinc, Total NO mg/kg 2.0 05/15/0716:10 05/17/0716:07 60,60108 MG
Prep Information
-------
Digestion Method: EPA3050B
Page 66 of 83
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Mercury, Total
Antimony, Total
Arsenic, Total
Barium, Total
Beryllium, Total
Cadmium, Total
Chromium, Total
Copper, Total
Iron, Total
Lead, Total
Manganese, Total
Nickel, Total
Selenium, Total
Silver, Total
Thallium, Total
Zinc, Total
Page 67 of 83
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
%Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
75-125
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
Page 68 of 83
INORGANICS
&
MISCELLANEOUS
05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified Lab Number:
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date:
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797-01 Date Collected:
Client ID: RIZ-1 (5'-7') Date Received:
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA Field Prep:
Matrix: Soil
Dilution Date Date
Parameter
RDL Factor Prepared Analyzed
-'-------'
Cyanide, Total ND mg/kg 1.0 05/16/07 16:30 05/16/07 21:39
Solids, Total 90 % 0.10 05111/0715:00
Page 69 of 83
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 08:30
05/10/07
Not Specified
Analytical
Method
64,9014
30,2540G
1lJ.:?MA
,'."dl-'
DD
LR
Project Name: Not Specified Lab Number:
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date:
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab 10: L0706797-02 Date Collected:
Client ID: RIZ-2 (5'-7') Date Received:
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA Field Prep:
Matrix: Soil
Dilution Date Date
Parameter Result Qualifier Units
RDL Factor Prepared Analyzed
------''----
Cyanide, Total ND mg/kg 1.2 05/16/07 16:30 05/16/07 21:39
Solids, Total % 0.10 05/11/07 15:00
Page 70 of83
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 10:50
05/10/07
Not Specified
Analytical
Method Analyst
64,9014 DD
30,2540G LR
zi\;?1-iA
;; .. ,. ........ .
05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified
Lab Number:
L0706797
Project Number: 12700960
Report Date: 05/18/07
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797-03 Date Collected: 05/09/07 13:00
ClientiD: RIZ-3 (10'-12') Date Received: 05/10/07
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA Field Prep:
Not Specified
Matrix: Soil
Dilution Date Date Analytical
Parameter Result Qualifier Units RDL
Factor Prepared Analyzed Method Analyst
Cyanide, Total ND mg/kg 1.2 05/16/0716:30 05/16/07 21:40 64,9014 DD
Solids, Total 73 % 0.10 05111/07 15:00 30,2540G LR
Page 71 of 83
Project Name: Not Specified Lab Number:
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date:
SAMPLE RESULTS
Lab ID: L0706797-04 Date Collected:
ClientiD: RIZ-4 (5'-7') Date Received:
Sample Location: BEVERLY, MA Field Prep:
Matrix: Soil
Dilution Date
Result Qualifier Units RDL Factor Prepared
Date
Analyzed
----
Cyanide, Total ND mg/kg 1.2 05/16/0716:30 05/16/07 21:41
Solids, Total 77 % 0.10 05/11/0715:00
Page 72 of83
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
05/09/07 14:45
05/10/07
Not Specified
Analytical
Method Analyst
---
64,9014 DD
30,2540G LR
.,&c?t;A
.. f ....
Project Name:
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Cyanide, Total ND
Page 73 of 83
Method Blank Analysis
Batch Quality Control
Units
Dilution
RDL Factor
Lab Number:
Report Date:
Date
Prepared
Date
Analyzed
mg/kg 0.97 05/16/07 16:30 05/16/07 21:35
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
Analytical
Method
64,9014 DD
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Cyanide, Total
Page 74 of 83
LCS
Lab Control Sample Analysis
Batch Quality Control
LCSD
%Recovery %Recovery
%Recovery
Limits
80-120
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
35

Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Parameter
Solids, Total
Page 75 of 83
Lab Duplicate Analysis
Batch Quality Control
Native Sample Duplicate Sample Units
77 76 %
Lab Number:
Report Date:
RPD
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
RPD Limits
20
,,,
'i,'
....

05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified Lab Number: L0706797
Project Number: 12700960 Report Date: 05/18/07
Sample Receipt and Container Information
Were project specific reporting limits specified?
YES
Cooler Information
Cooler Custody Seal
A Absent
Container Information
Container 10 Container Type Cooler pH Temp Pres Seal Analysis
L0706797-01A Vial MeOH preserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent VPH-04
L0706797-01B Vial water preserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent VPH-04
L0706797-01C Vial water preserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent VPH-04
l0706797-01D Amber 250ml unpreserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent EPH-04,MCP-8081-04,MCP-
8082-04,TPH-DRO-D
L0706797-01E Amber 250ml unpreserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent MCP-7 471 T ,MCP-AG-
6010T,MCP-AS-6010T,MCP-BA-
6010T,MCP-BE-6010T,MCP-CD-
6010T,MCP-CR-6010T,MCP-CU-
60 1 OT ,MCP-FE-60 1 OT, MCP-MN-
60 1 OT ,MCP-N 1-601 OT ,MCP-PB-
60 1 OT ,MCP-SB-601 OT ,MCP-SE-
6010T,MCP-TL-6010T,MCP-ZN-
6010T
L0706797-01F Amber 250m! unpreserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent MCP-TCN9014-04,TS
L0706797-02A Vial MeOH preserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent VPH-04
l0706797..02B Vial water preserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent VPH-04
L0706797-02C Vial water preserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent VPH-04
L0706797-02D Amber 250ml unpreserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent EPH-04,MCP-8081..04,MCP-
8082-04,TPH-DRO-D
L0706797-02E Amber 250ml unpreserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent MCP-7471T,MCP-AG-
60 1 OT ,MCP-AS-60 1 OT, MCP-BA-
6010T,MCP-BE-6010T,MCP-CD-
6010T,MCP-CR-6010T,MCP-CU-
6010T,MCP-FE-6010T,MCP-MN-
601 OT,MCP-NI-601 OT ,MCP-PB-
601 OT, MCP-SB-601 OT ,MCP-SE-
601 OT,MCP-TL-601 OT,MCP-ZN-
6010T
L0706797-02F Amber 250ml unpreserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent MCP-TCN9014-04,TS
L0706797-03A Vial MeOH preserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent VPH-04
L0706797-03B Vial water preserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent VPH-04
L0706797..03C Vial water preserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent VPH-04
L0706797-030 Amber 250m1 unpreserved A NA 4.1C
y
Absent EPH-04,MCP-8081-04,MCP-
8082..Q4,TPH-DRO-D
Page 76 of83
Project Name:
Project Number:
Not Specified
12700960
Container Information
Container 10 Container Type
L0706797-03E Amber 250ml unpreserved
L0706797-03F Amber 250ml unpreserved
L0706797-04A Vial MeOH preserved
L0706797-04B Vial water preserved
L0706797-04C Vial water preserved
L0706797-04D Amber 250ml unpreserved
L0706797-04E Amber 250ml unpreserved
L0706797-04F Amber 250ml unpreserved
L0706797-0SA Vial MeOH preserved
L0706797-0SB Vial water preserved
L0706797-0SC Vial water preserved
Page 77 of 83
Cooler pH Temp
A NA 4.1C
A NA 4.1C
A NA 4.1C
A NA 4.1C
A NA 4.1C
A NA 4.1C
A NA 4.1C
A NA 4.1C
NA NA NA
NA NA NA
NA NA NA
Pres Seal
y
Absent
y
Absent
y
Absent
y
Absent
y
Absent
y
Absent
y
Absent
y
Absent
y
Absent
y
Absent
y
Absent
05180713:48
Lab Number: L0706797
Report Date: 05/18/07
Analysis
MCP-7471T,MCP-AG-
6010T,MCP-AS.6010T,MCP-BA-
60 1 OT, MCP-8 E-60 1 OT ,MCP-CD-
6010T,MCP-CR-6010T,MCP-CU-
6010T,MCP-FE-6010T,MCP-MN-
601 OT, MCP-NI-601 OT ,MCP-PB-
6010T,MCP-SB-6010T,MCP-SE-
6010T,MCP-Tl-6010T,MCP-ZN-
6010T
MCP-TCN9014-04,TS
VPH-04
VPH-04
VPH-04
EPH-04,MCP-8081-04,MCP-
8082-04, TPH-DRO-D
MCP-7471T,MCP-AG-
6010T,MCP-AS-6010T,MCP-BA-
601 OT ,MCP-BE-601 OT,MCP-CD-
601 OT ,MCP-CR-601 OT,MCP-CU-
60 1 OT ,MCP-FE-601 OT ,MCP-M N-
60 1 OT, MCP-N 1-601 OT ,MCP-PB-
6010T,MCP-SB-6010T,MCP-SE-
6010T,MCP-TL-6010T,MCP-ZN-
6010T
MCP-TCN9014-04,TS
HOLD
HOLD
HOLD
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
GLOSSARY
Acronyms
EPA - Environmental Protection Agency.
Lab Number:
Report Date:
05180713:48
L0706797
05/18/07
LCS - Laboratory Control Sample: A sample matrix, free from the analytes of interest, spiked with verified
known amounts of analytes or a material containing known and verified amounts of analytes.
LCSD- Laboratory Control Sample Duplicate: Refer to LCS.
MS - Matrix Spike Sample: A sample prepared by adding a known mass of target analyte to a specified
amount of matrix sample for which an independent estimate of target analyte concentration is available.
Matrix Spike Sample Duplicate: Refer to MS.
MSD
NA
NC
- Not Applicable.
- Not Calculated: Term is utilized when one or more of the results utilized in the calculation are
non-detect at the parameter's reporting unit.
NO - Not detected at the reported detection limit for the sample.
RDL - Reported Detection Limit: The value at which an instrument can accurately measure an analyte at a
specific concentration. The RDL includes any adjustments from dilutions, concentrations or moisture
content, where applicable.
RPD - Relative Percent Difference: The results from matrix and/or matrix spike duplicates are primarily
designed to assess the precision of analytical results in a given matrix and are expressed as
relative percent difference (RPD). Values which are less than five times the reporting limit for any
individual parameter are evaluated by utilizing the absolute difference between the values; although
the RPD value will be provided in the report.
Terms
Analytical Method: Both the document from which the method originates and the analytical reference method.
(Example: EPA 82608 is shown as 1 ,82608.) The codes for the reference method documents are provided in the
References section of the Addendum.
Data Qualifiers
The following data qualifiers have been identified for use under the CT DEP Reasonable Confidence Protocols.
A- Spectra identified as "Aldol Condensation Product".
B - The analyte was detected above the reporting limit in the associated method blank. Flag only applies to
associated field samples that have detectable concentrations of the analyte.
E - Concentration of analyte exceeds the range of the calibration curve and/or linear range of the instrument.
J -Estimated value. The analyte was tentatively identified; the quantitation is an estimation. (Tentatively
identified compounds only.)
Report Format Not Specified
Page 78 of 83
05180713:48
Project Name: Not Specified
Project Number: 12700960
Lab Number:
Report Date:
L0706797
05/18/07
REFERENCES
1 Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste: Physical/Chemical Methods. EPA SW-846. Third
Edition. Updates 1- lilA, 1997.
30 Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. APHA-AWWA-WPCF.
18th Edition. 1992.
59 Method for the Determination of Volatile Petroleum Hydrocarbons (VPH). Massachusetts
Department of Environmental Protection, DENORS/BWSC. May 2004, Revision 1.1.
60 Quality Assurance and Quality Control Requirements and Performance Standards for SW-
846 Methods. MADEP BWSC. WSC-CAM-IIA (Revision 4 ), WSC-CAM-V C (Revision 2),
WSC-CAM-IIIA (Revision 5). May 2004.
61 Method for the Determination of Extractable Petroleum Hydrocarbons (EPH). Massachusetts
Department of Environmental Protection, DENORS/BWSC. May 2004, Revision 1.1.
64 Quality Assurance and Quality Control Requirements and Performance Standards for SW-
846 Methods. MADEP BWSC. WSC-CAM-IIA (Revision 4), WSC-CAM-V C (Revision 2),
WSC-CAM-IIIA (Revision 5). August 2004.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES
Alpha Woods Hole Labs performs services with reasonable care and diligence normal to the analytical testing
laboratory industry. In the event of an error, the sole and exclusive responsibility of Alpha Woods Hole Labs
shall be to re-perform the work at it's own expense. In no event shall Alpha Woods Hole Labs be held liable
for any incidental, consequential or special damages, including but not limited to, damages in any way
connected with the use of, interpretation of, information or analysis provided by Alpha Woods Hole Labs.
We strongly urge our clients to comply with EPA protocol regarding sample volume, preservation, cooling,
containers, sampling procedures, holding time and splitting of samples in the field .
. --------
Page 79 of83

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PLEASEANSWERQUESTIONSABOVE_I_____ . -- , - I Conta;nerType : ' J : Pleaseprintclearly,leglblyand I
Preservative I I completely. Samples can not te I
\S YOUR PROJECT In and turnaround timo ClOCk
By: Date/Time Received By: oate/Tkne d will not start until any amblgun;es are
MA MCP or CT RCP? - resotved. All samples submitted are
---- - .... ------ ------ subjecltoAipha's Payment Terms.
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'
12.4 t2.s
'
'
12,8 13.0 13.2

13.4
"'
co
0

"
"'
"'
a.

"'

r--
g
""
0
Data File:
Injection Date: 14-MAY-2007 22:37
Instrument: Petroto,i -.o-,
Cl.lent Sample ID: T
4.6;
4,S:






3.8

3.6-:














,_

2.01
1.

1.





1.1-:
t.O.:





0,4...;

0.2..:
0.1- JUlllll})jWlJ
-
"'
.1
5
..
'
r
I
0"
HP6890 GC Oata. tiD28.CH: 9.109 to 20.024 Min



1'o
t'z
' ' ' .. ' ' ' .. ' ' .. ' . ' ' . ' ' ' ' . ' ' '
. . . . I g)
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 0
Min
"'
11
<X>
Q)
Cl
"'
0..
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Analysis Report
August 08, 2007
Sample Information
Matrix: SOIL
Location Code: VHB-MA
Rush Request:
P.O.#: 10231
Client ID:
CREME SS-1
Parameter
Silver
Arsenic
Barium
Beryllium
Cadmium
Chromium
Mercury - Soil
Nickel
Lead
Antimony
Selenium
Thallium
Vanadium
Zinc
Percent Solid
Mercury Digestion
EPH Extraction
Ext. Petroleum Hydrocarbons
Soil Extraction for PCB
Total Metals Digest
Asbestos
Polychlorinated BiQhenyls
PCB-1016
PCB-1221
PCB-1232
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.
101 Walnut Street
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown, MA 02471-9151
Custody Information
Collected by:
Received by: LB
Analyzed by: see "By" below
Date
07/25/07
07/27/07
Time
10:00
16:30
Laborator:y Data
SOC I.D.: GAJ36104
Phoenix I.D.: AJ36104
Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
< 0.38 0.38 mg/Kg 07/31/07 EKT
SW6010
9.47 0.76 mg/Kg 07/31/07 EKT
SW6010
31.1 0.38 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
0.412 0.31 mg/Kg 07/31/07 EKT SW6010
< 0.38 0.38 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
12 0.38 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
< 0.10 0.10 mg/kg 07/31107
RS
SW-7471
9.66 0.38 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
47.7 0.38 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
< 3.82 3.82 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
< 1.91 1.91 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
< 3.82 3.82 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
25.6 0.38 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
6010
62.1 0.38 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
91 % 07/27/07 PU/IDB E160.3
Completed 07/31107
D
SW7471
Completed 07/27/07 SUP/K
3545
Completed 08/03/07 JH MADEP EPH-04
Completed 07/27/07
SJC/E
SW3545
Completed 07127/07 AGP SW846- 3050
ND % 08/03/07 E600/M482020
ND 360 ug!Kg 07/30/07 JH SW8082
ND 360 ug/Kg 07/30/07
JH
SW8082
ND 360 ug/Kg 07/30/07 JH SW8082
Page I of34
Client ID: CREME SS-1 Phoenix !.D.: AJ36104
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
PCB-1242 ND 360 ug/Kg 07/30/07
JH
SW8082
PCB-1248 ND 360 ug/Kg 07/30/07
JH
SW8082
PCB-1254 ND 360 ug/Kg 07/30/07
JH
SW8082
PCB-1260 ND 360 ug/Kg 07/30/07
JH
SW8082
PCB-1262 ND 360 ug/Kg 07/30/07
JH
sw 8082
PCB-1268 ND 360 ug/Kg 07/30/07
JH
sw 8082
QAlQC Surrogates
% DCBP (Surrogate Rec) 95 % 07/30/07
JH
SW8082
% TCMX (Surrogate Rec) 116 % 07/30/07 JH
SW8082
Comments:
*Asbestos analyzed by MA certified lab #M-NJ337. No Asbestos was detected in this sample.
If there are any questions regarding this data, please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit
...
2007
Page 2 of34
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Analysis Report
August 08, 2007
Sample Information
Matrix: SOIL
Location Code: VHB-MA
Rush Request:
P.O.#: 10231
Tel. (860) 6451 102 Fax (860) 645-0823
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.
101 Walnut Street
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown, MA 02471-9151
Custody Information
Collected by:
Received by: LB
Analyzed by: see "By" below
Date
07/25/07
07/27/07
Time
9:45
16:30
Laboratorx Data
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
Phoenix J.D.: AJ36105
Client ID:
CREME SS-2
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
Silver < 0.33 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Arsenic 4.68 0.66 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Barium 43 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Beryllium < 0.27 0.27 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Cadmium < 0.33 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Chromium 10.6 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Mercury - Soil < 0.10 0.10 mg/kg 07/31/07
RS SW-7471
Nickel 8.68 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Lead 52.3 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Antimony < 3.32 3.32 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Selenium < 1.66 1.66 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Thallium < 3.32 3.32 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT SW6010
Vanadium 21.1 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT 6010
Zinc 51.3 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT SW6010
Percent Solid 94 % 07/27/07 PU/IDB E160.3
Mercury Digestion Completed 07/31/07
D SW7471
EPH Extraction Completed 07/27/07
SUP/K
3545
Ext. Petroleum Hydrocarbons Completed 08/03/07
JH MADEP EPH-04
Soil Extraction for PCB Completed 07/30/07
JCIE
SW3545
Total Metals Digest Completed 07/27/07
AGP SW846- 3050
Polychlorinated Bi32henyls
PCB-1016 ND 380 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
SW8082
PCB-1221 ND 380 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
SW8082
PCB-1232 ND 380 ug/Kg 08/01/07
JH
SW8082
PCB-1242 ND 380 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
SW8082
Page 3 of34
Client ID: CREME SS-2 Phoenix !.D.: AJ36105
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
PCB-1248 ND 380 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
sw 8082
PCB-1254 ND 380 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
SW8082
PCB-1260 ND 380 ug!Kg 08/01/07
JH
SW8082
PCB-1262 ND 380 ug!Kg 08/01107
JH
SW8082
PCB-1268 ND 380 ug/Kg 08/01/07
JH
SW8082
QA/QC Surrogates
% DCBP (Surrogate Rec) 82 % 08/01107
JH
sw 8082
% TCMX (Surrogate Rec) 88 % 08/01107 JH
sw 8082
Comments:
If there are any questions regarding this data. please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit
Page 4 of34
Environmental Laboratories. Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
Analysis Report
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.
101 Walnut Street August 08, 2007
Sample Information
Matrix: SOIL
Location Code: VHB-MA
Rush Request:
P.O.#: 10231
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown, MA 02471-9151
Custody Information
Collected by:
Received by: LB
Analyzed by: see "By" below
Date
07/25/07
07/27/07
Time
10:15
16:30
Laboratory Data
SDG !.D.: GAJ36104
Client ID: CREME SS-3
Parameter Result
Silver < 0.36
Arsenic 5.89
Barium 28.5
Beryllium < 0.29
Cadmium < 0.36
Chromium 10.7
Mercury -Soil 0.11
Nickel 10.6
Lead 53.2
Antimony < 3.63
Selenium < 1.82
Thallium < 3.63
Vanadium 22.4
Zinc 53.2
Percent Solid 97
Mercury Digestion Completed
EPH Extraction Completed
Ext. Petroleum Hydrocarbons
Total Metals Digest
Asbestos
Completed
Completed
ND
RL Units Date
0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.73 mg/Kg 07/31/07
0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.29 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.10 mg/kg 07/31107
0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
3.63 mg/Kg 07/31107
1.82 mg/Kg 07/31107
3.63 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
% 07/27/07
07/31107
07/27/07
08/03/07
07/27/07
% 08/03/07
Page 5 of34
Phoenix !.D.: AJ36106
Time By Reference
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
RS
SW-7471
EKT
SW6010
EKT SW6010
EKT SW6010
EKT SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
6010
EKT SW6010
PU/IDB
160.3
D
SW7471
SUP/K
3545
JH MADEP EPH-04
AGP SW846- 3050
E600/M482020
Comments:
*Asbestos analyzed by MA certified lab #M-NJ337. No Asbestos was detected in this sample.
If there are any questions regarding this data, please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit
!?# ...
August 08, 2007
Page 6 of34
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Analysis Report
August 08, 2007
Sample Information
Matrix: SOIL
Location Code: VHB-MA
Rush Request:
P.O.#: 10231
Client ID:
Parameter
Silver
Arsenic
Barium
Beryllium
Cadmium
Chromium
Mercury - Soil
Nickel
Lead
Antimony
Selenium
Thallium
Vanadium
Zinc
Percent Solid
Mercury Digestion
Total Metals Digest
Asbestos
CREME SS-4
TeL (860) 6451 102 Fax (860) 645-0823
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin. Inc.
101 Walnut Street
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown, MA 02471-9151
Custody Information
Collected by:
Received by: LB
Analyzed by: see "By" below
Date
07/25/07
07/27/07
Time
9:35
16:30
Laboratory Data
sDc J.D.: GAJ36104
Phoenix J.D.: AJ36107
Result
< 0.37
6.49
45
< 0.29
< 0.37
14.5
0.11
14
85.1
< 3.67
< 1.84
< 3.67
47.5
95.8
92
Completed
Completed
ND
RL Units Date
0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.73 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.37 mg/Kg 07/31/07
0.29 mg!Kg 07/31107
0.37 mg!Kg 07/31107
0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.10 mglkg 07/31107
0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
3.67 mg/Kg 07/31107
1.84 mg/Kg 07/31/07
3.67 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
0.37 mg/Kg 07/31/07
% 07/27/07
07/31107
07/27/07
% 08/03/07
Page 7 of34
Time By Reference
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW60l0
EKT
SW60l0
RS SW-7471
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
SW6010
EKT
6010
EKT
SW6010
PU/IDB
E160.3
D
SW7471
AGP SW846- 3050
E600/M482020
Comments:
*Asbestos analyzed by MA certified lab #M-NJ337. No Asbestos was detected in this sample.
If there are any questions regarding this data. please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit

August 08, 2007
Page 8 of34
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
Analysis Report
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.
101 Walnut Street August 08, 2007
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown, MA 02471-9151
SamQle Information Custody Information Date Time
Matrix: SOIL Collected by: 07/25/07 15:00
Location Code: VHB-MA Received by: LB 07/27/07 16:30
Rush Request: Analyzed by: see "By" below
P.O.#: 10231
Laboratory Data
SOC J.D.: GAJ36104
Phoenix J.D.: AJ36108
Client ID:
CREME LGP-1 (0-1)
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
Silver < 0.37 0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Arsenic 4.67 0.74 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Barium 25.4 0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Beryllium 0.594 0.3 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT SW6010
Cadmium < 0.37 0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT SW6010
Chromium 6.36 0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT SW6010
Mercury - Soil < 0.10 0.10 mg/kg 07/31/07
RS
SW-7471
Nickel 7.86 0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Lead 58.7 0.37 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Antimony < 3.71 3.71 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Selenium < 1.85 1.85 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Thallium < 3.71 3.71 mg!Kg 07/31/07
EKT SW6010
Vanadium 40.2 0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT 6010
Zinc 66.5 0.37 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Percent Solid 95 % 07/27/07
PU/IDB El60.3
Mercury Digestion Completed 07/31107
D SW7471
EPH Extraction Completed 07/27/07
SUP/K
3545
Ext. Petroleum Hydrocarbons Completed 08/03/07
JH MADEP EPH-04
Total Metals Digest Completed 07/27/07
AGP
SW846- 3050
Page 9 of34
Comments:
If there are any questions regarding this data, please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit
f?f!f; ...
August 08, 2007
Page 10 of34
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike. P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
Analysis Report
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin. Inc.
101 Walnut Street August 08, 2007
Sample Information
Matrix: SOIL
Location Code: VHB-MA
Rush Request:
P.O.#: 10231
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown. MA 02471-9151
Custody Information
Collected by:
Received by: LB
Analyzed by: see "By" below
Date
07/25/07
07/27/07
Time
15:00
16:30
Laboratory Data
CREME LGP-2 {0-1)
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
Client ID:
Parameter
Silver
Arsenic
Barium
Beryllium
Cadmium
Chromium
Mercury - Soil
Nickel
Lead
Antimony
Selenium
Thallium
Vanadium
Zinc
Percent Solid
Mercury Digestion
EPH Extraction
Ext. Petroleum Hydrocarbons
Result
< 0.42
7.16
32.1
0.434
< 0.42
13.6
< 0.13
14.6
386
< 4.22
< 2.11
< 4.22
29.4
74.4
78
Completed
Completed
Completed
Soil Extraction for PCB Completed
Total Metals Digest Completed
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
PCB-1016 ND
PCB-1221 ND
PCB-1232 ND
PCB-1242 ND
RL Units
0.42 mg/Kg
0.84 mg/Kg
0.42 mg/Kg
0.34 mg/Kg
0.42 mg/Kg
0.42 mg/Kg
0.13 mg/kg
0.42 mg/Kg
0.42 mg/Kg
4.22 mg/Kg
2.11 mg/Kg
4.22 mg/Kg
0.42 mg/Kg
0.42 mg/Kg
%
310 ug/Kg
310 ug/Kg
310 ug/Kg
310 ug/Kg
Page 11 of34
Phoenix J.D.: AJ36109
Date Time By Reference
07/31107 EKT SW6010
07/31107 EKT
SW6010
07/31/07 EKT
SW6010
07/31/07 EKT
SW6010
07/31107 EKT
SW6010
07/31107 EKT
SW6010
07/31107 RS SW-7471
07/31107
EKT
SW6010
07/31107
EKT
SW6010
07/31107
EKT
SW6010
07/31107
EKT
SW6010
07/31107 EKT SW6010
07/31107
EKT 6010
07/31107 EKT
SW6010
07/27/07 PU/IDB El60.3
07/31107 D
SW7471
07/27/07
SUP/K
3545
08/03/07 JH MADEP EPH-04
07/27/07
SJC/E
SW3545
07/27/07 AGP SW846- 3050
07/30/07
JH
sw 8082
07/30/07
JH
sw 8082
07/30/07 JH
SW8082
07/30/07 JH
SW8082
Client ID: CREME LGP-2 {0-1)
Phoenix !.D.: AJ36109
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
PCB-1248 ND 310 ug/Kg 07/30/07 JH
SW8082
PCB-1254 ND 310 ug/Kg 07/30/07 JH
SW8082
PCB-1260 ND 310 ug!Kg 07/30/07 JH
sw 8082
PCB-1262 ND 310 ug!Kg 07/30/07 JH
sw 8082
PCB-1268 ND 310 ug!Kg 07/30/07
JH
sw 8082
QNQC Surrogates
% DCBP (Surrogate Rec) 106 % 07/30/07 JH
SW8082
% TCMX (Surrogate Rec) 123 % 07/30/07 JH
SW8082
Comments:
If there are any questions regarding this data. please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit

August 08, 2007
Page 12 of 34
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
Analysis Report
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.
101 Walnut Street August 08, 2007
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown, MA 02471-9151
Samgle Information Custod:,: Information Date Time
Matrix: SOIL Collected by: 07/25/07 10:00
Location Code: VHB-MA Received by:
LB 07/27/07 16:30
Rush Request: Analyzed by: see "By" below
P.O.#: 10231
Laborator_y Data
SDG !.D.: GAJ36104
Phoenix !.D.: AJ36110
Client ID:
CREME VHB-101 (0-2)
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
Silver < 0.33 0.33 mg/Kg 07131107
EKT
SW6010
Arsenic 7.04 0.66 mg/Kg 07/3!/07
EKT
SW6010
Barium 33.9 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Beryllium < 0.27 0.27 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Cadmium < 0.33 0.33 mg/Kg 07131107
EKT
SW6010
Chromium 15.6 0.33 mg/Kg 07131107
EKT
SW6010
Mercury - Soil 0.84 0.10 mglkg 07/3!107
RS SW-7471
Nickel 11.8 0.33 mg!Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Lead 81.6 0.33 mg/Kg 07/3!107
EKT
SW6010
Antimony < 3.32 3.32 mg!Kg 07/3!107
EKT
SW6010
Selenium < 1.66 1.66 mg!Kg 07/3!/07
EKT
SW6010
Thallium < 3.32 3.32 mg!Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Vanadium 23.2 0.33 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
6010
Zinc 73.4 0.33 mg/Kg 07/3!107
EKT
SW6010
Percent Solid 93 % 07/27/07
PU/IDB
E160.3
Mercury Digestion Completed 07131107
D
SW7471
EPH Extraction Completed 07/27/07
SUP/K
3545
Ext. Petroleum Hydrocarbons Completed 08/03/07
JH MADEP EPH-04
Total Metals Digest Completed 07/27/07
AGP SW846- 3050
Page 13 of34
Comments:
If there are any questions regarding this data, please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit
Page 14 of34
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
Analysis Report
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin. Inc.
101 Walnut Street
August 08, 2007
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown, MA 02471-9151
Samgle Information Custodx Information Date
Matrix: SOIL Collected by: 07/25/07
Location Code: VHB-MA Received by:
LB 07/27107
Rush Request:
Analyzed by: see "By" below
P.O.#: 10231
Time
14:00
16:30
Laboratory Data
SDG I.D.: GAJ36104
Phoenix I.D.: AJ36111
Client ID:
CREME VHB-102 (0-2)
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
Silver 3.24 0.35 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
Arsenic 8.71 0.71 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
Barium 187 0.35 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
Beryllium < 0.28 0.28 mg/Kg 07/31/07 EKT
SW6010
Cadmium 0.996 0.35 mg/Kg 07/31/07 EKT
SW6010
Chromium Ill 0.35 mg/Kg 07/31/07 EKT
SW6010
Mercury - Soil 0.42 0.10 mgikg 07/31107
RS
SW-7471
Nickel 177 0.35 mg/Kg 07/31/07 EKT
SW6010
Lead 26600 355 mg/Kg 08/06/07 EK
SW6010
Antimony 14 3.55 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
Selenium < 1.77 1.77 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
Thallium < 3.55 3.55 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT
SW6010
Vanadium 26.3 0.35 mg!Kg 07/31107 EKT
6010
Zinc 551 3.55 mg!Kg 08/01107 EK
SW60!0
Percent Solid 94 % 07/27/07
PU/IDB
E160.3
Mercury Digestion Completed 07/31/07 D
SW7471
EPH Extraction Completed 07/27/07
SUP/K
3545
Ext. Petroleum Hydrocarbons Completed 08/03/07 JH MADEP EPH-04
Soil Extraction for PCB Completed 07/27/07 SJC/E
SW3545
Total Metals Digest Completed 07/27/07 AGP SW846- 3050
Polychlorinated Bighenyls
PCB-1016 ND 3800 ug!Kg 08/01/07 JH
sw 8082
PCB-1221 ND 3800 ug!Kg 08/01/07 JH
sw 8082
PCB-1232 ND 3800 ug/Kg 08/01107 JH
SW8082
PCB-1242 ND 3800 ug/Kg 08/01/07 JH
SW8082
Page 15 of34
Client ID: CREME VHB-102 (0-2) Phoenix !.D.: AJ35111
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
PCB-1248 ND 3800 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
SW8082
PCB-1254 13000 3800 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
SW8082
PCB-1260 ND 3800 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
SW8082
PCB-1262 ND 3800 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
sw 8082
PCB-1268 ND 3800 ug/Kg 08/01107
JH
SW8082
QAJQC Surrogates
% DCBP (Surrogate Rec) 125 % 08/01/07
JH
SW8082
% TCMX (Surrogate Rec) 119 % 08/01/07 JH
SW8082
Comments:
If there are any questions regarding this data, please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit

Auguto:: 2007
Page 16 of 34
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
Analysis Report
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin. Inc.
August 08, 2007
101 Walnut Street
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown. MA 02471-9151
Samgle Information Custody Information Date Time
Matrix: SOIL Collected by: 07/25/07 10:30
Location Code: VHB-MA Received by: LB 07/27/07 16:30
Rush Request: Analyzed by: see "By" below
P.O.#: 10231
Laboratorx Data
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
Phoenix J.D.: AJ36112
Client ID: CREME VHB-1 01 (15-17)
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
Silver < 0.36 0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT SW6010
Arsenic 6.42 0.72 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Barium 30.4 0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Beryllium 0.499 0.29 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Cadmium < 0.36 0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Chromium 18.8 0.36 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Mercury Soil < 0.10 0.10 mg/kg 07/31107
RS
SW-7471
Nickel 15.2 0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107 EKT SW6010
Lead 2.28 0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Antimony < 3.58 3.58 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Selenium < 1.79 1.79 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Thallium < 3.58 3.58 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Vanadium 24.1 0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
6010
Zinc 35.4 0.36 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Percent Solid 93 % 07/27/07
PU/IDB
E160.3
Field Extraction Completed 07/25/07
BP
SW5035
Mercury Digestion Completed 07/31/07 D SW7471
EPH Extraction Completed 07/27/07
SUP/K
3545
Ext. Petroleum Hydrocarbons Completed 08/03/07
JH MADEP EPH-04
Total Metals Digest Completed 07/27/07
AGP SW846- 3050
Volatiles
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
RIJ
SW8260
1,1, 1-Trichloroethane ND 220 ug!Kg 07/28/07
RIJ
SW8260
1,1 ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
1, 1,2-Trichloroethane ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Page 17 of34
Client ID: CREME VHB-101 (15-17)
Parameter Result
1, 1-Dichloroethane
1,1-Dichloroethene
1, 1-Dichloropropene
1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene
1 ,2,3-Trichloropropane
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene
1,2-Dibrorno-3-chloropropane
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
1,2-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dichloropropane
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
1,3-Dichlorobenzene

1,4-Dichlorobenzene
2,2-Dichloropropane
2-Chlorotoluene
2-HeXanone
2-Isopropyl toluene
4-Chlorotoluene
4-Methyl-2-pentanone
Acetone
Acrylonitrile
Benzene
Bromobenzene
Bromochloromethane
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
Carbon Disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene
cis-1 ,3-Dichloropropene
Dibromochloromethane
Dibromoethane
Dibromomethane
Dichlorodifluoromethane
Ethylbenzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Isopropylbenzene
m&p-Xylene
Methyl Ethyl Ketone
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
RL
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
1100
220
220
1100
4400
440
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
220
2600
Units
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
Page 18 of 34
Phoenix !.D.: AJ36112
Date Time By Reference
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07.
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
R/J SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
R/J SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
R/J SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
Client ID: CREME VHB-101 (15-17) Phoenix !.D.: AJ36112
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
Methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Methylene chloride ND 440 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
n-Butylbenzene ND 220 ug!Kg 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
n-Propylbenzene ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Naphthalene ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
o-Xylene ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
p-Isopropyltoluene ND 220 ug!Kg 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
sec-Butylbenzene ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
Styrene ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
tert-Butylbenzene ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Tetrachloroethene ND 220 ug!Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Tetrahydrofuran (1HF) ND 440 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Toluene ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Total Xylenes ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
trans-1 ,2-Dichloroethene ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
trans-1,3-Dichloropropene ND 220 ug!Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
trans-1 ,4-dichloro-2-butene ND 440 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
Trichloroethene ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
Trichlorofluoromethane ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
Trichlorotrifluoroethane ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
Vinyl chloride ND 220 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
QA/OC Surrogates
% 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d4 99 % 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
% Bromofluorobenzene 91 % 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
% Dibromofluoromethane 93 % 07/28/07
R!J
SW8260
% Toluene-dS 96 % 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Comments:
If there are any questions regarding this data, please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit
Page 19 of34
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Analysis Report
August 08, 2007
Samgle Information
Matrix: SOIL
Location Code: VHB-MA
Rush Request:
P.O.#: 10231
TeL (860) 6451102 Fax (860) 6450823
FOR: Attn: Mr. Mike Bastoni
Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.
101 Walnut Street
P.O. Box 9151
Watertown, MA 02471-9151
Custodx Information Date
Collected by: 07/25/07
Received by: LB 07/27/07
Analyzed by: see "By" below
Time
14:30
16:30
Laboratory Data
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
Phoenix J.D.: AJ36113
Client ID:
CREME VHB-102 (10-12)
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
Silver < 0.34 0.34 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Arsenic 4.34 0.68 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Barium 31.7 0.34 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Beryllium 0.449 0.27 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Cadmium < 0.34 0.34 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT SW6010
Chromium 8.52 0.34 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT SW6010
Mercury - Soil < 0.10 0.10 mg/kg 07/31107
RS
SW-7471
Nickel 7.7 0.34 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Lead !.56 0.34 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Antimony < 3.39 3.39 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT
SW6010
Selenium < 1.7 1.7 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Thallium < 3.39 3.39 mg/Kg 07/31107
EKT SW6010
Vanadium 14.4 0.34 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT 6010
Zinc 31.3 0.34 mg/Kg 07/31/07
EKT
SW6010
Percent Solid 91 % 07/27/07
PU/IDB
E160.3
Field Extraction Completed 07/25/07
BP SW5035
Mercury Digestion Completed 07/31107
D
SW7471
EPH Extraction Completed 07/27/07
SUP/K
3545
Ext. Petroleum Hydrocarbons Completed 08/03/07
JH MADEP EPH-04
Total Metals Digest Completed 07/27/07
AGP SW846- 3050
Volatiles
1,1, 1,2-Tetrachloroethane ND 250 ug!Kg 07/28/07
RIJ
SW8260
1,1, 1-Trichloroethane ND 250 ug!Kg 07/28/07
RIJ
SW8260
1,1 ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
RIJ
SW8260
1, 1,2-Trichloroethane ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Page 20 of34
Client ID: CREME VHB-102 (10-12)
Parameter Result
1,1-Dichloroethane
1, 1-Dichloroethene
1, 1-Dichloropropene
1 ,2,3-Trichlorobenzene
1 ,2,3-Trichloropropane
1 ,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
1,2, 4-Trimethylbenzene
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
1,2-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dichloropropane
1 ,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
1 ,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,3-Dichloropropane
1, 4-Dichlorobenzene
2.2-Dichloropropane
2-Chlorotoluene
2-Hexanone
2-Isopropyltoluene
4-Chlorotoluene
4-Methyl-2-pentanone
Acetone
Acrylonitrile
Benzene
Bromobenzene
Bromochloromethane
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
Carbon Disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene
cis-1 ,3-Dichloropropene
Dibromochloromethane
Dibromoethane
Dibromomethane
Dichlorodifluoromethane
Ethylbenzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
lsopropylbenzene
m&p-Xylene
Methyl Ethyl Ketone
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
ND
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
RL
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
1200
250
250
1200
4900
490
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
2900
Units
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug/Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
ug!Kg
Page 21 of 34
Phoenix 1.0.: AJ36113
Date Time By Reference
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28107
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28107
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
07/28/07
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
R/J SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
R/J SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
R/J SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
R/J SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
RIJ SW8260
Client ID: CREME VHB-102 (10-12) Phoenix J.D.: AJ36113
Parameter Result RL Units Date Time By Reference
Methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Methylene chloride ND 490 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
n-Butylbenzene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
n-Propylbenzene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Naphthalene ND 250 ug!Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
a-Xylene ND 250 ug!Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
p-Isopropyltoluene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
sec-Butylbenzene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Styrene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
tert-Butylbenzene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Tetrachloroethene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Tetrahydrofuran (THF) ND 490 ug!Kg 07/28/07
RIJ
SW8260
Toluene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Total Xylenes ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
trans- I ,2-Dichloroethene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
trans-1 ,3-Dichloropropene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
trans- I, 4-dichloro-2-butene ND 490 ug!Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Trichloroethene ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Trichlorofluoromethane ND 250 ug!Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Trichlorotrifluoroethane ND 250 ug!Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Vinyl chloride ND 250 ug/Kg 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
QAJQC Surrogates
% 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d4 99 % 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
% Bromofluorobenzene 92 % 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
% Dibromofluoromethane 104 % 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
% Toluene-d8 95 % 07/28/07
R/J
SW8260
Comments:
If there are any questions regarding this data, please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
ND=Not detected BDL=Below Detection Limit RL=Reporting Limit

August 08, 2007
Page 22 of34
DEP REQUIRED EPH DATA REPORTING FORMAT/INFORMATION
SAMPLE INFORMATION
Matrix Aqueous XX Soil Sediment Other:
Containers XX Satisfuctory Broken Leaking
Aqueous Preservatives XXN/A pH<2 _pH>2 Comment:
Temperature Received on Ice Received at 4 degrees C XX Other: See Chain Of Custody
Extraction Method Water: 3510
EPH ANALYTICAL RESULTS
Method for Ranges: MADEP EPH-04 !Client ID
Method for Target Analytes: MADEP-EPH-04 I Lab ID
EPH Surrogate Standards
Aromatic: o-terphenyl
Aliphatic: 1-chlorooctadecane
EPH Fractionation Surrogates
Aromatic: 2-Fluorobiphenyl
Aromatic: 2-Bromonaphthalene
Range/Target Analyte
Total TPH (*I)
Diesel PAH Target Analytes
Naphthalene
2-Methyl Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Acenaphthene
Other PAH Target Analytes
Acenapthvlene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(a)pyrene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Benzo(k)fluoranthene
Chrvsene
Dibenzo( a,h )anthracene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
lndeno(l ,2,3-cd)pyrene
Pyrene
Benzo(ghi)pervlene
C9-C18 Aliphatic Hydrocarbons *1
Cl9-C36 Aliphatic Hydrocarbons *1
Cll-C22 Aromatic Hydrocarbons *1,2
Aliphatic Surrogate% Recovery
Aromatic Surrogate % Recovery
Sample Surrogate Acceptance Range
Fractionation Surrogate %Recovery
Fractionation Surrogate %Recovery
ractionation Surr. Acceptance Range
Date Collected
Date Received
Date Extracted:
Date Analyzed
Dilution Factor
%Moisture (soil)
RL Units
3.30 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33
0.33
3.30 ml')kg
3.30
3.30 mglkg
Soil: 3545
SS-1 SS-2
AJ36104 AJ36105
07/25/07 07125/07
07/27/07 07/27/07
07/27/07 07/27/07
08/01/07 08/01/07
9.0 6.0
51 16
<0.36 <0.34
<0.36 <0.34
2.9 1.3
<0.36 <0.34
1.3 0.45
1.2 0.87
2.6 1.4
2.9 1.4
3.9 2.4
0.7 0.41
3.8 1.9
2.2 1.1
6.4 3.2
0.4 <0.34
0.95 <0.34
5.9 2.7
2 1.1
<3.59 <3.43
<3.59 <3.43
51 16
53 61
76 80
40-140 40-140
94 92
79 63
40-140 40-140
*I Hydrocarbon range data exclude concentrations of any surrogate(s) and/or internal standards eluting in that range.
*2 C ll-C22 Aromatic Hydrocarbons exclude the concentration ofTarget PAH Analytes eluting in that range.
SS-3
AJ36106
07/25/07
07/27/07
07/27/07
08/01/07
3.0
89
0.39
<0.33
4
<0.33
3.2
3.1
5.6
5.5
8.5
2.4
7
3.4
12
0.7
1.6
II
4.9
<3.29
<3.29
89
44
80
40-140
92
63
40-140
Were all QA/QC procedures REQUIRED by the EPH method followed? XX Yes No
Were all performance/acceptance standards for the required QAIQC procedures achieved? XX Yes
Were any significant modifications made to the EPH method, as specified in Section 11.3?
*If above question was checked yes, samples were run via GC/MS, otherwise run by
LGP-1 (0-1)
AJ36108
07/25/07
07/27/07
07/27/07
08/01/07
5.0
40
<0.35
<0.35
3.7
<0.35
0.93
1.6
3.1
3.1
5
1.1
4.4
1.9
7.5
0.45
0.41
5.6
1.6
<3.47
<3.47
40
58
81
40-140
79
76
40-140
No
XX No
I attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that, based upon my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for obtaining the information,
the material contained in this report is, to theb {el'st,__ of mv knowledrze and belief, accurate and complete.
-ffif..,...r ....
Signature:
Printed Name: Johanna Harrington
Position: Chemist
Date: 8/8/2007
LGP-2 (0-1)
AJ36109
07/25/07
07/27/07
07/27/07
08/01/07
22.0
27
<0.42
<0.42
2
<0.42
0.68
1.2
1.2
1.7
2.5
0.89
2.6
1.3
4
0.5
0.62
3.8
<4.23
<4.23
27
58
94
40-140
88
68
40-140
DEP REQUIRED EPH DATA REPORTING FORMAT/INFORMATION
SAMPLE INFORMATION
Matrix Aqueous XX Soil Sediment Other:
Containers XX Satisfactory Broken Leaking
Aqueous Preservatives XXNIA ___pH<2 ___pH>2 Comment:
Temperature Received on Ice Received at 4 degrees C XX Other: See Chain Of Custody
Extraction Method Water: 3510
EPH ANALYTICAL RESULTS
Method for Ranges: MADEP EPH-04 !Client lD
Method for Target Analytes: MADEP-EPH-04 LablD
EPH Surrogate Standards
Aromatic: o-terphenyl
Aliphatic: 1-chlorooctadecane
EPH Fractionation Surrogates
Aromatic: 2-Fluorobiphenyl
Aromatic: 2-Bromonaphthalene
Range/Target Analyte
Total TPH (*I)
Diesel PAH Target Analytes
Naphthalene
2-Methyl Naphthalene
Phenanthrene
Acenaphthene
Other PAH Analytes
Acenapthvlene
Anthracene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(a)pyrene
Benzo(b)tluoranthene
Benzo(k)fluoranthene
Chrysene
Dibenzo( a,h )anthracene
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
lndeno( I ,2.3-cd)pyrene
Pyrene
Benzo(ghi)perylene
C9-C18 Aliphatic Hydrocarbons *1
C19-C36 Aliphatic Hydrocarbons * l
Cll-C22 Aromatic Hydrocarbons * 1,2
Aliphatic Surrogate %Recovery
Aromatic Surrogate % Recovery
Sample Surrogate Acceptance Range
Fractionation Surrogate% Recovery
Fractionation Surrogate% Recovery
ractionation Surr. Acceptance Range
Date Collected
Date Received
Date Extracted:
Date Analyzed
Dilution Factor
%Moisture (soil)
RL Units
3.30 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mglkg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg,kg
0.33 mglkg
0.33 mglkg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
0.33 mg/kg
3.30 mg/kg
3.30 mg/kg
3.30 mg/kg
Soil: 3545
VHB-101 (0-2) VHB-102 (0-2)
AJ36110 AJ36111
07/25/07 07/25/07
07/27/07 07/27/07
07/27/07 07/27/07
08/01/07 08/01/07
7.0 6.0
27 !50
<0.35 0.64
<0.35 <0.34
2.8 1.2
<0.35 <0.34
0.8 0.61
1.4 0.89
2.4 1.4
2.5 1.5
3 2.1
1.7 1.2
3.5 1.7
1.7 1.1
5.1 2.2
0.49 <0.34
1.3 0.82
4.5 1.9
2.2 1.5
<3.52 9.5
<3.52 120
27 . 18
54 71
77 86
40-140 40-140
92 94
50 69
40-140 40-140
*1 Hydrocarbon range data exclude concentrations of any surrogate(s) and/or internal standards eluting in that range.
*2 C 11-C22 Aromatic Hydrocarbons exclude the concentration of Target PAH Analytes eluting in that range.
l.:EKTIJ<
Were all QA/QC procedures REQUIRED by the EPH method followed? XX Yes _No
VHB-101 (15-17) VHB-102 (10-12
AJ36112 AJ36113
07/25/07 07/25/07
07/27/07 07/27/07
07/27/07 07/27/07
08/01/07 08/01/07
I I
7.0 9.0
4.1 5.5
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<0.34 <0.35
<3.42 <3.54
<3.42 <3.54
4.1 5.5
58 66
88 82
40-140 40-140
78 89
65 66
40-140 40-140
Were all performance/acceptance standards for the required QA!QC procedures achieved? XX Yes _No
Were any significant modifications made to the EPH method, as specified in Section 11.3? _*Yes XX No
*If above question was checked yes, samples were run via GCIMS, otherwise run by GC-FID.
I attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that, based upon my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for obtaining the information,
the material contained in this report is, to the best of mv knowled'i!.e and belief accurate and complete.
,,,..._
Signature:
Printed Name: Johanna Harrington
Position: Chemist
Date: """s"';s="t2"'o"'o7=---
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
NY#11301
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
QA/QC Report
August 08, 2007
OA/OC Data
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
Dup LCS LCSD LCS MS MSDup
Parameter
Blank RPD % % RPD Rec% Rec% RPD
QAIQC Batch 80966, Sample No: AJ35832 (AJ36114, AJ36115. AJ36!16)
Mercury BDL NC 101 92.4 8.9 95.7 96.1 0.4
QA!QC Batch 80906. Sample No: AJ35880 (AJ36114, AJ36115, AJ36116)
ICP Metals- Dissolved
Aluminum BDL NC 86.6 92.2 6.3 94.8 98.7 4.0
Antimony 0.005 NC 86.4 90.8 5.0 90.6 93.8 3.5
Arsenic BDL NC 84.4 89.3 5.6 87.8 91.2 3.8
Barium BDL BDL 88.5 94.6 6.7 94.0 97.5 3.7
Beryllium BDL NC 88.3 93.0 5.2 89.7 93.1 3.7
Boron BDL 1.00 87.7 92.3 5.1 90.3 93.5 3.5
Cadmium BDL NC 87.1 93.6 7.2 91.9 95.1 3.4
Calcium BDL BDL 88.9 95.7 7.4 NC NC NC
Chromium BDL NC 86.7 92.7 6.7 88.6 91.2 2.9
Cobalt BDL NC 86.6 92.5 6.6 90.2 94.8 5.0
Copper 0.001 3.00 87.2 95.1 8.7 94.9 97.9 3.1
Iron BDL 3.20 87.3 93.1 6.4 90.0 92.4 2.6
Lead BDL NC 88.3 93.1 5.3 91.6 95.1 3.7
Magnesium BDL 2.20 90.2 95.4 5.6 NC NC NC
Manganese BDL NC 87.8 94.6 7.5 91.2 93.6 2.6
Molybdenum BDL 3.70 88.1 93.5 5.9 89.6 92.9 3.6
Nickel 0.004 NC 86.7 93.0 7.0 90.5 94.1 3.9
Phosphorus BDL BDL 85.8 89.8 4.6 83.3 84.7 1.7
Potassium BDL BDL 96.4 96.5 0.1 92.4 97.2 5.1
Selenium BDL NC 76.6 79.9 4.2 81.6 86.2 5.5
Silver BDL NC 87.7 93.6 6.5 100 98.0 2.0
Sodium BDL 1.20 94.1 96.2 2.2 NC NC NC
Thallium BDL NC 86.5 92.0 6.2 94.9 99.0 4.2
Tin BDL NC 86.4 92.5 6.8 90.8 94.1 3.6
Vanadium BDL NC 85.9 93.5 8.5 89.0 92.5 3.9
Zinc 0.002 BDL 85.2 91.7 7.3 89.8 93.0 3.5
QA!QC Batch 80930, Sample No: AJ36089 (AJ36!04, AJ36105, AJ36106, AJ36107, AJ36108, AJ36!09. AJ36110, AJ36!11,
AJ36112, AJ36113)
ICP Metals- Soil
Aluminum BDL NC NC NC NC NC
Page I of8
OA/OC Data
SDG I. D.: GAJ36104
Dup LCS LCSD LCS MS MSDup
Parameter
Blank RPD % % RPD Rec% Rec% RPD
Antimony BDL NC 80.4 88.7 9.8 64.1 66.6 3.8
Arsenic BDL 18.8 78.6 86.8 9.9 65.3 66.8 2.3
Barium BDL 23.7 85.7 95.8 11.1 75.0 76.9 2.5
Beryllium BDL NC 85.3 96.5 12.3 69.7 71.9 3.1
Boron BDL NC 83.3 91.0 8.8 69.5 71.1 2.3
Cadmium BDL NC 88.0 94.7 7.3 74.0 75.3 1.7
Calcium BDL 14.8 NC NC NC NC
Chromium BDL 8.90 82.3 94.4 13.7 69.1 70.9 2.6
Cobalt BDL 4.30 83.9 95.8 13.2 71.8 74.2 3.3
Copper BDL NC 88.4 99.6 11.9 85.3 88.1 3.2
Iron BDL 14.3 NC NC NC NC
Lead BDL NC 85.4 92.5 8.0 80.6 81.6 1.2
Magnesium BDL NC 116 107 8.1 NC NC NC
Manganese BDL 4.60 86.9 98.5 12.5 83.0 98.1 16.7
Molybdenum BDL NC 82.6 92.6 11.4 69.6 71.1 2.1
Nickel BDL 5.20 86.1 97.5 12.4 70.6 72.0 2.0
Phosphorus 0.7 3.40 81.8 90.1 9.7 62.0 72.9 16.2
Potassium BDL NC 76.2 85.2 11.2 103 NC NC
Selenium BDL NC 68.9 75.3 8.9 57.0 58.4 2.4
Silver BDL NC 91.4 95.1 4.0 87.0 76.9 12.3
Sodium BDL 28.4 86.9 97.2 11.2 NC NC NC
Thallium BDL NC 90.8 96.5 6.1 77.4 79.1 2.2
Tin 2.54 NC 86.4 96.9 11.5 72.9 76.8 5.2
Vanadium BDL 15.5 83.5 94.1 11.9 70.9 72.8 2.6
Zinc BDL 18.5 88.2 96.0 8.5 34.4 >130 NC
QNQC Batch 81079, Sample No: AJ36104 (AJ36104, AJ36105, AJ36106, AJ36107, AJ36108, AJ36109, AJ36110, AJ36111,
AJ36112, AJ36113)
Mercury - Soil BDL NC 91.6 86.7 5.5 111 106 4.6
If there are any questions regarding this data, please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
RPD - Relative Percent Difference
?#; ...
LCS - Laboratory Control Sample
LCSD - Laboratory Control Sample Duplicate
MS - Matrix Spike
MS Dup - Matrix Spike Duplicate
NC - No Criteria
August 08, 2007
Page 2 of8
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
NY#11301
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
QA/QC Report
August 08, 2007
OA/OC Data
SDG I.D.: GAJ36104
LCS LCSD LCS MS MSDup
Parameter
Blank % % RPD Rec% Rec% RPD
QA!QC Batch 79895, Sample No: AJ31870 (AJ36104, AJ36105. AJ36106. AJ36108, AJ36109, AJ36110, AJ36111. AJ36112,
AJ36113)
MAEPH
Acenaphthene ND 87 94 7.7 84 85 1.2
Anthracene ND 74 74 0.0 89 90 1.1
Chrysene ND 113 123 8.5 76 84 10.0
n-Eicosane (CZO) ND 81 95 15.9 83 76 8.8
n-Nonadecane (C19) ND 81 95 15.9 83 76 8.8
n-Octacosane (C28) ND 81 95 15.9 83 76 8.8
n-Tetradecane (C14) ND 71 69 2.9 52 54 3.8
Naphthalene ND 48 48 0.0 53 55 3.7
Pyrehe ND 81 91 11.6 103 91 12.4
%2-Bromonaphthalene (surr) 97 79 75 5.2 85 85 0.0
%2-Flurobiphenyl (surr) 111 110 111 0.9 110 107 2.8
%a-COD (surr) 58 45 51 12.5 66 62 6.3
%o-Terphenyl (surr) 86 44 48 8.7 81 86 6.0
QAIQC Batch 81000, Sample No: AJ35858 (AJ36112. AJ36113)
Volatiles
1, 1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane ND 116 118 1.7 85 88 3.5
1, 1,1-Trichloroethane ND 116 120 3.4 96 96 0.0
1.1.2.2-Tetrachloroethane ND 108 109 0.9 79 80 1.3
1, 1,2-Trichloroethane ND 112 116 3.5 89 90 1.1
1, 1-Dichloroethane ND 112 115 2.6 90 89 1.1
1.1-Dichloroethene ND 107 95 11.9 95 94 1.1
1, 1-Dichloropropene ND 103 110 6.6 99 101 2.0
1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene ND 106 113 6.4 67 75 11.3
1 ,2,3-Trichloropropane ND 113 128 12.4 76 87 13.5
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene ND 96 99 3.1 64 69 7.5
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene ND 102 105 2.9 84 87 3.5
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane ND 126 129 2.4 77 83 7.5
1,2-Dichlorobenzene ND 103 103 0.0 73 76 4.0
1,2-Dichloroethane ND 113 117 3.5 84 85 1.2
1,2-Dichloropropane ND 109 115 5.4 89 90 1.1
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene ND 102 106 3.8 84 88 4.7
Page 3 of8
Parameter
1 ,3-Dichlorobenzene
1 ,3-Dichloropropane
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
2,2-Dichloropropane
2-Chlorotoluene
4-Chlorotoluene
Benzene
Bromobenzene
Bromochloromethane
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
Dibromochloromethane
Dibromoethane
Dibromomethane
Dichlorodifluoromethane
Ethylbenzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Isopropylbenzene
m&p-Xylene
Methyl Ethyl Ketone
Methyl t-Butyl Ether (MTBE)
Methylene chloride
n-Butylbenzene
n-Propylbenzene
Naphthalene
o-Xylene
p-Isopropyltoluene
sec-Butylbenzene
Styrene
tert-Butylbenzene
Tetrachloroethene
Toluene
Total Xylenes
trans-1 ,2-Dichloroethene
QA/QC Data
Blank
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
LCS LCSD LCS
% % RPD
102 !04 1.9
113 116 2.6
103 !05 1.9
109 92 16.9
102 !06 3.8
104 107 2.8
Ill 116 4.4
105 !07 1.9
117 118 0.9
116 120 3.4
125 !26 0.8
87 75 14.8
115 !20 4.3
107 112 4.6
104 132 23.7
115 118 2.6
115 113 1.8
114 !20 5.1
109 !08 0.9
120 !23 2.5
118 !23 4.1
115 121 5.1
149 !51 1.3
110 113 2.7
108 112 3.6
112 118 5.2
110 114 3.6
108 115 6.3
110 118 7.0
105 !09 3.7
102 !06 3.8
110 99 10.5
109 !13 3.6
105 112 6.5
98 102 4.0
113 116 2.6
106 111 4.6
104 110 5.6
108 115 6.3
102 110 7.5
Page 4 of8
SDG 1.0.: GAJ36104
MS MSDup
Rec% Rec%
73 78
86 88
75 79
90 71
83 87
80 82
91 95
79 82
93 91
84 88
74 77
75 50
93 99
85 87
82 98
89 89
84 81
95 94
84 82
82 85
93 94
88 92
119 114
92 95
84 90
89 91
92 95
87 87
81 82
85 85
86 85
70 63
89 93
86 92
86 89
87 88
90 95
94 97
92 96
84 88
RPD
6.6
2.3
5.2
23.6
4.7
2.5
4.3
3.7
2.2
4.7
4.0
40.0
6.3
2.3
17.8
0.0
3.6
1.1
2.4
3.6
1.1
4.4
4.3
3.2
6.9
2.2
3.2
0.0
1.2
0.0
1.2
10.5
4.4
6.7
3.4
1.1
5.4
3.1
4.3
4.7
Parameter
trans-1 ,3-Dichloropropene
Trichloroethene
Trichlorofluoromethane
Vinyl chloride
% 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d4
% Bromofluorobenzene
% Dibromofluoromethane
QA/QC Data
Blank
ND
ND
ND
ND
99
93
106
LCS LCSD LCS
% % RPD
113 !00 12.2
106 il3 6.4
120 126 4.9
124 !20 3.3
104 102 1.9
104 !02 1.9
106
%Toluene-dB 100 100
104
!00
1.9
0.0
QAJQC Batch 81073, Sample No: AJ35916 (AJ36114, AJ36115, AJ36116)
Volatiles Organics
1, 1, 1,2-Tetrachloroethane
I, I, 1-Trichloroethane
1,1 ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
1,1 ,2-Trichloroethane
1, 1-Dichloroethane
1, 1-Dichloroethene
1,1-Dichloropropene
1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene
1,2,3-Trichloropropane
1,2.4-Trichlorobenzene
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
1 ,2-Dichloroethane
I ,2-Dichloropropane
1 ,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,3-Dichloropropane
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
2,2-Dichloropropane
2-Chlorotoluene
4-Chlorotoluene
Benzene
Bromobenzene
Bromochloromethane
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Chloroethane
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
109
114
102
109
>130
122
113
95
<70
102
il2
96
106
il2
113
113
ilO
ilO
105
93
ilO
il2
il6
107
105
ill
104
85
il3
112
104
Page 5 of8
101
!07
88
85
!02
107
il2
89
<70
93
il6
80
97
89
98
123
106
94
102
90
il7
il6
ill
103
83
92
82
!06
119
108
131
7.6
6.3
14.7
24.7
NC
13.1
0.9
6.5
NC
9.2
3.5
18.2
8.9
22.9
14.2
8.5
3.7
15.7
2.9
3.3
6.2
3.5
4.4
3.8
23.4
18.7
23.7
22.0
5.2
3.6
23.0
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
MS MSDup
Rec% Rec%
82 67
97 101
99 94
98 88
101 101
100 101
103
98
109
113
106
114
>130
126
114
93
<70
99
110
98
105
112
115
109
107
108
104
73
110
106
114
106
107
il2
101
77
129
110
101
100
99
104
110
95
95
107
114
117
89
<70
93
116
76
99
96
101
120
105
98
105
74
il4
113
112
103
85
97
87
85
119
110
il7
RPD
20.1
4.0
5.2
10.8
0.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
4.7
2.7
10.9
18.2
NC
10.0
2.6
4.4
NC
6.3
5.3
25.3
5.9
15.4
13.0
9.6
1.9
9.7
1.0
1.4
3.6
6.4
1.8
2.9
22.9
14.4
14.9
9.9
8.1
0.0
14.7
Parameter
Chloroform
Chloromethane
cis-1.2-Dichloroethene
cis-1 ,3-Dichloropropene
Dibromochloromethane
Dibromoethane
Dibromomethane
Dichlorodifluoromethane
Ethylbenzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Isopropylbenzene
m&p-Xylene
Methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE)
Methylene chloride
n-Butylbenzene
n-Propylbenzene
Naphthalene
a-Xylene
p-lsopropyltoluene
sec-Butylbenzene
Styrene
tert-Butylbenzene
Tetrachloroethene
Toluene
trans-1 ,2-Dichloroethene
trans-1 ,3-Dichloropropene
Trichloroethene
Trichlorofluoromethane
Vinyl chloride
% 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d4
% Bromofluorobenzene
% Dibromofluoromethane
%Toluene-dB
QA/QC Data
Blank
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
102
93
97
101
LCS
%
Ill
>130
112
105
108
107
107
>130
116
107
123
117
115
124
115
114
100
114
119
109
110
116
113
114
119
103
112
117
>130
98
103
93
100
Comment: LFB was analyzed with this batch instead of MS/MSD.
QAJQC Batch 80919, Sample No: AJ35959 (AJ36114, AJ36115, AJ36116)
Polynuclear Aromatic HC
2-Methylnaphthalene
Acenaphthene
Acenaphthylene
Anthracene
Benz(a)anthracene
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
96
102
101
101
110
Page 6 of8
LCSD LCS
% RPD
99 11.4
118 NC
95 16.4
85 21.1
92 16.0
84 24.1
86 21.8
>130 NC
122 5.0
!07 0.0
>130 NC
120 2.5
94 20.1
94 27.5
!23 6.7
!26 10.0
85 16.2
112 1.8
!30 8.8
119 8.8
!04 5.6
127 9.1
120 6.0
ill 2.7
!03 14.4
81 23.9
110 1.8
115 1.7
125 NC
95 3.1
99 4.0
82 12.6
100 0.0
94
95
99
97
!09
2.1
7.1
2.0
4.0
0.9
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
MS MSDup
Rec% Rec%
109 101
96 98
110 102
99 85
104 90
110 90
110 92
92 89
114 122
106 102
111 124
115 120
117 103
124 103
110 118
110 122
96 87
111 114
112 123
113 124
110 108
113 124
112 121
115 113
119 107
97 81
115 113
117 118
108 105
100 95
104 99
94 87
101 99
RPD
7.6
2.1
7.5
15.2
14.4
20.0
17.8
3.3
6.8
3.8
11.1
4.3
12.7
18.5
7.0
10.3
9.8
2.7
9.4
9.3
1.8
9.3
7.7
1.8
10.6
18.0
1.8
0.9
2.8
5.1
4.9
7.7
2.0
QA/QC Data
SDG I. D.: GAJ36104
LCS LCSD LCS MS MSDup
Parameter
Blank % % RPD Rec% Rec% RPD
Benw(a)pyrene NO 100 99 1.0
Benzo(b)fluoranthene NO Ill 108 2.7
Benzo(ghi)perylene NO 112 108 3.6
Benzo(k)fluoranthene NO 109 107 1.9
Chrysene NO Ill 109 1.8
Dibenz(a,h)anthracene NO 120 116 3.4
Fluoranthene NO 117 111 5.3
Fluorene NO 105 102 2.9
lndeno(1.2.3-cd)pyrene NO 115 111 3.5
Naphthalene NO 92 92 0.0
Phenanthrene NO 105 !00 4.9
Pyrene NO 114 !09 4.5
% 2-Fluorobiphenyl 93 96 94 2.1
% Nitrobenzene-d5 97 90 114 23.5
% Terphenyl-d14 119 110 106 3.7
Comment: A LCS and LCS Duplicate were performed instead of a matrix spike and matrix spike duplicate.
QAJQC Batch 80927, Sample No: AJ36111 (AJ36104, AJ36105, AJ36109, AJ36111)
Polxchlorinated Bighenxls
PCB-1016 NO 96 95 1.0 115 90 24.4
PCB-1221 NO
PCB-1232 NO
PCB-1242 NO
PCB-1248 ND
PCB-1254 ND
PCB-1260 ND 87 84 3.5 NC
PCB-1262 ND
PCB-1268 ND
% DCBP (Surrogate Rec) 41 71 74 4.1 50 73 37.4
% TCMX (Surrogate Rec) 50 63 60 4.9 63 58 8.3
Comment: *Due to the presence of PCBs in the sample, aroclor 1260 is not reported for the MS/MSD.
QAJQC Batch 81407, Sample No: AJ37148 (aj36114, aj36115, aj36116)
MA-VPH
1,2,4-trimethylbenzene ND 100 98 2.0 100 102 2.0
2-methylpentane ND 100 102 2.0 74 92 21.7
Benzene ND 100 94 6.2 102 98 4.0
Ethylbenzene NO 106 92 14.1 108 102 5.7
I so-octane NO 100 !04 3.9 112 117 4.4
m&p-xylene ND 103 102 1.0 107 104 2.8
n-butylcyclohexane 130 120 8.0
n-nonane (C9) ND 84 80 4.9 126 122 3.2
n-pentane (C5) ND 112 114 1.8
Page 7 of8
OA/QC Data
SDG !.D.: GAJ36104
LCS LCSD LCS MS MSDup
Parameter
Blank % % RPD Rec% Rec%
naphthalene NO 114 108 5.4 88 92
a-xylene NO 102 98 4.0 102 100
tert-butylmethyl ether (MTBE) NO 96 94 2.1 84 80
Toluene NO 102 96 6.1 106 102
% 2,5-dibromotoluefle 93 94 90 4.3 121 123
If there are any questions regarding this data, please call Phoenix Client Services at extension 200.
RPD - Relative Percent Difference
LCS - Laboratory Control Sample
LCSD - Laboratory Control Sample Duplicate
MS - Matrix Spike
MS Dup - Matrix Spike Duplicate
NC - No Criteria

August 08, 2007
Page 8 of8
RPD
4.4
2.0
4.9
3.8
1.6
Title: MADEP MCPResponse Action Analytical Report Certification Form
Laboratory Name: Phoenix Environmental laboratories, Inc. Project#:
Project Location: CREME MADEP RTN1:
This Form provides certifications for !he following data set: [list laboratory Sample ID Number(s))
AJ36104,AJ36105,AJ36106,AJ36107,AJ36108,AJ36109,AJ36110,AJ36111,AJ36112,AJ36113,AJ36114,AJ36115,
AJ36116
Sample Matrices: 0 Groundwater [0' Soil/Sediment 0 Drinking Water DOther:
MCPSW-846 0s260B D 8151A D 8330 [!3"60108 [i2(7470Al1A
Methods Used
i:its27oc D 8061A DVPH D 6020 D 9014M2
1
As specified in MADEP
Compendium of
10 8082 D 80218 !i1 EPH D 7000S3 D 7196A
Analytical Methods. 1 List Release Tracking Number (RTN}, if known
(check all that apply) 2M- SW-846 Method 9014 or MADEP Physiologically Available Cyanide (PAC) Metho
3 S - SW-846 Methods 7000 Series List indiVidual method and analyte
An affirmative response to questions A, B, C and D is required for "Presumptive Certainty" status
A Were all samples received by the laboratory in a condition consistent

that described on the Chain-of-Custody documentation for the data set?
D No
B Were all QNQC procedures required for the specified analytical method(s)
r;:;r'Yes D No
included in this report followed, including the requirement to note and
.
discuss in a narrative QC data that did not meet appropriate performance
standards or guidelines?
c Does the analytical data included in this report meet all the requirements for
"Presumptive Certainty", as described in Section 2.0 (a), (b), (c) and (d) of
litves DNa
the MADEP document CAM VII A, "Quality Assurance and Quality Control
Guidelines for the and Reporting of Analytical Data"?
D VPH and EPH Methods only: Was the VPH or EPH Method conducted
without significant modifications (see Section 11.3 of respective Methods)
DYes ila'No
A response to questions E and F below is required for "Presumptive Certainty" status
E Were all QC performance standards and recommendations for the specffied
methods achieved?
DYes lB'No
F Were results for all analyte-list compounds/elements for the specified
l!'f Yes DNa
method(s) reported?
All negative responses must be addressed in an attached Environmentaf Laboratory case naffative.
I, the undersigned, attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that, based upon my personal
inquiry of those responsible for obtaining the information, the material contained in this analytical
report is, to the best of my knowledge and belief, accurate and complete.
1 Authorized
lf!..11+LfJ .v IJM.PfJ
Date: Wednesday, August as: 2007
Signature:
Printed Name: Kathleen Cressia Position: QNQC Officer
Printed Name: Phyllis Shiller Position: laboratory Director
CAM VII A, rev. 3.2 April2004
Page 1 of 1
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 6450823
MCP Certification Report
August 08, 2007
EPH Narration
Were all QA/QC performance criteria specified in the MADEP document CAM achieved? Yes.
Instrument: Au-fid2 08/03/07-1 IAJ36114. AJ36115. AJ36116l
A six level calibration was performed. All RSDs were within limits.
The continuing calibration standards were within control limits.
SDG I.D.: GAJ36104
SampleS 36114-36122 were not extracted using the EPH method. Only one liter of sample was provided for the analysis of semi-
volatiles and EPH. The semi-volatile SIM extract was exchanged, concentrated, and fractionated to yield extracts suitable for EPH
analysis. For samples 36114-36116, only the fractionation surrogate was added to this sample, therefore, o-terphenyl and o-COD
are not reported.
Printed Name
Position:
Date:
Johanna Harrington
Chemist
8/3/2007
All LCS recoveries were within 40- 140 with the following exceptions: None.
All LCSD recoveries were within 40 -140 with the following exceptions: None.
All MS recoveries were within 40. 140 with the following exceptions: None.
All MSD recoveries were within 40- 140 with the following exceptions: None.
A matrix effect is suspected when a MS/MSD recovery is outside of criteria. No further action is required if 80% ofLCS!LCSD
compounds are within criteria.
I attest under the pains and penalties of peljury that, based upon my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for
obtaining the information,. the material contained in this report is, to the best of my knowledge and belief, accurate and complete.
Mercury Narration
Were all QNQC performance criteria specified in the MADEP document CAM achieved? Yes.
Instrument: Merlin 07131107-1 IAJ36104, AJ36105 AJ36106, AJ36107, AJ36!08 AJ36109,
AJ36110 AJ36111 AJ36112 AJ36113, AJ36198, AJ36199)
The method preparation blank contains all of the acids and reagents as the samples; the instrument blanks do not.
The initial calibration met all criteria including a standard run at or below the reporting level.
All calibration verification standards (ICV, CCV) met criteria.
All calibration blank verification standards (ICB, CCB) met criteria.
The matrix spike sample is used to identify spectral interfernce for each batch of samples, if within 85-115%. no interference is
observed and no further action is taken.
Printed Name RJck Schweitzer
Position: Chemist
Date: 7/3112007
Page lof8
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370
1
Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
MCP Certification Report
August 08, 2007
All LCS recoveries were within 80- 120 with the following exceptions: None.
All LCSD recoveries were within 80 R 120 with the fol_lowing exceptions: None.
All MS recoveries were within 80 - 120 with the following ex-ceptions: None.
All MSD recoveries were within 80 - 120 with the following exceptions: None.
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
A matrix effect is suspected when a MSJMSD recovery is outside of criteria. No further action is required if 80% of LCS!LCSD
compounds are within criteria.
I attest under the pains and penalties ofpetjury that. based upon my inquiry of those individua1s immediately responsible for
obtaining the information, the material contained in this report is, to the best of my knowledge and belief, accurate and complete.
ICP Narration
Wr;rre all QAIQC performance criteria specified in the MADEP document CAM achieved? Yes.
Instrument: lcp7 08/06/07-1 (AJ3611ll
The initial calibration met criteria.
The continuing calibration standards met criteria for all the elements reported. The linear range is defmed daily by the calibration
range.
The continuing calibration blanks were less than the reporting level for the elements reported.
The ICSA and ICSAB were analyzed at the beginning and end of the run and were within criteria.
Printed Name Emily Kolominskaya
Position: Chemist
Date: 8/6/2007
Instrument: IeoS 07/27/07-1 CAJ36114. AJ36115. AJ361!6\
The initial calibration met criteria.
The continuing calibration standards met criteria for all the elements reported. The linear range is def"med daily by the calibration
range.
The continuing calibration blanks were less than the reporting level for the elements reported.
The ICSA and ICSAB were analyzed at the beginning and end of the run and were within criteria.
Printed Name Emily Kolominskaya
Position: Chemist
Date: 7/27/2007
Instrument: Iw8 07/31107-1 (AJ36104. AJ36!05. AJ36106. AJ36!07. AJ36!08. AJ36!09
AJ36110. AJ36lll. AJ361!2. AJ361!3. AJ36!98. AJ36!99)
The initial calibration met criteria.
The continuing calibration standards met criteria for all the elements reported. The linear range is def"med daily by the calibration
range.
The continuing calibration blanks were less than the reporting level for the elements reported.
The ICSA and ICSAB were analyzed at the beginning and end of the run and were within criteria.
Page2 of8
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike. P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
TeL (860) 6451102 Fax (860) 645-0828
MCP Certification Report
August 08, 2007
Printed Name
Position:
Date:
Instrument:
Emily Kolominskaya
Chemist
7/31/2007
!cpS 08/01/07-1 fAJ3611 ll
The initial calibration met criteria.
SDG I.D.: GAJ36104
The continuing calibration standards met criteria for all the elements reported. The linear range is defmed daily by the calibration
range.
The continuing calibration blanks were less than the reporting level for the elements reported.
The ICSA and ICSAB were analyzed at the beginning and end of the run and were within criteria
Printed Name Emily Kolominskaya
Position: Chemist
Date: 8/1/2007
Instrument: IeoS 08/03/07-1 (AJ3611 L AJ37997l
The initial ca1ibration met criteria.
The continuing calibration standards met criteria for all the elements reported. The linear range is def'med daily by the calibration
range.
The continuing calibration blanks were less than the reporting level for the elements reported.
The ICSA and ICSAB were analyzed at the begimring and end of the run and were within criteria.
Printed Name Emily Kolominskaya
Position: Chemist
Date: 8/3/2007
All LCS recoveries were within 75 125 with the following exceptions: Selenium
All LCSD recoveries were within 75 125 with the following exceptions: None.
All MS recoveries were within 75 125 with the following exceptions: Antimony, Arsenic, Beryllium, Boron, Cadmium, Chromium,
Cobalt, Molybdenum, Nickel, Phosphorus, Selenium, Tin, VanadiUm, Zinc
All MSD recoveries were within 75- 125 with the following exceptions: Antimony, Arsenic, Beryllium, Boron, Chromium, Cobalt,
Molybdenum, Nickel, Phosphorus, Selenium, Vanadium, Zinc
A matrix effect is suspected when a MS/MSD recovery is outside of criteria. No further action is required if 80% ofLCS!LCSD
compounds are within criteria.
I attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that, based upon my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for
obtaining the information, the material contained in this report is, to the best of my knowledge and belief, accurate and complete.
PAHSIM Narration
Were all QA/QC performance criteria .specified in the MADEP document CAM achieved? Yes.
Page3of8
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. {860} 645-1102 Fax {860} 6450623
MCP Certification Report
August 08, 2007
Instrument: Chem04 07131/07-1 CAJ36114 AJ36115 AJ36116l
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
The client requested P AH/base neutral compounds only. Phoenix utilized a method that contained a shortened list of base neutral
only compounds, CCCs, SPCCs and surrogates.
In order to achieve the the requested detection levels, the samples were analyzed by selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode.
The DDT breakdown and pentachlorophenol & benzidine peak tailing were not evaluated in the DFTPP tune.
Initial Calibration(Chem04/SIM_0731}:
All base neutra1 SPCCs, CCCs and >90% of target compounds met criteria The following base neutral compounds had %RSDs
>SO%: none
Continuing Calibration:
All SPCCs, CCCs and >90% of target compounds met criteria. The following compounds had %Ds >20%:
Printed Name
Position:
Date:
Keith Aloisa
Chemist
7/31/2007
QC Comments: QC Batch 80919 07/27/07 CAJ36114. AJ36115. AJ36116l
A LCS and LCS Duplicate were performed instead of a matrix spike and matrix spike duplicate.
All LCS recoveries were within 20 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All LCSD recoveries were within 20 - 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All MS recoveries were within 20 - 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All MSD recoveries were within 20 - 130 with the following exceptions: None.
A matrix effect is suspected when a MS/MSD recovery is outside of criteria. No further action is required if 80% ofLCSJLCSD
compounds are within criteria.
I attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that, based upon my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for
obtaining the information, the material contained in this report is, to the best of my knowledge and belief, accurate and complete.
PCB Narration
Were all QA/QC performance criteria specified in the MADEP document CAM achieved? Yes.
Instrument: Au-ecd8 OWJ/07-1 CAJ36105l
8082 Narration:
The initial calibration RSD for the compound list was less than 20%.
The continuing calibration standards were within acceptance criteria.
Printed Name Johanna Harrington
Position: Chemist
Date: 7/31/2007
Page4of8
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0828
MCP Certification Report
August 08, 2007
SDG I.D.: GAJ36104
Instrument: Au-ecd8 08/01107-1 IAJ36!11 AJ36784l
8082 NBITation:
The initial calibration RSD for the compound list was less than 20%.
The continuing calibration standards were within acceptance criteria.
Printed Name Johanna Harrington
Position: Chemist
Date: 8/1/2007
QC Comments: QC Batch 80927 07127107 (AJ36104. AJ36105. AJ36109. AJ36111l
*Due to the presence of PCBs in the sample, aroclor 1260 is not reported for the MS!MSD.
All LCS recoveries were within 30 - 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All LCSD recoveries were within 30- 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All MS recoveries were within 30- 130 with the foJlowing exceptions: None.
All MSD recoveries were within 30- 130 with the following exceptions: None.
A matrix effect is suspected when a MSJMSD recovery is outside of criteria. No further action is required if 80% ofLCS/LCSD
compounds are within criteria.
I atte13t under the pains and penalties of perjury that, based upon my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for
obtaining the information, the material contained in this report is, to the best ?f my knowledge and belief, accurate arid complete.
SVOASIM Narration
Were all QNQC performance criteria specified in the MADEP document CAM achieved? Yes.
QC Comments: OC Batch 80919 07/27107 (AJ36114 AJ361!5. AJ36116)
A LCS and LCS Duplicate were performed instead of a matrix spike and matrix spike duplicate.
Page5of8
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
MCP Certification Report
August 08, 2007
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
All LCS recoveries were within 20 - 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All LCSD recoveries were within 20 -130 with the following exceptions: None.
All MS recoveries were within 20- 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All MSD recoveries were within 20 - 180 with the following exceptions: None.
A matrix effect is suspected when a MS!MSD recovery is outside of criteria. No further action is required if 80% of LCS/LCSD
compounds are within criteria.
I attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that, based upon. my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for
obtaining the information, the material contained in this report is, to the best of my knowledge and belief, accurate and complete.
VOA Narration
Were all QNQC performance criteria specified in the MADEP document CAM achieved? Yes.
Instrument: Chem03 07127/07-1 IAJ36112. AJ36113. AJ36198. AJ36199l
Initial Calibration Verification (chem03/1110):
All SPCCs, CCCs and >80% of target compounds met criteria.
The fo11owing compounds had %RSDs >30%: None
Continuing Calibration Verification:
All SPCCs, CCCs and >80% of target compounds met criteria. Internal standards were within the 50%-200% deviation from the
initial calibration.
The following compounds had% Deviations >30%:
Printed Name
Positio.n:
Date:
Johanna Harrington
Chemist
7/27/2007
Instrument: ChemOS 07127/07-1 IAJ36114. AJ36115. AJ361!6)
This instrument is set up with a dual auto sampler Gabe1ed R and 8)
R .Side
Initial CalibratiDn (062007)
' All SPCCs, CCCs and >80% of target compounds met criteria.
Continuing Calibration Verification:
All SPCCs, CCCs and >80% of target compounds met criteria. Internal standards were within the 50%-200% deviation from the
initial calibration.
The following compounds had % Deviations >30%:
S-Side
Initial Calibration (062007)
All SPCCs, CCCs and >80% of target compounds met criteria.
Page6of8
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Tum.pike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
MCP Certification Report
August 08, 2007
SDG J.D.: GAJ36104
Continuing Calibration Verification:
All SPCCs, CCCs ap_d >80% of target compounds met criteria. Internal standards were within the 50%-200% deviation from the
initial calibration.
The following compounds had% Deviations >30%: Chloroethane, Acetone, Acrylonitrile, Tetrahydrofuran (THF) Bromomethane,
Naphthalene, 1,2,3-Tricblorobenzene
Printed Name Raman Makol
Position: Chemist
Date: 7/27/2007
All LCS recoveries were within 70-130 with the following exceptions: l,l-Dichloroethane,l,2,3-Trichloropropane, Chloromethane,
Dichlorodifluoromethane, Vmy1 chloride
All LCSD recoveries were within 70 - 130 with the following exceptions: 1,2,3-Trichloropropane, Chloroethane,
Dichlorodifluoromethane, Isopropylbenzene
All MS recoveries were within 70 w 130 with the following exceptions: 1,1-Dichloroethane, 1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene, 1,2,3-
Trichloropropane, 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
All MSD recoveries were within 70 - 130 with the following exceptions: 1,1-Dichloroethane, 1,2,3-Trichloropropane, 1,2,4-
Trichlorobenzene, Bromo methane, Naphthalene, trans-1,3-Dichloropropene
A matrix effect is suspected when a MS/MSD recovery is outside of criteria No further action is required if 80% of LCS/LCSD
compounds are within criteria.
I attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that, based upon my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for
obtaining the information, the material contained in this report is, to the best of my knowledge and belief, accurate and complete.
VPH Narration
Were all QNQC performance criteria specified in the MADEP document CAM achieved? Yes.
Instrument: Pid-fid 08/03/07-1 (AJ361l4, AJ36ll5, AJ36ll6l
A five level calibration was performed. All RSDs were within limits.
The continuing calibration standards were within control limits.
Printed Name Raman Makol
Position:
Date:
Chemist
8/3/2007
Page 7of8
Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O.Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Tel. (860) 645-1102 Fax (860) 645-0823
MCP Certification Report
August 08, 2007
SDG I.D.: GAJ36104
All LCS recoveries were within 70 - 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All LCSD recoveries were within 70 - 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All MS recoveries were within 70- 130 with the following exceptions: None.
All MSD recoveries were within 70 - 130 with the following exceptions: None.
A matrix effect is suspected when a MS/MSD recovery is outside of criteria. No further action is required if 80% of LCS/LCSD
compounds are within criteria.
I attest under the pains and penalties ofpetjury that, based upon my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for
obtaining the information, the material contained in this report is, to the best of my knowledge and belief, ac_curate and
Page8of8
,:'. li"' .,...
CHAIN OF CUSTODY RECORD ramp':) Pg 1 ot
...- 1.1V.Dl. \'.lA 587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O. Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040 Data Delivery:
Environmental Inc. Fax (860) 64S..Qa
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Matrix Code:
DW=drinklng water
GW=groundwater
Phoenix
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WW=wastewater S=soil/solid O=other
SL=sludge A=air
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Identification
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CHAIN OF CUSTODY RECORD
587 East Middle Turnpike, P.O. Box 370, Manchester, CT 06040
Te_mpS Pg 6< of
I Data Delivery:
0 Fax#--------


Environmental Laboratories, Inc.
Email: seiVice@phoenixlabs.com Fax (860) 645-0823
Client.Services (860) 645-8726

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Report Date:
12-Nov-0714:16
Tetra Tech Rizzo
One Grant Street - P.O. Box 9005
Framingham, MA 01701
Attn: Paula Rotenberg
Laboratoa ID Client Samule ID
SA70267-0l VHB-1 02-1 (0-10")
SA70267-02 VHB-1 02-2 (0-7")
SA70267-03 VHB-102-3 (0-10")
SA70267-04 VHB-1 02-4 (0-9")
SA70267-05 VHB-102-5 (0-12")
SA70267-06 VHB-102-6 (0-5")
SA70267-07 VHB-102-7 (0-7")
SA70267-08 VHB-1 02-8 (0-11 ")
SA70267-09 Dup-102607
SPECTRUM ANAL \'TICAL, INC
Featuring
HANIBAL TECHNOLOGY
Laboratory Report
Ill Final Report
D Re-Issued Report
D Revised Report
Project: CEA Beverly- Beverly, MA
Project 12700961
Matrix Date Samnled Date Received
Soil 26-0ct-07 11:55 29-0ct-07 14:10
Soil 26-0ct-07 12:10 29-0ct-07 14:10
Soil 26-0ct-07 12:25 29-0ct-07 14:10
Soil 26-0ct-07 12:35 29-0ct-07 14:10
Soil 26-0ct-07 12:55 29-0ct-0714:10
Soil 26-0ct-07 13:25 29-0ct-07 14:10
Soil 26-0ct-0713:15 29-0ct-07 14:10
Soil 26-0ct-07 13:05 29-0ct-0714:10
Soil 26-0ct-07 08:00 29-0ct-07 14:10
I attest that the information contained within the report has been reviewed for accuracy and checked against the quality control
requirements for each method. These results relate only to the sample(s) as received.
All applicable NELAC requirements have been met.
Please note that this report contains 11 pages of analytical data plus Chain of Custody document(s).
This report may not be reproduced, except in full, without written approval from Spectrum Analytical, Inc.
Massachusetts Certification# M-MA 138/MAlllO
Connecticut# PH-0777
Florida# E87600/E87936
Maine# MA 138
Authorized by:
New Hampshire# 2538/2972
New Jersey# MA0111MA012
New York# 11393/11840
Rhode Island # 98
Hanibal C. Tayeh, Ph.D.
President/Laboratory Director
USDA# S-51435
Vermont# VT-11393
Technical Reviewer's Initial: .e
Spectrum Analytical, Inc. is a NELAC accredited laboratory organi:=ation and meets NELAC testing standards. Use of the NELAC
logo however does not insure that Spectrum is currently accredited for the specific method or analyte indicated. Please refer to our
"Quality" web page at www.spectrum-analytical.comfor a foil listing of our current certificaUons and fields of accreditation. States in
which Spectrum Analytical, Inc. holds NELAC certification are New York, New Hampshire, New Jersey and Florida. All analytical
work for Volatile Organic and Air analysis are transferred to and conducted at our 830 Silver Street location (NH-2972, NY-11840,
FL-87936 and NJ-MAOJ2).
Headquarters: II Almgren & 830 Silver Street Agawam, MA 01001 1-800-789-9115 413-789-9018 FAX 413-789-4076
FL Dilision: 8180 Woodland Center Boulevard Tampa, FL 33614 1-888-497-5270 813-888-9507 FAX 800-480-6435
www.spectrum-analytical.com
Pagel of!!
CASE NARRATIVE:
The samples were received@ 14.8 degrees Celsius, please refer to the Chain of Custody for details specific to temperature upon
receipt. An infrared thennometer with a tolerance 2.0 degrees Celsius was used immediately upon receipt of the samples.
MADEP has published a list of analytical methods (CAM) which provides a series of recommended protocols for the acquisition,
analysis and reporting of analytical data in support ofMCP decisions. "Presumptive Certainty" can be established only for those
methods published by the MADEP in the MCP CAM. The compounds and/or elements reported were specifically requested by the
client on the Chain of Custody and in some cases may not include the full analyte list as defmed in the method.
According to WSC-CAM 5/2004 Rev.4, Table I I A-1, recovery for some VOC analytes have been deemed potentially difficult.
Although they may still be within the recommended 70%-130% recovery range, a range has been set based on historical control limits.
See below for any non-conformances and issues relating to quality control samples and/or sample analysis/matrix.
SW846 60108
Spikes:
7110417-MS1 Source: SA70267-05
-----
The spike recovery was outside ofQC acceptance limits for the MS, MSD and/or PS due to analyte concentration at 4 times or
greater the spike concentration. The QC batch was accepted based on LCS and/or LCSD recoveries within the acceptance limits.
Lead
7110417-MSDI Source: SA70267-05
----
The spike recovery was outside of QC acceptance limits for the MS, MSD and/or PS due to analyte concentration at 4 times or
greater the spike concentration. The QC batch was accepted based on LCS and/or LCSD recoveries within the acceptance limits.
Lead
71 10417-PS1 Source: SA70267-05
The spike recovery was outside ofQC acceptance limits for the MS, MSD and/or PS due to analyte concentration at 4 times or
greater the spike concentration. The QC batch was accepted based on LCS and/or LCSD recoveries within the acceptance limits.
Lead
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL = Below Reporting Limit Page2ofll
Samgle Identification
Client Project # Collection Dateffime
VHB-102-1 (0-10")
Matrix Received
SA70267-0I
12700961 Soil 26-0ct-07 11:55 29-0ct-07
CAS No. Analyte(s) Result Flag Units *RDL Dilution Method Ref. Prepared Analyzed Batch Analyst
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC
Polychlorinated BiQhenyls by SW846 8082
Prepared by method SW846 3545A
12674-11-2
PCB 1016 BRL IJQ/kg dry 36.3 SW846 8082 02-Nov-07 07-Nov-07 7110256 SM
11104-28-2
PCB 1221
BRL IJQ/kg dry 36.3
11141-16-5
PCB 1232
BRL IJQ/kg dry 36.3
53469-21-9
PCB 1242 BRL IJQ/kg dry 36.3
12672-29-6 PCB 1248 BRL IJQ/kg dry 36.3
11097-69-1 PCB 1254 170 IJQ/kg dry 36.3
11096-82-5 PCB 1260 48.9 IJQ/kg dry 36.3
37324-23-5 PCB 1262 BRL IJQ/kg dry 36.3
111Q0-14-4 PCB 1268 BRL IJQ/kg dry 36.3
-----
Surrogate recoveries:
10386-84-2 4,4-DB-Octafluorobipheny/ (Sr) 35 30-150%
2051-24-3 Decachforobiphenyl (Sr) 120 30-150%
Total Metals by EPA 6000nooo Series Methods
7439-92-1
Lead
297 mg/kgdry 1.82 SW846 60108 06-Nov-07 08-Nov-07 7110417 TBG
General Chemistry Parameters
%Solids 76.9 % SM2540 G Mod. 05-Nov-07 05-Nov-07 7110310 DBM
Samule Identification
Client Project # Matrix Collection Dateffime
VHB-102-2 (0-7")
Received
SA70267-02
12700961 Soil 26-0ct-07 12:10 29-0ct-()7
CAS No. Analyte(s) Result Flag Units *RDL Dilution Method Ref. Prepared Analyzed Batch Analyst
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC
Polychlorinated BiQhenyls by SW846 8082
Prepared by method SW846 3545A
12674-"11-2
PCB 1016
BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7 SW846 8082 02-Nov-07 07-Nov-07 7110256 SM
11104-28-2
PCB 1221
BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7
11141-16-5
PCB 1232
BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7
53469-21-9
PCB 1242 BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7
12672-29-6 PCB 1248 BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7
11097-69-1 PCB 1254 BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7
11096-82-5 PCB 1260 BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7
37324-23-5 PCB 1262 BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7
11100-14-4 PCB 1268 BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7
----------
Surrogate recoveries:
10386-84-2 4,4-DB-Octafluorobiphenyl (Sr) 35 30-150%
2051-24-3 Decachlorobiphenyl (Sr) 70 30-150%
Total Metals by EPA 60oonooo Series Methods
7439-92-1
Lead
113 mg/kg dry 1.53 SW846 60108 7110417 TBG
General Chemistry Parameters
%Solids
88.7 % SM2540 G Mod. 05-Nov-07 05-Nov-07 7110310 DBM
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL =Below Reporting Limit Page3ofll
Samgle Identification
Client Project# Matrix Collection Dateffime
VHB-102-3 (0-10")
Received
SA70267-03
12700961 Soil 26-0ct-07 12:25 29-0ct-07
CAS No. Analyte(s) Result Flag Units *RDL Dilution Method Ref. Prepared Analyzed Batch Analyst
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC
SW846 8082
Prepared by method SW846 3545A
12674-11-2 PCB 1016 BRL IJQ/kg dry 31.0 SW846 8082 02-Nov-07 07-Nov-07 7110256 SM
11104-28-2 PCB 1221 BRL IJQ/kg dry 31.0
11141-16-5 PCB 1232 BRL )JQ/kg dry 31.0
53469-21-9 PCB 1242 BRL jJQ/kg dry 31.0
12672-29-6
PCB 1248
BRL jJQ/kg dry 31.0
11097-69-1
PCB 1254
94.4 )Jg/kg dry 31.0
11096-82-5
PCB 1260
BRL )Jg/kg dry 31.0
37324-23-5
PCB 1262
BRL )JQ/kg dry 31.0
11100-14-4
PCB 1268
BRL )Jg/kg dry 31.0
Surrogate recoveries:
10386-84-2 4,4-DB-Octafluorobipheny/ (Sr) 35 30-150%
2051-24-3 Decach/orobiphenyl (Sr) 60 30-150%
Total Metals by EPA 60oonooo Series Methods
7439-92-1
Lead
56.9 mg/kg dry 1.60 SW846 60108 06-Nov-07 08-Nov-07 7110417 TBG
General Chemistry Parameters
%Solids
89.0 % SM2540 G Mod. 05-Nov-07 05-Nov-07 7110310 DBM
Samole Identification
Client Project # Matrix Collection Dateffime Received
VHB-102-4 (0-9")
12700961 Soil 26-0ct-07 12:35 29-0ct-07
SA70267-04
CAS No. Analyte(s) Result Flag Units *RDL Dilution Method Ref. Prepared Analyzed Batch Analyst
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC
BiQhenyls SW846 8082
Prepared by method SW846 3545A
12674-11-2
PCB 1016
BRL )Jglkg dry 34.5 SW846 8082 02-Nov-07 07-Nov-07 7110256 SM
11104-28-2
PCB 1221
BRL jJQ/kg dry 34.5
11141-16-5
PCB 1232
BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.5
53469-21-9
PCB 1242
BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.5
12672-29-6
PCB 1248
BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.5
11097-69-1
PCB 1254
60.2 IJQ/kg dry 34.5
11096-82-5
PCB 1260 41.3 IJQ/kg dry 34.5
37324-23-5
PCB 1262
BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.5
11100-14-4
PCB 1268
BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.5

Surrogate recoveries:
10386-84-2 4, 4-DB-Octaf/uorobipheny/ (Sr) 30 30-150%
2051-24-3 Decach/orobiphenyl (Sr) 70 30-150%
Total Metals by EPA 6000/7000 Series Methods
7439-92-1
Lead 501 mg/kg dry 1.64 SWB46 60108 06-Nov-07 08-Nov-07 7110417 TBG
General Chemistry Parameters
%Solids
83.7 % SM2540 G Mod. 05-Nov-07 05-Nov-07 7110310 DBM
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL = Below Reporting Limit Page4ofll
Samg:le Identification
Client Project#
VHB"102-5 (0-12")
Matrix Collection Dateffime Received
SA70267-05
12700961 Soil 26-0ct-07 12:55 29-0ct-07
CAS No. Analyte(s) Result Flag Units RDL Dilution Method Ref. Prepared Analyzed Batch Analyst
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC
Polychlorinated BiQhenyls by SW846 8082
Prepared by method SW846 3545A
12674-11-2 PCB 1016 BRL IJQ/kg dry 35.3 SWB46 8082 02-Nov-07 07-Nov-07 7110256 SM
11104-28-2 PCB 1221 BRL !JQ/kg dry 35.3
11141-16-5 PCB 1232 BRL j.Jg/kg dry 35.3
53469-21-9 PCB 1242 BRL !Jg/kg dry 35.3
12672-29-6 PCB 1248 BRL !Jg/kg dry 35.3
11097-69-1
PCB 1254
256 !JQ/kg dry 35.3
11096-82-5
PCB 1260
101 !Jg/kg dry 35.3
37324-23-5
PCB 1262
BRL !Jglk.g dry 35.3
11100-14-4
PCB 1268
BRL !Jglkg dry 35.3
Surrogate recoveries:
10386-84-2 4,4:.08-0ctafluorobipheny/ (Sr) 40 30-150%
2051-24-3 Decachforobiphenyl (Sr) 125 30-150%
Total Metals by EPA 6000nooo Series Methods
7439-92-1
Lead
929 mglkg dry 7.97 5 SWB46 60108 06-Nov-07 09-Nov-07 7110417 LR
General Chemistry Parameters
%Solids
79.0 % SM2540 G Mod. 05-Nov-07 05-Nov-07 7110310 DBM
Samgle Identification
Client Project #
VHB-102-6 (0-5")
Matrix Collection Dateffime Received
SA70267-06
12700961 Soil 26-0ct-()7 13:25 29-0ct-()7
CAS No. Analyte(s) Result Flag Units RDL Dilution Method Ref. Prepared Analyzed Batch Analyst
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC
Polychlorinated BiQheny:ls by: SW846 8082
Prepared by method SW846 3545A
12674-11-2
PCB 1016
BRL !JQ/kg dry 35.0 SW846 8082 02-Nov-07 07-Nov-07 7110256 SM
11104-28-2
PCB 1221
BRL !Jg/kg dry 35.0
11141-16-5
PCB 1232
BRL !Jg/kg dry 35.0
53469-21-9
PCB 1242
BRL !Jg/kg dry 35.0
12672-29-6
PCB 1248 BRL !Jg/kg dry 35.0
11097-69-1
PCB 1254 161 !Jg/kg dry 35.0
11096-82-5
PCB 1260
BRL !Jg/kg dry 35.0
37324-23-5
PCB 1262
BRL !JQ/kg dry 35.0
11100-14-4
PCB 1268
BRL !Jg/kg dry 35.0
Surrogate recoveries:
10386-84-2 4,4-DB-Octaf/uorobipheny/ (Sr) 35 30-150%
2051-24-3 Decachlorobiphenyl (Sr) 60 30-150%
Total Metals by EPA 600017000 Series Methods
7439-92-1
Lead
66.2 mglkg dry 1.66 SWB46 60108 06-Nov-07 09-Nov-07 7110417 TBG
General Chemistry Parameters
%Solids
83.9 % SM2540 G Mod. 05-Nov-07 05-Nov-07 7110310 DBM
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL =Below Reporting Limit Page5ofll
Samgle Identification
Client Project#
VHB-102-7 (0-7")
SA70267-07
12700961
CAS No. Analyte(s) Result Flag Units "RDL
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC
SW846 8082
Prepared by method SW846 3545A
1267411-2 PCB 1016 BRL !Jg/kg dry 34.0
11104-28-2 PCB 1221 BRL !Jg/kg dry 34.0
11141-16-5 PCB 1232 BRL !Jg/kg dry 34.0
53469-21-9 PCB 1242 BRL !-19/kg dry 34.0
12672-29-6
PCB 1248
BRL IJg/kg dry 34.0
11097-69-1
PCB 1254
47.5 IJg/kg dry 34.0
11096-82-5
PCB 1260 BRL IJg/kg dry 34.0
37324-23-5
PCB 1262
BRL IJg/kg dry 34.0
11100-14-4
PCB 1268
BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.0
------- --------------
Surrogate recoveries:
10386--84-2 4,4-DB-Octaf/uorobiphenyl (Sr) 40
2051-24-3 Decachlorobiphenyl (Sr) 80
Total Metals by EPA 6000/7000 Series Methods
7439-92-1
Lead
Gi!neral Chemistry Parameters
%Solids
Samgle Identification
VHB-102-8 (0-11")
SA70267-08
CAS No. Analyte(s)
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC
by SW846 8082
Prepared by method SW846 3545A
12674-11-2 PCB 1016
11104-28-2 PCB 1221
11141-16-5 PCB 1232
53469-21-9 PCB 1242
12672-29-6 PCB 1248
11097-69-1 PCB 1254
11096-82-5 PCB 1260
37324-23-5 PCB 1262
11100-14-4 PCB 1268
Surrogate recoveries:
108
85.1
Result
BRL
BRL
BRL
BRL
BRL
BRL
BRL
BRL
BRL
10386-84-2 4,4-DB-Octafluorobipheny/ (Sr) 35
2051-24-3 Decachlorobiphenyl (Sr) 85
Total Metals by EPA 6000/7000 Series Methods
7439-92-1 Lead 72.4
General Chemistry Parameters
%Solids
84.6
30-150%
30-150%
mg/kg dry 1.67
%
Client Project #
12700961
Flag Units *RDL
IJQ/kg dry 34.5
IJg/kg dry 34.5
IJg/kg dry 34.5
IJg/kg dry 34.5
IJQ/kg dry 34.5
IJQ/kg dry 34.5
IJQ/kg dry 34.5
IJg/kg dry 34.5
IJg/kg dry 34.5
30-150%
30-150%
mg/kg dry 1.55
%
Matrix Collection DatefTime Received
Soil 26-0ct-07 13:15 29-0ct-07
Dilution Method Ref. Prepared Analyzed Batch Analyst
SW846 8082 02-Nov-07 07-Nov-07 7110256 SM
SW846 60108 06-Nov-07 09-Nov-07 7110417 TBG
SM2540 G Mod. 05-Nov-07 05-Nov-07 7110310 DBM
Matrix Collection Dateffime Received
Soil 26-0cHl7 13:05 29-0ct-07
Dilution Method Ref. Prepared Analyzed Batch Analyst
SW846 8082 02-Nov-07 07-Nov-07 7110256 SM
SW846 601 OB 06-Nov-07 09-Nov-07 7110417 TBG
SM2540 G Mod. 05-Nov-07 7110310 DBM
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL = Below Reporting Limit Page6ofll
Sample Identification
Dup-102607
SA70267-09
CAS No. Analyte(s)
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC
Polychlorinated Biphenyls by SW846 8082
Prepared by method SW846 3545A
12674-11-2 PCB 1016
11104-28-2
PCB 1221
11141-16-5
PCB 1232
53469-21-9
PCB 1242
12672-29-6 PCB 1248
11097-69-1 PCB 1254
11096-82-5 PCB 1260
3732423-5 PCB 1262
1110014-4 PCB 1268
-------
Su!Togate recoveries:
10386-84-2 4,4-DB-Octaf/uorobiphenyl (Sr)
2051-24-3 Decachlorobiphenyl (Sr)
Result
BRL
BRL
BRL
BRL
BRL
63.8
53.2
BRL
BRL
30
85
Total Metals by EPA 60oonooo Series Methods
7439-92-1 Lead 723
General Chemistry Parameters
%Solids
82.4
Client Project #
12700961
Matrix
Soil
Flag Units *RDL Dilution
f.Ig/kg dry 35.5
IJg/kg dry 35.5
f.Ig/kg dry 35.5
f.Ig/kg dry 35.5
f.Ig/kg dry 35.5
j.Jg/kg dry 35.5
j.Jg/kg dry 35.5
IJg/kg dry 35.5
j.Jg/kg dry 35.5
30-150%
30-150%
mg/kg dry 1.71
%
Collection Dateffime
26-0ct-07 08:00
Received
29-0ct-07
Method Ref. Prepared Analyzed Batch Analyst
SW846 8082 02-Nov-07 07-Nov-07 7110256 SM
SW846 60108 06-Nov-07 09-Nov-07 7110417 TBG
SM2540 G Mod. 05-Nov-07 05-Nov-07 7110310 OBM
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL = Below Reporting Limit Page 7 of II
Semivolatile Organic Compounds by GC- Quality Control
Spike Source o/oREC RPD
Analyte(s) Result Flag Units 'RDL Level Result %REC Limits RPD Limit
Batch 7110256- SW846 3545A
Blank (7110256-BLK1)
Prepared: 02-Nov-07 Analyzed: 06-Nov-07
PCB 1016 BRL J.Jg/kg wet 28.6
PCB 1221 BRL tJg/kg wet 28.6
PCB 1232 BRL tJQ/kg wet 28.6
PCB 1242 BRL JJQ/kg wet 28.6
PCB 1248 BRL JJQ/kg wet 28.6
PCB 1254 BRL tJg/kg wet 28.6
PCB 1260 BRL tJg/kg wet 28.6
PCB 1262 BRL ]Jglkg wet 28.6
PCB 1268 BRL ]Jg/kg wet 28.6
----------------
Surrogate: 4,4-DB-Octafluorobipheny/ (Sr) 11.4 ]Jg/kg wet 28.6 40 30-150
Surrogate: Decach/orobiphenyl (Sr) 31.4 ]JQ/kg wet 28.6 110 30-150
LCS (7110256-8511
Prepared: 02-Nov-07 Analyzed: 06-Nov-07
PCB 1016 414 ]lg/kg wet 28.6 357 116 40-140
PCB 1260 441 ]lg/kg wet 28.6 357 124 40-140
Surrogate: (Sr) 10.0 ]lg/kg wet 28.6 35 30-150
Surrogate: Decachlorobiphenyl (Sr) 31.4 ]lg/kg wet 28.6 110 30-150
LCS Du(! (7110256-8501)
Prepared: 02-Nov-07 Analyzed: 06-Nov-07
PCB 1016 419 JJQ/kg wet 28.6 357 117 40-140 30
PCB 1260 447 J.Jg/kg wet 28.6 357 125 40-140 30
Surrogate: 4,4-DB-Octanuorobipheny/ (Sr) 10.0 JJQ/kg wet 28.6 35 30-150
Surrogate: Decachlorobiphenyl (Sr) 28.6 ]lQ/kg wet
28.6 . 100 30-150
DU(!IiCate f7110256-DUP1) Source: SA70476-01
Prepared: 02-Nov-07 Analyzed: 06-Nov-07
PCB 1016 BRL )Jg/kg dry 34.7 BRL 40
PCB 1221 BRL j.Jg/kg dry 34.7 BRL 40
PCB 1232 BRL j.JQ/kg dry 34.7 BRL 40
PCB 1242 BRL )Jg/kg dry 34.7 BRL 40
PCB 1248 BRL j.Jg/kg dry 34.7 BRL 40
PCB 1254 BRL j.JQ/kg dry 34.7 BRL 40
PCB 1260 BRL j.JQ/kg dry 34.7 BRL 40
PCB 1262 BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7 BRL 40
PCB 1268 BRL IJQ/kg dry 34.7 BRL 40
Surrogate: 4,4-DB-Octanuorobiphenyl (Sr) 15.6 IJQ/kg dry 34.7 45 30-150
Surrogate: Decachlorobiphenyl (Sr) 31.2 IJQ/kg dry 34.7 90 30-150
Matrix S(!ike (7110256-MS11 Source: SA70476-01
Prepared: 02-Nov-07 Analyzed: 06-Nov-07
PCB 1016 511 IJQ/kg dry 33.5 418 BRL 122 40-140
PCB 1260 527 tJQ/kg dry 33.5 418 BRL 126 40-140
-----
Surrogate: 4,4-DB-Octanuorobipheny/ (Sr) 13.4 tJg/kg dry 33.5 40 30-150
Surrogate: Decachforobiphenyl (Sr) 38.5 IJQ/kg dry 33.5 115 30-150
Matrix S!;!ike Due f7110256-MSD11 Source: SA70476-01
Prepared: 02-Nov-07 Analyzed: 06-Nov-07
PCB 1016 449 ]Jg/kg dry 31.0 387 BRL 116 40-140 5 50
PCB 126Q 426 ]Jg/kg dry 31.0 387 BRL 110 40-140 14 50
Surrogate: 4,4-DB-Octafluorobiphenyl (Sr) 10.8 ]Jg/kg dry 30.9 35 30-150
Surrogate: Decach/orobiphenyl (Sr) 29.4 JJglkg dry 30.9 95 30-150
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL =Below Reporting Limit Page8ofll
Total Metals by EPA 6000/7000 Series Methods - Quality Control
Spike Source %REC RPD
Analyte(s) Result Flag Units 'RDL Level Result %REC Limits RPD Limit
Batch 7110417- SW846 30508
Blank (7110417-BLK1}
Prepared: 06-Nov-07 Analyzed: 08-Nov-07
Lead BRL mg/kg wet 1.44
Ou(!licate (7110417-DUP1J Source: SA70267-01
Prepared: 06-Nov-07 Analyzed: 08-Nov-07
Lead 342 mglkg dry 1.78 297 14 20
Matrix S(!ike (7110417-M$1} Source: SA70267-05
Prepared: 06-Nov-07 Analyzed: 08-Nov-07
lead 933 QM4X mg/kg dry 1.82 151 929 3 75-125
Matrix S!;!ike Du(! (7110417-M$01} Source: SA70267-05
Prepared: 06-Nov-07 Analyzed: 08-Nov-07
Lead 769 QM4X mg/kg dry 1.74 145 929 -110 75-125 19 35
PostSeike (7110417-PS1} Source: SA70267-05
Prepared: 06-Nov-07 Analyzed: 09-Nov-07
Lead 3670 QM4X mglkg dry 1.77 146 929 1860 80-120
Reference (7110417-SRM1)
Prepared: 06-Nov-07 Analyzed: 09-Nov-07
Lead 42.0 mg/kg wet 1.50 45.4 92 81.8-118.1
Reference f7110417-5RM2}
Prepared: 06-Nov-07 Analyzed: 09-Nov-07
Lead 41.0 mglkg wet 1.50 44.6 92 81.8-118.1
General Chemistry Parameters - Quality Control
Spike Source o/oREC RPD
Analyte(s) Result Flag Units 'RDL Level Result %REC Limits RPD Limit
Batch 7110310- General Preparation
Duelicate f7110310-DUP1) Source: SA70267-01
Prepared & Analyzed: 05-Nov-07
%Solids 76.0 % 76.9 20
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL = Below Reporting Limit Page9ofll
Notes and Definitions
QM4X The spike recovery was outside ofQC acceptance limits for the MS, MSD and/or PS due to analyte concentration at 4
times or greater the spike concentration. The QC batch was accepted based on LCS and/or LCSD recoveries within the
acceptance limits.
BRL Below Reporting Limit- Analyte NOT DETECTED at or above the reporting limit
dry Sample results reported on a dry weight basis
NR Not Reported
RPD Relative Percent Difference
A plus sign(+) in the Method Reference colwnn indicates the method is not accredited by NELAC.
Laboratory Control Sample (LCS1: A known matrix spiked with compound(s) representative of the target analytes, which is used to
document laboratory performance.
Matrix Duplicate: An intra-laboratory split sample which is used to document the precision of a method in a given sample matrix.
Matrix Spike: An aliquot of a sample spiked with a known concentration of target analyte(s). The spiking occurs prior to sample
preparation and analysis. A matrix spike is used to document the bias of a method in a given sample matrix.
Method Blank: An analyte-free matrix to which all reagents are added in the same volumes or proportions as used in sample
processing. The method blank should be carried through the complete sample preparation and analytical procedure. The method
blank is used to document contamination resulting from the analytical process.
Method Detection Limit (MDL): The minimum concentration of a substance that can be measured and reported with 99%
confidence that the analyte concentration is greater than zero and is determined from analysis of a sample in a given matrix type
containing the analyte.
Reportable Detection Limit <RDU: The lowest concentration that can be reliably achieved within specified limits of precision and
accuracy during routine laboratory operating conditions. For many analytes the RDL analyte concentration is selected as the lowest
non-zero standard in the calibration curve. While the RDL is approximately 5 to 10 times the MDL, the RDL for each sample takes
into account the sample volume/weight, extract/digestate volume, cleanup procedures and, if applicable, dry weight correction.
Sample RDLs are highly matrix-dependent.
Surrogate: An organic compound which is similar to the target analyte(s) in chemical composition and behavior in the analytical
process, but which is not normally found in environmental samples. These compounds are spiked into all blanks, standards, and
samples prior to analysis. Percent recoveries are calculated for each surrogate.
Validated by:
Hanibal C. Tayeh, Ph.D.
Nicole Brown
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL = Below Reporting Limit Page 10 of II
MADEP MCP ANALYTICAL METHOD REPORT CERTIFICATION FORM
Laboratory Name: Spectrum Ana1ytical, Inc. -Agawam, MA Project#: 12700961
Project Location: CEA Beverly- Beverly, MA
MADEPRTN':
This form provides certifications for the following data set:
SA70267-0l
through SA70267-09
Sample matrices:
Soil
0 82608 0 8151A 0 8330 fi1l 60108 0 7470A/IA
MCPSW-846
0 8270C 0 8081A
Methods Used
0 VPH 0 6020 0
9014M'
fi1l 8082 0 80218 0 EPH 0
70005'
0 7196A
I List Release Tracking Number (RTN), ifknown
2 M SW-846 Method 9014 or MADEP Physiologically Available Cyanide (PAC) Method
3 S- SW-846 Methods 7000 Series List individual method and analyte
An affirmative response to questions A, B, C and Dis required for "Presumptive Certainty" status
A
Were all samples received by the laboratory in a condition consistent with that described on the
fi1l Yes 0 No
Chain of Custody documentation for the data set?
Were all QA/QC procedures required for the specified analytica1 method(s) included in this report
B
followed, including the requirement to note and discuss in a narrative QC data that did not meet fi1l Yes 0 No
appropriate performance standards or guidelines?
Does the data included in this report meet all the analytical requirements for "Presumptive
c
Certainty", as described in Section 2.0 (a), (b), (c) and (d) of the MADEP document CAM VII A,
"Quality Assurance and Quality Control Guidelines for the Acquisition and Reporting of
fi1l Yes 0 No
Analytical Data"?
D
VPH and EPH methods only: Was the VPH or EPH method conducted without significant
DYes 0 No
modifications (see Section 11.3 ofrespective methods)?
A response to questions E and F below is required for "Presumptive Certainty" status
E
Were a11 analytical QC performance standards and recommendations for the specified methods
fi1l Yes 0 No
achieved?
F Were results for all analyte-Iist compounds/elements for the specified method(s) reported? 0 Yes fi1l No
All negative responses are addressed in a case narrative on the cover page of this report.
I, the undersigned, attest under the pains and penalties of perjury that, based upon my personal inquiry of those
responsible for obtaining the information, the material contained in this analytical report is, to the best of my
knowledge and belief, accurate and complete.
t}Vtdzj__
Hanibal C. Tayeh, Ph.D.
President/Laboratory Director
Date:
11/12/2007 2:16:53PM
This laboratory report is not valid without an authorized signature on the cover page.
* Reportable Detection Limit BRL = Below Reporting Limit Page II of 11
;a;; ,. M"''"'
I
S,pvv.Hu
Stand4l:d TAT - 7 to l 0 business days
CHAI
"N OF cusrony RE" CORD .. , 0 Rush TAT" Date Needed:. "
- 1J " - AI! TATs subjeet lo
Min. 24-hOur 11eedcl for msl\t.'S.
A:>A
1
"'"'"' ' ., .. ._,
Page __ L ot'_l_
SamplCS disposed ()f ;li\cr 60 days unless
l (:1_\!v.:rwise instntcted.

/1,\._\\IL\L l0l.liOL
.......... .
----
l'rojw No.: _L;tlm"l(ru.
Site i?.{tl!ll<(
Rcpon To: e.-tun
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7
-.; --------- ---
Lm;ation: Stak fY\ A- __ _
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SampleJ\s): _
----
RQN: .5"1.11.':\.
2;;Hc'J 5"'Na0H 6'"Ascorhic Acid Containers: AnaLyses: \)A Rpbrtimx Notcto:
'
Water GW,,(Jroundw?Wr , W\V=Wastew
11
ter fTT ___ Fi.. ___..
SW""- Surfa!.:e Wute.r SO'"'SOll SV=Sludge /\'-"Air ..::1! _3 i 0 RCP
17<CH,OH SNaHSO, 9= .. 11& ......... --- JO
I
=-X""" XJ- " 0 " - ! I"" . . . . ..
....::: > 5
0
'": 1 - ,'
1
. . _ 1._('\"('1
CComposite . . . . . I lj <: g ;;; . J . : . ... : . 1iil. '""'"" 0 No QC
-- X I ;:; ;;: . ; . . .. . ..... 0 "'""- -----
Labld: Sampk Id: . Date: . . Tit1le: .I {1:. 1 . .:'o. 'a 'o I : : . . .... ''"'"'"'""""''"'"P'"';d:d"
. I .. I ""' ..... :
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.... 1 i _ ,., i'> .I I I I I I I I I I I i I II II I
I
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... _- 9 >'51
EDD Fornmt rlrkraooa hw.\;:, fZ.r;,, l,t:o-:r-:1; . . 1' I !t/(0
. >'!Z[:L __ P "'v=r< > -.. _ /0-;!14...()7. I
receipt: 0 kCd iMt= wr. . -t/--;
7
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11 Almgren Orin: 01001 .Ftt'x 413::789.-4976:
Appendix F
Human Health Risk Assessment of Potentia/Indoor and Outdoor
Inhalation Exposure to Landfill Gas Emissions From the Former
Brim bat A venue Landfill Relative to Future Development of the Site
prepared by Tetra Tech EC, Inc. September 2008
HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT
OF POTENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
INHALATION EXPOSURE TO
LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM
THE FORMER BRIMBAL AVENUE LANDFILL
RELATIVE TO FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE
September 2008
Prepared for
Tetra Tech Rizzo
CEA Group, Inc.
Prepared by
Tetra Tech EC, Inc.
133 Federal St., Gth Floor
Boston, MA 0211 0
HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT
OF POTENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR
INHALATION EXPOSURE TO
LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS FROM
THE FORMER BRIMBAL A VENUE LANDFILL
RELATIVE TO FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE
Revision
I
September 2008
Prepared for
Tetra Tech Rizzo
CEA Group, Inc.
Prepared by
Tetra Tech EC
133 Federal St., 6
1
h Floor
Boston, MA 02110
Date
09/30/08
Prepared By
T. Ambrose/
M. Newton Lima
Approved By
R. Marnicio
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0 INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL APPROACH .................................................................... 1-1
2.0 RISK ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................................. 2-1
2.1 Hazard Identification ................. : ..................................................................................... 2-1
2.1.1 Nature of the Site and the Proposed Development Activity ............................... 2-1
2.1.2 Description of the Areas oflnterest at the Site ................................................... 2-2
2.1.3 Evaluation of the Available LFG Composition Data ......................................... 2-2
2.2 Exposure Assessment ...................................................................................................... 2-4
2.2.1 Inhalation Exposure Areas (lEAs) ...................................................................... 2-4
2.2.2 Conceptual Site Model for Air Exposure ........................................................... 2-4
2.2.3 Characterization of the Potentially Exposed Populations .................................. 2-5
2.3 Dose-Response Assessment ............................................................................................ 2-6
2.4 Risk Characterization ...................................................................................................... 2-7
2.4.1 Indoor Air Risk Assessment.. ............................................................................. 2-7
2.4.2 Outdoor Air Risk Assessment .......................................................................... 2-10
2.4.3 Quantitative Cumulative Inhalation Pathway Risk Assessment ....................... 2-17
2.4.4 Qualitative Cumulative Inhalation Pathway Assessments for the Off-Site
Residents and the Commercial I Retail Customers .......................................... 2-18
2.4.5 Qualitative Odor Threshold Evaluation for Hydrogen Sulfide (H
2
S) .............. 2-19
2.5 Uncertainty Analysis ..................................................................................................... 2-19
2.5.1 LFG Composition ............................................................................................. 2-19
2.5.2 LFG Generation and Emission Rate ................................................................. 2-20
2.5.3 Atmospheric Mixing and Dispersion Modeling Using a Box Model... ............ 2-20
2.5.4 Exposure Frequency and Exposure Duration, and Daily Exposure Time ........ 2-21
2.5.5 Vapor Intrusion Modeling Input Parameters .................................................... 2-21
2.5.6 Exposure Parameters ........................................................................................ 2-22
2.5.7 Toxicity Criteria ............................................................................................... 2-22
3.0 SUMMARY AND FINDINGS .................................................................................................... 3-1
4.0 REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................. 4-l
FIGURES
Figure 1. Site Location Map
Figure 2. Proposed Layout for Site Development
Figure 3. Soil Gas Sampling Locations
Figure 4. Sizes and Orientations of the Boxes Assumed for the Outdoor Air Mixing and Dispersion
Analysis
TABLES
Table l. Summary of Landfill Gas Sampling Results for 2008
Table 2. Calculation of the Average Soil Gas Concentrations for the Detected LFG Constituents by
Inhalation Exposure Area
Table 3. Conceptual Site Model for the Potential Inhalation Exposures Associated with Development
at the North Shore Commons Site
Table 4. Inhalation Toxicity Values for the Detected Landfill Gas Constituents Associated with
Cancer and Non-Cancer Health Effect Endpoints
Table 5. Site-Specific Subsurface Soil and Site Parameters that Were Used to Project Vapor Diffusion
and Intrusion Into Indoor Air for the Cumulative Inhalation Pathway Risk Calculations (Same
for All Scenarios)
Table 6. Scenario-Specific Building Dimensions and Receptor Exposure Parameters Used in the
Cumulative Inhalation Pathway Risk Calculations
Table.7. Summary of the Results of the Indoor Air Risk Assessment for the North Shore Commons
Site
Table 8. Summary of the Results of the Indoor Air Risk Assessment for the Receptors Associated with
Future Development
Table 9. Summary of the LandGEM Modeling Results for LFG and Hydrogen Sulfide Generation
Rates Over Time for the Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Table 10. Average Annual Wind Speed and Direction Data for the Beverly Cove Meteorological
Station, Beverly, MA (2000-2007)
Table II. Airborne Mixing and Dispersion Calculations for the Concentrations of Landfill Gas
Constituents in the Outdoor Air at the Eastern Inhalation Exposure Area
Table 12. Airborne Mixing and Dispersion Calculations for the Concentrations of Landfill Gas
Constituents in the Outdoor Air at the Western Inhalation Exposure Area
Table 13. Airborne Mixing and Dispersion Calculations for the Concentrations of Landfill Gas
Constituents in the Outdoor Air at the Site-Wide Inhalation Exposure Area
Table 14. Calculation of the Cancer and Non-Cancer Inhalation Risk Estimates Relative to Outdoor
Exposure for Each Inhalation Exposure Area
Table 15. Summary of the Results of the Outdoor Air Risk Assessment for Each Inhalation Exposure
Area (Applicable to All Receptors Exposed to Outdoor Air)
Table 16. Combined Results of the Indoor and Outdoor Air Inhalation Risk Assessments for the North
Shore Commons Site for Each Inhalation Exposure Area
Table 17. Summary of the Hydrogen Sulfide Sampling Results and Relevant Odor Thresholds and
Occupational Safety Criteria for Hydrogen Sulfide
11
APPENDICES
Appendix A Site Visit Photographic Log (August 15, 2008)
Appendix B Test America Laboratory Report for the Soil Gas Probe Samples (August 18, 2008)
Appendix C LandGEM Output for the Modeling of Landfill Gas Generation at the Former Brimbal
Avenue Landfilll in Beverly, MA
Appendix D Selected Illustrative Johnson and Ettinger Model Calculation Worksheets for Potential
Landfill Gas Vapor Intrusion and Inhalation Risk Assessment
Appendix E Compilation ofthe Indoor Air Vapor Intrusion Risk Calculation Results by Inhalation
Exposure Area
iii
ATe
ATN
ATSDR
bgs
c
CAA
CalEPA
em
CMR
coc
CSM
DL
DTSC
ED
EF
ELCR
foe
g
Griffin Engineering
H
2
S
HEAST
m
hr
HHRA
HVAC
lEA
m
IRIS
IUR
J&E
L
LandGEM
LEL
LFG
m
m'
m'
mg
MassDEP
MCP
Mg
MH
NMOC
NSPS
ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
averaging time for carcinogenic risk
averaging time for non-carcinogenic risk
Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry
below ground surface
Centigrade degrees
Clean Air Act
California EPA
centimeter
Code of Massachusetts Regulations
chemicals of concern
conceptual site model
detection limit
Department of Toxic Substances Control
exposure duration
exposure frequency
Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk
fraction of organic carbon
gram
Griffin Engineering Group, LLC
Hydrogen sulfide
Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables
Hazard Index
hour
Human Health Risk Assessment
heating, ventilating, and air conditioning
Inhalation Exposure Area
inch
Integrated Risk Information System
Inhalation Unit Risk
Johnson and Ettinger
liter
Landfill Gas Emissions Model
Lower Explosive Limit
landfill gas
meter
square meters
cubic meters
milligram
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection
Massachusetts Contingency Plan
Megagram
mixing height
Non-Methane Organic Compound
New Source Performance Standards
IV
OHM
ORNL
PEL
ppb
ppm
PPRTV
RfC
RL
s
ug
USEPA
URF
uses
voc
yr
ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS- Cont'd
Oil or Hazardous Material
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Permissible Exposure Limit
parts per billion
parts per million
Provisional Peer Reviewed Toxicity Value
reference concentration
reporting limit
second
microgram
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Unit Risk Factor
Unified Soil Classification System
volatile organic compound
year
v
1.0 INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL APPROACH
CEA Group, Inc., located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is considering the development of the Former
Brimbal Avenue Landfill in Beverly, Massachusetts, which is referred to in this assessment as the North
Shore Commons Site. This Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) was conducted to evaluate the
potential risks to receptors that could be exposed to landfill gas (LFG) emissions by inhaling its
constituents either outdoors or indoors within the buildings associated with future development of the site.
Two primary inhalation exposure possibilities exist with respect to development at the site: l) as the
result of vapor migration from the subsurface soil or waste up into the indoor air of structures that may be
built as part of the development; and 2) in the outdoor air following the release ofLFG and its mixing and
dispersion in the air at the site.
The potential exposures and risks due to the inhalation of volatile vapors emitted from the inactive landfill
were evaluated by first developing a conservative estimate of the generation and emission rate of the
LFG. This LFG emission rate was then combined with measurements of on-site soil gas collected in the
area that is currently being considered for development. Together, this information provides a reasonable
estimate of the amount and composition of the LFG emissions that may lead to potential future exposures.
The LFG releases could migrate and enter into the indoor spaces of the new structures that may be
constructed on-site. The general design and construction characteristics of the potential structures were
projected based on knowledge of the site and the features of similar structures in this area. The
dimensions of the indoor air spaces most likely to be impacted by vapor intrusion were estimated from
typical building sizes depicted in one of the proposed development plans. A vapor intrusion model was
applied to estimate the concentrations of the LFG contaminants that may be created in the indoor air of
the future structures.
The LFG emissions at other locations at the site would be released and mixed with the ambient air that
blows across the surface of the property. This mixing and dispersion process would dilute the
concentration of any LFG constituents emitted. The conceptual mixing and dispersion and the dimensions
of the air volume into which the LFG emissions would be released were established based on the
proposed development plans and the detected soil gas constituent distributions. A mixing and dispersion
model was applied to estimate the outdoor concentrations of the released LFG contaminants within the
potential breathing zone of the people that are likely to be present on-site given the proposed
development. The level of risk associated with breathing this outdoor air was also estimated using
exposure parameters tailored to the future site users.
The representative concentrations of each constituent found to be present in the soil gas were entered into
the models for calculating the indoor and outdoor air exposure point concentrations. These concentrations
were combined with exposure parameters associated with the potential site future users and with
chemical-specific toxicity values for the constituents detected in the soil gas to develop estimates of the
potential inhalation risks posed to the people associated with the future development. These estimates of
the inhalation cancer and non-cancer risk were compared to the established Massachusetts Contingency
Plan (MCP) target risk thresholds to determine whether or not the proposed development poses a
"significant risk" to human health.
This risk assessment also includes qualitative assessments of the potential on-site exposure to hydrogen
sulfide (H
2
S) gas and the potential for exposure to released LFG constituents in the soil gas or ambient air
that may have migrated off-site.
1-1
2.0 RISK ASSESSMENT
This risk assessment of the potential inhalation exposures to a set of site-specific receptors was performed
in accordance with the risk characterization protocols established by the Massachusetts Department of
Environmental Protection (MassDEP) for the MCP program. Human health risk characterizations
performed under the MCP are conducted to determine whether conditions at a site pose a risk of harm to
health. The MCP provides three options for defining a level of "no significant risk":
Method l uses published numeric standards for more than l 00 common chemicals in soil and
groundwater;
Method 2 allows for some adjustments in these standards to reflect site-specific conditions; and
Method 3 allows for the potential risks to be estimated on the basis of a site-specific exposure
parameters and site conditions.
A MassDEP Method 3 risk characterization is a cumulative risk assessment that considers all of the
exposure pathways associated with a receptor and a land use with respect to the chemicals of concern
(COCs). A Method 3 risk characterization consists of five steps (MassDEP 1996):
l. Hazard Identification
2. Exposure Assessment
3. Dose-Response Assessment
4. Risk Characterization
5. Uncertainty Analysis
The subsections that follow present each of these components of the focused assessment of the potential
inhalation risks to a set of potential future groups expected to access or use the site or facilities of the
proposed development at the North Shore Commons Site.
2.1 Hazard Identification
The hazard identification step describes the chemical constituents that may be present in an area or
associated with the location of an exposure scenario. It identifies those chemicals that may be of concern
from a human health risk perspective given the concentration in which they are present and the nature of
the adverse effects that may be associated with exposures. To identifY these constituents, an
understanding of the current land use and the proposed future development was established. Thereafter,
the area of the site where the proposed development is to occur was defined. Finally, the composition of
the LFG that may be generated and migrate into the indoor air via diffusion through the foundations of
future buildings or into the ambient outdoor air where this development may be performed was identified.
These aspects of the assessment are discussed further below.
2.1.1 Nature of the Site and the Proposed Development Activity
The North Shore Commons Site is comprised of just over 6 acres and is located off of Route 128 on
Brimbal Avenue, next to the Northridge Homes Cooperative, Inc. in Beverly, MA. The general location
of the site is presented in Figure l. The landfill material is covered by soil, but there is no cap or landfill
gas vents installed at this time. The proposed future activities to take place at the site would be expected
to result in some level of exposure to the LFG released from the soil and waste beneath and within the site
boundary.
Historical activities performed at the North Shore Commons Site included the installation of a 24-inch
drainage culvert through the site in 1946. Prior to this date, the site was undeveloped and contained a free-
2-l
flowing stream. The Town of Beverly began using the site as a landfill between 1946 and 1947, and
continued dumping at the site until approximately 1961. During that time, the landfill accepted primarily
municipal household waste and some construction debris. The site has been inactive as a landfill since
1961, and the there are no municipal records of any other development or activities since that time.
2.1.2 Description of the Areas of Interest at the Site
Figure 2 depicts one proposed plan for the development of the site. The northwestern portion of the site is
the area designated for the development of a Day Care Center under this proposal. The remaining
southeastern portion of the site is the area designated for the development of commercial, retail, and/or
residential facilities under the proposal shown. The overall site has an approximate length (northwest-
southeast) of 650 feet (or 198.1 meters [m]) and an approximate width (northeast-southwest) of 400 feet
(or 121.9 m). The site is relatively flat, ranging in elevation from 78 feet to 86 feet across the area with
changes in grade near the outer boundaries adjacent to the roads and a few low-lying areas near the
drain line.
In order to obtain the site-specific information needed to conduct the risk assessment, a site walk and
reconnaissance of the property were conducted on August 15, 2008. The site visit and reconnaissance was
performed by Ron Marnicio of Tetra Tech EC, Inc. on August 15, 2008. The entire site was examined and
also the surrounding properties and usages. Twenty-nine photographs taken during the site visit are
presented in Appendix A. The photographs identified below highlight the following specific features of
the site:
I. Photograph l:
2. Photograph 17:
3. Photograph 9:
4. Photograph 13:
5. Photograph 2:
6. Photograph 7:
General Location of the Proposed Development Area
View to the South across the Western Portion of the Site
View to the South across the Eastern Portion of the Site
View to the South showing the Nearest Off-Site Residence
View showing the Property Advertisement Sign Posted On-Site
View across Brimbal Avenue showing the existing Commercial/Retail
Establishments
Soil borings made on-site show the soil to be coarse to medium sand, with some fine sand and surficial
organic soil and traces of silt, gravel, clay and debris at depth. The site is generally flat and vegetated with
scrub brush and small trees except where the vegetation was removed to provide access for well
placement or the soil borings, or the groundwater or soil gas sampling. Along the eastern edge of the site,
near Brimbal A venue, there is a section of exposed pavement that is a remnant of a former building
foundation slab. A drain line runs under the site and through a culvert under the Route 128 Access Road
on the northwestern edge of the site.
2.1.3 Evaluation of the Available LFG Composition Data
Soil gas samples were collected at a depth of between 3 and 8 feet below the ground surface by Griffin
Engineering Group, LLC (Griffin Engineering) on December 19, 2007 and August 4, 2008. The 2007
sampling occurred within three sample locations (GP-5, GP-6, and GP-14) and the 2008 sampling
occurred at eight additional locations (GP-6R, GP-11, GP-12, GP-14, GP-20, GP-21, GP-25, and GP-26)
(see Figure 3). A natural gas leak was detected under the street in the vicinity of sample GP-14 as the
result of uncharacteristically high levels of methane being detected in the soil gas being sampled at this
end of the site. Consequently, the LFG toxic constituent results for this sample were highly suspect and
the results of this sample were eliminated from further consideration and use in this risk assessment. In
addition, the sample extraction structures at GP-5 and GP-6 were both destroyed subsequent to the 2007
2-2
sampling event, so additional data collection at these locations was not possible in 2008. For these
reasons, only the 2008 sampling data (with the exception of sample GP-14) were used to establish the
characteristics of the LFG emissions for the risk assessment. The results for H
2
S from the 2007 sample
collected at GP-6 were, however, used in the qualitative assessment of this constituent. Table I presents
the soil gas sample data. The locations of these seven sampling points that were spread across the site are
shown in Figure 3.
It is common that the composition of the waste disposed in various parts of a landfill varies, and that the
composition of the LFG generated at a location depends a great deal on the nature of the waste disposed
there (among other factors like age and moisture content). For this risk assessment, a characterization of
the composition of the LFG that would be released from the site during completion of the proposed
development was necessary. However, this gas does not now exist and cannot, therefore, be measured
directly. In addition, the LFG is likely to change over time as soil gas migration shifts in response to
ongoing waste decay, landfill settlement, and the overlying disturbances associated with the new
development and its construction.
The concentrations of a total of 49 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were quantified by Test America
in each soil gas sample using Method T0-15 (see -Appendix B for the full data reports). Of these
49 VOCs, only 17 were detected in at least one of the seven samples. In addition, samples were also
analyzed for a set of common sulfide compounds. Of these, only one common sulfide (H
2
S) was detected
in any of the seven samples.
After evaluating the concentration patterns detected in the soil gas samples, it was seen that the samples in
the western portion of the site were somewhat distinct in composition from the eastern side. This was
especially true for the soil gas constituents of tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, chloroform,
chlorobenzene, and dichlorodifluoromethane as they were only detected on the western side of the site.
Similarly, methylene chloride and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were only detected on the eastern side of the
site see Table I), As such, the data from GP-6R, GP-20 and GP-26 were considered collectively to
characterize a Western Inhalation Exposure Area (lEA), and the data from GP-11, GP-12, GP-21 and GP-
25 were grouped together to characterize an Eastern lEA. Figure 4 shows the line dividing the site into
these two lEAs. Separate risk calculations were performed for the Western and Eastern lEAs, as well as
for a Site-Wide lEA, whose soil gas characteristics were based on the analytical results for all seven of
the 2008 samples.
Average concentrations for each detected VOC in the soil gas samples from each lEA were calculated for
use in the risk assessments. When a particular compound was not detected in a particular sample in the
set, one half of the maximum detection limit (DL) indicated for that compound by the laboratory was used
as the concentration for the purpose of calculating the average LFG constituent concentration. This
process is in accordance with the MassDEP Guidance for Disposal Site Risk Characterization (MassDEP
1996). Table 2 summarizes these analytical results for the three exposure areas. It should be noted that
bolded entries in the sample results columns indicate a detected concentration of that constituent in that
sample. The maximum measured concentrations were not considered to be characteristic of the LFG
constituent concentrations in the soil gas across the entire site or across an lEA. Use of all the maximum
detected concentrations in the risk assessment would be overly conservative with respect to the risks
posed by actual conditions that might be expected at the site.
2-3
2.2 Exposure Assessment
This exposure assessment identifies the potential exposure areas, the potentially exposed populations and
the potential routes of inhalation exposure for the people associated with the proposed development at the
North Shore Commons Site.
2.2.1 Inhalation Exposure Areas (lEAs)
As described above, the site displayed some soil gas contamination patterns that justified evaluating
potential exposures to soil gas separately in the western and eastern portions of the site. The proposed
development plan depicted in Figure 2 shows a possible Day Care facility in the Western lEA and
possible CommerciaVRetail and Residential use in the Eastern lEA. However, this risk assessment
evaluated all of these potential uses relative to each of the identified lEAs. As such, it is not predicated on
any particular development proposal.
2.2.2 Conceptual Site Model for Air Exposure
A conceptual site model (CSM) illustrates the exposure pathway relationships between the potential
sources of the VOCs associated with the subsurface conditions at the site and the potential inhalation
exposures of these compounds to future users or occupants of the site. A complete exposure pathway is
comprised of the following elements:
A source and mechanism of chemical release to the environment (i.e., releases of LFG from the
subsurface waste material);
An environmental transport medium for the released chemical (i.e., the ambient air where mixing
and dispersion of the released LFG constituents would occur or the indoor air where migrating
soil gas vapors penetrating through cracks in the floor of the proposed new would mix
with ventilated air within the buildings);
A point of potential coritact by people with the contaminated medium (i.e., the breathing zones
within the lEAs); and
A route of intake or exposure (i.e., inhalation of the dispersed LFG constituents by a person at
the site).
Table 3 presents a simplified tabular CSM for the North Shore Commons Site assummg a future
development scenario. It should be noted that the site is currently inactive.
The LFG that is generated within the emplaced waste could migrate up and into the indoor air of the
future buildings as well as into the ambient air. The processes of diffusion and convection could result in
the subsurface contaminants being transported into the ground level indoor air spaces of a potential new
slab-on-grade commerciaVretail or residential structure. The concentration of the LFG contaminants in
the indoor air also is shown to be affected by the ventilation and mixing of the intruding soil gas with
relatively fresh ambient (outside) air. Any future occupants of these structures also would be exposed to
this indoor air. Soil gas also could migrate into the indoor air spaces through preferential migration
pathways, such as storm water or sewer lines, underground utility corridors or building foundations. Soil
gas can also be released into the open air and naturally dispersed. A future site user would be exposed to
these contaminants at some level in the ambient outdoor air.
2-4
2.2.3 Characterization of the Potentially Exposed Populations
The proposed development of the North Shore Commons Site creates the opportunity for a variety of
receptors to be exposed to the LFG emissions via the inhalation route of exposure. These receptors are
described below.
Commercial/Retail Worker - This individual would work on-site inside a new slab-on-grade
building to be constructed as part of the proposed development. The Commercial/Retail Worker
is assumed to be an adult from 18 to 45 years of age who would work at the site 5 days per week
for 8 hours per day over 50 weeks of the year. This receptor is expected to be exposed to indoor
air for 7 hours per day and outdoor ambient air for I hour per day (e.g., during breaks).
Day Care Worker/Toddler- These individuals would be present on-site spending time both inside
and outside a Day Care facility to be constructed as part of the proposed development. The Day
Care Worker would be an adult from 18 to 45 years of age and the Toddler enrolled at the Day
Care would be between l and 5 years of age. Both the Day Care Worker and Toddler are
expected to be present at the site 5 days per week for 8 hours per day over 50 weeks of the year.
Both of these receptors are expected to be exposed to indoor air for 6 hours per day and outdoor
air for 2 hours per day.
Maintenance Worker - This individual would work on-site primarily inside a building to be
constructed as part of the proposed development. The Maintenance Worker is assumed to be an
adult from 18 to 45 years of age who is present at the site 5 days per week for 8 hours per day
over 50 weeks of the year, This receptor is expected to be exposed to indoor air for 7 hours per
day and outdoor ambient air for I hour per day.
Landscape Worker - This individual would work on-site primarily outdoors. The Landscape
Worker is assumed to be an adult from 18 to 45 years of age who is present at the site 5 days per
week for 8 hours per day over 50 weeks of the year. This receptor is expected to be exposed to
indoor air for only I hour per day and outdoor ambient air for 7 hours per day.
Construction Worker- This individual would work on-site and outdoors on projects related to the
proposed development. The Construction Worker is assumed to be an adult at 22 years of age
who accesses the site 5 days per week for 8 hours per day over 26 weeks of the year. This
receptor is expected to be exposed to outdoor air for the entire 8-hour workday.
Utility Worker - This individual would work on-site and outdoors on facilities related to the
proposed development. The Utility Worker is assumed to be an adult at 22 years of age who
accesses the site 5 days per week for 8 hours per day for I week of the year. This receptor is
expected to be exposed to outdoor air for the entire 8-hour workday.
On-Site Adult/Child Resident - These individuals would be present on-site both inside and
outside of a new slab-on-grade residential building constructed as part of the proposed
development. The On-Site Resident could be an Adult from 15 to 30 years of age or a Child from
I to 8 years of age. Both the Adult and the Child Resident are expected to be present on-site
7 days per week for 24 hours per day over 52 weeks of the year. These receptors are expected to
be exposed to indoor air for 20 hours per day and outdoor air for 4 hours per day.
Off-Site Adult/Child Resident - These individuals would not be present on-site, but would be
residing adjacent to the site. The Off-Site Resident would be an Adult from 15 to 30 years of age
2-5
or a Child from I to 8 years of age. Both the Adult and the Child Resident are expected to be
present at the off-site location 7 days per week for 24 hours per day over 52 weeks of the year.
These receptors are expected to be exposed to outdoor air for only 4 hours per day.
Commercial/Retail Customer - This receptor would temporarily be present at a new slab-on-
grade retail structure to be constructed as part of the proposed development. The Customer could
be either an Adult or a Child. The Commercial/Retail Customer is assumed to access the site once
per day 5 days per week for 0.5 hour per day over 50 weeks of the year. These receptors are
expected to be exposed to indoor air for 1/4 hour per day and outdoor air for 1/4 hour per day.
Trespasser - This member of the public may enter the site now or after development despite
physical barriers or prohibitions to not do so. An On-Site Trespasser is likely to be "passing
through" to a surrounding area adjacent to the site. The Trespasser is assumed to be an adolescent
teenager from 8 to 15 years of age who may be present at the site about once a day (during the
seven warmer months of the year) for about two hours per incursion. The trespasser is expected to
be outdoors and would, therefore, only be exposed to the outdoor air encountered at the site.
2.3 Dose-Response Assessment
The relationship between the level of exposure and the likelihood and/or severity of an adverse health
effect can be determined by analyzing the toxicity of a LFG constituent. Section 7 .2.1 of the Guidance for
Disposal Site Risk Characterization (MassDEP 1996) indicates:
"A Reference Concentration (RfC, in units of mg/m
3
) is the inhalation exposure concentration
(with uncertainty spanning perhaps an order of magnitude or greater) to which daily exposure of a
human population, including sensitive populations, is likely to be free of appreciable effects. The
Massachusetts Contingency Plan requires that primary consideration be given to information
developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (31 0 CMR 40.0993(5)(a))."
Similarly, Section 7.2.2 of the Guidance for Disposal Site Risk Characterization (MassDEP 1996)
indicates:
"The ability of a chemical to increase the incidence of cancer in a target population is described by
one of two measures: the cancer slope factor or the unit risk. The Unit Risk is the upper 95%
Confidence Limit of the mean incremental lifetime cancer risk estimated to result from lifetime
exposure to an agent if it is in the air at a concentration of I J.Lg/m
3
."
The inhalation toxicity values applied in this risk assessment are presented in Table 4. The following is a
list of sources for both RfC and Inhalation Unit Risk (IUR) values in the order of preference for use in
this risk assessment:
I. MassDEP' s Shortforms for Human Health Risk Assessment default v0207 workbook,
February 2007;
2. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEP A 2008) Integrated Risk Information System
(IRIS);
3. USEPA's Provisional Peer Reviewed Toxicity Values (PPRTVs); and
4. Other Toxicity Values. When information is not available in IRIS or PPRTV, the following
sources were reviewed to determine whether comparable values exist that are appropriate for
quantitative risk assessment:
2-6
a. Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR 2008) - ATSDR has produced
Toxicological Profiles for over 275 hazardous substances.
b. California EPA (CaiEPA 2008)- These values are reviewed by toxicologists for the State of
California, and address both cancer and non-cancer health effects.
c. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Regional Database of Preliminary
Remediation Goals - This database was developed under an interagency agreement with the
USEPA and includes toxicity information use utilized by USEPA Regions III, VI, and IX.
d. Other USEPA source documents and USEPA Technical Support.
2.4 Risk Characterization
The risk characterization step combines the hazard identification, exposure assessment, and dose-response
assessment components to develop a quantitative estimate of the chronic risk of harm to human health.
For this risk assessment, cancer and/or non-cancer risks were estimated separately for the potential
inhalation exposures of the identified receptors. Incremental chemical-specific contributions to risk were
then summed to generate cumulative Excess Lifetime Cancer Risk (ELCR) estimates and/or cumulative
non-cancer Hazard Indices (HI) estimates for exposure to indoor and outdoor air. These results for indoor
air exposure and for outdoor air exposure were then added together (when the receptor was assumed "to be
exposed to both media) and the sums were compared to the MassDEP Cumulative Receptor Risk Limits
(31 0 CMR 40.0933( 6)) to assess whether a condition of "no significant risk" would exist for the proposed
development. A condition of "no significant risk" of harm to human health exists for a potentially
exposed individual if:
the Cumulative Receptor Non-Cancer Risk calculated for that individual (i.e., the HI) is less than
or equal to the Cumulative Receptor Non-Cancer Risk Limit of 1.0; and
the Cumulative Receptor Cancer Risk calculated for that individual (i.e., the ELCR) is less than
or equal to the Cumulative Cancer Risk Limit of I x I o'.
Section 7 .4.1 of the MassDEP Guidance for Disposal Site Risk Characterization states that the potential
for non-cancer health effects is measured by the HI. The HI ratio compares the exposure concentration of
the "Oil or Hazardous Material" (OHM) within the air to the allowable level or the RfC (Reference
Concentration toxicity value). This ratio is calculated using the following equation:
HI; = OHM, I RfC, = CAM EAt I RfC,
Section 7.4.2 of the MassDEP Guidance for Disposal Site Risk Characterization states that the potential
for cancer health effects is measured by the ELCR. The ELCR value represents the probability of
developing cancer over a lifetime due to a specified exposure concentration of OHM within the air. The
IUR toxicity value is a measure of cancer potency and is used to estimate the ELCR by the following
equation:
ELCR, = OHM, x IUR; = CAidEAi x IUR;
The following sections discuss the indoor and outdoor air risk characterizations, as well as the models
used to perform the assessments.
2.4.1 Indoor Air Risk Assessment
The LFG generated in the subsurface may potentially migrate up into the indoor air of a new structure that
may be constructed as part of the proposed development. An assessment of the potential inhalation risks
2-7
associated with the volatile constituents measured in the soil gas vapor was conducted with respect to
their potential migration into such buildings. The indoor air risk assessment included the performance of a
series of area-specific cumulative risk calculations that were performed using the average soil gas
concentrations measured in each lEA and other site-specific and default parameters applicable to the site
and the potential receptors that may use the site in the future. Projections were made of the level of
inhalation risk associated with vapor intrusion into a hypothetical future Day Care facility, a Commercial/
Retail establishment, or a Residential structure that may be constructed within each lEA.
The site-specific evaluation was a cumulative multi-constituent inhalation pathway risk assessment that
included the following components:
Using the average calculated soil gas concentrations for each detected VOC within the three
defined lEAs (i.e., the Eastern, Western and Site-Wide lEAs);
Modeling the upward migration of each detected VOC (accounting for diffusion and convection)
into a hypothetical slab-on-grade Day Care, CommerciaVRetail, or Residential building (using the
vapor intrusion model and the default soil parameters used by MassDEP to calculated the MCP
GW-2 Method I Groundwater Standards);
Using the projected indoor air VOC concentrations as the exposure point concentratio-ns for the
receptors associated with the hypothetical development scenarios (i.e., an Adult and Child
Resident, a Day Care Worker, a Day Care Toddler, and a Commercial/Retail Worker) by
considering indoor air mixing and ventilation with fresh outdoor air at each structure;
Calculating the inhalation-related exposure to each detected/modeled VOC;
Applying the appropriate inhalation toxicity values for cancer and/or non-cancer health effect
endpoints for each VOC detected in each lEA;
Summing the constituent-specific contributions to the cumulative ELCR and/or the cumulative
non-cancer HI for each receptor to calculate the corresponding cumulative risk estimates for each
lEA; and
Comparing these estimates to threshold limits for cancer risk (i.e., an ELCR of l.OE-5) and/or
non-cancer risk (i.e., a HI of I) to assess the suitability of the current conditions in each lEA for
potential development of the types identified with respect to possible vapor intrusion.
The USEPA Johnson and Ettinger (J&E) Vapor Intrusion Model (USEPA 2004) was used to calculate the
projected indoor air concentrations associated with the average soil gas VOC concentrations for each
lEA. The vapor intrusion and inhalation risk calculations were performed for each of the f0ur hypothetical
receptors (i.e., a resident, an adult worker at a day care, a toddler at a daycare, and a commerciallretail
worker). The calculations were performed using a combination of site-specific information, default
MassDEP parameters used for the determination of the MCP GW-2 Method I Standards and default J&E
model assumptions. Table 5 presents the site-specific input parameters that were assumed for the vapor
intrusion analysis.
Other input parameters to the vapor intrusion modeling or receptor-specific exposure parameters used in
the risk calculations varied across the four hypothetical future use scenarios. These scenario-specific
assumptions were used to more accurately reflect the conditions and lengths of times that each receptor
associated with that scenario could be exposed to LFG emissions. The length and width of the potential
future Day Care and Commerciai!Retail buildings were estimated based on the potential site configuration
shown in Figure 2. The length and width of the potential future Residential building was taken as the
2-8
default assumption used in the calculation of the MCP GW-2 Method I Standards. Table 6 presents the
input parameters whose values differed for the various scenarios to account for variations in the possible
building dimensions, the people likely to use or occupy the buildings, and the amount of time the person
would potentially be exposed to soil gas contaminants intruding into the indoor air.
Using the site-specific soil gas concentrations, soil properties, and building characteristics, the vapor
intrusion modeling was performed using the J&E Model for each of the three lEAs for:
I. each of the VOCs detected in the soil gas in that lEA (i.e., for 10 VOCs in the Eastern lEA, 13
VOCs in the Western lEA, and 15 VOCs in the Site-Wide lEA); and
2. the residential, commercial/retail, and day care exposure scenarios.
These combinations represent 570 different J&E modeling runs (i.e., 3 lEAs x 5 future use scenarios x I 0,
13, or 15 VOCs per lEA, respectively). Appendix D presents a selection of these J&E Model calculation
worksheets [SG-ADV Version 3.1; 02/04] that were used to calculate the chemical-specific indoor air
inhalation risks. For illustration, the worksheets for the following cases are presented in Appendix D:
Set D-1: Residential (Adult) Scenario for tetrachloroethene for the Site-Wide lEA
Set D-2: Residential (Child) Scenario for tetrachloroethene for the Site-Wide lEA
Set D-3: Commercial/Retail Scenario for tetrachloroethene for the Site-Wide lEA
Set D-4: Day Care (Adult) Scenario for tetrachloroethene for the Site-Wide lEA
Set D-5: Day Care (Toddler) Scenario for tetrachloroethene for the Site-Wide lEA
Set D-6: Day Care (Toddler) Scenario for tetrachloroethene for the Western lEA
Results of the Indoor Air Risk Assessment
The MCP requires cumulative cancer and non-cancer risks to be calculated for a receptor for the full set
of chemicals and exposure routes associated with each complete exposure pathway. A cumulative ELCR
. of I.OE-05 or less indicates a condition of "no significant risk" of harm to human health based on the
projected cancer health effect endpoint. A cumulative HI of 1.0 or less indicates a condition of "no
significant risk" of harm to human health based on projected non-cancer health effect endpoints.
Accordingly, cumulative ELCRs and/or His were calculated for the hypothetical On-Site Resident (Adult and
Child), Commercial/Retail Worker, Adult Day Care Worker, and the Day Care Toddler by summing the
individual risks contributions projected for each LFG constituent detected in each lEA.
Appendix E contains the tabulated J&E vapor intrusion modeling results for each soil gas constituent in
each lEA and the resulting location-, chemical-, and receptor-specific contributions to the cumulative
ELCR and cumulative non-cancer HI for each evaluated receptor. Table 7 presents the cumulative ELCRs
and His that were calculated for each lEA and receptor by summing the constituent-specific contributions
to risk. The results are summarized in Table 8.
As indicated in Table 8, there were no potential non-cancer health risks relative to indoor air exposure for
any receptor within any lEA exceeding the MCP-specified cumulative HI of I. However, the on-site
Lifetime (Adult and Child) Resident exceeds the MCP cancer risk threshold of I.OE-5 in the Site-Wide and
Western lEAs, but not in the . Eastern lEA. These exceedances are primarily due to exposure to
tetrachloroethene, which was detected at one location in the Western lEA (and hence is also a part of the Site-
Wide lEA), but was not detected in the Eastern lEA.
The cumulative cancer and non-cancer results indicate that commercial/retail and day care redevelopment
would not be of concern in any of the lEAs given the results of the cumulative inhalation pathway risk
2-9
assessment. In addition, the results of the cumulative inhalation pathway risk assessment indicate that
residential development also would not be of concern in the Eastern lEA, but may not be suitable for the
Western lEA given the current conditions at the site. It is important to note that there is no residential
development proposed for the Western lEA under the plan depicted in Figure 2.
2.4.2 Outdoor Air Risk Assessment
The sections that follow consider the following aspects of the exposure and risk assessment with respect
to the outdoor air at the site: the emission rate of LFG; the spatial distribution of the LFG constituents; the
dilution of the emitted LFG constituents as they mix and disperse in the ambient air, and an estimate of
the concentration of the LFG constituents in the outdoor air of the exposure area.
LFG Emission Rate - LandGEM
The mass flux or volumetric flow of the LFG generated within the material disposed in a landfill is site-
specific and varies both spatially and temporally. The amount of LFG produced depends on the
characteristics of both the waste and the site, including the waste type, age, temperature, moisture,
avenues for gas migration, and the local barometric pressure.
For this analysis, direct measurement (e.g., by using flux box measurements) of the amount or flux of
LFG generated at the site may not yield quantitative results that would be representative of the proposed
development scenario. As was noted, the landfill has been inactive for some time and has a layer of soil
over the emplaced waste material and, as such, LFG flow rates and subsurface pressure gradients may
change when the proposed development occurs. In addition, site conditions affecting LFG generation
rates are not the same now as they will be in the future, such as moisture content, compaction and
channels for gas collection and preferential migration.
In light of these factors, LFG generation and emission rates were estimated by Griffin Engineering using
LandGEM (Landfill Gas Emissions Model). LandGEM is a USEPA screening model, routinely used to
quantij'y emissions from the anaerobic decomposition of landfilled waste in municipal solid waste
landfills .. The model estimates gas generation based on a first-order decomposition rate equation. The
modeling defaults in Land GEM are based on empirical data from a large number of U.S. landfills. A
modeling run was performed using LandGEM Version 3.02 (the most recent version) incorporating both
site-specific data and inputs supplemented with reasonable default values. Due to its relatively small size
and age, the landfill is neither subject to the Clean Air Act (CAA) nor the New Source Performance
Standards (NSPSs) for municipal solid waste landfills. As such, the modeling performed for this
assessment used the USEPA inventory default values for certain primary modeling inputs, in accordance
with LandGEM protocol, as these values were appropriate with respect to the characteristics of this
landfill. For these reasons, the LandGEM output is expected to provide a conservative estimate (i.e.,
reflecting greater LFG emissions than may actually occur) of the LFG generation rate for use in this risk
assessment.
The following site-specific inputs were applied in the LandGEM modeling performed by Griffin
Engineering.
Year Landfill Started Accepting Waste
Year Landfill Stopped Accepting Waste
Current quantity of Waste-In-Place (as of 1962)
Annual Waste Acceptance Quantities 1948-1961
Cumulative Waste-In-Place
2-10
1948
1961
155,909 Mg
(see Results in Appendix C)
12,250 short tons/year or 11,136 Mg/year
155,909 Mg 2008
In addition, the following set of default inputs were applied in the modeling in consideration to the overall
characteristics of the Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill:
Methane Generation Rate Parameter (k)
Potential Methane Generation Capacity (L
0
)
Non-Methane Organic Compound (NMOC) Concentration
Methane Content
0.040 year
1
100 m
3
/Mg
600 ppm (as hexane)
50% by volume
Chemical-specific properties were used for the default gas/pollutant in the model. The projected pollutant
concentrations in the LFG estimated by LandGEM were developed using USEPA's AP-42 emission
factor specifications and were corrected for air infiltration. The summary input, output, and all results of
the LandGEM modeling run are presented in Appendix C. The results estimated Total LFG, Methane,
NMOC, and H
2
S quantities. The primary results that are most applicable to this risk assessment are
summarized in Table 9. The LFG generation rate for 2008 was used for this risk assessment. This was a
conservative selection as the generation rates are projected to continue to decrease over time.
Representative Exposure Point Concentration for Chronic Outdoor Air Exposure
The emissions from the LFG are expected to be released into and through the soil gas and potentially on
and into the ambient air above the site. Once in the ambient air, the constituents will experience some
degree of dilution as they mix with the outdoor air and disperse due to wind and other forces.
A conservative estimate of this degree of mixing and dispersion may be obtained by applying a "box
model" approach to the evaluation of the LFG emissions. The box model approach considers the LFG
emissions being released into and mixing within a box-shaped volume of air, which is also ventilated by
wind carrying generally cleaner air into the box. The height of the box is estimated to be the minimum
height of the layer of air that would be naturally mixed. This mixing is generally caused by the wind
interacting with the roughness of the surface of the ground and protrusions that extend up from the ground
into the air. In this case, these protrusions include the new structures, vegetation, and the receptors. As
such, this height was based on the shorter of these protrusions and was conservatively taken to be the
breathing zone height ofthe site users.
Application of a box model to a slightly contoured surface adds some uncertainty to the conceptual
analysis of air mixing and dispersion relative to the case of a hypothetical flat "box." However, a number
of considerations and factors supported the justification to use the box model approach for this
assessment.
Winds blowing over a grassy landscaped area or parking are (i.e., the approximate conditions of
the flat portions of the site following development) tend to be in a laminar flow regime near the
surface of the ground. This flow regime is characterized by air flow lines that run approximately
parallel to the surface of the ground. When the undulations or changes in elevation of the ground
are not large in a relative sense, the flow lines rise or dip in response to the change in topography
while maintaining the laminar flow regime. When the topographic changes are more abrupt, a
deviation from the laminar flow regime can occur (i.e., separation) and vertical or turbulent
eddies of air flow can result. Separation would be expected to occur somewhat more readily for a
given change in topography when the elevation is falling off. In this situation, the momentum of
the air tends to make the streamline continue on a path that takes it farther fron{ the surface of the
ground. This spreading of the flow lines results in a widening mixing zone or "box" on the
downhill side of a hump. This occurrence would result in a "box" that was shorter at its inlet (or
upwind side) and taller at its outlet (or downwind side). If the separation gets even greater,
2-11
turbulent eddy flow can result. Conversely, if the wind is blowing up a slight grade, the "box"
could be shorter on the downwind side. A flat "box" approach typically provides a conservative
estimate of the near-ground air concentrations for sites that are not steeply sloped and relatively
flat. The layout of the proposed development reflect a fairly flat topography which slants slightly
to the south with relatively continuous contours.
As one assumption of the box model is that the air is well mixed within the box (by small scale
eddies near the ground or turbulent flow around solid features in the box (e.g., vehicles, buildings
and trees), some vertical mixing due to separation at topographic changes would make this
complete mixing assumption more representative of actual conditions.
In consideration of these factors, application of a flat-bottomed "box" with a conservatively specified
constant height was expected to provide a suitable estimate of the ambient air concentration near the
ground at the site.
Weather Underground publishes detailed information on historical wind speed and direction for
established weather stations on its website (www.weatherunderground.com). The nearest weather station
listed on this website to the Town of Beverly is the Beverly Cove Station. Table I 0 presents a summary
of the annual wind speed and direction data reported for the period 2000 through 2007. Data pre-dating
2000 were not available. Table 10 indicates that wind over a long-term average blow across the site from
the southeast toward the northwest. The average annual wind speed was calculated to be 0.54 m/s (see
Table I 0). These wind speeds were used as inputs for the lEA box modeling (see below).
The following three factors are most significant with regard to impacting the estimated concentrations of
the LFG constituents in the air within the box (and, accordingly, at the location of potential inhalation
exposures):
I. The dimensions of the box.
2. LFG emissions into the box via the soil gas.
3. The dilution of the air in the box by the wind bringing generally cleaner air into the box.
These factors can be related to the concentration of any particular LFG constituent mathematically using
the principal of conservation of mass. For this assessment, a steady-state evaluation that assumed that
there is no further build-up of LFG constituent concentrations in the air within the box over time was
appropriate, as this assumption provides an estimate of the highest concentration that would be generated
at the point of exposure. Assuming steady-state conditions, the influx of a LFG constituent must equal the
outflow of that LFG constituent from the box. Mathematically, this development is written in terms of a
"box" located in the proposed development area and coinciding with the footprint of one of the lEAs, as
defined in Figure 4 and described below.
Influx Contributions (from the south and east given the annual average wind is out of the southeast)
LFG Constituent Influx with the Wind from the South (INws):
Where:
INwsi
Vs
WIEA
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the south [ug/s];
Average speed of the wind blowing from the south [m/s];
Width of the lEA perpendicular to the flow of wind from the south [m];
2-12
MHIEA
CINWSi
Mixing Height of the air within the lEA [m]; and
Concentration ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the south [ug/m
3
].
LFG Constituent Influx with the Wind from the East (INWE):
Where:
IN WEi
VE
LIEA
MHIEA
CINWEi
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the east [ug/s];
Average speed of the wind blowing from the east [m/s];
Length of the lEA perpendicular to the flow of wind from the east [m];
Mixing Height of the air within the lEA [m]; and
Concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the east [ ug/m
3
].
LFG Constituent Influx from the LFG influx from the subsurface of the lEA (!Nv):
Where:
IN vi
Q
CINVi
Influx of LFG constituent "i" from the LFG influx from the subsurface of the lEA [ ug/s ];
Flux ofLFG released per unit area within the lEA [m
3
/m
2
-s];
Concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the LFG emissions being released into the lEA
[ug/m
3
];
Length of the lEA [m]; and
Width of the lEA [m].
Outflow Contributions (to the north and west given the observed annual average wind direction
LFG Constituent Outflow with the Wind to the North (OUT WN):
Where:
OUTWNi
VN
WIEA
MHIEA
CBOXi
Outflow ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing to the north [ug/s];
Average speed of the wind blowing to the north [m/s];
Width of the lEA perpendicular to the flow of wind to the north [m];
Mixing Height of the air within the lEA [m]; and
Concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the box representing the lEA [ ug/m
3
].
LFG Constituent Outflow with the Wind to the West (OUTww):
Where:
OUTwwi
Vw =
LIEA
MHIEA
Csoxi
Outflow ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing to the west [ug/s];
Average speed of the wind blowing to the west [m/s];
Length of the lEA perpendicular to the flow of wind to the west [m];
Mixing Height of the air within the lEA [ m]; and
Concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the box representing the lEA [ ug/m
3
].
2-13
Setting the sum of the inflow terms to the sum of the outflow terms yields the following expression:
Solving this expression for CBox;, the concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the box representing the
lEA, results in the following relationship:
[v, X W lEA X C lNWSi
l
r ] [ Q X C lNVi X L lEA
+ t.VE X LIHA X c JNWEi +
MH lEA
CBOXi
The concentration of the air in the box is indicated to be affected by contributions of the LFG constituents
from the soil gas below the site and potentially by the influx of LFG constituents into the box from
upwind areas. Initial applications of the box model indicated that given the size of the lEA, the speed of
the wind, and the relatively low projected LFG emission rate, both sources of constituent contributions
could be important.
As presented previously in Table 9, the LandGEM model estimated a Total LFG quantity of6.29 m
3
/m
2
-
year (or 2.0 E-07 m
3
/m
2
-s) for the year 2008. As noted earlier, this value was used for this conservative
assessment as the generation rate in any future year is projected to be lower and, accordingly, associated
with less potential inhalation risk. This value is the input parameter "Q" in the box model relationships. It
was assumed that the LFG emission rate or flux (Q) was the same across all locations on the landfill.
The three lEAs were assessed separately and in a certain sequence due to differences in the soil gas
concentrations, model inputs (such as the length and width of the box), and the potential contributions of
LFG constituents from upwind areas. The Eastern lEA was evaluated first, as the outputs from that
analysis (CBoXIEAi) were then used as an input to the analysis performed for the Western lEA (i.e., the
concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing out of the box of the Eastern lEA was assumed
to blow into the box of the Western lEA). The three analyses are presented in the sequence in which they
were performed.
The Box Model for the Eastern Inhalation Exposure Area
This "box" includes the southeastern portion of the site. As shown in Figure 4, this box has an
approximate length (the dimension in the southeast to northwest wind direction) of 565 feet (or 172.2 m)
and an approximate width (the dimension in the southwest to northeast direction) of325 feet (or 99.1 m).
The maximum mixing layer height was conservatively assumed to be 6 feet (1.83 m) to represent the
height of the breathing zone of the on-site receptors. As the actual mixing zone would be expected to be
taller (due to the influences of the taller buildings and trees associated with the development protruding
higher above the ground and increasing the turbulence and circulation), this assumption should not lead to
an underestimate of risk. The Eastern lEA box model dimensions were:
2-14
EASTERN lEA
LIEA = 172.2 m
Since this box extends to the southeastern boundary of the site (i.e., the upwind side), no contribution of
LFG constituents was assumed to come with the wind inflow from the upwind directions.
Mathematically, this translates into the following:
c!Nws; = c!NWEi = o
Calculating the concentration of the LFG constituents in the lEA was then accomplished using the
following simplified relationship:
Csox; = ((Q X CrNV; X w,EA X Luu;) + MH!Jid_
(VNx W1EA) + (Vwx L1EA)
The calculated LFG constituent concentrations within the lEA (CBoxi) are presented in Table II for the
Eastern lEA. CBoxi was then used as the estimate of CJNWsi and CINWEi for the Western lEA analysis, since
the Western lEA is located conceptually downwind of the Eastern lEA and would, therefore, be
influenced by the LFG concentrations coming out of the box for the Eastern lEA.
The Box Model for the Western Inhalation Exposure Area
This box includes the northwestern portion of the site. As shown in Figure 4, the Western lEA has an
approximate length (in the southeast to northwest wind direction) of 325 feet (99.1 m) and an
approximate width (in the southwest to northeast direction) of 235 feet (71.6 m). The maximum mixing
layer height was again conservatively assumed to be 6 feet (1.8 m) to represent the height of the breathing
zone of the on-site receptors. As discussed above, the actual mixing height is likely to be greater than 6
feet, which would cause the resulting outdoor air concentration to be lower that what was projected for
this assessment. The Western lEA box model dimensions were:
WESTERN lEA
WIEA = 71.6 m
2-15
Since this box is situated at the northwestern end of the site, it could experience an inflow contribution of
LFG constituents from the wind flowing out of the Eastern lEA. This matching condition can be
established by setting:
Cmwst= CmwEi = Csoxt(Eastern lEA)
Calculating the concentration of the LFG constituents in this lEA was then accomplished using the
following relationship:
The calculated LFG constituent concentrations for the Western lEA are presented in Table 12.
The Box Model for the Site-Wide Inhalation Exposure Area
This "box" includes the total area of the site. As shown in Figure 4, this box has an approximate length
(the dimension in the southeast to northwest wind direction) of 650 feet (or 198.1 m) and an approximate
width (the dimension in southwest to northeast direction) of 400 feet (or 121.9 m). The site is relatively
evenly contoured (from elevations of 78 feet to 86 feet). A maximum mixing layer height was again
conservatively assumed to be 6 feet (1.83 m) to represent the height of the breathing zone of the on-site
receptors. The Site-Wide lEA box model dimensions:
SITE-WIDE lEA
WIEA = 121.9 m
LIEA = 198.1 m
Since this box includes the entire site, no contribution of LFG constituents was assumed to come with the
wind inflow from the upwind directions. Mathematically, this translates into the following:
CJNws;= CmwEi = 0
Calculating the concentration of the LFG constituents in the lEA was then accomplished using the
following simplified relationship:
CBOXi = ((Q X Cmvi X WrEA X LrEJ) -i- MH!Jid
(VNx WrEA) + (Vwx LfEA)
The calculated LFG constituent concentrations within the lEA (CBox;) are presented in Table 13 for the
Site-Wide lEA.
2-16
Results of the Outdoor Air Risk Assessment
The MCP requires cumulative cancer and non-cancer risks to be calculated due to multiple chemicals and
exposure routes. A cumulative HI and ELCR were calculated for each !EA. The development of the results is
shown in Table 14, and the results are summarized in Table 15. No risk estimates for exposure to the outdoor
air exceeded the MassDEP cumulative risk thresholds.
2.4.3 Quantitative Cumulative Inhalation Pathway Risk Assessment
This section summarizes the quantitative aggregation of the indoor and outdoor risk results for each
receptor that was quantitatively evaluated in this assessment (a qualitative assessment of the potential
inhalation risks to Off-Site Residents and potential future CommerciaVRetail Customers is discussed in
Section 2.4.4 below). Each receptor associated with the potential site development (with the exception of
the Construction Worker, the Utility Worker, and the Trespasser who are assumed to spend all of their
time outdoors) was assumed to spend some portion of their time at the site exposed to both indoor air and
the outdoor air. Therefore, the total exposure for each receptor was quantified by:
calculating the fraction of time that each receptor spends indoors and multiplying that fraction by
the projected ELCR and/or HI calculated for that receptor for each lEA in the indoor air risk
assessment (which implicitly assumes a full day of inhalation exposure according to that specific
exposure scenario);
calculating the fraction of time that each receptor spends outdoors and multiplying that fraction
by the projected ELCR and/or HI calculated for that receptor for each lEA in the outdoor air risk
assessment; and
summing the two components of the inhalation risk to develop a combined cumulative ELCR
and/or HI for each receptor for each !EA.
The ELCRs for the Adult and Child On-Site Residents were combined to estimate an ELCR for potential
Lifetime exposure. These steps were completed for each receptor for which a quantitative evaluation was
to performed, and the results are presented in Table 16.
A cumulative ELCR of l.OE-05 or less indicates that a condition of "no significant risk" of harm to
human health exists based on the projected level of cancer health effects. The combined cumulative
ELCRs for all but the Lifetime On-Site Resident were below this threshold. The combined cumulative
ELCR for the Lifetime On-Site Resident exceeded this threshold in the Site-Wide lEA (ELCR of 1.26E-
05) and the Western lEA (ELCR of 2.77E-05). These ELCRs were driven by the LFG constituent
tetrachloroethene, which was not detected in the samples collected in the Eastern !EA. It should be
recalled that the Site-Wide lEA includes both the Western and Eastern lEAs. The risk associated with the
Site-Wide lEA is primarily associated with the projected exposure to LFG in the Western IgA, since the
combined cumulative ELCR for the Eastern lEA (ELCR of 5.50E-07) is well below the risk threshold of
l.OE-05.
A cumulative HI of 1.0 or less indicates that a condition of "no significant risk" of harm to human health
exists based on the projected level non-cancer health effects. The highest HI calculated for this assessment
(1.26E-02 for the Child On-Site Resident in the Site-Wide lEA) is almost two orders of magnitude lower
than the threshold value. Therefore, it can be concluded that there is "no significant risk" to any of the
assessed receptors with respect to non-cancer health effect endpoints relative to proposed development.
2-17
2.4.4 Qualitative Cumulative Inhalation Pathway Assessments for the Off-Site Residents
and the Commercial/ Retail Customers
Supplementing the quantitative assessment discussed above, qualitative assessments of the human health
risks attributable to inhalation exposure to hypothetical Off-Site Adult and Child Residents and a
potential Commercial/Retail Customer also were performed.
On July 15, 2008, methane was detected at sampling location GP-20 at a concentration of 17.4% of the
Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) (Griffin Engineering 2008). This location was approximately 30 feet from
a residential structure on the northern edge of the Northridge Homes Cooperative property (located
adjacent to the southwestern corner of the site). This 2.5 story structure is Building K of that complex.
A crushed stone trench exists along the property line between GP-20 and Building K. It is believed that
the trench may have been installed in the past for gas venting purposes. On July 22, 2008 (at the request
of the MassDEP Solid Waste Section), Griffin Engineering conducted additional methane sampling
within and around Building K. Soil gas samples were collected on both sides of the crushed stone trench
to determine if it was acting as an effective barrier to gas migration toward the off-site residential
complex. Thirteen soil gas samples were collected in the vicinity of the crushed stone trench. Eight of the
samples were collected on the Northridge Homes Cooperative side ofthe trench and five were collected
on the side toward the site and the former landfill. Field screening of the soil gas detected methane in the
subsurface at concentrations exceeding 25% of the LEL at two locations on the landfill side of the trench.
Methane was detected at a maximum concentration of only 0.2% of the LEL on the residential side of the
trench. These results indicate that the crushed stone trench was effectively venting the LFG to the ambient
air at this time. Additional sampling in the basement laundry room of Building K revealed no methane.
Utility penetrations into Building K also were examined by Griffin Engineering. Natural gas, electricity
and telephone services were all found to be installed on the outside of the building foundation wall and to
penetrate the building wall above grade. As such, these services cannot provide a preferential pathway for
potential LFG migration into the building. The water and sewer services for Building K enter the building
through the lowest slab level. Air quality testing near the sewer cleanout, the water main shut-offvalve, in
the hallway in the lowest level of the building, and in the laundry room of Building K provided no
evidence of LFG intrusion into Building K. Based on these observations, there was no evidence that LFG
is migrating into Building K.
While the sampling on either side of the crushed stone trench, in the basement of Building K, and near the
utility penetrations of the walls of Building K did not quantifY the levels of specific toxic VOCs (i.e., the
samples were field screened and only analyzed for methane), the lack of methane at any significant level
on the residential side of the trench and no indication of methane in Building K (the residence closest to
the former landfill) supports the position that other toxic LFG constituents also are not migrating to and
into this building. As such, a condition of "no significant risk" is indicated to exist relative to the potential
inhalation of LFG constituents in indoor air by an Off-Site Resident. As the projected outdoor air
inhalation risks for the On-Site Resident were well below the MassDEP threshold levels, the outdoor air
inhalation risks at an off-site residence (like Building K) should be even less. While the Off-Site Resident
would have the same exposure parameters as the On-Site Resident, the outdoor air concentrations of the
LFG constituents should be less than are projected for the on-site locations due to the fact that the existing
off-site residential locations are generally upwind of the site or farther from the landfill source material
(which allows for greater mixing and dispersion of the LFG emissions). Taken together, the inhalation
risks to the Off-Site Resident resulting from indoor and outdoor exposures are indicated to be very small
and pose "no significant risk" to the Off-Site Residents (adult or child).
2-18
Because the human health risks relative to both cancer and non-cancer health effects were found to not be
significant for the Commercial/Retail Worker, it can be inferred that LFG constituents at the site would
also not pose a significant risk to the Commercial/Retail Customer (who will spend less time on-site, both
indoors and outdoors, than the Commercial/Retail Worker).
2.4.5 Qualitative Odor Threshold Evaluation for Hydrogen Sulfide (H
2
S)
H
2
S is a colorless, flammable gas that is easily identified by a "rotten egg" odor. H
2
S can cause eye, nose
and throat irritation at concentrations less than I 0 ppm, with higher concentrations causing significant
health issues and even death. Olfactory fatigue (which is when a person looses the ability to smell a
particular compound) occurs at high concentrations and/or with continuous exposure to lower
concentrations of H
2
S in air. This can lead individuals to believe that there is no danger present, even as
concentrations increase to potentially more toxic levels. Table 17 summarizes the soil gas H
2
S data
collected at the site and the odor thresholds and occupational health limits for airborne H
2
S from several
pertinent sources.
H
2
S was detected at GP-6 in December, 2007 and at GP-6R in August, 2008. There were also detections
at two locations on the landfill side of a gravel trench along the western boundary of the site during the
same sampling event near Building K discussed above, although was no H
2
S detected inside Building K.
The detected concentrations were above all three odor thresholds listed in Table 17, but below the lowest
occupational health limit of I 0 ppm. These detections confirm the presence of H
2
S in the Western lEA at
levels that should be easily smelled by the average person. No sampling for H
2
S was performed in the
Eastern lEA. As such, it cannot be determined whether H
2
S may pose an odor problem or a potential
health concern in that part of the site. It has been shown that H
2
S may have detrimental health effects on
children at levels as low as 0.6 ppm (Simonton and Spears 2007).
2.5 Uncertainty Analysis
Risk assessments are subject to a number of uncertainties which necessitate the making of assumptions
for quantitative analysis. For risk assessments, these assumptions are typically based on "best estimate"
values of the uncertain parameters or, more typically, on conservative assumptions selected specifically
so that the estimated exposures or risks will not be underestimated. The following discussion examines
the primary uncertainties associated with this risk assessment and their implications relative to this risk
assessment.
2.5.1 LFG Composition
The composition of the LFG that may be emitted in the future was estimated based on a set of
measurements of the soil gas at seven locations throughout the site. As noted previously, the analytical
results from a couple of samples had to be discounted and not used in the risk assessment (e.g., due to
natural gas infiltration from a pipeline leak and destruction of the sampling port). Consequently, the LFG
composition was based on a relatively small number of measurements. An analysis of this data was
performed and it was seen that the soil gas appeared to be characteristically different in the eastern and
western portions of the site with respect to the set of constituents that was detected and their
concentrations. This finding supported the decision to establish separate exposure areas for the risk
assessment. However, splitting the relatively small data set left each of the two lEAs with only three or
four samples on which to base the LFG constituent compositions. While the calculated average LFG
constituent concentrations for each lEA are considered to be representative for use in this risk assessment,
some uncertainty associated with this characterization exists. For example, tetrachloroethene (the risk
2-19
driver for the indoor air risk assessments for the Western lEA) was only detected at one of three locations
in the Western lEA and was not detected at all in the Eastern lEA.
No soil gas samples from the Eastern lEA were analyzed for H
2
S. Based on the sampling performed in
the Western lEA, possible odor concerns might be anticipated for the entire site if no mitigation steps are
taken.
2.5.2 LFG Generation and Emission Rate
The LFG generation and assumed emission rates were estimated by Griffin Engineering using the
industry standard LandGEM model that was developed by USEPA. This model was selected for use due
to its demonstrated applicability to municipal landfills of the size and age of the Former Brimbal Avenue
Landfill. The default modeling inputs in LandGEM were based on empirical data from a large number of
similar U.S. landfills. While there is variability in the exact nature of municipal wastes and the amount of
LFG they can generate, the LandGEM model is reported to provide an accurate prediction of the LFG
generation. Site-specific waste-in-place histories were used in the modeling, and other input parameters
were tailored to site-specific values whenever the site documentation allowed. LandGEM is expected to
provide a conservative estimate of the LFG generation and emission rate (i.e., reflecting greater LFG
emissions than may actually occur). The LandGEM predictions of LFG generation were seen to be
decreasing with time due to the fact that waste placement ended some time ago. As a conservative
measure, the current LFG emission rate (i.e., the highest value projected with respect to the future
composting scenario) was used in the risk assessment. Over the next 20 years the LFG generation rate is
projected to drop by approximately 55% (see Table 9) which would result in a commensurate drop in the
projected exposure point concentrations and inhalation risks.
2.5.3 Atmospheric Mixing and Dispersion Modeling Using a Box Model
The mixing and wind-borne dispersion of LFG emissions in the outdoor air at a future developed site will
be influenced by a number of site-specific aspects of the proposed development, the local meteorology,
and the type and exact location of the activities associated with the development. Many of these factors
have not been specified at this time. As such, a detailed modeling of the potential mixing and dispersion
of released LFG constituents at the landfill could not be supported.
For this assessment, a conservative steady-state evaluation was conducted which assumed no build-up of
LFG constituent concentrations in the air within the box over time (i.e., established the maximum
concentration expected within the box). The mixing height parameter limits the amount of air into which
the LFG emissions can mix and dilute by placing a top on the box. The smaller the mixing height, the
more conservative the analysis will be in terms of not providing too much dilution volume for the LFG
constituents to mix within. As such, the smallest representative and plausible mixing height of 6 feet
( 1.83 m) was selected for each of the lEA box model simulations. This value is reflective of the minimal
height of the potential future intrusions into the box by structures, landscaping, vegetation, and vehicles
that would serve to divert and mix the air flow within the box. This height also is consistent with the
thickness of the breathing zone of a typical adult. Increasing the height of the box to account for the
proposed buildings would increase the dilution of the LFG constituents within the air, thus lowering the
exposure point concentrations and the corresponding ELCR and HI projections. A reduction in height
(especially for the Western lEA to account for the presence of children) would decrease the dilution, and
increase the ELCR and HI projections somewhat. The assumed mixing height value is reasonably
conservative and appropriate given the uncertainties associated with the nature and details of the future
development that have been considered at this time.
2-20
Wind speed inputs into the box model calculations were selected based on long term average
meteorological data from the Weather Underground website. This data was selected because it was
collected at a nearby analogous location and had the required published meteorological information. The
seacoast areas along the north shore of Boston experience similar local wind and meteorological patterns.
Observing that the predominant wind directions annually for this area are from the southeast, applications
of the box models were set-up to account for the inflow influence of the "upwind" portions of the site.
This approach assumes the greatest inflow of LFG constituents into the lEA, as winds blowing from the
northwest would pass over little or no emplaced waste and pick up minimal LFG emissions. As such, the
wind data was used to set-up the box models in a conservative fashion such that an underestimate of the
resulting risks was very unlikely.
The portions of the site that were defined as the Eastern and Western lEAs (and also the Site-Wide lEA)
are not perfectly rectangular, as is assumed in the box modeling. The lengths and widths assumed for the
boxes used in the mixing and dispersion analyses for each lEA were selected to maintain an equivalent
overall area for that lEA and in consideration of the relative amount of emplaced waste that was indicated
to be beneath the rectangular lEA and the actual lEA boundary. This approximation is not expected to
introduce significant uncertainty into the results of the outdoor air risk assessment.
2.5.4 Exposure Frequency and Exposure Duration, and Daily Exposure Time
The ELCR and HI values calculated using the MCP exposure relationship do not explicitly account for a
receptor-specific Exposure Frequency (EF), Exposure Duration (ED), or exposure during only a portion
of a given day. This exposure relationship implicitly reflects a scenario of continuous exposure through
the underlying development of the toxicity values and the averaging times associated with the inhalation
exposure relationship. The anticipated exposures of the identified site receptors under the proposed future
development scenario will not be exposed to the released LFG constituents continuously. For most of the
groups that would be expected to access the future site, the exposure scenarios reflect less than
24 hour/day exposure. Alternate formulations of the ELCR and HI relationships allow these exposure
factors to be explicitly considered through the multiplicative reduction factors (i.e., EF /365 for the HI
and EFxED 125,550 for the ELCR). These exposure-related adjustments for the non-residential receptors
would only serve to reduce the projected risks for the various on-site workers, the Day Care Toddlers, and
the Trespasser. As the risks to these receptors were already less than the MassDEP thresholds, the
exposure-related adjustments would only lead to even lower projected risks that would also reflect "no
significant risk."
The fractions of time each receptor was assumed to be indoors (and exposed to the indoor air) and
outdoors (and exposed to the ambient air) were explicitly accounted for in the combined cumulative risk
projections for each receptor.
2.5.5 Vapor Intrusion Modeling Input Parameters
The assumed building characteristics and soil properties used in the J&E Modeling for the indoor air risk
assessment were conservative MassDEP defaults (i.e., the values used to establish the MCP Method I
GW-2 Standards) or characteristics established by site-specific measurement or observation. Site-specific
commerciaVretail and day care building dimensions reflective of the proposed development plan depicted
in Figure 2. As such, the projected risks are likely to be higher than would actually result from
development of the site.
Actual future structures may have larger footprints, taller internal spaces, or thicker slabs and foundations
than were assumed for this assessment. All of these differences would lead to lower projected indoor air
2-21
concentrations and lower projected inhalation risks. In addition, many modern commerciaVretail
buildings are designed to maintain a positive pressure differential with respect to tbe outside air. An
effective positive pressure design would essentially eliminate vapor intrusion concerns.
2.5.6 Exposure Parameters
The assumed exposure parameters used in this inhalation risk assessment were either based on site-
specific considerations or were the conservative regulatory defaults. As such, risks are not likely to have
been underestimated.
2.5.7 Toxicity Criteria
This risk assessment incorporated the currently published MassDEP ShortForm and federal toxicity
values in accordance with the hierarchy of preferred sources established by MassDEP. No published, peer
reviewed chronic inhalation toxicity criteria or chemical parameters were identified for 4-ethyltoluene or
1,2-dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane, and no appropriate surrogates were identified. The lack of suitable
inhalation toxicity values for these two constituents would lead to a slight underestimation of the
inhalation risk. Given the level of conservatism included in the other toxicity values and throughout the
assessment, tbis underestimation is not significant with respect to the results of tbe risk assessment.
2-22
3.0 SUMMARY AND FINDINGS
The Town of Beverly is considering a proposal to allow development on a portion of the Former Brimbal
Avenue Landfill in Beverly, MA known as the North Shore Commons Site following the closure of the
former landfill. This human health risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the inhalation risks to
potential future commercial/retail, day care, residential, and other users of the site assuming the site is
developed. The risk assessment focused on potential inhalation exposures to LFG constituents that could
be encountered either inside the proposed new buildings or outside the buildings in the near-field
ambient air.
Analytical data from on-site and off-site sampling performed in 2007 and 2008 were compiled and
evaluated with regard to spatial trends. Based on differences in the detected sets of soil gas contaminants,
the overall site was broken down into a Western Inhalation Exposure Area (where a Day Care facility is
proposed to be built), an Eastern Inhalation Exposure Area (where Commercial/Retail and Residential
facilities are proposed to be built), and a Site-Wide Inhalation Exposure Area (i.e., the whole site). The
soil gas characteristics for each Inhalation Exposure Area were used in combination with conservative
indoor air vapor intrusion modeling and outdoor air atmospheric mixing and dispersion modeling to
estimate the concentrations of the LFG constituents that may be present in the air at potential future
exposure points associated with site development. These concentrations were then combined with current
peer-reviewed inhalation toxicity values to project the potential cancer and non-cancer risks for the
persons that may access and use this area in the future (as the site is currently vacant).
The findings of the risk assessment were as follows:
The analyses indicated that there is "no significant risk" of harm to human health for any of the
evaluated receptors in any portion of the site with the exception of a potential future resident with
lifelong exposure to the released LFGs in the western portion of the site. The projected ELCR for
this scenario exceeded the MassDEP threshold of 1.0 E-5, due to potential vapor intrusion into
the indoor air of a hypothetical new slab-on-grade residence in this area. The LFG constituent
tetrachloroethene was the principal risk driver. No inhalation risk concerns were identified for the
other receptors in the Western Inhalation Exposure Area, or for any of the evaluated receptors in
the Eastern Inhalation Exposure Area. The tetrachloroethene in the western portion of the site
also caused the projected cancer risk for a potential future resident with lifelong Site-Wide
exposure to exceed the MassDEP threshold. The tetrachloroethene was only detected in the soil
gas at one location in the Western Inhalation Exposure Area. No inhalation risk issues were
identified relative to exposure to the outdoor air under any of the evaluated scenarios.
Regarding the potential significance of H
2
S relative to development, no sampling was performed
for H
2
S in the Eastern Inhalation Exposure Area, and only 2 of 3 samples collected in the Western
Inhalation Exposure Area were analyzed for H
2
S. The detection ofH
2
S in the Western Inhalation
Exposure Area (at a maximum concentration of 4.2 ppm) exceeded a number of published odor
thresholds (which ranged between 0.13 ppm and 8.1 ppm). As such, it is likely that people would
be able to smell H
2
S in the Western Inhalation Exposure Area if no mitigative steps are taken. It
could not be determined whether H
2
S may pose an odor problem or a potential health concern in
the eastern part of the site since the H
2
S levels in the soil gas in this area have not been
quantified.
While the off-site sampling associated with Building K of the neighboring residential complex
did not quantifY the levels of specific toxic VOCs, the lack of methane at any significant level on
3-1
the residential side of the off-site interceptor trench and no indication of methane in Building K
(the residence closest to the former landfill) supports the position that other toxic LFG
constituents also are not migrating to and into this building. As such, a condition of "no
significant risk" is indicated to exist relative to the potential inhalation of LFG constituents by an
Off-Site Resident.
The uncertainty analysis indicated that there is a moderate to high level of confidence in these findings.
3-2
4.0 REFERENCES
ATSDR (Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry). 2008. Available online at http://www.
atsdr.cdc.gov/mrls.html
CaiEPA (California EPA). 2008. Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. Available online at
http:l/www.oehha.ca.gov/risklchemicalDBI/index.asp.
Griffin Engineering (Griffin Engineering Group, LLC). 2008. Letter from Robert H. Griffin, P.E. to Mr.
John Carrigan, Solid Waste Section. MassDEP, "Notification of Exceedance of 25% LEL at Property
Line", Brimbal Avenue Property, Beverly, MA. July 23.
MassDEP (Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection). 1996 Guidance for Disposal Site
Risk Characterization. Interim Final Policy #WSC/ORS-95-141, March.
Simonton, Scott and Morgan Spears. 2007. Human Health Effects from Exposure to Low-
Level Concentrations of Hydrogen Sulfide. Occupational Health and Safety. Available online at
http:l/www.ohsonline.com/articles/50654/.
USEPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). 2004. Johnson and Ettinger Model Spreadsheets for
Estimating Subsurface Vapor Intrusion into Buildings, Version 3.1, February. USEPA Version.
USEP A. 2008. Integrated Risk Information System. Available online at http:l/cfpub.epa.gov/
ncealiris/index.cfm.
4-1
FIGURES
I
)
Figure 1
Site Location Map
North Shore Commons Site
Beverly, MA
'-'V&&I_AUV&MJ Beverly, MA

Figure 2
Proposed Layout for Site Development
North Shore Commons Site
Beverly, MA
s
B
N
Total
Partiaa
w
li,QOO SP
lO,OOOSP
l'J)OOSF
23,300 SP
65,300"
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NOR'lHl<tOGI: Hct.IE'S COOI'ERATI"E, INC.
IE) l oct. Hill PAt I

LEGEND
GP-228 __ _
EX. GAS PROBE
CP- 16 0
RIZ- 1
C81
GAS PROBE DESTROYED
CROUNWAITR MOI\ITORING WRL
DRAI N MANHOLE
CATCH BASIN
\
I
"""""


...... ,,
0 ',,,
'' .......... ___ __ _
_G) LGP-2
{ ,.. ___ '
\ I
"-----',;1
"------- ---

c:y'CP-2.3
Figure 3
Soil Gas Sampling Locations
North Shore Commons Site
Beverly, MA
_,..

TETRA TECH EC, INC.
\

t,
I 70 "'
/ e . --
1 111/'- l __-- -<"
/ \ \ /
/ ' '\ ,"' '
/ \,
/ 0 CP- 17 ' '
/ ' ' ,:;V _,,._ .
' (lfl7HOY!D) \ ---'J<"'}Fitr ' '
l
' : \ <>r \ ' '
I \ I \
\ ' '
/ I I ' :' -- -'CP-8 \ ',. ,_
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' \ I '
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,
I
Exposure Area
l \
-.... '--- VHB- 104
...'' ---e-- -- --------
,-. ', .,_
'' ', -- 8 MW- t 'IHB-101 ', 0
', '...;;:::........ ti)\.,
' '\ '
Figure 4
Sizes and Orientations of the
Boxes Assumed for the
Outdoor Air Mixing and
Dispersion Analysis
North Shore Commons Site
Beverly, MA
'1 _0 UJP-2 ',,,
', I ( -- -, ' ...
',, \. \_ ,/ ... _
' ____ ,
. ,.-;,
NOR'lHlitOGI: Ha.4ES COOI'ERA INC.
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fUI<ItliGl1>\. ..... Z2
LEGEND
GP-22
0
EX. GAS PROBE
CP- 16 0
RTZ- 1 fiJ<
CBT
GAS PROBE OESTRO
CROUNWATER MONITO
DRAIN MANHOLE
CATCH BASIN
Approximate
Site-Wide lEA Box
NOimtiiiDCI: Ha.4e
()OO?e:t.All\0,
CIIDII>'* ,_,"""'.

.,_.,
'
Notou:
I. Ed.nt9 c:.r.dltfcno <l'ld Soon4<r) su-...1
by H ... -ck AMocittt.., DaiMiro. NA
2. <;eo Locelan en a'IH'Odmate.



TABLES
Table 1. Summary of Landfill Gas Sampling Results for 2008
>In I Area
Date
GP-20 1RI GP-12 I GP-25
........ " uo"
Western Inhalation Eastern Inhalation
Detection
Exposure Area Exposure Area
Limit
Gases- ASTM D1946-% (v/v)
Carbon Dioxide 13 3.8 16 11 7.4 9.7 9.6
2.1
.....
...... ___
2.1
.... 1? ...
12 13

74 72 77 72 75 70 75
Methane 8.4 7.6 0.027 13 NO 6.0 0.23
Carbon Monoxide NO ND NO NO NO NO NO
T0-15- ppb (v/v)
Acetone 10
16 .
19 NO NO 20 27 19
..3.0 .28
.. 1.4
I No
. __ 7._6_ 3.1
.. .. .
..... _.4.8 ..
Benzyl
25 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Bromodichloromethane 2.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Bromoform 2.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Bromomethane 4.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
2-Butanone (MEK) 10 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
...
i 10 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Carbon Tetrachloride 2.0 NO .... NO NO NO NO NO
Chlorobenzene 2.0 2.2 : ND NO NO NO NO
. ...... 2Q ..... N.D ...
N[) NO NO NO NO
.....
.. Nb
\.Alouo ucu oao oc 4.0 NO NO NO NO NO
Chloroform 2.0 8.1
:, .......
!1\11'1
NO NO NO NO
Chloromethane
. 4.q ..
NO _ND_
_N[)_.
NO ND_
........ f\10
NO
..
1 (EDB) 2.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
1 ,2-Dichlorobenzene 2.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
1,3-L 2.0 ND NO NO NO NO NO NO
1 A-Dichlorobenzene 6.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Dichlorodifluoromethane 2.0 4;0
. .-.;-21 NO NO NO ND
1,1 2.0 NO ND NO NO NO NO NO
1 ,2-Dichloroethane 2.0 NO NO NO NO

NO Nb
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene 2.0 7.2

ND ,
5.1
NO ..
'

< ? .
2.0 NO NO
.NO
NO NO NO NO
1 1-
ucuoc"c 2.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
1 ,2-Dichloropropane 3.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
cis-1
... ....
3.0 NO NO .. _ND __ . ND_
NO NO
u a .. o , .:>-Uivo 2.0
.. - . ...
......
NO
ND
NO NO
1 ,2-Dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane 2.0
- 21
..
4.6. __ ..
2.0
7.t_ .
iNo .
.. _7;8 6.8.< . ',:::6 .
3;1
4-Ethyltoluene 2.0

\is> 'f'ib"""
. 6.3
2.3 -
. NO No
Hexachlorobutadiene 4.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO
2-Hexanone "'.'""'' 10 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Methylene Chloride 2.0 ND NO NO
... Nb
2;5 .. NO NO
4-Methyi-2-Pentanone (MIBK) 10 NO
1 .
NO NO NO NO
2.0
1_,_, ' , - JP
.2.7>
.
......
1,1 ,2,2-T cu avo uuo ucu oao '" 2.0 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO
Tetrachloroethene 2.0
NO ..
......
: .280< NO NO NO NO
Tolue111l ...
. .. . ...... 2 .. 9 ..
1 ..... 1.9_ __
112 ',' _1_5_
..... :
r 21 ___ -. 13 .
1 ,2,4-To ovo nuo uuco "c' '" 5.0 NO NO NO NO NO
flib""
1,1, 1-Trichloroethane 2.0 NO NO NO NO ND NO NO
1,1 ,2-Trichloroethane 2.0 NO NO NO ND NO NO
. . . f\1[)
I
.. .. . . ; iTCE)
2.0 ND
ND
!!-0
ND NO NO NO
Table 1. Summary of Landfill Gas Sampling Results for 2008
Site-Wide Inhalation Exposure Area
Sample Date 8/4/2008
Sample Location
GP-6R I GP-20 I GP-26 GP-11RI GP-12 I GP-21 GP-25
Minimum
Detection
Limit
Western Inhalation
Exposure Area
Eastern Inhalation
Exposure Area
Trichlorofluoromethane 2.0 ND ND ND ND ND ND ND
.................. ?.:_9______ N D N D N D N D N D .... t:J.!?.... . . ..ti!? ... .
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 3.0 No-- ----No Ni5"-- -g-;g- s:a NO ND
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene 3.0 ND ND ND ND ND ND ND
-------
Xvlenes (total) 4.0 I< H . 12 6,2 17 13 <. 9.7 7.6 ;
Sulfides- EPA 15/16- ppm (v/v) NS NS NS NS NS
Hydrogen sulfide 0.05 4;2 ND
... . .... Q,Q?. ....... _f':I_Q ____ ................. 1':1.1?. ........................................... ----
Methyl mercaptan 0.05 ND ND
Ethyl mercaptan 0.05 ND ND
___ .. . ... _9 .. Q?. .......... t:J.!? .... ------ .... f':l.i?. .... -- ......................... ----
Carbon disulfide 0.025 ND ND
Dimethyl disulfide 0.025 ND ND
Notes:
Bold indicates a detection
NO Not Detected
NS Not Sampled
ppm parts per million
ppb parts per billion
Table 2. Calculation of the Average Soil Gas Concentrations for the Detected LFG Constituents by Inhalation Exposure Area
Range of
Site-Wide
CAS
Minimum Maximum
Sample Locations (08/04/08)
Detected
lEA
Number
Detection Detection Concentra-
Average
Limit Limit tions
Detected Chemicals GP-6R GP11R GP-12 GP-20 GP-21 GP-25 GP-26 (ppb) (ppb)
VOCs Method T0-15 ppb (vlv)
Acetone 67-64-1 10 20 16 10 20 19 27 19 10 16-27 17.3
Benzene 71-43-2 3.0 6.0 28 7.6 31 14 32 4.8 3 4.8-32 17.2
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 2.0 4.0 2.2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2.2 2.0
Chloroform 67-66-3 2.0 4.0 8.1 2 2 2.4 2 2 2 2.4-8.1 2.9
Dichlorodifluoromethane 75-71-8 2.0 4.0 4.0 2 2 2 2 2 21 4.0-21 5.0
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene 540-59-0 2.0 4.0 7.2 2 2 2 5.1 2 11 5.1-11 4.5
1 ,2-Dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane 76-14-9 2.0 4.0 3.5 21 2 2 14 4.6 42 3.5-42 12.7
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 2.0 4.0 7.1 7.8 6.8 6.5 4.6 3.1 2 3.1-7.8 5.4
4-Ethyltoluene - 2.0 4.0 2.2 6.3 2.3 2.6 2 2 2 2.2-6.3 3
Methylene Chloride 75-09-2 2.0 4.0 2 2 2.5 2 2 2 2 2.5 2.1
Styrene 100-42-5 2.0 4.0 4.2 2 2.7 4.0 3.3 2.6 2 2.6-4.2 3.0
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) 127-18-4 2.0 4.0 2 2 2 2 2 2 280 280 41.7
Toluene 108-88-3 2.0 4.0 19 15 15 14 21 13 12 12.0-21.0 15.6
Trichloroethene (TCE) 79-01-6 2.0 4.0 2 2 2 2 2 2 9.0 9.0 3.0
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 95-63-6 3.0 10.0 5 9.9 5.8 5 5 5 5 5.8-9.9 5.8
Vinyl chloride 75-01-4 9.4 6.0 48 3 3 44 21 6.2 3 6.2-48 18.3
Xvlenes (total\ 1330-20-7 4.0 4.0 17 17 13 12 9.7 7.6 6.2 6.2-17 11.8
Sulfides- EPA 15/16- ppm (v/v) NS NS NS NS NS
Hydrogen sulfide 7783-06-4 0.05 0.25 4.2 0.025 4.2 2.1
Inhalation Exposure Area West East East We.st East East West
NOTES.
1 Conversion factors for converting ppb (ppm for Hydrogen Sulfide) to ug/m'; Taken from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards, 2006.
2 4-Ethyltoluene was converted from ppb to ug/m' using the molar mass of 120.19, (Average Concentration+ 22.4) x 120.19
3 The conversion factor is based on the average form, p, and o xylenes.
Samples locations are shown on Figure 2-2. Sample results for the sample from GP-14 were omitted due to a leak which compromised the sample.
ITALICS: Indicates the location of the highest concentration for the associated chemical.
BOLD: Detected values
NOT IN BOLD: Non-detected constituent: Values shown are 112 of the constituent-specific Maximum Detection Limit for that sample.
Conversion
Factor
1
'
2
'
1
2.38
3.19
4.61
4.88
4.95
3.97
6.99
4.34
(2)
3.47
4.26
6.78
3.77
5.37
4.92
2.56
4.36
1.40
Site-Wide lEA Western lEA Eastern lEA
Ave_rage Average Average
(ug/m ) (uglm) (uglm)
41;1 35.7 45.2
54.9 ..

47.9
.
60:1
9.4 9.5 9.2
14.3 20.3 9.8
24.8 44.6 9.9
17.8 .. .
/
26.7 .
11.0
89.0 110:7 . . 72.7
... : 2.5 . .
2Z.6 :
. 24.2 ..
i4.9 12.2 16.9
I
7.2 6.9 7:4 ..

... .14.5 . ::
.. h.:!
282.8
.... .6418
13.6

ss;z.. :
..5.6_,_6 . .
. 60.3
16.1 23 .. 3. . 10.7
28.6 24.6 31.6
1. 46:9 . _8.1-1.
21.2
5.t4 51.2 51.6
3.0 3.0 NS
Table 3. Conceptual Site Model for the Potential Inhalation Exposures Associated with Development at the North Shore Commons Site
Receptor Age Exposure Medium Exposure Route Type of Analvsis
Commercial/ Retail Worker Adult Indoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
18-45 years Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
Day Care Worker Adult Indoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
18-45 years Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
Day Care Toddler Child Indoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
1-5 years Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
Maintenance Worker Adult Indoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
18-45 years Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
Landscape Worker Adult Indoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
18-45 years Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
Construction Worker Adult Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
22 years
Utility Worker Adult Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
22 years
On-Site Resident Adult Indoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
----------------- -- ---- ------------------- -- -- ------------ -- ---------------
Child Indoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
1-8 years Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
Off-Site Resident Adult Indoor Air Inhalation
--1
_18-45 _ Outdoor Air Inhalation
----------------- ----- -- - . ----------------- ------ --------- - ------
Child Indoor Air Inhalation Qualitative
1-8 years Outdoor Air Inhalation Qualitative
Commercial/ Retail Customer Adult Indoor Air Inhalation Qualitative

Outdoor Air Inhalation Qualitative
. - --- -- --------- --- ----- -- --- --------- ---------- -----
Child Indoor Air Inhalation Qualitative
1-8 vears Outdoor Air Inhalation Qualitative
Trespasser Adolescent Outdoor Air Inhalation Quantitative
8-15 years
Notes.
Quantitative analysis means that cancer and non-cancer risk levels were projected for this receptor.
Qualitative analysis means that. the risk to this receptor was evaluated in comparison to the risks of another receptor for which risks were
quantitatively assessed that was similarly exposed to higher levels of contamination for a longer frequency or duration of exposure.
Table 4. Inhalation Toxicity Values for the Detected Landfill Gas Constituents Associated with Cancer and Non-Cancer Health Effect Endpoints
CAS Inhalation
Detected LFG Constituent Number Unit Risk
(f!g/mar'
Acetone 67-64-1 NA
Benzene 71-43-2 7.8E-06
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 NA
Chloroform 67-66-3 2.3E-05
Dichlorodifluoromethane 75-71-8 NTV
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene 156-59-2 NA
1 ,2-Dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane 76-14-2 NTV
Ethyl benzene 100-41-4 NA
4-Ethyltoluene 622-96-8 NTV
Methylene Chloride 75-09-2 4.7E-07
Styrene 100-42-5 5.7E-07
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) 127-18-4 5.5E-05
Toluene 108-88-3 INAD
Trichloroethene (TCE) 79-01-6 1.7E-06
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 95-63-6 NA
Vinyl chloride 75-01-4 8.8E-06
Xylenes (total) 1330-20-7 INAD
Hydrogen Sulfide 7783-06-4 INAD
NOTES.
ATSDR
IRIS
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (minimal risk levels).
U.S. EPA Integrated Risk Information System. Accessed August 22, 2008.
http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/iris/index.cfm
Reference.
SOURCE Concentration
(mg/m)
IRIS 8.00E-01
MassDEP 3.00E-02
IRIS 2.00E-02
MassDEP 6.60E-01
NTV 2.00E-01
IRIS 3.50E-02
NTV NTV
IRIS 1.00E+OO
NTV NTV
IRIS 1.06E+OO
MassDEP 1.00E+OO
MassDEP 4.60E+OO
IRIS 5.00E+OO
MassDEP 1.80E-01
IRIS 6.00E-03
MassDEP 1.00E-01
IRIS 1.00E-01
IRIS 2.00E-03
MassDEP MassDEP Shortfonms for Human Health Risk Assessment Under the MCP. Updated February 2007.
http://www.mass.gov/dep/service/compliance/riskasmt.htm
INAD
NA
NTV
ORNL
PPRTV
Per the U.S. EPA, data are inadequate for an assessment of human carcinogenic potential.
This compound is not considered a carcinogen by the U.S EPA
No Inhalation RfC and/or IUR available.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Regional Database of Preliminary Remediation Goals.
http://epa-prgs.ornl.gov/chemicals/index.shtml
USEPA Provisional Peer Reviewed Toxicity Value. February 28, 2008.
SOURCE
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
ORNL
MassDEP
NTV
MassDEP
NTV
ATSDR
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
PPRTV
MassDEP
MassDEP
IRIS
Table 5.
Site-Specific Subsurface Soil and Site Parameters that Were Used to
Project Vapor Diffusion and Intrusion Into Indoor Air for the Cumulative
Inhalation Pathway Risk Calculations
(Same for All Scenarios)
Input Parameter Default Value
Depth Below Grade to Bottom of Enclosed Space Floor
111
15 em (5.9 inches)
Soil Gas Depth Below Grade
1
'1 133.5 em (52.6 inches)
Average Soil Temperature
131
JO"C
Thickness of Soil Stratum A
1
'1 133.5 em (52.6 inches)
Stratum A SCS Soil Type 1'
1
S (Sand)
Stratum A Soil Dry Bulk Density 1
3
1 1.5 g/cm
3
Stratum A Soil Total Porosity 1
3
1 0.43 (unitless)
Stratum A Soil Water-Filled Porosity 1
3
1 0.06 cm
3
I cm
3
Soil Stratum for Estimating Soil Vapor Permeabilityl'l Stratum A
Enclosed Space Floor Thickness
111
15 em (5.9 inches)
Soil-Building Pressure Differential [J] 40 g/cm,s
Enclosed Space Floor Height
13
1 244 em (96.1 inches)
Floor-Wall Seam Crack Width [JJ 0.1 em (0.039 inches)
Average Vapor Flow Rate into Building
131
5 Llmin
NOTES:
[I] Consistent with a future slab-on-grade structure.
[2] Consistent with the depth of the soil gas samples collected at the site.
[3] Soil parameter values used in the vapor intrusion modeling for the MassDEP MCP
GW-2 Method I Standards.
[4] Site-specific assumption.
Table 6.
Scenario-Specific Building Dimensions and Receptor Exposure Parameters
Used in the
Cumulative Inhalation Pathway Risk Calculations
Receptor
Input Parameter
Adult Child Commercial Day Care Day Care
Resident Resident I Retail Worker Toddler
Enclosed Space 961 em 961 em 2724.9 em 3773.4 em 3773.4 em
Floor Length (32 ft) (32 ft) (89 ft) (124ft) (124ft)
Enclosed Space 961 em 961 em 1886.7 em 2305.1 em 2305.1 em
Floor Width (32 ft) (32 ft) (62 ft) (76ft) (76 ft)
Averaging Time 70 yrs 70 yrs 70yrs 70 yrs 70 yrs
(Cancer)
Averaging Time 30yrs 7 yrs 25 yrs 25 yrs 4 yrs
(Non-Cancer)
Indoor Air Exchange 0.45 I hr 0.45 I hr 1.0 I hr 0.45 I hr 0.45 I hr
Rate
Exposure Duration 30 yrs 7 yrs 25 yrs 25 yrs 4yrs
Exposure Frequency 365 dayslyr 365 dayslyr 250 dayslyr 250 dayslyr 250 dayslyr
Table 7. Summary of the Results of the Indoor Air Risk Assessment for the North Shore Commons Site
Site-Wide Inhalation Exposure Area Eastern Inhalation Exposure Area Western Inhalation Exposure Area
Projected Projected Cumulative Projected Projected Projected Projected
Cumulative Non-Cancer Hazard Cumulative Cumulative Non- Cumulative Cumulative Non-
Receptors
Excess Lifetime Index Excess Lifetime Cancer Hazard Excess Lifetime Cancer Hazard
Cancer Risk Cancer Risk Index Cancer Risk Index
Commercial/ Retail Worker 8.66E-07 1.29E-03 3.52E-08 1.21E-03 1.90E-06 ?.OOE-04
Adult Day Care Worker 1.19E-06 1.79E-03 4.82E-08 1.68E-03 2.63E-06 9.60E-04
Day Care Toddler 1.91 E-07 1.79E-03 7.70E-09 1.68E-03 4.21E-07 9.60E-04
On-Site Resident- Adult
1.51E-05
1.50E-02
6.57E-07
1.40E-02
3.31E-05
8.57E-03
On-Site Resident - Child 1.50E-02 1.40E-02 9.36E-03
On-Site Resident - Lifetime 1.74E-05 3.49E-02 7.48E-07 3.26E-02 3.81E-05 2.05E-02
Notes.
Bold indicates an exceedance of the MassDEP excess lifetime cancer risk threshold of 1.0 E-05.
Table 8.
Summary of the Results of the Indoor Air Risk Assessment for the Receptors Associated with Future
Development
No. of Risk lEA Where Risk Receptor for Whom Calculated
Health Effect Type Threshold Thresholds Were Risk Thresholds Cumulative
Exceedances Exceeded Were Exceeded Risk
{#)
Cancer 2 Site-Wide On-Site Lifetime 1.51 E-05
Resident
Western On-Site Lifetime 3.31 E-05
Resident
Non-Cancer 0 None None None
Table 9.
Summary of the LandGEM Modeling Results for LFG and Hydrogen Sulfide
Generation Rates over Time for the Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill
Year Total LFG Generation Hydrogen Sulfide Generation
(m'/year) (m'!m"-
year)
1
(m'/year) (m'/m"-yearf
1
2008 152,000 6.29 0.1368 5.66E-06
2018 101,900 4.22 0.09169 3.80E-06
2028 68,290 2.83 0.06146 2.54E-06
2038
45,780.
1.90 0.0412 1.71E-06
2048 30,680 1.27 0.02762 1.14E-06
2058 20,570 0.85 0.01851 7.66E-07
2068 13,790 0.57 0.01241 5.14E-07
2078 9,242 0.38 0.008318 3.44E-07
NOTE:
[I] The value of cubic meters ofthe Total LFG or Hydrogen Sulfide generated per
square meter of emplaced waste is based on a waste footprint of24,156 square meters
or 6 acres (i.e., the estimated footprint of the emplaced waste at the site).
Table 10. Average Annual Wind Speed and Direction Data for the Beverly Cove Meteorological Station, Beverly, MA (2000-2007)
Monitoring Year
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 8 Year Average
(mph) (mph) (mph) (mph) (mph) (mp.h) (mph) (mph) (mph)
Average Wind Speed
2.0 1.9 0.5 1.4 1.1 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.2
Predominant Wind Direction . SE SE ESE ESE E ENE SSE ssw SE
---- -----
SOURCE: Weather Underground, Historical Weather for the Beverly Cove Weather Station, Beverly, MA. Accessed August 20, 2008.
(http://www. wunderground .com/weatherstation/WXDailyH istory.asp?l D=KMASTONE 1 &day=20&year=2008&month=8&graphspan=year)
[1) CONVERSION FACTOR: 1 mph = 0.44704 m/s
8 Year Average [1]
(m/s)
0.54
SE
Table 11. Airborne Mixing and Dispersion Calculations for the Concentrations of Landfill Gas Constituents in the Outdoor Air at the Eastern
Inhalation Exposure Area
Influx with wind from the South
Influx with wind from the East
Influx from the Vents
Outflow with wind to North
Outflow with wind to East
Cone of LFG in the lEA or UA
DEFINITIONS
INwsi
IN wEi
IN vi
OUTwNi=
OUTwwi=
CBOXi
Vs and VN
VE and Vw
WIEA
LIEA
MHIEA
Q
CINWSi
CINWEi
CINVi
ll'{ys; = Vs x"Tf;EAXMJ-kAJCCINws.
Il'{yEi = v;,x4EAXMJ-kAJCCINwE
IN V; = Q X CINVi X LIEA X WIEA
OUJ;N; =v;;xw;dM!fEAxCsox
OUJ:'w,
[
l
[
l
[
QxCINViXL1EAXWmA]
Vs X WIEA X c!NWSi + VEX LIEA X CINWEi +
MHIE4
CBOX!i = [( L )]
Vsx WIEA) + (VEx IliA
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the south [ug/s]
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the east [ug/s]
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" from the LFG influx from within the footprint area of the box [ug/s]
Outflow ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing to the north [ug/s]
Outflow ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing to the west [ug/s]
Concentration ofLFG constituent "i" in the box [ug/m
3
]
Average speed of the wind blowing from the south or to the north [rnls]
Average speed of the wind blowing from the east or to the west [rnls]
Width of the box [m]
Length of the box [m]
Mixing Height of the air in the box [m]
Flux ofLFG released per unit area within the footprint of the box
Concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the clean wind blowing from the south into the box (Assumed= 0) [ ug!m
3
]
Concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the clean wind blowing from the east into the box (Assumed= 0) [ ug/m3]
Concentration ofLFG constituent "i" in the LFG emissions entering into the box [ug/m
3
]
Table 11. Airborne Mixing and Dispersion Calculations for the Concentrations of Landfill Gas Constituents in the Outdoor Air at the Eastern
Inhalation Exposure Area
V
8
and VN VE and Vw WIEA
.
LIEA MHIEA Q
(m/s) (m/s) (m) (m) (m)
{m /m s)
I Eastern lEA Box Model Parameters 0.54 0.54 -99.1 172.2 1.83 2.0E-07
Eastern lEA
Cuoxi CINWSi CtNWEi CINVi
Detected Volatile Organic Compounds
(uglm ) (ug/m ) (uglm ) (ug/m)
Acetone 5.74E-04 0.00 0.00 45.2
Benzene 7.64E-04 0.00 0.00 60.1
Chlorobenzene 1.17E-04 0.00 0.00 9.2
Chloroform 1.24E-04 0.00 0.00 9.8
Dichlorodifluoromethane 1.26E-04 0.00 0.00 9.9
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene 1.40E-04 0.00 0.00 11.0
1 ,2-Dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane 9.23E-04 0.00 0.00 72.7
Ethyl benzene 3.07E-04 0.00 0.00 24.2
4-Ethyltoluene 2.15E-04 0.00 0.00 16.9
Methylene Chloride 9.36E-05 0.00 0.00 7.4
Styrene 1.43E-04 0.00 0.00 11.3
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) 1.72E-04 0.00 0.00 13.6
Toluene 7.66E-04 0.00 0.00 60.3
Trichloroethene (TCE) 1.36E-04 0.00 0.00 10.7
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 4.01E-04 0.00 0.00 31.6
Vinyl chloride 2.70E-04 0.00 0.00 21.2
Xylenes (total) 6.55E-04 0.00 0.00 51.6
Table 12. Airborne Mixing and Dispersion Calculations for the Concentrations of Landfill Gas Constituents in the Outdoor Air at the Western
Inhalation Exposure Area
Influx with wind from the South
Influx with wind from the East
Influx from the Vents
Outflow with wind to North
Outflow with wind to East
Cone of LFG in the lEA or UA
DEFINITIONS
INwsi
IN wEi
IN vi
OUTwNi=
OUTwwi=
CBOXi
V
5
and VN
VE and Vw
WIEA
LIE A
MHIEA
Q
CINWSi
CINWEi
CtNVi
----- --------
l.!Vws; =V,xw;EAxMfk;xGNws.
IJve; ="V;,x4eAxlVllfeAxGNwE.
INv; = QxCINVi xLIEA xWIEA
OU'f,Ni
OUTww; = VExLIEAxMHIEAxCsox;;
[v: W C
l
[ C
l
[
QxCINviXLIEAxWIEA]
s X lEA X INWSi + VEX LJEA X INWEi + '
C
- MHIEA
BOX/i-
[(V
8
xW
11
"') + (VEXL
1
EA )]
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the south [ug/s]
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the east [ug/s]
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" from the LFG influx from within the footprint area of the box [ug/s]
Outflow ofLFG constituent ''i" in the wind blowing to the north [ug/s]
Outflow ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing to the west [ug/s]
Concentration ofLFG constituent "i" in the box [ug/m
3
]
Average speed of the wind blowing from the south or to the north [m/s]
Average speed of the wind blowing from the east or to the west [m/s]
Width of the box [m1
Length of the box [ m 1
Mixing Height of the air in the box [ m 1
Flux ofLFG released per unit area within the footprint of the box [m3/m2-s1
Concentration ofLFG constituent "i" in the clean wind blowing from the south into the box
output of the Eastern lEA) [ug/m31
Concentration of LFG c:onstituent "i" in the clean wind blowing from the east into the box
output of the Eastern lEA) [ug/m31
Concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the LFG emissions entering into the box [ ug/m
3
]
Table 12. Airborne Mixing and Dispersion Calculations for the Concentrations of Landfill Gas Constituents in the Outdoor Air at the Western
Inhalation Exposure Area
Vs and VN VEand Vw
WIEA LIEA MHn:A Q
(m/s) (m/s) (m) (m) (m)
(m /m s)
!Western lEA Box Model Parameters 0.54 0.54 71.6 99.1 1.83 2.0E-07
Western lEA
Caoxi CINWSi CINWEi CINVi
Detected Volatile Organic Compounds
(ug/m ) (ug/m ) (ug/m) (ug/m )
Acetone 8.74E-04 5.74E-04 5.74E-04 35.7
Benzene 1.17E-03 7.64E-04 7.64E-04 47.9
Chlorobenzene 1.97E-04 1.17E-04 1.17E-04 9.5
Chloroform 2.95E-04 1.24E-04 1.24E-04 20.3
Dichlorodifluoromethane 5.00E-04 1.26E-04 1.26E-04 44.6
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene 3.64E-04 1.40E-04 1.40E-04 26.7
1 ,2-Dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane 1.85E-03 9.23E-04 9.23E-04 .110.7
Ethyl benzene 4.97E-04 3.07E-04 3.07E-04 22.6
4-Ethyltoluene 3.17E-04 2.15E-04 2.15E-04 12.2
Methylene Chloride 1.52E-04 9.36E-05 9.36E-05 6.9
Styrene 2.65E-04 1.43E-04 1.43E-04 14.5
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) 5.56E-03 1.72E-04 1.72E-04 641.8
Toluene 1.24E-03 7.66E-04 7.66E-04 56.6
Trichloroethene (TCE) 3.32E-04 1.36E-04 1.36E-04 23.3
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 6.08E-04 4.01E-04 4.01 E-04 24.6
Vinyl chloride 9.50E-04 2.70E-04 2.70E-04 81.1
Xylenes (total) 1.08E-03 6.55E-04 6.55E-04 51.2
Table 13. Airborne Mixing and Dispersion Calculations for the Concentrations of Landfill Gas Constituents in the Outdoor Air at the Site-Wide
Inhalation Exposure Area
Influx with wind from the South
Influx with wind from the East
Influx from the Vents
Outflow with wind to North
Outlaw with wind to East
Cone of LFG in the lEA or UA
DEFINITIONS
INwsi
IN wEi
IN vi
OUTwNi=
OUTwwi=
Cooxi
Vs and VN
VEand Vw
WIEA
LIEA
MHIEA
Q
CINWSi
CINWEi
CINVi
lls; ="Vs,x'if;EAxMfkrGNws.
IlE;
IN Vi = Q X CJNVi X LIEA X WIEA
OUJ;Ni
OU;l;v; =
[
l
[
l
[
QxCINVixL,EAxW,EA]
xC!Nwst + VExL,EA xC,NwEt + MH,EA
CBOX/i = (V L )]
[ (V,x WlliA) + EX lEA
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the south [ug/s]
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing from the east [ug/s]
Influx ofLFG constituent "i" from the LFG influx from within the footprint area of the box [ug/s]
Outflow ofLFG constituent "'i" in the wind blowing to the north [ug/s]
Outflow ofLFG constituent "i" in the wind blowing to the west [ug/s]
Concentration of LFG constituent "i" in the box [ug/m
3
]
Average speed of the wind blowing from the south or to the north [rn/s]
Average speed of the wind blowing from the east or to the west [rn/s]
Width of the box [m]
Length of the box [ m]
Mixing Height of the air in the box [m]
Flux ofLFG released per unit area within the footprint of the box [rn3/rn2-s]
Concentration ofLFG constituent "i" in the clean wind blowing from the south into the box (Assumed= O) [ug/rn
3
]
Concentration ofLFG constituent "i" in the clean wind bloWing from the east into the box(= 0) [ug/m3]
Concentration ofLFG constituent "i" in the LPG emissions entering into the box [ug/m
3
]
Page 1 of 2
Table 13. Airborne Mixing and Dispersion Calculations for the Concentrations of Landfill Gas Constituents in the Outdoor Air at the Site-Wide
Inhalation Exposure Area
Vs and VN VEand Vw WIEA LIEA MHIEA
Q
(m/s) (m/s) (m) (m) (m)
(m /m s)
!Site-Wide lEA Box Model Parameters 0.54 0.54 121.9 198.1 1.83 2.0E-07
Site-Wide lEA
Cnoxi CINWSi CINWEi CINVi
Detected Volatile Organic Compounds
(ug/m ) (ug/m') (ug/m') (ug/m )
Acetone 6.27E-04 0.00 0.00 41.1
Benzene 8.37E-04 0.00 0.00 54.9
Chlorobenzene 1.43E-04 0.00 0.00 9.4
Chloroform 2.18E-04 0.00 0.00 14.3
Dichlorodifluoromethane 3.77E-04 0.00 0.00 24.8
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene 2.71E-04 0.00 0.00 17.8
1 ,2-Dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane 1.36E'03 0.00 0.00 89.0
Ethyl benzene 3.58E-04 0.00 0.00 23.5
4-Ethyltoluene 2.27E-04 0.00 0.00 14.9
Methylene Chloride 1.10E-04 0.00 0.00 7.2
Styrene 1.93E-04 0.00 0.00 12.7
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) 4.31 E-03 0.00 0.00 282.8
Toluene 8.95E-04 0.00 0.00 58.7
Trichloroethene (TCE) 2.46E-04 0.00 0.00 16.1
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 4.36E-04 0.00 0.00 28.6
Vinyl chloride 7.15E-04 0.00 0.00 46.9
Xylenes (total) 7.84E-04 0.00 0.00 51.4
Page 2 of 2
Table 14. Calculation of the Cancer and Non-Cancer Inhalation Risk Estimates Relative to Outdoor Exposure for Each Inhalation Exposure Area
Exposure Point
Non-Cancer Health Effect Endpoint
Detected Volatile Organic Compounds
Concentration Incremental Non
-CBOXi RfC RfC Cancer Hazard
Index
(ug/m3) (ug/m3) Source
Site-Wide Inhalation Exposure Area
Acetone 6.27E-04
Benzene 8.37E-04
Chlorobenzene 1.43E-04
Chloroform 2.18E-04
Dichlorodifluoromethane 3.77E-04
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene 2.71E-04
1 ,2-Dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane 1.36E-03
Ethyl benzene 3.58E-04
4-Ethyltoluene 2.27E-04
Methylene Chloride 1.10E-04
Styrene 1.93E-04
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) 4.31E-03
Toluene 8.95E-04
Trichloroethene (TCE) 2.46E-04
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 4.36E-04
Vinyl chloride 7.15E-04
Xvlenes (total) 7.84E-04
Hvdroqen sulfide 4.51E-05
TOTAL
NOTES:
All values are based on chronic exposure.
X- Signifies inadequate or unavailable inhalation toxicity value
RfC - Reference Concentration
IUR- Inhalation Unit Risk
IRIS= Integrated Risk Information System
8.00E+02
3.00E+01
2.00E+01
6.60E+02
2.00E+02
3.50E+01
X
1.00E+03
X
1.06E+03
1.00E+03
4.60E+03
5.00E+03
1.80E+02
6.00E+OO
1.00E+02
1.00E+02
2.00E+OO
ATSDR =Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (Minimal Risk Levels)
PPRTV = Provisional Peer Reviewed Toxicity Value
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
ORNL
MassDEP
X
MassDEP
X
ATSDR
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
PPRTV
MassDEP
MassDEP
IRIS
MassDEP = MassDEP Shortforms for Human Health Risk Assessment Under the MCP. Updated February 2007.
ORNL = Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Regional Database of Preliminary Remediation Goals.
7.84E-07
2.79E-05
7.13E-06
3.30E-07
X
X
X
3.58E-07
X
1.04E-07
1.93E-07
X
1.79E-07
1.37E-06
7.27E-05
7.15E-06
7.84E-06
2.26E-05
1.49E-04
Cancer Health Effect Endpoint
Incremental
IUR IUR Excess Lifetime
Cancer Risk
(ug/m3) Source
X X X
7.80E-06 MassDEP 6.53E-09
X X X
2.30E-05 MassDEP 5.01 E-09
X X X
X X X
X X X
X X X
X X X
4.70E-07 IRIS 5.15E-11
5.70E-07 MassDEP
5.50E-05 MassDEP 2.37E-07
X X X
1.70E-06 MassDEP 4.18E-10
X X X
8.80E,06 MassDEP X
X X X
X X X
2.49E-07
.
Table 14. Calculation of the Cancer and Non-Cancer Inhalation Risk Estimates Relative to Outdoor Exposure for Each Inhalation Exposure Area
Exposure Point
Non-Cancer Health Effect Endpoint
Detected Volatile Organic Compounds
Concentration Incremental Non
-CBOXi RfC RfC Cancer Hazard
Index
(ug/m3) (ug/m3) Source
Eastern Inhalation Exposure Area
Acetone 5.74E-04
Benzene 7.64E-04
Chlorobenzene 1.17E-04
Chloroform 1.24E-04
Dichlorodifluoromethane 1.26E-04
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene 1.40E-04
1 ,2-Dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane 9.23E-04
Ethyl benzene 3.07E-04
4-Ethyltoluene 2.15E-04
Methylene Chloride 9.36E-05
Styrene 1.43E-04
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) 1.72E-04
Toluene 7.66E-04
Trichloroethene (TCE) 1.36E-04
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 4.01E-04
Vinyl chloride 2.70E-04
Xylenes (total) 6.55E-04
Hydrogen sulfide -
TOTAL
NOTES.
All values are based on chronic exposure.
X- Signifies inadequate or unavailable inhalation toxicity value
RfC - Reference Concentration
IUR- Inhalation Unit Risk
IRIS= Integrated Risk Information System
8.00E+02
3.00E+01
2.00E+01
6.60E+02
2.00E+02
3.50E+01
X
1.00E+03
X
1.06E+03
1.00E+03
4.60E+03
5.00E+03
1.80E+02
6.00E+OO
1.00E+02
1.00E+02
2.00E+OO
ATSDR =Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (Minimal Risk Levels)
PPRTV =Provisional Peer Reviewed Toxicity Value
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
ORNL
MassDEP
X
MassDEP
X
ATSDR
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
PPRTV
MassDEP
MassDEP
IRIS
MassDEP = MassDEP Shortforms for Human Health Risk Assessment Under the MCP. Updated February 2007.
ORNL = Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Regional Database of Preliminary Remediation Goals.
7.18E-07
2.55E-05
5.85E-06
1.88E-07
X
X
X
3.07E-07
X
8.84E-08
1.43E-07
X
1.53E-07
7.58E-07
6.69E-05
2.70E-06
6.55E-06
-
1.10E-04
Cancer Health Effect Endpoint
Incremental
IUR IUR Excess Lifetime
Cancer Risk
(ug/m3) Source
X X X
7.80E-06 MassDEP 5.96E-09
X X X
2.30E-05 MassDEP 2.85E-09
X X X
X X X
X X X
X X X
X X X
4.70E-07 IRIS 4.40E-11
5.70E-07 MassDEP
5.50E-05 MassDEP 9.47E-09
X X
.
X
1.70E-06 MassDEP 2.32E-10
X X X
B.BOE-06 MassDEP X
.
X X X
X X X
1.86E-08
Table 14. Calculation of the Cancer and Non-Cancer Inhalation Risk Estimates Relative to Outdoor Exposure for Each Inhalation Exposure Area
Exposure Point
Non-Cancer Health Effect Endpoint
Detected Volatile Organic Compounds
Concentration Incremental Non
-CBOXi RfC RfC Cancer Hazard
Index
(ug/m3) (ug/m3) Source
Western Inhalation Exposure Area
Acetone 8.74E-04
Benzene 1.17E-03
Chlorobenzene 1.97E-04
Chloroform 2.95E-04
Dichlorodifluoromethane 5.00E-04
cis-1 ,2-Dichloroethene 3.64E-04
1 ,2-Dichloro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane 1.85E-03
Ethyl benzene 4.97E-04
4-Ethyltoluene 3. 17E-04
Methylene Chloride 1.52E-04
Styrene 2.65E-04
Tetrachloroethene (PCE) 5.56E-03
Toluene 1.24E-03
Trichloroethene (TCE) 3.32E-04
1 ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 6.08E-04
Vinyl chloride 9.50E-04
Xylenes (total) 1.08E-03
HvdroQen sulfide 2.48E-05
TOTAL
NOTES.
All values are based on chronic exposure.
X.- Signifies inadequate or unavailable inhalation toxicity value
RfC - Reference Concentration
IUR- Inhalation Unit Risk
IRIS = Integrated Risk Information System
8.00E+02
3.00E+01
2.00E+01
6.60E+02
2.00E+02
3.50E+01
X
1.00E+03
X
1.06E+03
1.00E+03
4.60E+03
5.00E+03
1.80E+02
6.00E+OO
1.00E+02
1.00E+02
2.00E+OO
ATSDR =Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (Minimal Risk Levels)
PPRTV = Provisional Peer Reviewed Toxicity Value
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
ORNL
MassDEP
X
MassDEP
X
ATSDR
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
MassDEP
PPRTV
MassDEP
MassDEP
IRIS
MassDEP = MassDEP Shortforms for Human Health Risk Assessment Under the MCP. Updated February 2007.
ORNL = Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Regional Database of Preliminary Remediation Goals.
1.09E-06
3.88E-05
9.85E-06
4.46E-07
X
X
X
4.97E-07
X
1.43E-07
2.65E-07
X
2.48E-07
1.84E-06
1.01 E-04
9.50E-06
1 .OBE-05
-
1.75E-04
Cancer Health Effect Endpoint
Incremental
IUR IUR Excess Lifetime
Cancer Risk
(ug/m3) Source
X X X
7.80E-06 MassDEP 9.09E-09
X X X
2.30E-05 MassDEP 6.77E-09
X X X
X X X
X X X
X X X
X X X
4.70E-07 IRIS 7.14E-11
5.70E-07 MassDEP
5.50E-05 MassDEP 3.06E-07
X X X
1.70E-06 MassDEP 5.64E-10
X X X
8.80E-06 MassDEP X
X X X
X X X
3.22E-07
Table 15.
Summary of the Results of the Outdoor Air Risk Assessment
for Each Inhalation Exposure Area
(ApJ licable to All Receptors Exposed to Outdoor Air)
Inhalation Exposure Area
Site-Wide Eastern Western
Cumulative HI 1.49E-04 l.IOE-4 1.75E-04
Cumulative ELCR 2.49E-07 1.86E-08 3.22E-07
TABLE 16. Combined Results of the Indoor and Outdoor Air Inhalation Risk Assessments for the North Shore Commons Site for Each Inhalation Exposure
Area
Exoosure Time Parameters Cancer Risk Non-Cancer Risk
Exposure Exposure Total
Projected Projected
Combined Projected Projected Combined
Indoor Outdoor
Time Time Exposure
Cumulative Cumulative
Cumulative Indoor Outdoor Cumulative
Receptors Indoors Outdoors Time
Excess Excess
Excess Cumulative Cumulative Non-Cancer
(Hours I (Hours I (Hours I
Lifetime Lifetime
Lifetime Non-Cancer Non-Cancer Hazard
Day) Day) Day)
Cancer Risk Cancer Risk
Cancer Risk Hazard Index Hazard Index Index
Site-Wide lEA
Commercial/ Retail Worker 7 1 8 8.66E-07 2.49E-07 7.89E-07 1.29E-03 1.49E-04 1.15E-03
Day Care Worker 6 2 8 1.19E-06 2.49E-07 9.58E-07 1.79E-03 1.49E-04 1.38E-03
Day Care Toddler 6 2 8 1.91 E-07 2.49E-07 2.06E-07 1.79E-03 1.49E-04 1.38E-03
On-Site Resident -Adult I Lifetime 20 4 24 1.51 E-05 2.49E-07

1.50E-02 1.49E-04 1.26E-02
On-Site Resident - Child 20 4 24 NA NA NA 1.50E-02 1.49E-04 1.26E-02
Maintenance Worker 7 1 8 8.66E-07 2.49E-07 7.89E-07 1.29E-03 1.49E-04 1.15E-03
Landscape Worker 1 7 8 8.66E-07 2.49E-07 3.26E-07 1.29E-03 1.49E-04 2.92E-04
Construction Worker 0 8 8 0 2.49E-07 2.49E-07 0 1.49E-04 1.49E-04
Utility Worker 0 8 8 0 2.49E-07 2.49E-07 0 1.49E-04 1.49E-04
Trespasser 0 2 2 0 2.49E-07 2.49E-07 0 1.49E-04 1.49E-04
Eastern lEA
Commercial/ Retail Worker 7 1 8 3.52E-08 1.86E-08 3.32E-08 1.21 E-03 1.10E-04 1.08E-03
Day Care Worker 6 2 8 4.82E-08 1.86E-08 4.08E-08 1.68E-03 1.10E-04 1.29E-03
Day Care Toddler 6 2 8 7.23E-09 1.86E-08 1.01 E-08 1.65E-03 1.10E-04 1.26E-03
On-Site Resident -Adult I Lifetime 20 4 24 6.57E-07 1.86E-08 5.50E-07 1.40E-02 1.10E-04 1.17E-02
On-Site Resident- Child 20 4 24 NA NA NA 1.40E-02 1.10E-04 1.17E-02
Maintenance Worker 7 1 8 3.52E-08 1.86E-08 3.32E-08 1.21 E-03 1.10E-04 1.08E-03
Landscape Worker 1 7 8 3.52E-08 1.86E-08 2.07E-08 1.21 E-03 1.10E-04 2.48E-04
Construction Worker 0 8 8 0 1.86E-08 1.86E-08 0 1.10E-04 1.10E-04
Utility Worker 0 8 8 0 1.86E-08 1.86E-08 0 1.10E-04 1.10E-04
Trespasser 0 2 2 0 1.86E-08 1.86E-08 0 1.10E-04 1.10E-04
Western lEA
Commercial/ Retail Worker 7 1 . 8 1.90E-06 3.22E-07 1.71E-06 7.00E-04 1.75E-04 6.34E-04
Day Care Worker 6 2 8 2.63E-06 3.22E-07 2.05E-06 9.60E-04 1.75E-04 7.64E-04
Day Care Toddler 6 2 8 4.21E-07 3.22E-07 3.96E-07 9.60E-04 1.75E-04 7.64E-04
On-Site Resident -Adult I Lifetime 20 4 24 3.31 E-05 3.22E-07

8.57E-03 1.75E-04 7.17E-03
On-Site Resident - Child 20 4 24 NA NA NA 8.57E-03 1.75E-04 7.17E-03
Maintenance Worker 7 1 8 1.90E-06 3.22E-07 1.71E-06 7.00E-04 1.75E-04 6.34E-04
Landscape Worker 1 7 8 1.90E-06 3.22E-07 5.20E-07 7.00E-04 1.75E-04 2.41E-04
Construction Worker 0 8 8 0 3.22E-07 3.22E-07 0 1.75E-04 1.75E-04
Utility Worker 0 8 8 0 3.22E-07 3.22E-07 0 1.75E-04 1.75E-04
Trespasser 0 2 2 0 3.22E-07 3.22E-07 0 1.75E-04 1.75E-04
NOTE.
NA = Not Applicable
Table 17. Summary of the Hydrogen Sulfide Sampling Results
and Relevant Odor Thresholds and
Occupational Safety Criteria for Hydrogen Sulfide
Data Summary
CAS Number 7783-06-4
Minimum Detected Concentration (ppm) 0.9
Maximum Detected Concentration (ppm) 4.2 ppm
Location of Maximum Detected Concentration GP-6R
Frequency of Detection 2/5
Odor Thresholds
ERDC Odor Threshold [1] 0.13 ppm
ATSDR Odor Threshold [2] 0.5 ppb
CaiEPNOEHHA Odor Threshold [3] 8.1 ppb
Relevant Occupational Safety Criteria
NIOSH REL [4] 10 ppm
OSHA PEL - Construction Industry [5] 10 ppm
ACGIH TLV (8-hr Time Weighted Average) [1] 10 ppm
ACGIH STEL [1] 15 ppm
OSHA PEL- General Industry [5] 20ppm
OSHA Maximum Peak (10 min exposure) [4] 50 ppm
NIOSH IDLH Level [4] 100 ppm
NOTES:
ACGIH =American Conference of Government Industrial Hygenists
IDLH = Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health
PEL= Permissible Exposure Limit (10 minute maximum peak)
REL = Reasonable Exposure Limit
STEL =Short Term Exposure Limit (above TLV)
TLV = Threshold Limit Value
[1] Source: Economic Research and Development Center (ERDC), USAGE
[2] Source: ATSDR Website (http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/mhmi/mmg114.html)
[3] CaiEPA OEHHA.
[4] Source: NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards (online).
[5] Source: OSHA Website (www.osha.gov)
APPENDIX A
Site Visit Photographic Log
August 15, 2008
Location Key to the Photographic Log
Site: North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Numbers correspond to photograph numbers in the photographic log. Arrows denote direction in which the photograph in the log was
taken. Created 9/2/2008.
--------- - ----
Photograph 1: View to the west from Brimbal Avenue across
the site, w1th the temporary access road into the site visible on
the left.
t ' P ro 6.5 i\CRES
-----
\\/ILL rrO SlJirf
Photograph 2: View to the south at the northeastern edge of
the site along Brimbal Avenue, showing the property
advertisement sign.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 3: View to the southwest from Brimbal Avenue
across the site toward the Northridge Homes Cooperative, with the
section of exposed pavement to the left.
Photograph 4: Close-up view of the section of exposed
pavement along Brimbal Avenue on the eastern edge of the
site.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 5: View to the south across the site, showing
the topography and ground cover and the northeastern
portion of the Northndge Homes Cooperative.
Photograph 6: View to the east across Brimbal Avenue
from the eastern edge of the site, toward the North Shore
Regional Dialysis Center.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 7: View to the southeast across Brimbal Avenue
from the eastern edge of the site, toward the gas stations across
from the southeast corner of the site.
Photograph 8: View of the ground surface in the
northeastern portion of the s1te that was cleared and that
had accumulated rainwater.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 9: View to the south across the eastern half of
the site, snowing the current ground cover and the open
area of the Northridge Homes Cooperative in the
b-aGkQFOH-nfi-. - -----
Photograph 10: View to the southwest across the site,
showing the current ground cover and the unit of the Northridge
Homes Cooperative closest to the site.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 11: View to the northwest across Sohier Road,
at the ous1ness across the street.
Photograph 12: View to the west across Sohier Road, at the
business across the street.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 13: View to the south from the southwestern
corner of the site, showing the unit of the Northridge
Homes Cooperative closest to the site.
Photograph 14: View to the northeast from the center of the
site, toward the Italian American Club on Brimbal Avenue.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
--- ---- --- - -----------
Photograph 15: View to the west from the northeastern corner
of the site along the Sohier Road I Brimbal Avenue access road
that borders the site on the north, showing the change in
elevation and fence.
Photograph 16: View to the south from the northeastern corner
of the site along Brimbal Avenue that borders the site on the east,
showing the fence that blocks portions of the site.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 17: View to the south from the Schier Road I
Brimbal Avenue access road across the central portion of
the site, showing the topography and current ground cover.
Photograph 18: View to the southeast from the Schier Road I
Brimbal Avenue access road across the central portion of the
site, showing the fence and the current ground cover.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 19: View to the northeast from the northwestern
corner of the site, showing the fencing above the drainage
culvert running beneath the Sohier Road I Brimbal Avenue
access road.
--
Photograph 20: View to the east from the northwestern
corner of the site, showing the property advertisement sign.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 21: View to the southeast from the northwestern
corner of the site across the central portion of the site,
showing the topography and current ground cover.
Photograph 22: View to the southeast from the western edge
of the site, showing the unit of the Northridge Homes
Cooperative closest to the site.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 23: View toward the northeast from the
southwestern corner of the site, showing the topography and
current ground cover in this area.
Photograph 24: View toward the east from just south of the
southwestern corner of the site, showing the trench next to the
unit of the Northridge Homes Cooperative.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 25: View toward the southeast across Sohier
Road, showing the sign for the Northridge Homes Cooperative.
Photograph 26: View toward the northwest from the
southwestern corner of the site, showing the CPI facility across
Sohier Road.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 27: View toward the northwest from the
northwestern corner of the site, looking across the grass island
in the traffic intersection.
Photograph 28: View toward the northeast from the
northeastern corner of the site, looking across the grass island in
the traffic intersection with the Italian American Club in the
background.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
Photograph 29: View toward the north along Brimbal Avenue
from the southeastern corner of the site.
SITE VISIT PHOTOGRAPHIC LOG
Solid Waste Assessment Risk Assessment
North Shore Commons Site, Brimbal Avenue, Beverly, MA
APPENDIXB
Test America Laboratory Report
for the Soil Gas Probe Samples
August 18, 2008
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
August 18, 2008
Client:
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915
Attn: Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
LABORATORY REPORT
Work Order:
Project Name:
Project Number:
Date Received:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
08/05/08
The results listed within this Laboratory Report pertain only to the samples tested in the laboratory. The analyses contained in this report were
performed in accordance with the applicable certifications as noted This Laboratory Report is confidential and is intended for the sole use of
TestAmerica and its client. This report shafl not be reproduced, except in full, without written permission from TestAmerica.
TestAmerica Laboratories, Inc. certifies that the analytical results contained herein apply only to the specific samp/e(s) analyzed.
The Chain(s) ofCziStody, 2 pages, are included and are an integral part of this report. This entire report was reviewed and approved for
release.
If you have any questions relating to this analytical report, please contact your Laboratory Project Manager at 714-258-8610.
Analyses included in this report were performed by the laboratory shown at the top of this report unless otherwise indicated.
Approved By:
Marisol Tabirara
Project Manager
NELAP Certification # E87652
1 of 53 LRH0043
Test America
Tfii;: LEADE:R IN ENVIRONME:NTAL TESTING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
SAMPLE IDENTIFICATION
GP-21
GP-25
GP-14
GP-26
GP-20
GP-6R
GP-IIR
GP-12
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order: LRH0043
Project: Brimbal Ave
Project Number:
[none]
LAB NUMBER COLLECTION
LRH0043-0I 08/04/08 09: 16
LRH0043-02 08/04/08 09:35
LRH0043-03 08/04/08 09:30
LRH0043-04 08/04/08 10:00
LRH0043-05 08/04/08 10:05
LRH0043-06 08/04/08 10:38
LRH0043-07 08/04/08 I 0:25
LRH0043-08 08/04/08 I 0: 18
2 of 53
MATRIX
Air
Air
Air
Air
Air
Air
Air
Air
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/0817:18
CONTAINER TYPE
Passivated Canister
Passivated Canister
Passivated Canister
Passivated Canister
Passivated Canister
Passivated Canister
Passivated Canister
Passivated Canister
LRH0043
Test America
THE LE:ADE:R IN ENVIRONMENTAl TESTING
!721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Department: , Sample Control
Method:
QC Batch:
Identification and Definition of Problem:
Work Order: LRH0043
Project: Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
CORRECTIVE ACTION REPORT
Date: 08/05/2008
Matrix:
Sample #01 was not analyzed for EPA 1,5/16.
Determination of the Cause of the Problem:
The Tedlar bag that contained the sample was flat when received at the laboratory.
Corrective Action Taken:
Client was notitied of the anomaly on August 5, 2008.
3 of 53
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17: 18
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax_714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Work Order:
Project
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
{none]
Received: 08/05/08 I 0:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Analyte
Sample ID: LRH0043-0I (GP-21 -Air)
Data
Result Qualifiers
EPA TOIS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chi oro benzene
Dibromochloromethane
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
1,2-Dichlorobcnzene
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
I, 4-Dichlorobenzene
Dichlorodifluoromethane
I, 1-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dichloroethane
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene
trans- I ,2-Dich\oroethene
I, I- Dichloroethene
I ,2-Dich\oropropane
cis- I ,3-Dichloropropene
trans- 1,3-Dichloropropene
J ,2-Dichloro-1,1,2,2-tetraftuoroethane
Ethyl benzene
4-Ethy\to\uene
Hexachlorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methy\-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
I, I ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Tetrachloroethene
Toluene
I ,2, 4-Trichlorobenzene
1,1, !-Trichloroethane
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethene
27
32
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
5,1
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
14
4.6
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
3.3 JA
ND
ND
21
ND
ND
ND
ND
Units
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
RL
10
3.0
10
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4 of 53
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 09:16
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13 :34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13 :34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13:34
08/06/08 13 :34
08/06/08 13:34
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H0701l
8H07011
8H07011
8H070\l
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H0701l
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070\l
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
LR!I0043
Test America
THE LEADE:R IN ENVIRONMENTAl TE'STING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
l 00 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Result
Sample ID: LRH0043-0l (GP-21 -Air)- cont.
Work Order: LRH0043
Project: Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data
Qualifiers Units RL
Dilution
EPA T015 (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS- coot
Trichlorofluoromethane NO ppbv 2.0 1.0
I, 1,2-Trichloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane NO ppbv 2.0 1.0
I ,2, 4-T rimethylbenzene NO ppbv 3.0 1.0
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene NO ppbv 3.0 1.0
Vinyl acetate NO ppbv 10 1.0
Vinyl chloride 21 ppbv 3.0 1.0
Xylenes, total 9.7 ppbv 2.0 1.0
5 of 53
Received: 08/05/08 I 0:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
Date QC
Analyzed Instrument Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 09:16
08106/08 13:34 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 13:34 MSA AA &H07011
08106/08 13:34 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 13:34 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 13;34 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 13:34 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 13:34 MSA AA 8H07011
LRH0043
Test America
THE: Lf:ADE:R IN ENVIRONMf:NTAL TE:STING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
BrimbalAve
[none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/0817:18
Analytc
Data
Result Qualifiers Units RL
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sample ID: LRH0043-02 (GP-25- Air)
EPA TOtS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodich\oromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chi oro benzene
Dibromochloromethane
Chloroethane
Chlorofonn
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
I ,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,4-Dich\orobenzene
Dichlorodifluoromethane
1,1-Dich\oroethane.
I ,2-Dich\oroethane
cis-! ,2-Dichloroethene
trans-! ,2-Dichloi-oethene
I, 1-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dichloropropane
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
trans-! ,3-Dichloropropene
1,2-Dichloro-1, 1,2,2-tetrafluoroetbane
Ethyl benzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Hexachlorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
I, 1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
T etrach1oroethene
Toluene
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
1,1, 1-Trichloroethane
I, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trich1oroethene
19
4.8
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
4.6
3.1
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
2.6 JA
NO
NO
13
NO
NO
NO
NO
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
10
3.0
10
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
_2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
lO
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
6 of 53
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
Sampled: 08/04/08 09:35
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/0814:14
08/06/0814:14
08/06/0814:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14: 14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/08 14:14
08/06/0814:14
08/06/0814:14
08/06/0814:14
08/06/08 14:14
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H0701l
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H0701l
8H0701 I
8H07011
8H07011
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN EONVIRONMENTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings_ Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Result
Sample ID: LRH0043-02 (GP-25- Air)- cont.
Work Order: LRH0043
Project Brim hal Ave
Project Number: [none J
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data
Qualifiers Units RL
Dilution
EPA TOtS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS- cont.
Trichlorofluoromethane NO ppbv 2.0 1.0
I, I ,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane NO ppbv 2.0 1.0
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene NO ppbv 3.0 1.0
ND ppbv 3.0 1.0
Vinyl acetate NO ppbv 10 1.0
Vinyl chloride 6.2 ppbv 3.0 1.0
Xylenes, total 7.6 ppbv 2.0 1.0
7 of 53
Date
Analyzed
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/0817:18
QC
Instrument Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 09:35
08/06/08 14: 14 MSA AA 8H0701l
08/06/08 14: 14 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 14: 14 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 14:14 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 14:14 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 14:14 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/0814:14 MSA AA 8H07011
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL HoSTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610" Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Analyte
Sample 10: LRH0043-03 (GP-14- Air)
Data
Result Qualifiers
EPA TO IS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Dibromocbloromethane
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
I ,3-Dich\orobenzene
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
Dichlorodifluoromethane
1,1-Dichloroethane
I ,2-Dichloroethane
cis-1,2-Dich\oroethene
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene
I, 1-Dich\oroethene
1,2-Dich\oropropane
cis-! ,3-Dich\oropropene
trans-\ ,3-Dich\oropropene
I ,2-Dich\oro-1, 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
Ethylbenzene
4-Etbyltoluene
Hexachlorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methy\-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
1, I ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
T etrachloroethene
Toluene
1,2,4-Trich\orobenzene
I, I, 1-Trichloroethane
I, 1,2-Trich\oroethane
Trichloroethene
NO
250
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
..
2.0
NO
NO
NO
NO
4.2 JA
NO
NO
30
NO
NO
NO
NO
Units
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
Jlpbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
RL
!0
3.0
10
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
8 of 53
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 09:30
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
10
1.0
10
1.0
10
1.0
10
10
1.0
10
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
10
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
10
1.0
10
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
10
1.0
10
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 IS :04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/0815:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
08/06/08 15:04
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H070.11
8H07011
8H0701 I
8H07011
8H0701 I
8H0701l
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H0701\
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H0701l
8H0701 I
8H07011
8H0701l
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H0701\
8H07011
8H0701\
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
LRH0043
Test America
THI': LI':ADI':R IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
.
Analyte
Result
Sample ID: LRH0043-03 (GP-14- Air)- cont.
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data
Qualifiers Units RL Dilution
EPA T015 (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS- cont.
T richlorofluoromethane ND ppbv 2.0 1.0
I, 1 ,2 Tricbloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane ND ppbv 2.0 1.0
1,2,4-Trimethy\benzene ND ppbv 3.0 1.0
1,3,5-Trimethy\benzene ND ppbv 3.0 1.0
Vinyl acetate ND ppbv 10 1.0
Vinyl chloride NO ppbv 3.0 1.0
Xylenes, total 14 ppbv 2.0 1.0
9 of 53
.
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08118/08 17:18
Date QC
Analyzed Instrument Anaiyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 09:30
08/06/08 15:04 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 15 :04 MSA AA 8H0701\
08/06/08 15:04 MSA AA 8H07011
08106/08 15:04 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 15:04 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 15:04 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 15:04 MSA AA 8H07011
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVJRONMEN'fAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
Received: 08105108 I 0:00
Reported: 08118108 17:18
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Analyte
Sample ID: LRH0043-04 (GP-26- Air)
Data
Result Qualifiers
EPA T015 (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Dibromochloromethane
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
I ,2-Dichlorobenzene
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
I ,4-Dichlorobenzene
Dichlorodiftuoromethane
I, 1-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dichloroethane
ds-1,2-Dichloroethene
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene
I, 1-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dichloropropane
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
trans-! ,3-Dichloropropene
1,2-Dichloro-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroetbane
Ethylbenzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Hexachlorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
I, I ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Tetrachloroethene
Toluene
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
I, I, !-Trichloroethane
I, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroetbene
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
ND
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
21
NO
NO
11
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
42
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
280
12
NO
NO
NO
9,0
Units
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
pphv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
"""
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
RL
20
5.9
20
3.9
3.9
7.8
20
20
3.9
3.9
3.9
7.8
3.9
7.8
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
5.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
7.8
20
3.9
20
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
9.8
3.9
3.9
3.9
10 of 53
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sampled: 0810410810:00
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
08106/08 15:39
08/06/08 15;39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/0815:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/0815:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08106/08 15:39
08/06/08 15;39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/0815:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08106/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/0815:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/0815:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
08/06/08 15:39
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H070ll
8H070ll
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 *Fax 714-258..-0921
Griffin Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Result
Sample ID: LRH0043-04 (GP-26- Air)- cont.
Work Order: LRH0043
Project: Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data
Qualifiers Units RL Dilution
EPA TOtS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS- cont
Trichlorofluoromethane NO ppbv 3.9 2.0
I, 1,2-T richloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane NO ppbv 3.9 2.0
I ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene NO pplw 5.9 2.0
1,3,5-T rimethylbenzene NO ppbv 5.9 2.0
Vinyl acetate NO ppbv 20 2.0
Vinyl chloride NO ppbv 5.9 2.0
Xylenes, total 6.2 ppbv 3.9 2.0
11 of 53
Received: 08105108 I 0:00
Reported: 0811810817:!8
Date QC
Analyzed Instrument Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08104108 10:00
08106/08 15:39 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 15:39 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/0815:39 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 15:39 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 15:39 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 15:39 MSA AA 8H07011
08/06/08 15:39 MSA AA 8H0701l
LRH0043
TestAmerica
THE LEADER IN TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Analyte
Sample ID: LRH0043-05 (GP-20- Air)
Data
Result Qualifiers
EPA TOIS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodichloromethane
Bromofonn
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Dibromochloromethane
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
1 ,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
1,2-Dichlorobenzene

I,
Dichlorodifluoromethanc
1,1-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dichloroethane
cis-! ,2-Dichloroethene
trans-! ,2-Dichloroethene
I, 1-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dichloropropane
cis- I ,3-Dich\oropropene
trans-! ,3-Dichloropropene
I ,2-Dichloro-1, 1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
Ethylbenzeoe
4-Ethy\toluene
Hexach1orobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
I, I ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
T etrachloroethene
Toluene
1,2,4-Trich\orobenzene
I, l,l-Trichloroethane
1, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethene
19
14
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
2.4
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
65
2.6
NO
NO
NO
NO
4.0 JA
NO
NO
14
NO
NO
NO
NO
Units
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
RL
10
3.0
10
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
12 of 53
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 10:05
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08/07/08'05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08/07/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
08107/08 05:28
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H070l2
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Result
Sample ID: LRH0043-05 (GP-20- A;r)- cont.
Work Order: LRH0043
Project: Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data
Qualifiers Units RL Dilution
EPA T015 (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS- cont.
Trichlorofluoromethane NO ppbv 2.0 1.0
I, 1,2-T richloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane NO ppbv 2.0 1.0
1,2,4-Trimethy\benzcne NO ppbv 3.0 1.0
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene NO ppbv 3.0 1.0
Vinyl acetate NO ppbv 10 1.0
Vinyl chloride 44 ppbv 3.0 1.0
Xylenes, total 12 ppbv 2.0 1.0
13 of 53
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
Date QC
Analyzed Instrument Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 I 0:05
08/07/08 05:28 MSA AA 8H07012
08/07/08 05:28 MSA AA 8H07012
08107/08 05:28 MSA AA 8H07012
08/07/08 05:28 MSA AA 8H07012
08107/08 05:28 MSA AA 8H07012
08107/08 05:28 MSA AA 8H07012
08/07/08 05:28 MSA AA 8H07012
LRH0043
Test America
Tf-<E LE:ADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TSTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
IOO Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Work Order:
Project
Project Number:
LRH0043
BrimbalAve
[none]
Received: 08/05108 I 0:00
Reported: 08/1810817:18
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Analyte
Sample ID: LRH0043-06 (GP-6R- Air)
Data
Result Qualifiers
EPA TOtS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Dibromoch\oromethane
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
1 ,3-Dichlorobenzene
1 ,4-Dichlorobenzene
DichlorodiOuoromethane
I, 1-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dichloroethane
cis-1,2-Dichloroethenc
trans- I ,2-Dichloroethene
I, 1-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dichloropropane
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
trans-! ,3-Dichloropropene
I ,2-Dichloro-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
Ethylbenzene
4-IUhyltoluene
Hexachlorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
I, 1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
T etrachloroethene
Toluene
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
I, 1,1-Trichloroethane
I, 1 ,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethene
16
28
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
2.2
NO
NO
8.1
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
4.0
NO
NO
7.2
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
3.5
7.1
2.2
NO
NO
NO
NO
4.2 JA
NO
NO
19
NO
NO
NO
NO
Units
ppbv
ppbv
ppb'
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
RL
10
3.0
10
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
14 of 53
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08!0:38
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
08/07/0806:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06: I I
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06:11
08/07/08 06:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06:11
08/07/08 06:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/0806:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06:ll
08/07/08 06:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06:11
08/07/08 06:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06:11
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/0806:11
08/07/08 06: II
08/07/0806:11
08/07/0806:11
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
'MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H070l2
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADE'fl!N ENVIRONME'NTAL tESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
I 00 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Result
Sample ID: LRH0043-06 (GP-6R- Ak)- cont.
Work Order: LRH0043
Project: Brimbal Ave
Project Number; [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data
Qualifiers Units RL Dilution
EPA T015 (Med-Jevel)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS- cont.
Trichlorofluoromethane ND ppbv 2.0 1.0
I, I ,2-Trichloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane ND ppbv 2.0 1.0
1,2, 4-Trimelhylbenzene ND ppbv 3.0 1.0
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene ND ppbv 3.0 1.0
Vinyl acetate ND ppbv 10 1.0
Vinyl chloride 48 ppbv 3.0 1.0
Xylenes, total 17 ppbv 2.0 1.0
15 of 53
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
Date QC
Analyzed Instrument Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 10:38
08/07/0806:11 MSA AA 8H07012
08/07/0806:11 MSA AA 8H07012
08/07/0806:11 MSA AA 8H07012
08/07/08 06:11 MSA AA 8H07012
08/07/08 06:11 MSA AA 8H07012
08/07/08 06:11 MSA AA 8H07012
08/07/08 06:11 MSA AA 8H07012
LRH0043
Test America
THE: LE:ADE:R IN ENVIRONMENTAl TESTING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
I 00 Cwnmings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Received: 08/05/08 IO:Oo'
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
Analyte
Data
Result Qualifiers Units RL
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sample ID: LRH0043-07 (GP-llR- Air)
EPA (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Dibromochloromethane
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
1,2-J::!ichlorobenzene
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
I ,4-Dichloroberu:ene
Dichlorodifluoromethane
1,1-Dichloroethane
I ,2-Dichloroethane
cis-! ,2-Dichloroethene
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene
I, 1-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dichloropropane
cis-! ,3-Dichloropropene
trans-! ,3-Dich loropropene
1.2-Diehloro-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
Ethyl benzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Hexachlorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
I, I ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
T etrachloroethene
Toluene
1,2,4-Trichloroben;zene
I, 1,1-Trichloroethane
I, 1,2-TrichloroethMe
Trichloroethene
ND RL2
7,6 RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
NO RL2
NO RL2
ND RL2
NO RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
NO RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
NO RL2
21 RL2
7.8 RL2
6.3 RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
15 RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ND RL2
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
20
6.0
20
4.0
4.0
8.0
20
20
4.0
4.0
4.0
8.0
4.0
8.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
6.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
8.0
20
4.0
20
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
10
4.0
4.0
4.0
16 of 53
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
Sampled: 08/04/08 I 0:25
08/0.7/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08107/08 Q6:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08107/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08107/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08107/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08107/08 06:56
08107/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
08/07/08 06:56
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order: LRH0043 Received: 08105108 10:00
Reported: 08118108 17:18
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915 Project: Brimbal Ave
Peter Flink Project Ntunber: [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data
Analyte
Result Qualifiers Units RL
Sample ID: LRH0043-07 (GP-IIR- Air)- cont.
EPA T015 Organic Compounds by GC/MS- cont.
Trichlorofluoromethane ND RL2 ppbv 4.0
1,1 ,2-Trichloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane ND RL2 ppbv 4.0
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 9.9 RL2 ppbv 6.0
1,3,5-Trimethy\benzene ND RL2 ppbv 6.0
Vinyl acetate ND RL2 ppbv 20
Vinyl chloride NO RL2 ppbv 6.0
Xylenes, total 17 RL2 ppbv 4.0
17 of 53
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 10:25
2.0 08/07/08 06:56 MSA AA 8H07012
2.0 08/07/08 06:56 MSA AA 8H070l2
2.0 08/07/08 06:56 MSA AA 8H07012
2.0 08/07/08 06:56 MSA AA 8H07012
2.0 08/07/08 06:56 MSA AA 8H07012
2.0 08/07/08 06:56 MSA AA 8H07012
2.0 08/07/08 06:56 MSA AA 8H07012
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENoAL TE:SOING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18108 17:18
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Analyte
Sample 10: LRH0043-08 (GP-12- Air)
Data
Result Qualifiers
EPA TO IS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Dibromochloromethane
Cbloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
1,2-Dich\orobenzene
I ,3-Dicblorobenzene
I
Dichlorodi fluoromethane
I, 1-Dichloroethane

cis-! ,2-Dichloroethene
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene
I, 1-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dichloropropane
cis-! ,3-Dichloropropene
trans-1,3-Dichloropropene
I ,2-Dichloro-1, I ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
Ethylbenzene
4-Ethyltoluene,
Hexachlorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methy1-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
I, 1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
T etrachloroethene
Toluene
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
I, 1, 1-Trichloroethane
I, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethene
20
31
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
63
23
ND
ND
2.5
ND
2.7
ND
ND
15
ND
ND
ND
ND
Units
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
pplw
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
RL
10
3.0
10
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
18 of 53
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08104/08 10:18
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08107/08 15:46
08107/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08107/0815:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08107/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08107/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08107/08 15:46
08107/0815:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/0815:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
08107/08 15:46
08/07/08 15:46
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
. MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TE:STING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Result
SampleiD: LRH0043-08 (GP-12- Air)- cont.
Work Order: LRH0043
Project Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data
Qualifiers Units RL
Dilution
EPA TOlS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS- cont.
Trichlorofluoromethane NO ppbv 2.0 1.0
I, I ,2-Trichloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane NO ppbv 2.0 1.0
I ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 5.8 ppbv 3.0 1.0
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene NO ppbv 3.0 1.0
Vinyl acetate NO ppbv 10 1.0
Vinyl chloride NO ppbv 3.0 1.0
Xylenes, total 13 ppbv 2.0 1.0
19 of 53
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
Date QC
Analyzed Instrument Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 10:18
08/07/08 15:46 MSA AA 8H08008
08/07/08 15:46 MSA AA 8H08008
08/07/08 15:46 MSA AA 8H08008
08107/08 15:46 MSA AA 8H08008
08/07/08 15:46 MSA AA 8H08008
08107/08 15:46 MSA AA 8H08008
08/07/08 15:46 MSA AA 8H08008
LRH0043
Test America
Tfl!O LEADf:R IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Data
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
BrimbalAve
[none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Received:
Reported:
08/05/08 10:00
08118/0817:18
Analyte
Result Qualifiers Units RL
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sample ID: LRH0043-0l (GP-21 - Ak)
ASTM 01946 Gases
Carlron
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
9.7
NO
6.0
l2
70
o/o(v/v) 0.020
%(v/v) 0.0020
o/<>(v/v) 0.00040
o/o(v/v) 0.40
%(v/v) 2.0
20 of 53
Sampled: 08/04/08 09:16
2.0 08/06/08 10:24 GC8 El 8H07006
2.0 08/06/08 I 0:24 GC8 El 8H07006
2.0 08106/08 10:24 GC8 EI 8H07006
2.0 08106/08 10:24 GC8 El 8H07006
2.0 08/06/08 10:24 GC8 El 8H07006
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-256-8610 *Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order: LRH0043 Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
Project Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data Date
Analyte
Result Qualifiers Units RL
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sample ID: LRH0043-02 (GP-25- Air)
ASTM 01946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
9,6 o/o(v/v)
NO o/o(v/v)
0.23 %(v/v)
13 o/o(v/v)
75 %(v/v)
Sampled: 08/04/08 09:35
0.021 2.1 08/06/08 10:37 GC8 El 8H07006
0.0021 2.1 08/06/08 10:37 GC8 El 8H07006
0.00041 2.1 08/06/08 10:37 GC8 El 8H07006
0.41 2.1 08/06/08 10:37 GC8 El 8H07006
2.1 2.1 08/06/08 10:37 GC8 El 8H07006
21 of 53 LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN E'NVIRONMENTAL TESTING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Data
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order: LRH0043 Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/0817:18
Project Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Date
Analyte
Result Qualifiers Units RL
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sample ID: LRH0043-03 (GP-14- Air)
ASTM D1946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
II
NO
25
1.3
60
%(v/v) 0.021
%(v/v) 0.0021
%(v/v) 0.00041
o/<>(v/v) 0.41
o/<>(v/v) 2.1
22 of 53
Sampled: 08/04/08 09:30
2.1 08/06/08 10:50 GC8 El 8H07006
2.1 08/06/08 10:50 GC8 El 8H07006
2.1 08/06/08 10:50 GCS El 8H07006
2.1 08106/08 10:50 GC8 El 8H07006
2.1 08106/08 10:50 GC8 El 8H07006
LRH0043
TestAmerica
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cwnmings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order: LRH0043 Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 0811810817:18
Project: Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data Date
Analyte
Result Qualifiers Units RL Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sample ID: LRH0043-04 (GP-26- Air)
ASTM Dl946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
EPA 15/16- Sulfur Compounds
Carbon disulfide
Carbonyl sulfide
Dimethyl disulfide
Dimethyl sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide
Ethyl mercaptan
Methyl mercaptan
16
NO
0.027

77
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
o/o(v/v) 0.020
%(v/v) 0.0020
%(v/v) 0.00039
'Yo(v/v) 0.39
%(v/v) 2.0
ppmv 0.025
ppmv 0.050
ppmv 0.025
PP'"'
0.050
ppmv 0.050
ppmv 0.050
ppmv 0.050
23 of 53
Sampled: 08104108 10:00
2.0 08/06/08 II :04 GCS EI 8H07006
2.0 08/06/08 II :04 GCS EI 8H07006
2.0 08/06/08 II :04 GCS EI 8H07006
2.0 08/06/08 II :04 GCS EI 8H07006
2.0 08/06/08 II :04 GCS EI 8H07006
1.0 08/06/08 07:44 GC1 TO 8H06002
1.0 08106/08 07:44 GC7 TO 8H06002
1.0 08106/08 07:44 GC1 TO 8H06002
1.0 08106/08 07:44 GC7 TO 8H06002
1.0 08/06/08 07:44 GC1 TO 8H06002
1.0 08/06/08 07:44 GC7 TO 81-106002
1.0 08/06/08 07:44 GC7 TO 8H06002
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TE'STING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Data
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Received:
Reported:
Date
08/05/08 10:00
08118/0817:18
Analyte
Result Qualifiers Units RL Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sample ID: LRH0043-05 (GP-20- Air)
ASTM 01946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
3.8 o/o(v/v)
NO o/o(v/v)
7.6 %(v/v)
14 %(v/v)
72 %(v/v)
Sampled: 08/04/08 10:05
0.020 2.0 08106/08 II: 17 GC8 EI 8H07006
0.0020 2.0 08106/08 II: 17 GC8 EI 8H07006
0.00041 2.0 08/06/0811:17 GC8 EI 8H07006
0.41 2.0 08/06/08 II: 17 GC8 EI 8H07006
2.0 2.0 08/06/08 11:17 GC8 EI 8H07006
24 of 53 LRH0043
Test America
THE: LE:ADE:R IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
I 00 Cwnmings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Sample ID: LRH0043-06 (GP-6R- Air)
ASTM D1946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
EPA 15/16- Sulfur Compounds
Carbon disulfide
Carbonyl sulfide
Dimethyl disulfide
Dimethyl sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide
Ethyl mercaptan
Methyl mercaptan
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data
Result Qualifiers Units RL
Date
Dilution Analyzed
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/0817:18
Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sampled: 08/04/08 10:38
13 %(v/v) 0.020 2.0 08/06/08 II :34 GCS El 8H07006
ND o/o(v/v) 0.0020 2.0 08106/08 II :34 GC8 El 8H07006
8.4 %(v/v) 0.00040 2.0 08/06/08 II :34 GCS El 8H07006
2.1 o/n(v/v) 0.40 2.0 08/06/08 II :34 GC& El 8H07006
74 o/o{v/v) 2.0 2.0 08/06/08 11:34 GCS El 8H07006
ND
ppm' 0.025 1.0 08/06/08 08:09 GC7 TD 8H06002
ND ppmv 0.050 1.0 08/06/08 08:09 GC7 TD 8H06002
ND
ppm' 0.025 1.0 08/06/08 08:09 GC7 TD 8H06002
ND ppmv 0.050 1.0 08/06/08 08:09 GC7 TD 8H06002
4.2 ppmv 0.25 5.0 08/06/08 08:32 GC7 TD 8H06002
ND ppmv 0.050 1.0 08/06/08 08:09 GC7 TD 8H06002
ND ppmv 0.050 1.0 08/06/08 08:09 GC? TD 8H06002
25 of 53 LRH0043
Test America
THE tEADEiliN ENVIRONMENTAl TESTING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Ave,nue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610* Fax 714-258-0921
Data
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none}
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
Analyte
Result Qualifiers Units RL
Date
Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sample ID: LRH0043-07 (GP-IIR- Air)
ASTM 01946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
11 %(v/v)
NO %(v/v)
13 %(v/v)
2.1 %(v/v)
72 "%(v/v)
Sampled: 08/04/08 10:25
0.020 2.0 08/06/08 II :50 GCS EI 8H07006
0.0020 2.0 08/06/08 11:50 GC8 EI 8H07006
0.00040 2.0 08/06/08 ll:SO GC8 EI 8H07006
0.40 2.0 08106/08 II :50 GC8 El SH07006
2.0 2.0 08106/08 II :50 GC8 El 8H07006
26 of 53 LRH0043
Test America
THE LEAOE:R IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
I 00 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 0!915
Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 *Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order: LRH0043 Received: 08/05/08 I 0:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17: 18
Project Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
ANALYTICAL REPORT
Data Date
Analyte
Result Qualifiers Units RL Dilution Analyzed Instrument
QC
Analyst Batch
Sample ID: LRH0043-08 (GP-12- Air)
ASTM 01946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
7,4 %(v/v)
NO %(v/v)
NO o/o(v/v)
15 o/o(v/v)
75 o/o(v/v)
Sampled: 08/04/0810:18
0.022 2.2 08106/08 12:03 GC8 EI 8H07006
0.0022 2.2 08106/08 12:03 GC8 EI 8H07006
0.00044 2.2 08/06/08 12:03 GC8 EI 8H07006
0.44 2.2 08106/08 12:03 GC8 EI 8H07006
2.2 2.2 08/06/08 12:03 GC8 EI SH07006
27 of 53 LRH0043
Test America
THE: UocADE:R IN E:NVIRONM!;NTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610* Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte Result
Sample 10: 8H07011-BLKI (Blank- Air)
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
Data
Qualifier Units
Blank
Date
RL Dilution Analyzed
EPA TOtS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodichloromethane
Bromofonn
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Dibromochloromethane
Chloroethane
Chlorofom1
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
Dichlorodifluoromethane
I, 1-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dichloroethane
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene
trans-\ ,2-Dichloroethene
1, 1-Dichloroethene
I ,2-Dichloropropane
cis-! ,3-Dichloropropene
trans-! ,3-Dichloropropene
I ,2-Dichloro-1, 1,2,2 -tetrafluoroethane
Ethyl benzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Hexachlorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
l, 1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
T etrachloroethene
NO
ND
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
lO
3.0
lO
2.0
2.0
4.0
lO
lO
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
lO
2.0
lO
2.0
2.0
2.0
28 of 53
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
LOO
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
08/06/08 II :47
08/06/08 ll:47
08/06/08 11 :4 7
08/06/08 II :4 7
08/06/08 II :4 7
08/06/08 II :4 7
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 ll:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 II :4 7
08/06/08 II :47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 ll:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
Received: 08105108 10:00
Reported: 08118108 17:18
Instrument Analyst
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
QC
Batch
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H0701\
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
LRH0043
Test America
TH!: L!':AOE:R IN ENVIRONMENTAL T!':ST!NG
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915_
Peter Flink
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimba!Ave
[none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
Blank- Cont.
Date
Analyte Result
Data
Qualifier Units RL Dilution Analyzed
Sample ID: 8H07011-BLK1 (Blank- Air)- cont.
EPA TO IS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Toluene
I ,2,4-Trich\orobenzene
l, I, 1-Trichloroethane
I, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethene
Trichlorofluoromethane
I, I ,2-T richloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane
I ,2,4-Trimethylbenzene
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
Vinyl acetate
Vinyl chloride
Xylenes, total
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
Sample ID: 8H07012-BLK1 (Blank- Air)
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
EPA T015 (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Bromomethane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chi oro benzene
Dibromochloromethane
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
I ,2-Dichlorobenzene
I ,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
Dichlorodifluoromethane
1,1-Dichloroethane
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
2.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
10
3.0
2.0
10
3.0
10
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
29 of 53
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
08/06/08 II :4 7
08/06/08 II :4 7
08/06/08 II :4 7
08/06/08 11:47
08/06/08 11:47
08106/08 11:47
08106/08 11:47
08106/08 II :4 7
08106/08 11:47
08106/08 l1:47
08106/08 11:47
08106/08 II :4 7
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08107/08 2:53
08.(07/08 2:53
08107/08 2:53
08107/08 2:53
08107/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08107/08 2:53
08107/08 2:53
08107/08 2:53
08107/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
Instrument Analyst
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
QC
Batch
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H070ll
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07011
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H070\2
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
LRH0043
Test America
Tf.lE lEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL tESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
I 00 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
.
Result
Sample ID: 8H07012-BLKI (Blank- Air)- cont.
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
BrimbalAve
[none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
Data
Qualifier
Blank- Cont.
Units RL
Date
Dilution Analyzed
EPA TO IS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
1,2-Dichloroethane
cis-\ ,2-Dich\oroethene
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene
I, 1-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dich\oropropane
cis-! ,3-Dichloropropene
trans- I ,3-Dichloropropene
I ,2-Dichloro-1, I ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
Ethyl benzene
4-Ethy\toluene
Hexachlorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
I, 1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
T etrachloroethene
Toluene
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
I, I, !-Trichloroethane
I, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trich1oroethene
Trichlorofluoromethane
1, 1 ,2-T richloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
Vinyl acetate
Vinyl chloride
Xylenes, total
Sample ID: 8H08008-BLKI (Blank- Air)
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
EPA T015 (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Benzene
Benzyl chloride
NO
NO
NO
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
10
3.0
2.0
10
3.0
10
30 of 53
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 2:53
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
Received:
Reported:
08/05/08 10:00
08/18/08 17: 18
Instrument Analyst
QC
Batch
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H07012
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL IE'ST!NG
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte Result
Sample ID: 8H08008-BLK1 (Blank- Air)- cont.
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
Blank- Cont.
Date Data
Qualifier Units RL Dilution Analyzed
EPA TO IS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Bromodicbloromethane
Bromoform
Bromometbane
2-Butanone (MEK)
Carbon disulfide
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
Dibromochtoromethane
Chloroethane
Chloroform
Chloromethane
1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB)
I ,2-Dichlorobenzene
1 ,3Dichlorobenzene
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
Dichlorodifluoromethane
1, 1-Dichloroethane
1,2-Dich\oroethane
cis-! ,2-Dichloroethene
trans- I ,2-Dich\oroethene
I, 1-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dich\oropropane
cis-! ,3-Dichloropropene
trans-1,3-Dichloropropene
I ,2-Dich \oro-\, I ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
Ethyl benzene
4-Ethyltolucne
HexaChiorobutadiene
2-Hexanone
Methylene chloride
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK)
Styrene
l, 1 ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
T etrach\oroethene
Toluene
I ,2,4-T rich! oro benzene
I, I, !-Trichloroethane
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
NO
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
31 of 53
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07108 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08107108 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08107108 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08107108 14:16
08/07108 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08107108 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07108 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07108 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/08 17:18
Instrument Analyst
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
QC
Batch
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAl TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte Result
Sample ID: 8H08008-BLK1 (Blank- Air)- cont.
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
Blank- Cont.
Date Data
Qualifier Units RL Dilution Analyzed
EPA T015 (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethene
Trichlorofluoromethane
I, 1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane
1,2,4-T rimethylbenzene
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
Vinyl acetate
Vinyl chloride
Xylenes, total
Analyte
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
Result
Sample ID: 8H06002-BLKI (Blank- Air)
EPA 15/16- Sulfur Compounds
Carbon disulfide
Carbonyl sulfide
Dimethyl disulfide
Dimethyl sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide
Ethyl mercaptan
Methyl mercaptan
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
Sample ID: 8H07006-BLKI (Blank- Air)
ASTM D1946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
ND
ND
ND
ND
ND
Data
Qualifier
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
10
3.0
2.0
Blank - Cont.
Units
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
o/o(v/v)
o/o(v/v)
o/o(v/v)
o/o(v/v)
o/o(v/v)
RL
0.025
0.050
0.025
0.050
0.050
0.050
0.050
0.010
0.0010
0.00020
0.20
1.0
32 of 53
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
08/07/08 14:16
08107/08 14:16
08107/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08107/08 14:16
08107/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
08/07/08 14:16
Date
Dilution Analyzed
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
08/06/08 7:20
08/06/08 7:20
08/06/08 7:20
08/06/08 7:20
08/06/08 7:20
08/06/08 7:20
08/06/08 7:20
08/06/08 7:30
08/06/08 7:30
08/06/08 7:30
08/06/08 7:30
08/06/08 7:30
Received: 08/05/08 I 0:00
Reported: 08118/08 17: 18
Instrument Analyst
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
AA
Instrument Analyst
GC7
GC7
GC7
GC7
GC7
GC7
GC7
GCS
GCS
GC8
GC8
GCS
TD
TD
TD
TD
TD
TD
TD
El
El
El
El
El
QC
Batch
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
8H08008
QC
Batch
8H06002
8H06002
8H06002
8H06002
8H06002
8H06002
8H06002
8H07006
8H07006
8H07006
8H07006
8H07006
LRH0043
TestAmerica
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TE'STING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
I 00 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order: LRH0043 Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/0817:18
Project: Brimbal Ave
Project Nwnber: [none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
Analyte Result
Sample ID: 8H07006-BLK1 (Blank- Air)- cont.
ASTM 01946- Fixed Gases
Blank - Cont.
Data
Qualifier Units RL
33 of 53
Date QC
Dilution Analyzed Instrument Analyst Batch
LRH0043
Test America
LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TE:STING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
I 00 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Sample ID: 8H07011-BSI (LCS- Air)
Result
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
Data
Qualifiers Units
LCS
RL
Spike
Dilution Cone % Rec
EPA TOtS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Bromodichloromethane
Bromomethane
Carbon disulfide
Chloroform
l ,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,2-Dichloroethane
trans-! ,2-Dichloroeth ene
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
Ethylbenzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Styrene
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichlorofluoromethane
I, I ,2-T richloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane
Vinyl chloride
Sample ID: 8H07012-BSI (LCS- Air)
58.0
49.0
51.2
55.4
50.2
48.6
45.2
49.6
45.8
50.8
53.5
46.4
39.5
46.0
57.1
52.6
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
EPA TO IS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Bromodichloromethane
Bromomethane
Carbon disulfide
Chloroform
I ,3-Dichlorobenzene
I ,2-Dichloroethane
trans-! ,2-Dichloroethene
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
Ethyl benzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Styrene
I, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichlorofluoromethane
1,1,2-T richloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane
Vinyl chloride
57.2
52.3
43.5
52.4
48.6
46.2
49.5
51.5
48.2
52.4
55.9
47.5
40.4
47.0
54.1
50.3
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
10
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
10
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
l.OO
1.00
l.OO
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
l.OO
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
l.OO
1.00
1.00
l.OO
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
34 of 53
53.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
53.0
53.0
52.5
50.0
52.5
54.5
50.0
50.0
53.0
50.0
50.0
53.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
53.0
53.0
52.5
50.0
52.5
54.5
50.0
50.0
53.0
50.0
50.0
109%
98%
102%
Ill%
100%
92%
85%
94%
92%
97%
98%
93%
79%
87%
114%
105%
108%
105%
87%
105%
97%
87%
93%
98%
96%
100%
103%
95%
81%
89%
108%
101%
Target
Range
70- 130
70-130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- ]30
70- 130
70-130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/0817'18
Instrument
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA.
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MsA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
Date
Analyzed
QC
Batch
08/06/08 10:19 8H070 II
08/06/08 10:19 8H070 11
08/06/0810:19 8H07011
08/06/0810:19 8H07011
08/06/0810:19 8H07011
08/06/08 10:19 8H070ll
08/06/0810:19 8H07011
08/06/08 10:19 8H07011
08/06/08 10:19 8H07011
08106/08 10:19 8H070 II
08/06/0810:19 8H07011
08/06/0810:19 8H07011
08/06/08 10:19 8H070ll
08/06/0810:19 8H07011
08/06/0810:19 8H07011
08/06/08 10:19 8H07011
08/07/0801:39 8H07012
08/07/08 01:39 8H07012
08/07/0801:39 8H07012
08/07/08 01:39 8H07012
08/07/08 01:39 8H07012
08/07/08 01:39 8H07012
08/07/0801:39 8H07012
08/07/08 01:39 8H07012
08/07/0801:39 8H07012
08/07/0801:39 8H07012
08/07/0801:39 8H07012
08/07/08 01:39 SH07012
08/07/08 01:39 8H07012
08/07/08 01:39 8H07012
08/07/08 01:39 8H07012
08/07/08 01:39 8H07012
LRH0043
Test America
THE LE:ADEfl IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cununings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Sample ID: 8H08008-BSI (LCS- Air)
Result
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
BrimbalAve
[none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
Data
Qualifiers Units
LCS -Cont.
RL
Spike
Dilution Cone % Rec
EPA TO IS {Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Bromodichloromethane
Bromomethane
Carbon disulfide
Chlorofonn
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,2-Dich\oroethane
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
Ethylbenzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Styrene
1, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichlorofluoromethane
I, I ,2-Trichloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroetbane
Vinyl chloride
Analyte
Sample ID: 8H06002-BSI (LCS- Air)
EPA 15/16- Sulfur Compounds
Carbon disulfide
Carbonyl sulfide
Dimethyl disulfide
Dimethyl sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide
Ethyl mercaptan
Methyl mercaptan
62.6
su
66.1
51.4
50.3
51.8
47.8
50.1
47.7
56.1
57.9
54.8
40.8
44.7
53.9
53.3
Result
0.912
1.04
0.258
0.976
0.802
0.797
0.817
ME
Data
Qualifiers
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
Units
ppm'
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
10
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
LCS- Cont.
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
53.0
50.0
118%
102%
50.0 132%
50.0 103%
50.0
53.0
53.0
52.5
50.0
52.5
54.5
50.0
50.0
53.0
50.0
50.0
101%
98%
90%
95%
95%
107%
106%
110%
82%
84%
108%
107%
RL
Spike
Dilution Cone % Rec
0.025
0.050
0.025
0.050
0.050
0.050
0.050
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
35 of 53
0.950 96%
1.03 101%
0.300 86%
0.985 99%
0.980 82%
0.890 90%
0.930 88%
Target
Range
70- 130
70- 130
70-130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70-130
70- 130
70-130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
Target
Range
70- 120
75- 140
70- 130
70- 130
60- 130
70- 130
75- 130
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08118/08 17:18
Instrument
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
MSA
Instrument
GC7
GC7
GC7
GC7
GC7
GC7
GC7
Date
Analyzed
QC
Batch
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08107/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/0812:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
08/07/08 12:38 8H08008
Date
Analyzed
QC
Batch
08/06/08 06:21 8H06002
08/06/08 06:21 8H06002
08/06/08 06:21 8H06002
08/06/08 06:21 8H06002
08/06/08 06:21 8H06002
08/06/08 06:21 8H06002
08/06/08 06:21 8H06002
LRH0043
Test America
THE lEAOE:R IN ENVIRONME:NTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 * 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Analyte
Sample ID: 8H07006-BSI (LCS- Air)
ASTM 01946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide
Carbon monoxide
Methane
Oxygen
Nitrogen
Result
1.05
0.0483
0.0293
5.17
20.6
Work Order: LRH0043
Project Brimbal Ave
Project Number; [none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
LCS- Cont.
Data Spike Target
Qualifiers Units RL Dilution Cone % Rec Range
o/o(v/v) 0.010 1.00 0.998 105% 75- 125
%(v/v) 0.0010 1.00 0.0455 106% 70- 130
%(v/v) 0.00020 1.00 0.0280 105% 75- 135
%(v/v) 0.20 1.00 4.98 104% 70- 130
o/o(v/v) 1.0 1.00 20.0 103% 70-130
36 of 53
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08118/08 17:18
Instrument
GC8
ocs
GC8
GC8
GC8
Date
Analyzed
08/06/08 06;57
08/06/08 06:57
08106/08 06:57
08/06/08 06:57
08/06/08 06:57
QC
Batch
8H07006
SH07006
8H07006
8H07006
8H07006
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL rESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax-714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
I 00 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
LCS Dup
Spike
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08118/08 17:18
Target
Analyte Result
Data
Qualifiers Units RL Dilution Cone % Rec Range RPD Limit
Date
Analyzed
QC
Batch
Sample ID: 8H07011-BSDI (LCS Dup- Air)
EPA TOlS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Bromodichloromethane
Bromomethane
Carbon disulfide
Chloroform
1 ,3-Dichlorobenzene
I ,2-Dichloroethane
troos-1 ,2-Dicliloroethene
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
Ethyl benzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Styrene
I, I ,2-Trichloroethane
Trichlorofluoromethane
I, 1,2-T richloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane
Vinyl chloride
60.8
50.6
57.1
55.3
50.5
49.0
46.0
52.2
47.8
51.6
57.4
49.0
40.5
49.2
56.5
51.2
Sample ID: 8H07012-BSDI (LCS Dup- Air)
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
pP,v
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
EPA TOtS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Bromodichloromethane
Bromomethane
Carbon disulfide
Chlorofonn
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
I ,2-Dichloroethane
trans-!
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
Ethyl benzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Styrene
I, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichlorofluoromethane
1, I ,2-T richloro-1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane
Vinyl chloride
59.8
52.3
55.5
52.3
48.2
47.1
47.8
50.7
48.2
52.7
58.7
49.9
39.8
47.7
53.7
49.9
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
10
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
10
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
37 of 53
53_0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
53.0
53.0
52.5
50.0
52.5
54.5
50.0
50.0
53.0
50.0
50.0
53.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
53.0
53.0
52.5
50.0
52.5
54.5
50.0
50.0
53.0
50.0
50.0
115% 70-130
101% 70- 130
114% 70- 130
111% 70-130
101% 70-130
92% 70- 130
87%
99%
96%
98%
70- 130
70-130
70- 130
70- 130
105% 70- 130
98% 70- 130
81% 70-130
93% 70-130
113% 70- 130
102% 70- 130
5
3
II
0.2
0.6
0.8
4
7
3
7
113% 70- 130 4
105% 70- 130 0.09
Ill% 70-130 24
105% 70- 130 0.2
96% 70 - 130 0.8
89% 70-130 2
90% 70-130 4
97% 70- 130
96% 70- 130
100% 70- 130
108% 70- 130
100% 70- 130
80% 70- 130
90% 70- 130
107% 70- 130
100% 70- 130
0.2
0.6
2
2
0.7
0.9
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
08/06/08 10:53 8H07011
08106/08 10:53 8H07011
08/06/08 10:53 8H070 II
08/06/08 10:53 8H070 II
08/06/08 10:53 8H07011
08/06/08 10:53 8H07011
08106/08 10:53 8H070 11
08/06/08 10:53 8H070ll
08/06/0810:53 8H07011
08/06/08 10:53 8H07011
08/06/08 10:53 8H07011
08/06/08 10:53 8H07011
08/06/08 10:53 8H07011
08/06/08 10:53 8H07011
08106/08 10:53 8H07011
08106/08 10:53 8H07011
08/07/08 02:14 8H07012
08/07/0802:14 8H07012
08/07/08 02:14 8H07012
08/07/08 02:14 8H07012
08/07/08 02:14 8H07012
08107/0802:14 8H07012
08/07/0802:14 8H07012
08/07/0802:14 8H07012
08107/0802:14 8H07012
08/07/08 02:14 8H07012
08/07/08 02:14 8H07012
08/07/0802:14 8H07012
08/07/08 02:14 8H07012
08/07/0802:14 8H07012
08/07/08 02:14 8H070\2
08/07/08 02:14 8H07012
LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TE:$TING
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA 01915
Peter Flink
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Work Order:
Project:
Project Number:
LRH0043
Brimbal Ave
[none]
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08118/08 17:18
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
Analyte Result
Sample ID: 8H08008-BSDI (LCS Dup- Ak)
Data
Qualifiers Units
EPA TOtS (Med-level)- Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS
Acetone
Bromodichloromethane
Bromomethane
Carbon disulfide
Chloroform
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,2-Dich\oroethane
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
Ethylbenzene
4-Ethyltoluene
Styrene
I, 1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichlorofluoromethane
I, I ,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane
Vinyl chloride
Analyte
52.1
50.9
63.7
53.6
48.7
49.3
46.1
Sl.l
47.3
52.5
55.5
49.6
39.5
47.7
55.0
50.6
Result
Sample ID: 8H06002-BSDI (LCS Dup- Air)
EPA 15/16- Sulfur Compounds
Carbon disulfide
Carbonyl sulfide
Dimethyl disulfide
Dimethyl sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide
Ethyl mercaptan
Methyl mercaptan
0.905
1.01
0.256
0.966
0.757
0.737
0.797
Data
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppb\'
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
ppbv
Qualifiers Units
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
ppmv
LCS Dup- Cont.
Spike Target
RL Dilution Cone % Rec Range RPD Limit
Date
Analyzed
QC
Batch
10
2.0
4.0
10
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
1.00
1.00
l.OO
1.00
1.00
l.OO
1.00
1.00
l.OO
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
LCS Dup - Cont.
53.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
53.0
53.0
52.5
50.0
52.5
54.5
50.0
50.0
53.0
50.0
50.0
Spike
98% 70. 130
102% 70- 130
127% 70- 130
107% 70-130
97% 70- 130
93%
87%
97%
95%
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
70- 130
100% 70- 130
102% 70- 130
99% 70- 130
79% 70- 130
90% 70-130
110% 70-130
101% 70- 130
Target
18
0.4
4
4
3
4
2
7
4
10
3
6
2
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
08/07/08 13:14 8H08008
08/07/08 13:14 8H08008
08107/08 13:14 8H08008
08107/08 13:14 8H08008
08/07/08 13:14 8H08008
08/07/08 13:14 8H08008
08107/0813:14 8H08008
08107/08 13:14 8H08008
08107/08 13:14 8H08008
08107/08 13:14 8H08008
08107/08 13:14 8H08008
08107/08 13:14 8H08008
08/07/08 13:14 8H08008
08/07/0813:14 8H08008
08/07/08 13:14 8H08008
08/07/08 13:14 8H08008
RL Dilution Cone % Rec Range RPD Limit
Date
Analyzed
QC
Batch
0.025
0.050
0.025
0.050
0.050
0.050
0.050
l.OO
1.00
1.00
l.OO
1.00
l.OO
1.00
38 of 53
0.950 95%
1.03 98%
0.300 85%
0.985 98%
0.980 77%
0.890 83%
0.930 86%
70- 120
75- 140
70- 130
70- 130
60- 130
70- 130
75- 130
0.7
3
6
8
2
25 08106/08 07:00 8H06002
25 08/06/08 07:00 8H06002
30
30
25
30
25
08/06/08 07:00 8H06002
08/06/08 07:00 8H06002
08/06/08 07:00 8H06002
08/06/08 07:00 8H06002
08/06/08 07:00 8H06002
LRHQ043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 Fax 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
I 00 Cummings Center Suite 222G
Beverly, MA 0!915
Peter Flink
Work Order: LRH0043
Project: Brim hal Ave
Project Number: [none]
PROJECT QUALITY CONTROL DATA
LCS Dup - Cont.
Data Spike Target
Received: 08/05/08 10:00
Reported: 08/18/0817:18
Date
Analyte Result Qualifiers Units RL Dilution . Cone % Rec Range RPD Limit Analyzed
QC
Batch
Sample ID: 8H07006-BSDI (LCS Dup- Air)
ASTM 01946- Fixed Gases
Carbon dioxide LOS %(v/v) 0.010 1.00 0.998 105% 75- 125 03 20 08/06/08 07:10 8H07006
Carbon monoxide 0.0483 %{v/v) 0.0010 1.00 0.0455 106% 70- 130 0.003 30 08/06/08 07: 10 8H07006
Methane 0.0293 o/o{v/v) 0.00020 1.00 0.0280 105% 75- 135 0.06 20 08106/08 07:10 8H07006
Oxygen 5.17 o/o(v/v) 0.20 1.00 4.98 104% 70- \30 0.04 30 08106/08 07: to 8H07006
Nitrogen 20.6 o/o(v/v) 1.0 1.00 20.0 103% 70- 130 0 30 08106/08 07: to 8H07006
39 of 53 LRH0043
Test America
THE LEADER IN ENVIRONMENTAL TE:STINO
1721 South Grand Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 714-258-8610 714-258-0921
Griffin Engineering Group Beverly
100 Cummings Center Suite 2220
Beverly, MA01915
Peter Flink
Work Order: LRH0043
Project: Brimbal Ave
Project Number: [none]
DATA QUALIFIERS AND DEFINITIONS
Internal Standard recovery was outside of method limits. Matrix interference was conftrmed by reanalysis.
JA The analyte was positively identified but the quantitation is an estimate.
Received: 08/05/08 I 0:00
Reported: 08/18/0817:18
ME The percent recovery of the analyte is outside the control limits but within marginal exceedance limits, per NELAC
requirements.
RL2 Reporting limit raised due to high concentrations of hydrocarbons.
ND Not detected. at the reporting limit (or method detection limit if shown)
40 of 53 LRH0043

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1721 Soult\ Grand A'Ve
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Canister Samples Chain of Custody Record
Tes/Amstka UII!Milfon"&s.. /M. sssumes no liablilywith to llle co!ltldion end stt/pmMl oll!lese ssm,plet.

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Canister Samples Chain of Custody Record
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Te$fAmerfeai..BbOilllm'fM. tnc. <ti!S:SI.ItrteS .rwlia'Jih1y wilh rrJJptJCl to lh$ shlpm&nt tJI these sefi'1P(es.
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., ... ---- -r- .

CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD
VFR ID: ttF I LJ l
CLIENT: _ __ t:_c_tJ_G_ . -
CANISTER SERIAL#: __ DI.-!.3=-.::0::_S:::__O=.. -=------
Duration of comp. : '- Hrs. I mins.
DATE CLEANED: ----,:0,., ____ _
FJow setting: -:-Lf/7mVmin
CLIENT SAMPLE #: -;i(},""t-'---'l..:::c\L----,----:-:------
SITE LOCATION:
READING
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I INITIAL FIELD VACUUM
q(C.,
I FINAL FIELD READING
II\ 0
Initials:
LABORATORY CANISTER PRESSURIZATION
I
. INITIAL VACUUM {circle unit used))
I
.FINAL
I
Pressurization Gas:
COMPOSITE
TIME
COMMENTS: IHOURSl
15Min.
30Min.
1
2
4
6.
8
10
12
24
J
FLOW RATE RANGE
(ml/min)
316-333
158-166.7
79.2-83.3
39.6-41.7
19.8 20.8
13.2 13.9
9.9-10.4
7.92 8.3
6.6-6.9
3.5-4.0
N;\COI\OOCS\TestAmerica DOCs\TestAmerica- CANISTER FIElD DATA RECORD- 2Q080201.doc t
43 of 53 LRH0043
7,

CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD
CLIENT: ----'-6"'-'' __ t_c_N_G_. -
VFR ID: tiFQ"Z.S"
CANISTER SERIAL #: _.._\ 2,_......:;3t<.O.L::::.YL_-==------
Duration of comp. : ?..... Hrs. I mins.
DATECLEANED: 6f.Z..'-LOoF
CLIENT SAMPLE #:
SITE LOCATION: 6f1W\6lf'rC tf\VL
Flow setting: 0<i.{, :-L(f.7ml!min
Initials:
READING
INITIAL VACUUM CHECK
!INITIAL FIELD VACUUM
36
I FINAL FIELD READING
LABORATORY CANISTER PRESSURIZATION
INITIAL VACUUM (Inches Hg I unit used))
I I o- s-1 I
'i .r /o 'i
I
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.FINAL PRESSURE
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COMPOSITE
FLOW RATE RANGE
TIME
COMMENTS: IHOURS\
(ml/min)
15 Min. 316-333
30Min. 158 166.7
1 79.2 83.3
2 39.6 41.7
4 19.8-20.8
6 13.2 13.9
8 9.9-10.4
10 7.92-8.3
12 6.6-6.9
24 3.5-4.0
N:\COI\DOCS\TestAmerica DOCs\TestAmerica CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD. 20080201 .doc I
44 of 53 LRH0043
.,... . __ t_ K_ -
Ill:::! tt;U
CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD
::,
CLIENT: _ __ _/'J_G_. -
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DATE CLEANED: --;OO"i ____ _
CLIENT SAMPLE#:
SITE LOCATION: _flJ"""'(l.;ul
Duration of camp. : L- Hrs. I mins.
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Initials:
READING
INITIAL VACUUM CHECK
I INITIAL FIELD VACUUM
I FINAL FIELD READING
<? ,,
LABORATORY CANISTER PRESSURIZATION
INITIAL VACUUM (Inches untl used))
\.__/,(
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COMMENTS:
I , 6. "c I
I Z(.Cj( I
I
COMPOSITE
TIME
IHOURS\
15 Min.
30Min.
1
2
4
6
8
10
12
24
1/1
I
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(mVmin)
316-333
158-166.7
79.2-83.3 .
39.6-41.7
19.8-20.8
13.2-13.9
9.9 11l.4
7.92 8.3
6.6 6.9
3.5 4.0
N:\001\DOCS\TestAmerica DOCs\TestAmeric-a FIELD DATA 20080201,doc I
45 of 53 LRH0043
CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD
CLIENT: --'-"6'--'', _,_f_F-"I"--N __ t_N_G_. -
CANISTER SERIAL#:
DATE CLEANED: _ ____ _
CLIENT SAMPLE #: _ _,G"-'f_-_,'Z.,_(p=-------:-------
SITELOCATION: ilJC"\Mf#-G k
READING
INITIAL VACUUM CHECK
I INITIAL FIELD VACUUM
tooo
VFR ID: tfF 0 8;'=\
Duration of comp. : ?-- Hrs./ mins.
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I FINAL FIELD READING
B

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1 -
INITIAL VACUUM (Inches Hg (circle untt used))
I
I L
I
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. FINAL PRESSURE <{siAl)
I
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I
.(;
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COMPOSITE
FLOW RATE RANGE
TIME
COMMENTS: (HOURS)
(m!lmln)
15 Min. 316-333
30Min. 158-166.7
1 79.2-83.3
2 39.6-41.7
4 19.8-20.8
6 13.2-13.9
8 9.9-10.4
10 7.92 8.3
12 6.6-6.9
.
24 3.5 4.0
N:\COI\DOCS\TestAmerica DOCs\TestAmerica- CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD - 20080201.doc t
46 of 53 LRH0043
5
CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD
CLIENT: --'-"6"--'' __ E_N_G_. -
CANISTER SERIAL #: _(\-"--{o=-_-"--'{_=-.@,=-----::=-----
DATE CLEANED: ____ _
VFR ID: ttf=O \0
Duration of comp. : {._ Hrs. I mins.
Flow setting: 7,"{.(., >Lf/.7ml/min
CLIENT SAMPLE#:
SITE LOCATION: _ ___
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READING
INITIAL VACUUM CHECK
I INITIAL FIELD VACUUM
({)6)'
I FINAL FIELD READING
I i}ct[o(
LABORATORY CANISTER PRESSURIZATION
INITIAL VACUUM (Inches Hg/ e (circle unit used))
2(.
COMPOSITE
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TIME
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(mllmin)
15 Min. 316-333
.
30Min. 158-166.7
1 79.2-83.3
2 39.6-41.7
4 19.8-20.8
6 13.2-13.9
8 9.9 10.4
10 7.92 8.3
12 6.6 6.9
24 3.5-4.0
N:\COI\DOCS\TestAmetica DOCs\TestAmerica FIELD DATA RECORD- 20080201.doc !
47 of 53 LRH0043
G

CANISTER FIElD DATA RECORD
CLIENT: __ 'E_N_G_. -
VFR ID: tiF 0 :S'"]
CANISTER SERIAL #: _q--'""5-"-'L.=-3.....,_"3,,__---:::=-----
DATECLEANED: 0 t
Duration of camp. : '- Hrs. I mins.
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CLIENT SAMPLE #:
SITE LOCATION: 6i:..IN\. A!J'f
READING
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I INITIAL FIELD VACUUM
IO'S
I FINAL FIELD READING

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I
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I
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. FINAL PRESSURE 1s1A0
I 2 f-77
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-
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(f TIMES\
HOURS
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30Min.
1
2
4
6
8
10
12
24
I

I

I
M
I
&
FLOW RATE RANGE
(mVmin)
316-333
158 166.7
79.2 83.3
39.6 41.7
19.8 20.8
13.2 13.9
9.9 10.4
7.92-8.3
6.6-6.9
3.5-4.0
N:\COI\DOCS\Tes!America DOCs\TestAmerica FIELD DATA R!;CORD - 20080201.doc I
48 of 53 LRH0043
CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD
CLIENT: _ _,_,6"-'' __ E__N_G_. -
CANISTER SERIAL #: _
DATE CLEANED: _ ___,0=" _I-:--'-2__7-L.-\li"0"--'15"-'='-'F ____ _
CLIENT SAMPLE #: -J..,42rf-- rf._.'------::-:--.----
SITE LOCATION: _
READING
INITIAL VACUUM CHECK
I INITIAL FIELD VACUUM
\02\
I FINAL FIELD READING
VFR ID: ttF l \ 'l._
Duration of comp. : (._ Hrs./ mins.
Flow setting: 7> Df,.(p -:-L(/.7mVmin
Initials:
LABORATORY CANISTER PRESSURIZATION
J
.INITIAL VACUUM (Inches Hg (circle unit used))
I
I
I I 'b I
Pressurization Gas:
COMPOSITE
FLOW RATE RANGE
TIME
COMMENTS: IHOURS\
{mVmln)
15 Min. 316-333
30Min. 158-166.7
1 79.2-83.3
2 39.6-41.7
4 19.8-20.8
6 13.2-13.9
8 9.9 10.4
10 7.92 8.3
12 6.6 6.9
24 3.5 4.0
I
N;\COI\DOCS\TestAmerlca OOGs\TestAmerica- CANISTER FlELO DATA RECORD- 20080201.doc j
49 of 53 LRH0043
CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD
CLIENT: --'-6"-'' P-.'--'-"I=-'-f-'-F_:::I=.:._N __ t__f\)_G_. -
CANISTER SERIAL #: _ __,l__,lw3,_'-t--"--'2_=--==-----
DATECLEANED: 0/Z.:LlO"b"F
CLIENT SAMPLE#: ___,(b!;.)"-(J_----'\'-'1.,...'-------------
SITE
READING
INITIAL VACUUM CHECK
I INITIAL FIELD VACUUM
JD r'f
I FINAL FIELD READING
VFR ID: tiF \ 0 \
Duration of comp. : _ Hrs. I mins.
Flow setting: 2,0f,.(., -:-'-{f.7mVmin
Initials:
LABORATORY CANISTER PRESSURIZATION
INITIAL VACUUM (Inches Hg (circle unfi used))
. FINAL PRESSURE fs0>
I Z(, D? I .f; I
Pressurization Gas: __My
COMPOSITE
FLOW RATE RANGE
TIME
COMMENTS: (HOURS)
(ml/min)
15 Min. 316-333
30 Min. 158-166.7
1 79.2-83.3
2 39.6 41.7
4 19.8-20.8
6 13.2-13.9
8 9.9-10.4
10 7.92-8.3
12 6.6 6.9
24 3.5 4.0
I
N;\001\00CS\TestAmerit:a DOCs\TestAmerlca- CANISTER FIELD DATA RECORD- 20080201.doc j
50 of 53 LRH0043
CANISTER QC
CERTIFICATION
TestAmerioo
1[' . :::-- - r- PT If" ..

Certification Type: ..
'
Date Cleaned/Batch
Date of QC
Data File Number
vls q3D-33
.......-- Dl.\ I l-\l.a
\/'"" 1\34 d.
6Co3d.49
l2ti-0'3 f
CANISTER ID NUMBERS
v- q3oso
v OLl\lpY

9ted-:J B
Cf31S5
The above canisters cleaned as.a batch. This certifies this batch contains no
target analyte concentratiO.ngreater than or equal to the method criteria for the
Tvofi' indicate'd above.
* " "INDICATES THE CAN OR CANS WHICH WERE SCREENED.
Reviewed By:
N:\CQI\DOCS\TestAmerica 009S\Can QC Cert 20Ci70712.doc
Date:
51 of 53 LRH0043
Data File: \\LAPC046\MSA CC\chem\MSA.i\080730.B\MB07301.D
Report Date: 30-Jul-2008-10:25
Data file :
Lab Smp Id:
Inj Date
Operator
Smp Info
Mise Info
Comment
TestAmerica Los Angeles
AIR TOXICS - T0-14AIT0-15 MEDIUM LEVEL
\\LAPC046\MSA CC\chem\MSA.i\080730.B\MB0730l.D
BLANK - Client Smp ID: 93233
30-JUL-2008 09:58
DLK Inst ID: MSA.i
. BLANK,93233,,SCREEN BLANK
1,1,500,500,3,,BLANK,BLANK.SUB,O,
Method \\LAPC046\MSA CC\CHEM\MSA.I\080730.B\T014A.m
Meth Date 30-Jul-2008 OB:39 kammererd Quant Type: ISTD
Cal Date 30-JUL-2008 03:53 Cal File: IC07295.D
Als bottle: 15 QC Sample: BLANK
Dil Factor: 1.00000
Page 1
Integrator: HP RTE
Subtraction File: \\LAPC046\MSA CC
Target Version: 4.04
Compound Sublist: BLANK.SUB
Processing Host: LAPC046
Concentration Formula: Amt * DF * (FinalPres I InitPres)*(CalVol I SmpVol)
Name
DF
Final Pres
InitPres
Cal Vol
SmpVol
Compounds


64 Bromochloromethane
$
70 1,2-Dichloroethane-d4

77 1,4-Difluoroben%ene
$ 89 Toluene-de
.
102 Chlorobenzene-dS
$ 122 4-Bromo.fluorobenzene
Value
1.000
1. 000
1.000
500.000
500.000
Description
Dilution Factor
Final Pres
InitPres
Cal Vol
SmpVol
QUANT SIG
MASS RT EXP RT REt. RT
49 10.311 10.353 (1.000)
65 11.363 (0.937)
114 12.087 12.112 {1.000)
100 14.685 14.709 (1.215)
117 17.346 .17.361 (1.000)
95 1.9.582 19.598 {1.129)
52 of 53
CONCENTRATIONS
ON-COLUMN FINAL
RESPONSE ( ppbv)_ { ppbv)
"'""'"'"'"'"'"'
1743374 50.0000
801869 53.7201 53.72
2513688 50.0000
1350319 51.5680 51.57
2006782 50.0000
1774461 52.4509 52.45
LRH0043
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53 of 53
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APPENDIXC
Land GEM Output for the Modeling of Landfill Gas Generation
at the Former Brimbal Avenue Landfill in Beverly, MA
Appendix C.xls
INTRODUCTION
LandGEM - Landfill Gas Emissions Model, Version 3.02
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Model Design:
Worksheet Name Function
INTRO Contains an overview of the model and important notes about using Land GEM
Allows users to provide landfill characteristics, determine model parameters, select up to
USER INPUTS
four gases/pollutants (total landfill gas, methane, carbon dioxide, NMOC, and 46 air
pollutants), and enter waste acceptance rates
POLLUTANTS
Allows users to edit air pollutant concentrations and molecular weights for existing
pollutants and add up to 10 new pollutants
INPUT REVIEW Allows users to review and print model inputs
METHANE
Calculates methane emission estimates using the first-order decomposition rate equation
Shows tabular emission estimates for up to four gases/pollutants (selected in the USER
RESULTS
INPUTS worksheet) in megagrams per year, cubic meters per year, and user's choice of
a third unit of measure (average cubic feet per minute, cubic feet per year, or short tons
per year)
Shows graphical emission estimates for up to four gases/pollutants (selected in the
GRAPHS
USER INPUTS worksheet) in megagrams per year, cubic meters per year, and user's
choice of a third unit of measure (selected in the RESULTS worksheet)
INVENTORY
Displays tabular emission estimates for all gases/pollutants for a single year specified by
users
REPORT Allows users to review and print model inputs and outputs in a summary report
IMPORTANT NOTES!
The following user inputs MUST be completed in the USER INPUTS worksheet:
- Landfill open year
- Landfill closure year or Waste design capacity
-Annual waste acceptance rates from open year to current year or closure year
Other Important Notes:
- LandGEM is based on the gas generated from anaerobic decomposition of landfilled waste which
has a methane content between 40 and 60 percent.
- When using Land GEM to comply with the CAA, the methane content of the landfill gas must
remain fixed at 50% by volume (the model default value).
- Default pollutant concentrations used by LandGEM have already been corrected for air infiltration,
as stated in AP-42. If a user-specified value for NMOC concentration is used based on site-specific
data, then it must be corrected for air infiltration.
-When comparing results from LandGEM with measurements of extracted gas collected at a site,
the landfill owner/operator must adjust for air infiltration prior to any comparisons.
-One megagram is equivalent to one metric ton.
INTRO -1
10/2/2008
About LandGEM:
Land GEM is based on a first-order decomposition rate equation
for quantifying emissions from the decomposition of landfilled
waste in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The software
provides a relatively simple approach to estimating landfill gas
emissions. Model defaults are based on empirical data from U.S.
landfills. Field test data can also be used in place of model
defaults when available. Further guidance on EPA test methods,
Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations, and other guidance regarding
landfill gas emissions and control technology requirements can be
found at
http://www .epa .gov/ttnatwO 1 /landfill/landflpg. html
Land GEM is considered a screening tool -the better the input
data, the better the estimates. Often, there are limitations with the
available data regarding waste quantity and composition, variation
in design and operating practices over time, and changes
occurring over time that impact the emissions potential. Changes
to landfill operation, such as operating under wet conditions
through leachate recirculation or other liquid additions, will result
in generating more gas at a faster rate. Defaults for estimating
emissions for this type of operation are being developed to include
in LandGEM along with defaults for convential landfills (no
leachate or liquid additions) for developing emission inventories
and determining CAA applicability. Refer to the Web site identified
above for future updates.
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
USER INPUTS Landfill Name or Identifier:

1: PROVIDE LANDFILL CHARACTERISTICS
Clear ALL Non-Parameter I
Inputs/Selections
Landfill Open Year 1948
Landfill Closure Year 1961
Have Model Calculate Closure Year? CYes .ENo
Waste Design Capacity
short tons
... ,
Restore Default Model
2: DETERMINE MODEL PARAMETERS
Parameters
Methane Generation Rate, k (year
1
)
I Inventory Conventional - 0.04 ... J
Potential Methane Generation Capacity, L
0
(m
3
/Mg)
I
Inventory Conventional - 100
3
NMOC Concentration (ppmv as hexane)
I Inventory No or Unknown Co-disposal - 600 ... j
Methane Content(% by volume)
I
CAA - 50% by \,{)lume ... ]
3: SELECT GASES/POLLUTANTS
Gas I Pollutant #1 User-specified pollutant parameters are currently being used by model.
I Total landfill gas
... I
Edit Existing or Add
Gas I Pollutant #2 New Pollutant
I Methane
... ]
Parameters
Gas I Pollutant #3
I NMOC
... I
Restore Default
Pollutant
Gas I Pollutant #4
Parameters
I
Hydrogen sulfide
_ ... I
Description/Comments:
USER INPUTS- 1
Appendix C.xls
4: ENTER WASTE ACCEPTANCE RATES
Input Units: I short tons/year ..-I
Input Units Calculated Units
Year
(short tons/year) (Mg/year)
1948 12,250 11,136
1949 12,250 11,136
1950 12,250 11 ,136
1951 12,250 11,136
1952 12,250 11,136
1953 12,250 11,136
1954 12,250 11,136
1955 12,250 11 ,136
1956 12,250 11,136
1957 12,250 11 ,136
1958 12,250 11,136
1959 12,250 11,136
1960 12,250 11,136
1961 12,250 11,136
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
USER INPUTS - 2
10/2/2008
Appendix C.xls
4: ENTER WASTE ACCEPTANCE RATES
Input Units: j short tons/year ..-j
Input Units Calculated Units
Year
(short tons/year) (Mglyear)
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
USER INPUTS - 3
10/2/2008
Appendi x C.xls
POLLUTANTS Landfill Name or Identifier:
----------------------------------------------
Enter New Pollutant
Parameters
Edit Existing Pollutant
Parameters
Default parameters will be used by model unless alternate parameters are entered.
Gas I Pollutant Default Paramet,
Concentration
Compound (ppmv) Molecular Weight
Ul Total landfill gas 30 03
3: Methane 1604
C1l
Carbon dioxide 44.01
(.!)
NMOC 600 86.18
-
........................... ... .... ......................... .. ... ...... ... .. ... ................... ... ........................... ............................................... ... ......... .... .............. ............
1,1, 1-Trichloroethane (methyl chloroform)- HAP 0.48 133.41
1,1 ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane- HAPNOC 1.1 167.85
1, 1-Dichloroethane (ethylidene dichloride)- HAPNOC 2.4 98.97
1, 1-Dichloroethene (vinylidene chloride) - HAPNOC 0.20 96.94
1 ,2-Dichloroethane (ethylene dichloride)- HAPNOC 0.41 98.96
1 ,2-Dichloropropane (propylene dichloride)- HAPNOC 0.18 112.99
2-Propanol (isopropyl alcohol) - VOC 50 60.11
Acetone 7.0 58.08
Acrylonitrile - HAPNOC 6.3 53.06
Benzene - No or Unknown Co-disposal - HAPNOC 1.9 78.11
Total landfill gas 11 78.11
Bromodichloromethane - VOC 3.1 163.83
Methane 5.0 58.12
Carbon disulfide - HAPNOC 0.58 76.13
NMOC 140 28.01
Carbon tetrachloride - HAPNOC 4.0E-03 153.84
Hydrogen sulfide 0.49 60.07
Chlorobenzene - HAPNOC 0.25 112.56
Chlorodifluoromethane 1.3 86.47
Chloroethane (ethyl chloride) - HAPNOC 1.3 64.52
Chloroform - HAPNOC 0.03 119.39
Chloromethane - VOC 1.2 50.49
Dichlorobenzene - (HAP for para isomerNOC) 0.21 147
Dichlorodifluoromethane 16 120.91
Dichlorofluoromethane - VOC 2.6 102.92
Dichloromethane (methylene chloride)- HAP 14 84.94
Dimethyl sulfide (methyl sulfide)- VOC 7.8 62.13
Ethane 890 30.07
.!!! Ethanol - VOC 27 46.08
c:
Ethyl mercaptan (ethanethiol) - VOC 2.3 62.13

,; Ethylbenzene - HAPNOC 4.6 106.16
0
Ethylene dibromide - HAPNOC 1.0E-03 187.88 a..
Fluorotrichloromethane - VOC 0.76 137.38
Hexane - HAPNOC 6.6 86.18
Hydrogen sulfide 36 34 08
Mercury (total)- HAP 2.9E-04 200.61
Methyl ethyl ketone - HAPNOC 7.1 72.11
Methyl isobutyl ketone - HAPNOC 1.9 100.16
Methyl mercaptan - VOC 2.5 48.11
Pentane - VOC 3.3 72.15
Perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene)- HAP 3.7 165.83
Propane - VOC 11 44.09
t-1 ,2-Dichloroethene - VOC 2.8 96.94
Toluene- No or Unknown Co-disposal - HAPNOC 39 92.13
Toluene - Co-disposal - HAPNOC 170 92.13
Trichloroethylene (trichloroethene)- HAPNOC 2.8 131.40
Vinyl chloride - HAPNOC 7.3 62.50
Xylenes - HAPNOC 12 106.16
POLLUTANTS - 1
Notes
..................
A
A, B
A, B
A, B
A, B
A, B
B
A, B
A, B
A, B
B
B
A, B
A, B
A, B
A, B
A, B
A, B
B
B, C
B
A
B
B
B
A, B
A, B
B
A, B
A
A, B
A, B
B
B
A
B
B
A, B
A, B
A, B
A, B
A, B
Enter User-specified Pollutant
Parameters for Existina Poll
--------
Concentration
(ppmv) Molecular Weight
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.02
0.01
0.09
0.00
0.01
0.00
1.00E-03
0.90
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.01
0.02
0.00
0.05
0.03
0.08
0.00
0.90
0.01
0.05
0.00
0.00
0.07
0.07
0.00
0.19
0.24
10/2/2008
Appendix C.xls
I Enter New Com ound
A. Hazardous air pollutants (HAP) listed in Title Ill of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments.
B. Considered volatile organic compounds (VOC}, as defined by U.S. EPA in 40 CFR 51 .100(s).
C. Source tests did not indicate whether this compound was the para- or ortho- isomer. The
para- isomer is a Title Ill-listed HAP.
Source: Tables 2.4-1 and 2.4-2 of Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors, AP-42, Volume
1: Stationary Point and Area Sources , 5th ed. , Chapter 2.4 Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. U.S.
EPA, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards. Research Triangle Park, NC. November
1998. http://www.epa.gov/ttn/chief/ap42/ch02/final/c02s04.pdf
POLLUTANTS- 2
Return to
USER INPUTS
10/2/2008
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
INPUT REVIEW Landfill Name or Identifier:
LANDFILL CHARACTERISTICS
Landfill Open Year
Landfill Closure Year (with 80-year limit)
Actual Closure Year (without limit)
Have Model Calculate Closure Year?
Waste Design Capacity
MODEL PARAMETERS
Methane Generation Rate, k
Potential Methane Generation Capacity, La
NMOC Concentration
Methane Content
GASES I POLLUTANTS SELECTED
Gas I Pollutant #1:
Gas I Pollutant #2:
Gas I Pollutant #3:
Gas I Pollutant #4:
Total landfill gas
Methane
NMOC
Hydrogen sulfide
Description/Comments:
1948
1961
1961
No
0.040
100
600
50
-------------------------------------
short tons
year-
1
m
3
/Mg
ppmv as hexane
%by volume
INPUT REVIEW- 1
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
WASTE ACCEPTANCE RATES
Year (Mg/year) (short tons/year)
1948 11 '136 12,250
1949 11 '136 12,250
1950 11 '136 12,250
1951 11 '136 12,250
1952 11 ' 136 12,250
1953 11 '136 12,250
1954 11 '136 12,250
1955 11 '136 12,250
1956 11 ' 136 12,250
1957 11 '136 12,250
1958 11 '136 12,250
1959 11 '136 12,250
1960 11 '136 12,250
1961 11 '136 12,250
1962 0 0
1963 0 0
1964 0 0
1965 0 0
1966 0 0
1967 0 0
1968 0 0
1969 0 0
1970 0 0
1971 0 0
1972 0 0
1973 0 0
1974 0 0
1975 0 0
1976 0 0
1977 0 0
1978 0 0
1979 0 0
1980 0 0
1981 0 0
1982 0 0
1983 0 0
1984 0 0
1985 0 0
1986 0 0
1987 0 0
1988 0 0
1989 0 0
1990 0 0
INPUT REVIEW- 2
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
WASTE ACCEPTANCE RATES
Year (Mg!year) (short tons/year)
1991 0 0
1992 0 0
1993 0 0
1994 0 0
1995 0 0
1996 0 0
1997 0 0
1998 0 0
1999 0 0
2000 0 0
2001 0 0
2002 0 0
2003 0 0
2004 0 0
2005 0 0
2006 0 0
2007 0 0
2008 0 0
2009 0 0
2010 0 0
2011 0 0
2012 0 0
2013 0 0
2014 0 0
2015 0 0
2016 0 0
2017 0 0
2018 0 0
2019 0 0
2020 0 0
2021 0 0
2022 0 0
2023 0 0
2024 0 0
2025 0 0
2026 0 0
2027 0 0
INPUT REVIEW- 3
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
METHANE Landfill Name or Identifier:
First-Order Decomposition Rate Equation:
Where,
n 1 (M)
QcH4 = L L kLo _i e -lctsj
i=l j=O.l } Q
Mi = mass of waste accepted in the i th year (Mg) OcH
4
= annual methane generation in the year of the calculation (m
3
!year)
i = 1-year time increment
n =(year of the calculation) - (initial year of waste acceptance)
j = 0.1-year time increment
tii = age of the jth section of waste mass M i accepted in the ith year
(decimal years , e.g., 3.2 years)
k =methane generation rate (year
1
)
L
0
=potential methane generation capacity (m
3
/ Mg)
When Model Calculates Closure Year ...
Final Non-Zero Acceptance Entered =
Waste Design Capacity =
Closure Year (with 80-year limit) =
Actual Closure Year (without limit)=
Model Waste Acceptance Limit =
Model Parameters from User Inputs:
11,136 megagrams in 1961
megagrams
1961
1961
80 years
METHANE- 1
k = 0.040 year
1
Lo = 100 m
3
/ Mg
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
User Waste
User Waste-In Waste Waste-In-
Year
Acceptance
Place Acceptance Place
Inputs
(Mg!year) (Mg) (Mg!year) (Mg)
1948 11 ' 136 0 11 ' 136 0
1949 11 ' 136 11 ' 136 11 ' 136 11 ' 136
1950 11 ' 136 22,273 11 ' 136 22,273
1951 11 ' 136 33,409 11 ' 136 33,409
1952 11 ' 136 44,545
11 ' 136 44,545
1953 11 ' 136 55,682 11 ' 136 55,682
1954 11 ' 136 66,818 11 ' 136 66,818
1955 11 ' 136 77,955 11 ' 136 77,955
1956 11 ' 136 89,091 11 ' 136 89,091
1957 11 ' 136 100,227 11 ' 136 100,227
1958 11 ' 136 111 ,364 11 ' 136 111 ,364
1959 11 ' 136 122,500 11 ' 136 122,500
1960 11 ' 136 133,636
11 ' 136 133,636
1961 11 ' 136 144,773 11 ' 136 144,773
1962 0 155,909 0 155,909
1963 0 155,909 0 155,909
1964 0 155,909 0 155,909
1965 0 155,909 0 155,909
1966 0 155,909 0 155,909
1967 0 155,909 0 155,909
1968 0 155,909 0 155,909
1969 0 155,909 0 155,909
1970 0 155,909 0 155,909
1971 0 155,909 0 155,909
1972 0 155,909 0 155,909
1973 0 155,909 0 155,909
1974 0 155,909 0 155,909
1975 0 155,909 0 155,909
1976 0 155,909 0 155,909
1977 0 155,909 0 155,909
1978 0 155,909 0 155,909
1979 0 155,909 0 155,909
1980 0 155,909 0 155,909
1981 0 155,909 0 155,909
1982 0 155,909 0 155,909
1983 0 155,909 0 155,909
1984 0 155,909 0 155,909
1985 0 155,909 0 155,909
1986 0 155,909 0 155,909
1987 0 155,909 0 155,909
1988 0 155,909 0 155,909
1989 0 155,909 0 155,909
1990 0 155,909 0 155,909
1991 0 155,909 0 155,909
1992 0 155,909 0 155,909
1993 0 155,909 0 155,909
1994 0 155,909 0 155,909
1995 0 155,909 0 155,909
1996 0 155,909 0 155,909
1997 0 155,909 0 155,909
1998 0 155,909 0 155,909
1999 0 155,909 0 155,909
2000 0 155,909 0 155,909
2001 0 155,909 0 155,909
2002 0 155,909 0 155,909
2003 0 155,909 0 155,909
2004 0 155,909 0 155,909
2005 0 155,909 0 155,909
2006 0 155,909 0 155,909
2007 0 155,909 0 155,909
METHANE - 2
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
User Waste
User Waste-In Waste Waste-In-
Year
Acceptance
Place Acceptance Place
Inputs
(Mg!year) (Mg) (Mg!year) (Mg)
2008 0 155,909 0 155,909
2009 0 155,909 0 155,909
2010 0 155,909 0 155,909
2011 0 155,909 0 155,909
2012 0 155,909 0 155,909
2013 0 155,909 0 155,909
2014 0 155,909 0 155,909
2015 0 155,909 0 155,909
2016 0 155,909 0 155,909
2017 0 155,909 0 155,909
2018 0 155,909 0 155,909
2019 0 155,909 0 155,909
2020 0 155,909 0 155,909
2021 0 155,909 0 155,909
2022 0 155,909 0 155,909
2023 0 155,909 0 155,909
2024 0 155,909 0 155,909
2025 0 155,909 0 155,909
2026 0 155,909 0 155,909
2027 0 155,909 0 155,909
METHANE - 3
Appendix C.xls 1012/2008
RESULTS Landfill Name or Identifier:-----------------
Closure Year (wilh 80-year limit) =
Methane=
Year
Waste Accepted
(Mg!year) (short tons/ year)
1948 11,136 12,250
1949 11,136 12,250
1950 11,136 12,250
1951 11 ,136 12,250
1952 11 ,136 12,250
1953 11 ,136 12,250
1954 11 ,136 12,250
1955 11 ,136 12,250
1956 11 ,136 12,250
1957 11 ,136 12,250
1958 11 ,136 12,250
1959 11 ,136 12,250
1960 11 ,136 12,250
1961 11,136 12,250
1962 0 0
1963 0 0
1964 0 0
1965 0 0
1966 0 0
1967 0 0
1968 0 0
1969 0 0
1970 0 0
1971 0 0
1972 0 0
1973 0 0
1974 0 0
1975 0 0
1976 0 0
1977 0 0
1978 0 0
1979 0 0
1980 0 0
1981 0 0
1982 0 0
1983 0 0
1984 0 0
1985 0 0
1986 0 0
1987 0 0
1988 0 0
1989 0 0
1990 0 0
1991 0 0
1992 0 0
1993 0 0
1994 0 0
1995 0 0
--:;-%
0 0
1997 0 0
1998 0 0
1999 0 0
2000 0 0
2001 0 0
2002 0 0
2003 0 0
2004 0 0
2005 0 0
2006 0 0
2007 0 0
2008 0 0
2009 0 0
2010 0 0
2011 0 0
2012 0 0
2013 0 0
2014 0 0
2015 0 0
2016 0 0
2017 0 0
2018 0 0
2019 0 0
2020 0 0
2021 0 0
2022 0 0
2023 0 0
1961
50 % by volume
Waste-In-Place
(Mg) (short tons)
0 0
11,136 12,250
22,273 24,500
33,409 36,750
44,545 49,000
55,682 61,250
66,818 73,500
77,955 85,750
89,091 98,000
100,227 110,250
111,364 122,500
122,500 134,750
133,636 147,000
144,773 159,250
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
Please choose a third unit of measure to represent all of
the emission rates below.
User-specified Unit : I av ft"31min I
Total landfill gas
(Mg!year) (m
3
!year) (av ftAJfmin)
0 0 0
1.093E+02 8.751E+04 5.880E+OO
2.143E+02 1.716E+05 1.153E+01
3.152E+02 2.524E+05 1.696E+01
4.121E+02 3.300E+05 2.217E+01
5.052E+02 4.045E+05 2.718E+01
5.947E+02 4.762E+05 3.200E+01
6.806E+02 5.450E+05 3.662E+01
7.632E+02 6.112E+05 4.106E+01
8.426E+02 6.747E+05 4.533E+01
9.188E+02 7.358E+05 4.944E+01
9.921E+02 7.944E+05 5.338E+01
1.062E+03 8.508E+05 5.716E+01
1.130E+03 9.049E+05 6.080E+01
1.195E+03 9.569E+05 6.430E+01
1.148E+03 9.194E+05 6.178E+01
1.103E+03 8.834E+05 5.935E+01
1.060E+03 8.487E+05 5.703E+01
1.018E+03 8.155E+05 5.479E+01
9.784E+02 7.835E+05 5.264E+01
9.401E+02 7.528E+05 5.058E+01
9.032E+02 7.232E+05 4.859E+01
8.678E+02 6.949E+05 4.669E+01
8.338E+02 6.676E+05 4.486E+01
8.011E+02 6.415E+05 4.310E+01
7.697E+02 6.163E+05 4.141E+01
7.395E+02 5.921E+05 3.979E+01
7.105E+02 5.689E+05 3.823E+01
6.826E+02 5.466E+05 3.673E+01
6.559E+02 5.252E+05 3.529E+01
6.301E+02 5.046E+05 3.390E+01
6.054E+02 4.848E+05 3.257E+01
5.817E+02 4.658E+05 3.130E+01
5.589E+02 4.475E+05 3.007E+01
5.370E+02 4.300E+05 2.889E+01
5.159E+02 4.131E+05 2.776E+01
4.957E+02 3.969E+05 2.667E+01
4.763E+02 3.814E+05 2.562E+01
4.576E+02 3.664E+05 2.462E+01
4.396E+02 3.520E+05 2.365E+01
4.224E+02 3.382E+05 2.273E+01
4.058E+02 3.250E+05 2.183E+01
3.899E+02 3.122E+05 2.098E+01
3.746E+02 3.000E+05 2.016E+01
3.599E+02 2.882E+05 1.937E+01
3.458E+02 2.769E+05 1.861E+01
3.323E+02 2.661E+05 1.788E+01
3.192E+02 2.556E+05 1.718E+01
3.067E+02 2.456E+05 1.650E+01
2.947E+02 2.360E+05 1.586E+01
2.831E+02 2.267E+05 1.523E+01
2.720E+02 2.178E+05 1.464E+01
2.614E+02 2.093E+05 1.406E+01
2.511E+02 2 011E+05 1.351E+01
2.413E+02 1.932E+05 1.298E+01
2.318E+02 1.856E+05 1.247E+01
2.227E+02 1.783E+05 1.198E+01
2.140E+02 1.714E+05 1.151E+01
2.056E+02 1.646E+05 1.106E+01
1.975E+02 1.582E+05 1.063E+01
1.898E+02 1.520E+05 1.021E+01
1.824E+02 1.460E+05 9.811E+OO
1.752E+02 1.403E+05 9.426E+OO
1.683E+02 1.348E+05 9.057E+OO
1.617E+02 1.295E+05 8.702E+OO
1.554E+02 1.244E+05 8.360E+OO
1.493E+02 1.196E+05 8.033E+OO
1.434E+02 1.149E+05 7.718E+OO
1.378E+02 1.104E+05 7.415E+OO
1.324E+02 1.060E+05 7.124E+OO
1.272E+02 1.019E+05 6.845E+OO
1.222E+02 9.788E+04 6.577E+OO
1.174E+02 9.404E+04 6.319E+OO
1.128E+02 9.036E+04 6.071 E+OO
1.084E+02 8.681E+04 5.833E+OO
1.042E+02 8.341E+04 5.604E+OO
(Mg!year)
0
2.919E+01
5.724E+01
8.418E+01
1.101E+02
1.349E+02
1.588E+02
1.818E+02
2.039E+02
2.251E+02
2.454E+02
2.650E+02
2.838E+02
3.019E+02
3.192E+02
3.067E+02
2.947E+02
2.831E+02
2.720E+02
2.613E+02
2.511E+02
2.413E+02
2.318E+02
2.227E+02
2.140E+02
2.056E+02
1.975E+02
1.898E+02
1.823E+02
1.752E+02
1.683E+02
1.617E+02
1.554E+02
1.493E+02
1.434E+02
1.378E+02
1.324E+02
1.272E+02
1.222E+02
1.174E+02
1.128E+02
1.084E+02
1.042E+02
1.001E+02
9.614E+01
9.238E+01
8.875E+01
8.527E+01
8.193E+01
7.872E+01
7.563E+01
7.266E+01
6.982E+01
6.708E+01
6.445E+01
6.192E+01
5.949E+01
5.716E+01
5.492E+01
5.277E+01
5.070E+01
4.871E+01
4.680E+01
4.496E+01
4.320E+01
4.151E+01
3.988E+01
3.832E+01
3.681E+01
3.537E+01
3.398E+01
3.265E+01
3.137E+01
3.014E+01
2.896E+01
2.782E+01
Methane NMOC Hydrogen sulfide
(m
3
!year) (av ftAJfmin) (Mg!year) (m
3
!year) (avftA3/min) (Mg!year) (m
3
/year) (av ftAJfmin)
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4.375E+04 2.940E+OO 1.882E-01 5.250E+01 3.528E-03 1.116E-04 7.876E-02 5.292E-06
8.579E+04 5.764E+OO 3.690E-01 1.030E+02 6.917E-03 2.189E-04 1.544E-01 1.038E-05
1.262E+05 8.478E+OO 5.428E-01 1.514E+02 1.017E-02 3.219E-04 2.271E-01 1.526E-05
1.650E+05 1.109E+01 7.097E-01 1.980E+02 1.330E-02 4.210E-04 2.970E-01 1.995E-05
2.023E+05 1.359E+01 8.700E-01 2.427E+02 1.631E-02 5.161E-04 3.641E-01 2.446E-05
2.381E+05 1.600E+01 1.024E+OO 2.857E+02 1.920E-02 6.075E-04 4.286E-01 2.880E-05
2.725E+05 1.831E+01 1.172E+OO 3.270E+02 2.197E-02 6.953E-04 4.905E-01 3.296E-05
3.056E+05 2.053E+01 1.314E+OO 3.667E+02 2.464E-02 7.797E-04 5.500E-01 3.696E-05
3.374E+05 2.267E+01 1.451E+OO 4.048E+02 2.720E-02 8.607E-04 6 072E-01 4.080E-05
3.679E+05 2.472E+01 1.582E+OO 4.415E+02 2.966E-02 9.386E-04 6.622E-01 4.449E-05
3.972E+05 2.669E+01 1.709E+OO 4.766E+02 3.203E-02 1.013E-03 7.150E-01 4.804E-05
4.254E+05 2.858E+01 1.830E+OO 5.105E+02 3.430E-02 1.085E-03 7.657E-01 5.145E-05
4.525E+05 3.040E+01 1.946E+OO 5.430E+02 3.648E-02 1.154E-03 8.144E-01 5.472E-05
4.785E+05 3.215E+01 2.058E+OO 5.742E+02 3.858E-02 1.221E-03 8.613E-01 5.787E-05
4.597E+05 3.089E+01 1.977E+OO 5.517E+02 3.707E-02 1.173E-03 8.275E-01 5.560E-05
4.417E+05 2.968E+01 1.900E+OO 5.300E+02 3.561E-02 1.127E-03 7.950E-01 5.342E-05
4.244E+05 2.851E+01 1.825E+OO 5.092E+02 3.422E-02 1.083E-03 7.639E-01 5.132E-05
4.077E+05 2.740E+01 1.754E+OO 4.893E+02 3.287E-02 1 040E-03 7.339E-01 4.931E-05
3.917E+05 2.632E+01 1.685E+OO 4.701E+02 3.159E-02 9.995E-04 7.051E-01 4.738E-05
3.764E+05 2.529E+01 1.619E+OO 4.517E+02 3.035E-02 9.603E-04 6.775E-01 4.552E-05
3.616E+05 2.430E+01 1.555E+OO 4.339E+02 2.916E-02 9.227E-04 6.509E-01 4.374E-05
3.474E+05 2.334E+01 1.494E+OO 4.169E+02 2.801E-02 8.865E-04 6.254E-01 4.202E-05
3.338E+05 2.243E+01 1.436E+OO 4.006E+02 2.692E-02 8.517E-04 6.009E-01 4.037E-05
3.207E+05 2.155E+01 1.380E+OO 3.849E+02 2.586E-02 8.183E-04 5.773E-01 3.879E-05
3.082E+05 2.070E+01 1.325E+OO 3.698E+02 2.485E-02 7.862E-04 5.547E-01 3.727E-05
2.961E+05 1.989E+01 1.274E+OO 3.553E+02 2.387E-02 7.554E-04 5.329E-01 3.581E-05
2.845E+05 1.911E+01 1.224E+OO 3.414E+02 2.294E-02 7.258E-04 5.120E-01 3.440E-05
2.733E+05 1.836E+01 1.176E+OO 3.280E+02 2.204E-02 6.973E-04 4.920E-01 3.305E-05
2.626E+05 1.764E+01 1.130E+OO 3.151E+02 2.117E-02 6.700E-04 4.727E-01 3.176E-05
2.523E+05 1.695E+01 1.085E+OO 3.028E+02 2.034E-02 6.437E-04 4.541 E-01 3.051E-05
2.424E+05 1.629E+01 1.043E+OO 2.909E+02 1.954E-02 6.185E-04 4.363E-01 2.932E-05
2.329E+05 1.565E+01 1.002E+OO 2.795E+02 1.878E-02 5.942E-04 4.192E-01 2.817E-05
2.238E+05 1.503E+01 9.625E-01 2.685E+02 1.804E-02 5.709E-04 4.028E-01 2.706E-05
2.150E+05 1.445E+01 9.248E-01 2.580E+02 1.733E-02 5.485E-04 3.870E-01 2.600E-05
2.066E+05 1.388E+01 8.885E-01 2.479E+02 1.665E-02 5.270E-04 3.718E-01 2.498E-05
1.985E+05 1.333E+01 8.537E-01 2.382E+02 1.600E-02 5.064E-04 3.572E-01 2.400E-05
1.907E+05 1.281E+01 8.202E-01 2.288E+02 1.537E-02 4.865E-04 3.432E-01 2.306E-05
1.832E+05 1.231E+01 7.880E-01 2.198E+02 1.477E-02 4.674E-04 3.298E-01 2.216E-05
1.760E+05 1.183E+01 7.571E-01 2.112E+02 1.419E-02 4.491 E-04 3.168E-01 2.129E-05
1.691E+05 1.136E+01 7.274E-01 2.029E+02 1.364E-02 4.315E-04 3.044E-01 2 045E-05
1.625E+05 1.092E+01 6.989E-01 1.950E+02 1.310E-02 4.146E-04 2.925E-01 1.965E-05
1.561E+05 1.049E+01 6.715E-01 1.873E+02 1.259E-02 3.983E-04 2.810E-01 1.888E-05
1.500E+05 1.008E+01 6.452E-01 1.800E+02 1.209E-02 3.827E-04 2.700E-01 1.814E-05
1.441E+05 9.683E+OO 6.199E-01 1.729E+02 1.162E-02 3.677E-04 2.594E-01 1.743E-05
1.385E+05 9.303E+OO 5.956E-01 1.662E+02 1.1 16E-02 3.533E-04 2.492E-01 1.675E-05
1.330E+05 8.938E+OO 5.722E-01 1.596E+02 1.073E-02 3.394E-04 2.395E-01 1.609E-05
1.278E+05 8.588E+OO 5.498E-01 1.534E+02 1.031E-02 3.261E-04 2.301E-01 1.546E-05
1.228E+05 8.251E+OO 5.282E-01 1.474E+02 9.902E-03 3.133E-04 2.210E-01 1.485E-05
1.180E+05 7.928E+OO 5.075E-01 1.416E+02 9.513E-03 3.010E-04 2.124E-01 1.427E-05
1.134E+05 7.617E+OO 4.876E-01 1.360E+02 9.140E-03 2.892E-04 2.041E-01 1.371E-05
1.089E+05 7.318E+OO 4.685E-01 1.307E+02 8.782E-03 2.779E-04 1.961E-01 1.317E-05
1.046E+05 7.031E+OO 4.501E-01 1.256E+02 8.438E-03 2.670E-04 1.884E-01 1.266E-05
1.005E+05 6.756E+OO 4.325E-01 1.207E+02 8.107E-03 2.565E-04 1.810E-01 1.216E-05
9.660E+04 6.491E+OO 4.155E-01 1.159E+02 7.789E-03 2.465E-04 1.739E-01 1.168E-05
9.281E+04 6.236E+OO 3.992E-01 1.114E+02 7.483E-03 2.368E-04 1.671E-01 1.123E-05
8.917E+04 5.992E+OO 3.836E-01 1.070E+02 7.190E-03 2.275E-04 1.605E-01 1.078E-05
8.568E+04 5.757E+OO 3.685E-01 1.028E+02 6.908E-03 2.186E-04 1.542E-01 1.036E-05
8.232E+04 5.531E+OO 3.541E-01 9.878E+01 6.637E-03 2.100E-04 1.482E-01 9.956E-06
7.909E+04 5.314E+OO 3.402E-01 9.491E+01 6.377E-03 2.018E-04 1.424E-01 9.565E-06
7.599E+04 5.106E+OO 3.269E-01 9.119E+01 6.127E-03 1.939E-04 1.368E-01 9.190E-06
7.301E+04 4.906E+OO 3.140E-01 8.761E+01 5.887E-03 1.863E-04 1.314E-01 8.830E-06
7.015E+04 4.713E+OO 3.017E-01 8.418E+01 5.656E-03 1.790E-04 1.263E-01 8.484E-06
6.740E+04 4.528E+OO 2.899E-01 8.088E+01 5.434E-03 1.720E-04 1.213E-01 8.151E-06
6.475E+04 4.351E+OO 2.785E-01 7.771E+01 5.221E-03 1.652E-04 1.166E-01 7.831 E-06
6.222E+04 4.180E+OO 2.676E-01 7.466E+01 5.016E-03 1.587E-04 1.120E-01 7.524E-06
5.978E+04 4.016E+OO 2.571E-01 7.173E+01 4.820E-03 1.525E-04 1.076E-01 7.229E-06
5.743E+04 3.859E+OO 2.470E-01 6.892E+01 4.631E-03 1.465E-04 1.034E-01 6.946E-06
5.518E+04 3.708E+OO 2.373E-01 6.622E+01 4.449E-03 1.408E-04 9.932E-02 6.674E-06
5.302E+04 3.562E+OO 2.280E-01 6.362E+01 4.275E-03 1.353E-04 9.543E-02 6.412E-06
5.094E+04 3.422E+OO 2.191E-01 6.113E+01 4.107E-03 1.300E-04 9.169E-02 6.160E-06
4.894E+04 3.288E+OO 2.105E-01 5.873E+01 3.946E-03 1.249E-04 8.809E-02 5.919E-06
4.702E+04 3.159E+OO 2.023E-01 5.643E+01 3.791E-03 1.200E-04 8.464E-02 5.687E-06
4.518E+04 3.035E+OO 1.943E-01 5.421E+01 3.643E-03 1.153E-04 8.132E-02 5.464E-06
4.341E+04 2.916E+OO 1.867E-01 5.209E+01 3.500E-03 1.107E-04 7.813E-02 5.250E-06
4.170E+04 2.802E+OO 1.794E-01 5.004E+01 3.363E-03 1.064E-04 7.507E-02 5.044E-06
RESULTS -1
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
RESULTS Landfill Name or Identifier:
--------------------------------
Closure Year (with 80-year limit)=
Methane =
Year
Waste Accepted
(Mg!year) (short tons/year)
2024 0 0
2025 0 0
2026 0 0
2027 0 0
2028 0 0
2029 0 0
2030 0 0
2031 0 0
2032 0 0
2033 0 0
2034 0 0
2035 0 0
2036 0 0
2037 0 0
2038 0 0
2039 0 0
2040 0 0
2041 0 0
2042 0 0
2043 0 0
2044 0 0
2045 0 0
2046 0 0
2047 0 0
2048 0 0
2049 0 0
2050 0 0
2051 0 0
2052 0 0
2053 0 0
2054 0 0
2055 0 0
2056 0 0
2057 0 0
2058 0 0
2059 0 0
2060 0 0
2061 0 0
2062 0 0
2063 0 0
2064 0 0
2065 0 0
2066 0 0
2067 0 0
2068 0 0
2069 0 0
2070 0 0
2071 0 0
2072 0 0
2073 0 0
2074 0 0
2075 0 0
2076 0 0
2077 0 0
2078 0 0
2079 0 0
2080 0 0
2081 0 0
2082 0 0
2083 0 0
2084 0 0
2085 0 0
2086 0 0
2087 0 0
2088 0 0
1961
50 % by volume
Waste-In-Place
(Mg) (short tons)
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,9og 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
Please choose a third unit of measure to represent all of
the emission rates below.
User-specified Unit : I av N'31min I
Total landfill gas
(Mg/year) (m !year) (avftA3/min)
1.001 E+02 8.014E+04 5.384E+OO
9.615E+01 7.700E+04 5.173E+OO
9.238E+01 7.398E+04 4.970E+OO
8.876E+01 7.108E+04 4.776E+OO
8.528E+01 6.829E+04 4.588E+OO
8.194E+01 6.561E+04 4.408E+OO
7.872E+01 6.304E+04 4.236E+OO
7.564E+01 6.057E+04 4.069E+OO
7.267E+01 5.819E+04 3.910E+OO
6.982E+01 5.591E+04 3.757E+OO
6.708E+01 5.372E+04 3.609E+OO
6.445E+01 5.161E+04 3.468E+OO
6.193E+01 4.959E+04 3.332E+OO
5.950E+01 4.764E+04 3.201E+OO
5.717E+01 4.578E+04 3 076E+OO
5.492E+01 4.398E+04 2.955E+OO
5.277E+01 4.226E+04 2.839E+OO
5.070E+01 4.060E+04 2.728E+OO
4.871E+01 3.901E+04 2.621E+OO
4.680E+01 3.748E+04 2.518E+OO
4.497E+01 3.601E+04 2.419E+OO
4.320E+01 3.460E+04 2.325E+OO
4.151E+01 3.324E+04 2.233E+OO
3.988E+01 3.194E+04 2.146E+OO
3.832E+01 3.068E+04 2.062E+OO
3.682E+01 2.948E+04 1.981E+OO
3.537E+01 2.833E+04 1.903E+OO
3.399E+01 2.721E+04 1.829E+OO
3.265E+01 2.615E+04 1.757E+OO
3.137E+01 2.512E+04 1.688E+OO
3.014E+01 2.414E+04 1.622E+OO
2.896E+01 2.319E+04 1.558E+OO
2.783E+01 2.228E+04 1.497E+OO
2.673E+01 2.141E+04 1.438E+OO
2.569E+01 2.057E+04 1.382E+OO
2.468E+01 1.976E+04 1.328E+OO
2.371E+01 1.899E+04 1.276E+OO
2.278E+01 1.824E+04 1.226E+OO
2.189E+01 1.753E+04 1.178E+OO
2.103E+01 1.684E+04 1.131E+OO
2.021E+01 1.618E+04 1.087E+OO
1.941E+01 1.555E+04 1.044E+OO
1.865E+01 1.494E+04 1.004E+OO
1.792E+01 1.435E+04 9.642E-01
1.722E+01 1.379E+04 9.264E-01
1.654E+01 1.325E+04 8.900E-01
1.589E+01 1.273E+04 B.551E-01
1.527E+01 1.223E+04 8.216E-01
1.467E+01 1.175E+04 7.894E-01
1.410E+01 1.129E+04 7.584E-01
1.354E+01 1.085E+04 7.287E-01
1.301E+01 1.042E+04 7.001 E-01
1.250E+01 1.001E+04 6.727E-01
1.201E+01 9.619E+03 6.463E-01
1.154E+01 9.242E+03 6.210E-01
1.109E+01 8.880E+03 5.966E-01
1.065E+01 8.531E+03 5.732E-01
1.024E+01 8.197E+03 5.507E-01
9.835E+OO 7.875E+03 5.291E-01
9.449E+OO 7.567E+03 5.084E-01
9.079E+OO 7.270E+03 4.885E-01
8.723E+OO 6.985E+03 4.693E-01
8.381E+OO 6.711E+03 4.509E-01
8.052E+OO 6.448E+03 4.332E-01
7.736E+OO 6.195E+03 4.162E-01
Methane NMOC Hydrogen sulfide
(Mg/year) (m
3
/year) (av ftA3/min) (Mglyear) (m
3
/year) (av ftA3/min) (Mglyear) (m
3
/year) (av ftAJfmin)
2.673E+01 4.007E+04 2.692E+OO 1.724E-01 4.808E+01 3.231 E-03 1.022E-04 7.212E-02 4.846E-06
2.568E+01 3.850E+04 2.587E+OO 1.656E-01 4.620E+01 3.104E-03 9.823E-05 6.930E-02 4.656E-06
2.468E+01 3.699E+04 2.485E+OO 1.591E-01 4.439E+01 2.982E-03 9.437E-05 6.658E-02 4.473E-06
2.371E+01 3.554E+04 2.388E+OO 1.529E-01 4.265E+01 2.865E-03 9.067E-05 6.397E-02 4.298E-06
2.278E+01 3.414E+04 2.294E+OO 1.469E-01 4.097E+01 2.753E-03 8.712E-05 6.146E-02 4.129E-06
2.189E+01 3.281E+04 2.204E+OO 1.411E-01 3.937E+01 2.645E-03 8.370E-05 5.905E-02 3.968E-06
2.103E+01 3.152E+04 2.118E+OO 1.356E-01 3.782E+01 2.541E-03 8.042E-05 5.673E-02 3.812E-06
2.020E+01 3.028E+04 2.035E+OO 1.303E-01 3.634E+01 2.442E-03 7.727E-05 5.451E-02 3.663E-06
1.941E+01 2.910E+04 1.955E+OO 1.252E-01 3.492E+01 2.346E-03 7.424E-05 5.237E-02 3.519E-06
1.865E+01 2.796E+04 1.878E+OO 1.202E-01 3.355E+01 2.254E-03 7.133E-05 5.032E-02 3.381E-06
1.792E+01 2.686E+04 1.805E+OO 1.155E-01 3.223E+01 2.166E-03 6.853E-05 4.835E-02 3.248E-06
1.722E+01 2.581E+04 1.734E+OO 1.110E-01 3.097E+01 2 081 E-03 6.584E-05 4.645E-02 3.121E-06
1.654E+01 2.479E+04 1.666E+OO 1.066E-01 2.975E+01 1.999E-03 6.326E-05 4.463E-02 2.999E-06
1.589E+01 2.382E+04 1.601E+OO 1.025E-01 2.859E+01 1.921E-03 6.078E-05 4.288E-02 2.881E-06
1.527E+01 2.289E+04 1.538E+OO 9.845E-02 2.747E+01 1.845E-03 5.840E-05 4.120E-02 2.768E-06
1.467E+01 2.199E+04 1.47BE+OO 9.459E-02 2.639E+01 1.773E-03 5.611E-05 3.958E-02 2.660E-06
1.410E+01 2.113E+04 1.420E+OO 9.088E-02 2.535E+01 1.704E-03 5.391E-05 3.803E-02 2.555E-06
1.354E+01 2.030E+04 1.364E+OO 8.732E-02 2.436E+01 1.637E-03 5.179E-05 3.654E-02 2.455E-06
1.301E+01 1.950E+04 1.310E+OO 8.389E-02 2.340E+01 1.573E-03 4.976E-05 3.511E-02 2.359E-06
1.250E+01 1.874E+04 1.259E+OO 8.060E-02 2.249E+01 1.51 1E-03 4.781 E-05 3.373E-02 2.266E-06
1.201E+01 1.800E+04 1.210E+OO 7.744E-02 2.160E+01 1.452E-03 4.594E-05 3.241E-02 2.177E-06
1.154E+01 1.730E+04 1.162E+OO 7.441E-02 2.076E+01 1.395E-03 4.414E-05 3.114E-02 2.092E-06
1.109E+01 1.662E+04 1.117E+OO 7.149E-02 1.994E+01 1.340E-03 4.241E-05 2.992E-02 2.010E-06
1.065E+01 1.597E+04 1.073E+OO 6.868E-02 1.916E+01 1.287E-03 4.074E-05 2.874E-02 1.931E-06
1.024E+01 1.534E+04 1.031E+OO 6.599E-02 1.841E+01 1.237E-03 3.914E-05 2.762E-02 1.855E-06
9.834E+OO 1.474E+04 9.904E-01 6.340E-02 1.769E+01 1.188E-03 3.761E-05 2.653E-02 1.783E-06
9.449E+OO 1.416E+04 9.516E-01 6.092E-02 1.700E+01 1.142E-03 3.614E-05 2.549E-02 1.713E-06
9.078E+OO 1.361E+04 9.143E-01 5.853E-02 1.633E+01 1.097E-03 3.472E-05 2.449E-02 1.646E-06
8.722E+OO 1.307E+04 8.784E-01 5.623E-02 1.569E+01 1.054E-03 3.336E-05 2.353E-02 1.581E-06
8.380E+OO 1.256E+04 8.440E-01 5.403E-02 1.507E+01 1 013E-03 3.205E-05 2.261E-02 1.519E-06
8 051E+OO 1.207E+04 B.109E-01 5.191E-02 1.448E+01 9.731E-04 3.079E-05 2.172E-02 1.460E-06
7.736E+OO 1.160E+04 7.791E-01 4.988E-02 1.391E+01 9.349E-04 2.959E-05 2.087E-02 1.402E-06
7.432E+OO 1.114E+04 7.485E-01 4.792E-02 1.337E+01 8.982E-04 2.842E-05 2.005E-02 1.347E-06
7.141E+OO 1.070E+04 7.192E-01 4.604E-02 1.284E+01 8.630E-04 2.731E-05 1.927E-02 1.295E-06
6.861E+OO 1.028E+04 6.910E-01 4.424E-02 1.234E+01 8.292E-04 2.624E-05 1.851E-02 1.244E-06
6.592E+OO 9.881E+03 6.639E-01 4.250E-02 1.186E+01 7.967E-04 2.521E-05 1.779E-02 1.195E-06
6.334E+OO 9.493E+03 6.379E-01 4.083E-02 1.139E+01 7.654E-04 2.422E-05 1.709E-02 1.148E-06
6.085E+OO 9.121E+03 6.129E-01 3.923E-02 1.095E+01 7.354E-04 2.327E-05 1.642E-02 1.103E-06
5.847E+OO 8.764E+03 5.888E-01 3.770E-02 1.052E+01 7 066E-04 2.236E-05 1.577E-02 1.060E-06
5.617E+OO 8.420E+03 5.657E-01 3.622E-02 1.010E+01 6.789E-04 2.148E-05 1.516E-02 1.018E-06
5.397E+OO 8 090E+03 5.436E-01 3.4BOE-02 9.708E+OO 6.523E-04 2.064E-05 1.456E-02 9.784E-07
5.185E+OO 7.773E+03 5.222E-01 3.343E-02 9.327E+OO 6.267E-04 1.983E-05 1.399E-02 9.400E-07
4.982E+OO 7.468E+03 5.018E-01 3.212E-02 8.961 E+OO 6.021E-04 1.905E-05 1.344E-02 9.032E-07
4.787E+OO 7.175E+03 4.821E-01 3.086E-02 8.610E+OO 5.785E-04 1.831E-05 1.291E-02 8.678E-07
4.599E+OO 6.894E+03 4.632E-01 2.965E-02 8.272E+OO 5.558E-04 1.759E-05 1.241E-02 8.337E-07
4.419E+OO 6.623E+03 4.450E-01 2.849E-02 7.948E+OO 5.340E-04 1.690E-05 1.192E-02 8.010E-07
4.245E+OO 6.364E+03 4.276E-01 2.737E-02 7.636E+OO 5.131E-04 1.624E-05 1.145E-02 7.696E-07
4.079E+OO 6.114E+03 4.108E-01 2.630E-02 7.337E+OO 4.930E-04 1.560E-05 1.101E-02 7.395E-07
3.919E+OO 5.874E+03 3.947E-01 2.527E-02 7.049E+OO 4.736E-04 1.499E-05 1.057E-02 7.105E-07
3.765E+OO 5.644E+03 3.792E-01 2.428E-02 6.773E+OO 4.551E-04 1.440E-05 1.016E-02 6.826E-07
3.618E+OO 5.423E+03 3.644E-01 2.333E-02 6.507E+OO 4.372E-04 1.384E-05 9.761E-03 6.558E-07
3.476E+OO 5.210E+03 3.501E-01 2.241E-02 6.252E+OO 4.201E-04 1.329E-05 9.378E-03 6.301E-07
3.340E+OO 5.006E+03 3.363E-01 2.153E-02 6 007E+OO 4.036E-04 1.277E-05 9.010E-03 6.054E-07
3.209E+OO 4.810E+03 3.232E-01 2.069E-02 5.771E+OO 3.878E-04 1.227E-05 8.657E-03 5.817E-07
3.083E+OO 4.621E+03 3.105E-01 1.988E-02 5.545E+OO 3.726E-04 1.179E-05 8.318E-03 5.589E-07
2.962E+OO 4.440E+03 2.983E-01 1.910E-02 5.328E+OO 3.580E-04 1.133E-05 7.992E-03 5.370E-07
2.846E+OO 4.266E+03 2.866E-01 1.835E-02 5.119E+OO 3.439E-04 1.088E-05 7.678E-03 5.159E-07
2.734E+OO 4.098E+03 2.754E-01 1.763E-02 4.918E+OO 3.304E-04 1.046E-05 7.377E-03 4.957E-07
2.627E+OO 3.938E+03 2.646E-01 1.694E-02 4.725E+OO 3.175E-04 1.005E-05 7.088E-03 4.762E-07
2.524E+OO 3.783E+03 2.542E-01 1.627E-02 4.540E+OO 3.050E-04 9.653E-06 6.810E-03 4.576E-07
2.425E+OO 3.635E+03 2.442E-01 1.564E-02 4.362E+OO 2.931E-04 9.274E-06 6.543E-03 4.396E-07
2.330E+OO 3.492E+03 2.347E-01 1.502E-02 4.191E+OO 2.816E-04 8.911 E-06 6.286E-03 4.224E-07
2.239E+OO 3.355E+03 2.255E-01 1.443E-02 4.027E+OO 2.705E-04 8.561E-06 6.040E-03 4.058E-07
2.151E+OO 3.224E+03 2.166E-01 1.387E-02 3.869E+OO 2.599E-04 8.226E-06 5.803E-03 3.899E-07
2.067E+OO 3.098E+03 2.081E-01 1.332E-02 3.717E+OO 2.497E-04 7.903E-06 5.576E-03
RESULTS- 2
Appendix C.xls
GRAPHS Landfill Name or Identifier:
(/)
c:::
0
;;;
(/)
e
w
---------------------------------------
Megagrams Per Year
1 .400E+03 .,--------------------------------------------------------,
1.200E+03 +-------...----------------------------1
1.000E+03
8.000E+02
6.000E+02
4.000E+02
2.000E+02
O.OOOE+OO


Year
-Total landfill gas - Methane - NMOC - Hydrogen sulfide
(/)
c:::
0
;;;
(/)
e
w
Cubic Meters Per Year
8.000E+05
6.000E+05
4.000E+05
O.OOOE+OO


Year
-Total landfill gas - Methane - NMOC - Hydrogen sulfide
(/)
c:::
0
;;;
(/)
e
w
User-specified Unit (units shown in legend below)
7.000E+01
6.000E+01
5.000E+01
4.000E+01
3.000E+01
2.000E+01
1.000E+01
O.OOOE+OO


Year
-Total landfill gas (av ftA3/min) - Methane (av ft"3/min)
- NMOC (av ft"3/min) - Hydrogen sulfide (av ft"3/min)
GRAPHS- 1
10/2/2008
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
INVENTORY Landfill Name or Identifier:
---------------------------------------
Enter year of emissions inventory:
Gas I Pollutant
Emission Rate
(Mg!year) (m
3
/year) (av ft
3
!min) (ft
3
!year) (short tons/year)
9(3S
Methane
Carbon dioxide
NMOC
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
...... . ....
O.OOOE+OO
. .... .........
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
..............................................
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
. ......................................................... .
1,1,1-Trichloroethane (methyl chloroform)- HAP
1,1 ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane- HAPNOC
1, 1-Dichloroethane (ethylidene dichloride)- HAPNOC

1 .ljJ.\F!JYOg .....
1 ,2-Dichloropropane (propylene dichloride) - HAPNOC
2-Propanol (isopropyl alcohol)- VOC
Acetone
Acrylonitrile - HAP/VOC
- No or Unknown - HAPNOC
Benzer1e Hf\P.fY()(:
Bromodichloromethane - VOC
..... ............
Butane- VOC
Carbon disulfide - HAP/VOC
Carbon monoxide
Carbon tetrachloride - HAP/VOC
ti.f.\f.'./Y.'Qg .............................................
Chlorobenzene - HAPNOC
Chlorodifluoromethane
Chloroethane (ethyl chloride) - HAPNOC
Chloroform - HAPNOC
Chloromethane - VOC
f()rpar?.
Dichlorodifluoromethane
Dichlorofluoromethane - VOC

O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
.......... I
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
.... ...
i
....
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
.......... ----
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO

O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
....
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
.. ......
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
........
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
Dimethyl sulfide (methyl sulfide)- VOC O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
Ethane O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
Ethanol - VOC O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
Ethyl mercapt_?.f1 _(eth.anethiol)- VOC ... .. ........... ........................ ..... ..9.:900E+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
...
Ethylene dibromide- HAP/VOC
Fluorotrichloromethane - VOC
Hexane - HAPNOC
Hydrogen sulfide
(!()t<ll) - HAP _
HAPNOC
Methyl - HAP/VOC
.. ....= .. \!Q9
Pentane - VOC
Perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene)- HAP
Propane - VOC
... ... \!Qg
.. ....l:l .. .... ..= .. ti!\P.JY9C: ....
Toluene - Co-disposal - HAP/VOC
Trichloroethylene (trichloroethene)- HAP/VOC
Vinyl chloride - HAPNOC
Xylenes - HAPNOC
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
----------- -----------
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
...... -----------------
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
n---
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
0.888::::: 88 O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
- + , ............................................... ............................... .
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO ....... O.OOOE+OO
INVENTORY- 1
---
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
.......
O.OOOE+OO O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
I
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
------------------------------------
...
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
O.OOOE+OO
Appendix C.xls
&EPA
LandGEM
Landfill Gas Emissions Model
Version 3.02
U.S. Enviromnental Protection Agency
Office of Research and Development
National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL)
and
Clean Air Technology Center (CATC)
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina
Summary Report
Landfill Name or Identifier:
Date: Thursday, October 02, 2008
Description/Comments:
About LandGEM:
First-Order Decomposition Rate Equation:
n 1 [MJ
QcH4 = L L kLa _l e -ktjj
i=l j=O.l 1 Q
Where,
OcH
4
=annual methane generation in the year of the calculation (m
3
/year)
i = 1-year time increment Mi =mass of waste accepted in the i
1
h year (Mg)
10/2/2008
n = (year of the calculation)- (initial year of waste acceptance)
j = 0.1-year time increment
tii = age of the j
1
h section of waste mass Mi accepted in the i
1
h year
(decimal years, e.g., 3.2 years)
k = methane qeneration rate (vear -
1
)
La = potential methane generation capacity (m
3
/Mg)
LandGEM is based on a first-order decomposition rate equation for quantifying emissions from the decomposition of landfilled waste in
municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The software provides a relatively simple approach to estimating landfill gas emissions. Model defaults
are based on empirical data from U.S. landfills. Field test data can also be used in place of model defaults when available. Further guidance on
EPA test methods, Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations, and other guidance regarding landfill gas emissions and control technology requirements
can be found at http://www.epa.gov/ttnatw01/landfill/landflpg.html.
LandGEM is considered a screening tool- the better the input data, the better the estimates. Often, there are limitations with the available data
regarding waste quantity and composition, variation in design and operating practices over time, and changes occurring over time that impact
the emissions potential. Changes to landfill operation, such as operating under wet conditions through leachate recirculation or other liquid
additions, will result in generating more gas at a faster rate. Defaults for estimating emissions for this type of operation are being developed to
include in LandGEM along with defaults for conventiallandfills (no leachate or liquid additions) for developing emission inventories and
determining CAA applicability. Refer to the Web site identified above for future updates.
REPORT- 1
Appendix C.xls
Input Review
LANDFILL CHARACTERISTICS
Landfill Open Year
Landfill Closure Year (with 80-year limit)
Actual Closure Year (without limit)
Have Model Calculate Closure Year?
Waste Design Capacity
MODEL PARAMETERS
Methane Generation Rate, k
Potential Methane Generation Capacity, La
NMOC Concentration
Methane Content
GASES I POLLUTANTS SELECTED
Gas I Pollutant #1:
Gas I Pollutant #2:
Total landfill gas
Methane
Gas I Pollutant #3: NMOC
Gas I Pollutant #4: Hydrogen sulfide
WASTE ACCEPTANCE RATES
Year
Waste Accepted
(Mglyear) (short tons/year)
1948 11 I 136 12,250
1949 11 1136 12,250
1950 111136 12,250
1951 111136 12,250
1952 11 1136 12,250
1953 111136 12,250
1954 111136 12,250
1955 11 I 136 12,250
1956 11 1136 12,250
1957 111136 12,250
1958 11 I 136 12,250
1959 11 1136 12,250
1960 111136 12,250
1961 111136 12,250
1962 0 0
1963 0 0
1964 0 0
1965 0 0
1966 0 0
1967 0 0
1968 0 0
1969 0 0
1970 0 0
1971 0 0
1972 0 0
1973 0 0
1974 0 0
1975 0 0
1976 0 0
1977 0 0
1978 0 0
1979 0 0
1980 0 0
1981 0 0
1982 0 0
1983 0 0
1984 0 0
1985 0 0
1986 0 0
1987 0 0
1948
1961
1961
No
0.040
100
600
50
short tons
year -
1
m
3
/Mg
ppmv as hexane
%by volume
Waste-In-Place
(Mg) (short tons)
0 0
111136 12,250
22,273 24,500
33,409 36,750
44,545 49,000
55,682 61,250
66,818 73,500
77,955 85,750
89,091 98,000
100,227 110,250
111,364 122,500
122,500 134,750
133,636 147,000
144,773 159,250
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
155,909 171,500
155,909 171 ,500
REPORT-2
101212008
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
WASTE ACCEPTANCE RATES (Continued)
Year
Waste Accepted Waste-In-Place
(Mg!year) (short tons/year) (Mg) (short tons)
1988 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
1989 0 0 155,909 171,500
1990 0 0 155,909 171,500
1991 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
1992 0 0 155,909 171,500
1993 0 0 155,909 171,500
1994 0 0 155,909 171,500
1995 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
1996 0 0 155,909 171,500
1997 0 0 155,909 171,500
1998 0 0 155,909 171,500
1999 0 0 155,909 171,500
2000 0 0 155,909 171,500
2001 0 0 155,909 171,500
2002 0 0 155,909 171,500
2003 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
2004 0 0 155,909 171,500
2005 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
2006 0 0 155,909 171,500
2007 0 0 155,909 171,500
2008 0 0 155,909 171,500
2009 0 0 155,909 171,500
2010 0 0 155,909 171,500
2011 0 0 155,909 171,500
2012 0 0 155,909 171,500
2013 0 0 155,909 171,500
2014 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
2015 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
2016 0 0 155,909 171,500
2017 0 0 155,909 171,500
2018 0 0 155,909 171,500
2019 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
2020 0 0 155,909 171,500
2021 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
2022 0 0 155,909 171,500
2023 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
2024 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
2025 0 0 155,909 171 ,500
2026 0 0 155,909 171,500
2027 0 0 155,909 171,500
REPORT-3
Appendix C.xls 10/2/2008
Pollutant Parameters
G I P II t t D f. It P as o u an e au arame ers: User-specified Pollutant Parameters:
Concentration Concentration
Compound (ppmv) Molecular Weight (ppmv) Molecular Weight
Total landfill gas 0.00
1/)
Methane
Q)
16.04
1/)
co
Carbon dioxide 44.01
(!)
NMOC 4,000 86.18
1,1, 1-Trichloroethane
(methyl chloroform)-
HAP 0.48 133.41 0.00
1,1,2,2-
Tetrachloroethane -
HAPNOC 1.1 167.85 0.00
1, 1-Dichloroethane
(ethylidene dichloride)-
HAPNOC 2.4 98.97 0.00
1, 1-Dichloroethene
(vinylidene chloride)-
HAPNOC 0.20 96.94 0.00
1 ,2-Dichloroethane
(ethylene dichloride)-
HAPNOC 0.41 98.96 0.00
1 ,2-Dichloropropane
(propylene dichloride)-
HAPNOC 0.18 112.99 0