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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 Vol XV, Edition 22
9/11: NEVER FORGET
NATION PAGE 7
IS HEAD OF
NFL LYING?
SPORTS PAGE 11
STATE MANDATES
WORKER SICK DAYS
STATE PAGE 5
FLIGHT 93 SITE TOURED ON 9/11 ANNIVERSARY EVE
PETER MOOTZ
Police say three special needs students and their student teacher were injured on the 300 block of Hillsdale
Boulevard when a car veered onto a sidewalk and struck them.
REUTERS
Barack Obama delivers a live televised address to the nation on his plans
for military action against the Islamic State.
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Opening a
new military front in the Middle
East, President Barack Obama
authorized U.S. airstrikes inside
Syria for the rst time Wednesday
night, along with expanded
strikes in Iraq as part of a steady,
relentless effort to root out
Islamic State extremists and their
spreading reign of
terror.
We will hunt
down terrorists
who threaten our
country, wherever
they are, Obama
declared in a
prime-time address to the nation
from the White House. This is a
core principle of my presidency: If
President says, We will hunt
down terrorists who threaten
our country, wherever they are
Obama OKs
airstrikes in
Middle East
STAFF AND WIRE REPORT
Three Hillsdale High School
special needs students and a stu-
dent teacher were struck by a car in
San Mateo Wednesday morning
while walking on a school eld
trip, a police sergeant and school
ofcials said.
At about 10:30 a.m., 15 students
were walking with ve teachers on
the sidewalk on the 300 block of
Hillsdale Boulevard when a black
Acura driven by a 53-year-old man
heading west veered off the road
and struck the group and a light
pole. The car came to rest just east
of the intersection of Stephen
Car hits special needs students
Three students, student teacher struck near Hillsdale High School
By Scott Morris
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The family of an 18-year-old dis-
abled woman suffering from schiz-
ophrenia who was fatally shot by a
San Mateo County sheriffs deputy
outside her home near Half Moon
Bay in June led a federal civil
rights lawsuit against the county
on Tuesday.
The complaint filed in U.S.
District Court in San Francisco
alleges that Deputy Menh Trieu
Family of woman killed by deputy sues
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In an effort to conserve water
during the drought, Millbrae is
implementing a water shortage
contingency plan at a minimum
stage that imposes the state
required restrictions on the irriga-
tion of ornamental landscapes or
turf with potable water.
Stage 1, which the city voted to
implement Tuesday, is enacted
when there is a water shortage of
0-5 percent, but may be appropri-
ate in other situations. During this
stage, there are restrictions on
Millbrae imposing state
restrictions on watering
Yanira Serrano, 18, who suffered from
schizophrenia, shot near Half Moon Bay
Yanira Serrano
See OBAMA, Page 8 See CRASH, Page 8
See WATER, Page 20 See SERRANO, Page 20
See page 6
Inside
Kerry says
U.S. will back
Iraq against
militants
www.smdailyjournal.com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 Vol XV, Edition 22
9/11: NEVER FORGET
NATION PAGE 7
IS HEAD OF
NFL LYING?
SPORTS PAGE 11
STATE MANDATES
WORKER SICK DAYS
STATE PAGE 5
FLIGHT 93 SITE TOURED ON 9/11 ANNIVERSARY EVE
PETER MOOTZ
Police say three special needs students and their student teacher were injured on the 300 block of Hillsdale
Boulevard when a car veered onto a sidewalk and struck them.
REUTERS
Barack Obama delivers a live televised address to the nation on his plans
for military action against the Islamic State.
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Opening a
new military front in the Middle
East, President Barack Obama
authorized U.S. airstrikes inside
Syria for the rst time Wednesday
night, along with expanded
strikes in Iraq as part of a steady,
relentless effort to root out
Islamic State extremists and their
spreading reign of
terror.
We will hunt
down terrorists
who threaten our
country, wherever
they are, Obama
declared in a
prime-time address to the nation
from the White House. This is a
core principle of my presidency: If
President says, We will hunt
down terrorists who threaten
our country, wherever they are
Obama OKs
airstrikes in
Middle East
STAFF AND WIRE REPORT
Three Hillsdale High School
special needs students and a stu-
dent teacher were struck by a car in
San Mateo Wednesday morning
while walking on a school eld
trip, a police sergeant and school
ofcials said.
At about 10:30 a.m., 15 students
were walking with ve teachers on
the sidewalk on the 300 block of
Hillsdale Boulevard when a black
Acura driven by a 53-year-old man
heading west veered off the road
and struck the group and a light
pole. The car came to rest just east
of the intersection of Stephen
Car hits special needs students
Three students, student teacher struck near Hillsdale High School
By Scott Morris
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The family of an 18-year-old dis-
abled woman suffering from schiz-
ophrenia who was fatally shot by a
San Mateo County sheriffs deputy
outside her home near Half Moon
Bay in June led a federal civil
rights lawsuit against the county
on Tuesday.
The complaint filed in U.S.
District Court in San Francisco
alleges that Deputy Menh Trieu
Family of woman killed by deputy sues
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In an effort to conserve water
during the drought, Millbrae is
implementing a water shortage
contingency plan at a minimum
stage that imposes the state
required restrictions on the irriga-
tion of ornamental landscapes or
turf with potable water.
Stage 1, which the city voted to
implement Tuesday, is enacted
when there is a water shortage of
0-5 percent, but may be appropri-
ate in other situations. During this
stage, there are restrictions on
Millbrae imposing state
restrictions on watering
Yanira Serrano, 18, who suffered from
schizophrenia, shot near Half Moon Bay
Yanira Serrano
See OBAMA, Page 8 See CRASH, Page 8
See WATER, Page 20 See SERRANO, Page 20
See page 6
Inside
Kerry says
U.S. will back
Iraq against
militants
Illinois volunteers grill
100-foot-long bratwurst
BELLEVILLE, Ill. About 50 peo-
ple volunteered to carefully grill a
100-foot bratwurst without burning or
breaking it at a bar in Illinois.
Silver Creek Saloon hosted the prac-
tice run Tuesday to prepare for the
citys 200th anniversary celebration,
where the volunteers will attempt to
grill a 200-foot-long bratwurst, the
Belleville News-Democrat reported.
The Bicentennial Oktoberfest
Weekend Celebration is set to be held
Sept. 19-21 in downtown Belleville.
On Tuesday, Larry Schubert, who
made the 60-pound sausage, led the
effort to unroll it onto a specially
made 100-foot metal trough.
Volunteers exercised more caution
after practicing in August with a 50-
foot bratwurst that broke in several
places because it was turned too quick-
ly and the grill was too hot.
Organizers walked around to inspect
and x splits in the meat.
Anearby baking company will make
a 200-foot-long bun to go with the
bratwurst when its grilled at the com-
munity event on Sept. 21. Donations
will be collected from people who want
to eat a piece of the bratwurst. Proceeds
will benet local food pantries.
Man held for allegedly
stealing Ferrari twice
FONTANA Authorities have
arrested a Southern California man
they say stole the same Ferrari
twice.
The Riverside Press-Enterprise says
Earnie Hooks of Los Angeles was
arrested last week behind the wheel
of the $250,000 car. Court records
say hes pleaded not guilty to car
theft and resisting police.
Police in Fontana, 50 miles east of
LA, say they stopped Hooks at a
drunken driving checkpoint on Aug.
29 and discovered that the black
2014 Ferrari 458 Spider he was driv-
ing had been reported stolen.
Police claim Hooks drove away
from the checkpoint and later aban-
doned the car, which was impounded.
But around 3 a.m. the next morn-
ing, someone stole it from the
impound lot.
Hooks was arrested five days later
while driving the Ferrari in his
Studio City neighborhood.
Man named human loses
primary in New Hampshire
ROCHESTER, N.H. Humans
race ended in defeat.
A candidate who legally changed
his name to human with a lower-
case H lost his bid to run for
office in New Hampshire on Tuesday.
The former David Montenegro lost
a primary contest to incumbent
Democratic state Rep. Rose Marie
Rogers by a count of 181-30.
Montenegro changed his name in
2012. He made headlines this year
when the states highest court ruled
he could have a vanity license plate
that reads COPSLIE. He had sued
after the Division of Motor Vehicles
said he couldnt have the plate
because it denigrated police offi-
cers.
Rogers was first elected in 2012
and represents Rochester, a city of
about 30,000 residents.
Police say woman used
wheelchair cart for getaway
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP, Mich.
Police in Michigan say they arrested
a shoplifting suspect following her
slow-speed getaway in a $1,200
motorized wheelchair shopping cart
taken from a Wal-Mart.
The Muskegon Chronicle says
police located 46-year-old Shirley
Mason about 2 miles away, riding the
cart with $600 in clothing.
A customer called police Monday
night to report someone riding a
shopping cart from the lot at the
store in Muskegon Countys
Fruitport Township.
Police say Mason told them she
couldnt find anyone to pick her up
from the store and took the wheel-
chair cart because she didnt feel
like walking.
Authorities say Mason told ofcers
she planned to sell the clothing.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Musician,
composer Moby is
49.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
2001
on Americas single-worst day of ter-
rorism, nearly 3,000 people were
killed as 19 al-Qaida members
hijacked four passenger jetliners,
sending two of the planes smashing
into New Yorks World Trade Center,
one into the Pentagon and the fourth
into a eld in western Pennsylvania.
This will remain the land of the free
only so long as it is the home of the brave.
Elmer Davis, American news commentator (1890-1958)
Syrian President
Bashar Assad is 49.
Rapper Ludacris is
37.
Birthdays
REUTERS
British history enthusiast portraying German Feldwebelleutnant ofcer Fritz Brandt, front, leads members of the
Sturmabteilungbrandt group during the re-enactment of the First Battle of the Marne, which took place a century ago, at
Chauconin-Neufmontiers, Eastern Paris.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morn-
ing then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the mid 60s to
lower 70s. Light winds...Becoming west
around 5 mph in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
The headline of the article San Francisco Unied School
District Board of Trustees candidate drops out: Monica
Peregrina Boyd doesnt want to split Latino vote in the
Sept. 10 edition of the Daily Journal was incorrect. The
headline should have read, South San Francisco Unied
School District Board of Trustees candidate drops out:
Monica Peregrina Boyd doesnt want to split Latino vote.
Correction
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
KUDOS BRING LAWYER MOSAIC
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: He promised to give up cigarettes, but he
was just BLOWING SMOKE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
RAYIN
LADVI
TARORO
VTELEV
2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No.11,in rst place; Solid Gold,No.10,in second
place; and Claifornia Classic, No. 5, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:43.19.
7 1 5
25 34 55 70 71 1
Mega number
14 39 40 43 13
Powerball
Sept. 10 Powerball
7 17 19 22 25
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
9 2 5 0
Daily Four
5 2 1
Daily three evening
10 12 15 31 46 23
Mega number
Sept. 10 Super Lotto Plus
2
Sept. 9 Mega Millions
I n 1714, the forces of King Philip V of Spain overcame
Catalan defenders to end the 13-month-long Siege of
Barcelona during the War of the Spanish Succession.
I n 1789, Alexander Hamilton was appointed the rst U.S.
Secretary of the Treasury.
I n 1814, an American eet scored a decisive victory over
the British in the Battle of Lake Champlain in the War of
1812.
I n 1857, the Mountain Meadows Massacre took place in
present-day southern Utah as a 120-member Arkansas immi-
grant party was slaughtered by Mormon militiamen aided by
Paiute Indians.
I n 1936, Boulder Dam (now Hoover Dam) began operation
as President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressed a key in
Washington to signal the startup of the dams rst hydro-
electric generator.
I n 1941, groundbreaking took place for the Pentagon. In a
speech that drew accusations of anti-Semitism, Charles A.
Lindbergh told an America First rally in Des Moines, Iowa,
that the British, the Jewish and the Roosevelt administra-
tion were pushing the United States toward war.
I n 1954, the Miss America pageant made its network TV
debut on ABC; Miss California, Lee Meriwether, was
crowned the winner.
I n 1962, The Beatles completed their rst single for EMI,
Love Me Do and P.S. I Love You, at EMI studios in
London.
I n 1974, Eastern Airlines Flight 212, a DC-9, crashed
while attempting to land in Charlotte, North Carolina,
killing 72 of the 82 people on board.
Actress Betsy Drake is 91. Former Sen. Daniel Akaka, D-
Hawaii, is 90. Actor Earl Holliman is 86. Comedian Tom
Dreesen is 75. Movie director Brian De Palma is 74. Rock
singer-musician Jack Ely (The Kingsmen) is 71. Rock musi-
cian Mickey Hart (The Dead) is 71. Singer-musician Leo
Kottke is 69. Actor Phillip Alford is 66. Actress Amy Madigan
is 64. Rock singer-musician Tommy Shaw (Styx) is 61.
Sports reporter Lesley Visser is 61. Actor Reed Birney is 60.
Singer-songwriter Diane Warren is 58. Homeland Security
Secretary Jeh (jay) Johnson is 57. Musician Jon Moss
(Culture Club) is 57. Actor Scott Patterson is 56.
3
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SAN CARLOS
Arre s t. Awoman was arrested for posses-
sion of a controlled substance on the 500
block of Walnut Street before 11:52 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 7.
Arre s t. A man was arrested on a warrant
for possession of a controlled substance
on the 1400 block of Greenbrier Road
before 9:59 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 6.
Arre s t . A man was arrested for driving
under the influence on Brittan Avenue and
El Camino Real before 1:16 a.m.
Saturday, Sept. 6.
Vandal i sm. Vandalism was reported on
the 1100 block of Industrial Road before
6:45 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 4.
Arre s t. A man was arrested for being
drunk in public on the 700 block of Laurel
Street before 10:21 p.m. Saturday, Aug.
30
REDWOOD CITY
Publ i c drunkenness. An intoxicated
man contacted police about having four
broken bones in his back and couldnt
stand up on Woodside Road before 12:37
a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 2.
Loud musi c compl ai nt. Aloud bass was
heard playing from a black BMW o n
Rolison Road before 11:12 p.m. Sunday,
Aug. 31.
Strong arm robbery . A man in a black
hoodie riding a yellow bike stole a purse
on Maple Street before 6:18 p.m. Sunday,
Aug. 31.
Reckl ess dri vers. Areckless driver in a
green van with rust on the hood was seen
swerving on Florence Street before 4:29
p.m. Sunday, Aug. 31.
James H. Browne
James H. Browne, born Nov 23, 1944,
died Aug 19, 2014. Browne was a resident of
San Bruno.
He is survived by his ve children, Nina
(Anthony), James and Jason (Brenda), Anne
Marie and Paulette. Along with his 14 grand-
children Jaclynn (Mario), Marisa, Charles,
Hope, David, Sia, Mia, Aingel, Tyler,
Jolynn, Tristyn, Gabriella, Alyssa and
Dakota and his great-grandson Mario. James
is also survived by his brothers and sisters;
Nancy (Al), William (Carol), Robert
(Maryann), Jeannie (Norm), Johnny
(Nancy), Phillip (Karen), Richard and
Jolynn (Chuck) and 23 nieces and nephews
and numerous great-nieces and great-
nephews.
He is preceded in death by his parents
Rupert and Eve, Brother Tom and son Jimito.
His greatest passion in life was his grand-
children, helping others, gifting his friends
with pictures and shing.
He will be loved and
forever missed by all who
knew him. Goodbye Dad
we miss and love you.
A celebration of
Brownes life is 1 p.m.
Sept. 13 at St Brunos
Church.
As a public service, the
Daily Journal prints obituaries of approxi-
mately 200 words or less with a photo one
time on the date of the familys choosing. To
submit obituaries, email information along
with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjour-
nal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style,
clarity, length and grammar. If you would
like to have an obituary printed more than
once, longer than 200 words or without edit-
ing, please submit an inquiry to our advertis-
ing department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Police reports
Southern inhospitality
A person reported being afraid of a
group of people with a Confederate ag
on Hopkins Avenue in Redwood City
before 9:23 p.m. Wednesday, Aug 27.
Obituary
4
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Three cousins pleaded not guilty
Monday to burglarizing an apart-
ment above a Redwood City
church during services Sunday and
fleeing from the congregation
when confronted, prosecutors
said.
Daniel, John and Peter Beskalis,
ages 18, 26 and 23, respectively,
were arrested when they were found
xing a fence they damaged as
they ran, according to the San
Mateo County District Attorneys
Ofce.
They pleaded not guilty to bur-
glary, grand theft, receiving
stolen property, brandishing a
deadly weapon, battery and van-
dalism charges, according to pros-
ecutors.
The burglary
was discovered
at about 12:30
p.m. Sunday
when the
daughter of the
deacon at
C o p t i c
O r t h o d o x
Church at 401
Hudson St.
went upstairs to the apartment she
shares with her father above the
church and discovered that a lap-
top, cellphones, jewelry and cash
had been stolen.
She came back to the service and
told her father, who announced it
to the congregation and said
everyone should stay while they
sorted it out.
But the three
B e s k a l i s
cousins bolted
out of their
seats toward the
door, prosecu-
tors said. Some
church members
pursued them
but two of the
c o u s i n s
allegedly turned and pointed pock-
etknives at the parishioners.
The cousins ran out of the
church and into the yard of a near-
by home, where they damaged a
fence. The 74-year-old woman
who lives there saw them and
stopped them, demanding they x
her fence.
John Beskalis offered her $40
for the fence,
but she refused,
and handed him
a hammer and
told them to x
i t .
The cousins
did as they were
told. John and
Peter Beskalis
were working
on xing the fence when police
arrived, with Daniel Beskalis
standing nearby.
They were all arrested. Some of
the stolen items were found in
John Deskaliss pockets while the
rest was found in a bag hidden in
the church, prosecutors said.
The three are scheduled to return
to court on Sept. 19 for a prelimi-
nary hearing.
Alleged burglars flee congregation, found fixing fence
Daniel Beskalis John Beskalis Peter Beskalis
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
ARichmond man arrested on his
26th birthday after employees of
the San Mateo store he was
allegedly trying to rob with a
sawed-off shotgun wrestled him
into submission was immediately
sentenced to 13 years in prison
after changing his plea to attempt-
ed robbery.
Vincent Lee Carter Jr. also
admitted using a rearm during the
robbery and
having a prior
felony strike
and a convic-
tion within the
last ve years.
In return,
Carter was
given the flat
13-year term
with credit of
225 days earned while in custody
on $350,000 bail. Prosecutors
dropped another count of attempt-
ed armed robbery and resisting
arrest.
The case settlement comes three
months after a pair of court-
appointed attorneys agreed Carter
was competent to stand trial for
the Feb. 26 incident at the La Raza
Market at 380 N. Ellsworth Ave.
in San Mateo. According to prose-
cutors, just before 10 a.m. on
Carters birthday, a man later iden-
tied as him entered the store with
the weapon and told the clerk
hands up, give me all the money,
dont move. The clerk responded
by hitting the alarm and grabbing
the shotgun.
As the pair wrestled, another
employee joined in and both sub-
dued the would-be robber until
police arrived.
Carter told authorities the store
clerks actually attacked him,
according to the District
Attorneys Ofce.
Birthday robber wraps up plea deal, gets 13 years prison
Mountain lion killed;
likely one that attacked boy
CUPERTINO Wildlife ofcials
in Northern California shot and
killed a mountain lion Wednesday
and say they are virtually certain it
is the one that attacked a 6-year-old
boy along a hiking trail three days
earlier.
The 65-pound male mountain
lion was shot while high in a tree
near the trail in Cupertino where the
boy was attacked and wounded, said
California Department of Fish and
Wildlife spokesman Patrick Foy. It
will take DNA testing to determine
whether it is the correct cat.
I think its very, very highly
likely, but we cant put a 100 per-
cent stamp on it until we get the
DNA, Foy said.
Field Poll:Water bond
leads among likely voters
SACRAMENTO A new Field
Poll nds slightly more than half of
likely voters approve of a $7.5 bil-
lion water bond on the November
ballot.
But the poll released Wednesday
shows that Gov. Jerry Brown and
other supporters have work to do
promoting Proposition 1. Nearly
two-thirds of those surveyed had
not heard about the proposal.
The Legislature approved the
bipartisan plan last month and the
Democratic governor signed it.
Vincent Carter
Around the state
5
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Back to School Special
HALF OFF FIRST MONTH'S TUITION
PIANO LESSONS IN MENLO PARK
All Ages & 8kill levels welcome
Reasonaole rates
Highl] skilled and
experienced teacher
Check out www.youtube.com/user/PianoStudio94301
Call 650.838.9772
Piano Studio of Alita Lake
State mandates sick
days for employees
By Michael R. Blood
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Gov. Jerry Brown
signed legislation Wednesday that will
require most California employers next year
to provide up to three sick days for millions
of workers, a policy long-sought by labor
unions but opposed by business groups.
This is the least we can do, Brown told
reporters after signing the bill at a ceremo-
ny in downtown Los Angeles, alluding to a
growing income gap that has left many
Americans struggling to make ends meet.
Supporters said as many as 6.5 million
workers including temporary and part-
time employees will benet from the law
that takes effect next July.
Whether youre a dishwasher in San
Diego or a store clerk in Oakland, this bill
frees you of having to choose between your
familys health and your job, Brown said
in a statement from his ofce.
The law will require most employers to
provide paid sick leave to employees who
work 30 or more days within a year, and
workers will earn a minimum of one hour of
paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked.
The legislation by Lorena Gonzalez, D-
San Diego, hit a last-minute snag when key
unions and some Democrats pulled their
support in the nal hours of the legislative
session last month when Brown sought an
exemption for home health aides for the eld-
erly and people with disabilities. That
affects about 363,000 employees paid
through the states In-Home Supportive
Services network, which would have
increased costs to the state.
The National Federation of Independent
Business in California said in a statement
that the law will kill plans by small
employers to expand their businesses.
So the state cant afford its own man-
dates, but small business owners are sup-
posed to be able to absorb those costs?
said John Kabateck, the groups executive
director. Our small business owners, who
make up more than 99 percent of the
employer community in California, already
face an increase in minimum wage, among
the highest taxes and more regulations than
any other state.
The California Chamber of Commerce
previously included the bill on its list of so-
called job killers but withdrew the desig-
nation after amendments were made to allow
employers to keep existing policies allow-
ing different accrual rates for sick pay as
long as they offer a minimum of three paid
days off per year.
Brown signed the legislation in Los
Angeles with fellow Democrats, many of
whom face re-election this year.
Connecticut already has a statewide paid
sick leave law, and voters in Massachusetts
will decide on a similar proposal in the
November election, according to the
National Partnership for Women &
Families, which praised the enactment of
the California law but called for it to be
expanded to home health workers.
A new law will require most employers to provide paid sick leave to employees who work 30
or more days within a year, and workers will earn a minimum of one hour of paid sick leave
for every 30 hours worked.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Carlos has seen the light actu-
ally, 1,465 of them.
Thats how many city-owned street
lights being converted this month into
energy-efcient xtures that will cut
down on costs, maintenance and green-
house gasses.
The swi t chover, whi ch began
Monday, i s a col l aborat i on
between with the city and Pacific
Gas and Electric. The current over-
head street lights are high pressure
sodium the long-time standard
but will be changed to light
emitting diode fixtures.
Aside from nancial and environ-
mental gains, the benet of LED light-
ing is its ability to be better directed to
avoid light pollution, increases clarity
for viewers and is less attractive to
nocturnal insects, according to Public
Works Director Jay Walter.
The lighting also contains no mercu-
ry, lasts three to ve times longer and
needs less maintenance than its prede-
cessors.
Walker called the conversion a great
opportunity for the citys efforts in
reducing energy use and greenhouse gas
emissions. The price tag for the work
is estimated at $481,330, which will
be covered by $135,000 in general
funds and a zero-interest loan through
PG&E. The city will repay the loan
using annual costs savings in electrici-
ty and, once that is complete, pocket
the remainder in the future.
The annual cost of the old lights was
approximately $132,000. After the
conversion, the city anticipates sav-
ing $67,749 annually in energy costs.
The new lights will also save 489,506
kilowatt hours yearly and reduce carbon
dioxide output by 256,501 pounds,
according to the Public Works
Department.
The work is expected to be nished
within 30 days.
San Carlos converting street lights to LED
6
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
SENIOR CARE AT HOME
Bathing Dressing Exercises
Transfers Housekeeping Toileting
Med Reminders Social Activities
Committed to matching our clients with caregivers
who are aligned with your loved ones needs.
650-993-2345
www.companioncareservices.net
Redwood City Sunrise Lions Fundraiser
Saturday, September 20
th
(Rain or shine)
Parking Lot
American Legion Post
651 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(just south of Whipple Avenue)
8:00 AM 4:00 PM
For more info, please phone:
Marilyn 650.365.3991
Scientists say the
ozone layer is recovering
WASHINGTON Earths protective
ozone layer is beginning to recover, large-
ly because of the phase-out since the 1980s
of certain chemicals used in refrigerants and
aerosol cans, a U.N. scientic panel report-
ed Wednesday in a rare piece of good news
about the health of the planet.
Scientists said the development demon-
strates that when the world comes together,
it can counteract a brewing ecological cri-
sis.
For the rst time in 35 years, scientists
were able to conrm a statistically signi-
cant and sustained increase in stratospheric
ozone, which shields the planet from solar
radiation that causes skin cancer, crop dam-
age and other problems.
From 2000 to 2013, ozone levels climbed
4 percent in the key mid-northern latitudes
at about 30 miles up, said NASA scientist
Paul A. Newman. He co-chaired the every-
four-years ozone assessment by 300 scien-
tists, released at the United Nations.
Highway shutdown
averted at Ferguson protests
BERKELEY, Mo. A planned highway
shutdown fell through Wednesday as a wall
of ofcers in riot gear kept Ferguson police
shooting protesters from walking onto
Interstate 70 in a nearby St. Louis suburb
during the late afternoon commute.
State troopers and St. Louis city and coun-
ty ofcers warned the roughly 150 demon-
strators who gathered to stay out of the road
as they protested last months shooting of
Michael Brown, a black, unarmed 18-year-
old, by a white ofcer. There were nearly as
many ofcers as demonstrators.
Around the nation
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD The United States pledged
Wednesday to stand by Iraq as its new leaders
pleaded for help in facing down a rampant,
deadly insurgency. The assurances by U.S.
Secretary of State John Kerry during a day-
long visit to Baghdad came as President
Barack Obama outlined his strategy for
defeating the Islamic State militant group
that has overrun wide swaths of northern Iraq
and Syria.
The increased devotion to Iraq and its spi-
raling security problems means Obama like-
ly will spend the remaining two years of his
presidency focused on a nation he cam-
paigned to largely leave in the rear-view mir-
ror after withdrawing American troops in
2011.
This is a ght that the Iraqi people must
win, but its also a ght that the rest of the
world needs to win with them, Kerry told
reporters at the close of a
daylong visit to
Baghdad, the rst high-
level meeting between
the U.S. and new Iraqi
Prime Minister Haider al-
Abadi. And its a ght
the United States and the
rest of the world need to
support every single step
of the way.
A coalition of nearly 40 nations already
has committed to contribute to what Kerry
predicted will be a worldwide ght to defeat
the Islamic State, which has surpassed even
al-Qaida in its ruthlessness to impose
extremist laws in a caliphate it wants to
carve out of the Mideast. But much of the
world and most notably Iraq was
watching to see what Obama would offer in a
speech Wednesday night.
Al-Abadi, who was sworn into ofce just
days ago, told Kerry that the U.S. and other
foreign allies must help Iraq stem the threat
that is pouring in the country from Syria,
where the Islamic State has established a
safe haven.
Of course, our role is to defend our coun-
try, but the international community is
responsible to protect Iraq and protect Iraqis
in the whole region, al-Abadi said. Whats
happening in Syria is coming across to Iraq.
We cannot cross that border. Its an interna-
tional border, but there is a role for the inter-
national community, for the United Nations
to do that role ... to act immediately to stop
the spread of this cancer.
Brandishing Obamas plans, Kerry will
head to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on Thursday to
try to persuade ofcials from across the
Mideast and Turkey to put aside longstand-
ing rivalries to more vigorously pursue the
Islamic State and, in doing so, ward off a
threat that has put the entire region at risk.
Kerry: U.S. will back Iraq against militants
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO A 65-year-old
woman who suffered a head injury when a
television struck her during last months
earthquake in Californias wine country has
died the rst death attributed to the mag-
nitude-6.0 temblor, sheriffs ofcials said.
Laurie Anne Thompson was at her Napa
home during the Aug. 24 quake when she
was hit, according to the Napa County
Sheriffs Office. Thompson told family
members that she was asleep in a reclining
chair in her living room when a TV struck
her in the head during the earthquake, Capt.
Steven Blower said Wednesday.
Thompson did not go to the hospital until
the next day when she told her family that
she felt dizzy and experienced a decline in
mental function, Blower said. She collapsed
and was rushed to a hospital, where she died
Friday due to bleeding in her skull, sheriffs
ofcials said.
Her condition continued to deteriorate
over time and, unfortunately, she passed
away, Sheriffs Capt. Doug Pike said.
The earthquake has not claimed any other
lives, but left scores of people injured,
among them a 13-year-old boy who broke
his pelvis in several places when part of a
chimney collapsed on him. It was the
strongest quake to hit the San Francisco Bay
area since a magnitude-6.9 quake in 1989.
The temblor was centered near the city of
Napa and broke water mains and gas lines
and sparked gas-fed res that destroyed sev-
eral mobile homes. The worst damage and
disruption was conned to downtown Napa,
where a post ofce, library and a 141-room
hotel were among 150 homes and buildings
deemed unsafe to occupy.
First death reported from California earthquake
John Kerry
NATION 7
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pollution
Prevention Week
September 15
th
-21
st
The City of Millbrae wishes to thank all
r
esidents and businesses for their efforts towards
making a difference by:
Safely Disposing Medications
Police Bureau, Monday-Friday 9:00 am-5 pm
Safely Disposing Household Hazardous Waste
Gardening with Non-toxic Products
Visit ourwaterourworld.org
Cleaning with Non-toxic Products
Visit the eco-home page @ baywise.org
Keeping Storm Drains Clean
Place waste in trash & maintain vehicles
Remembering Wipes Clog Pipes
Flush only human waste and toilet paper
AND
Joining Community for Annual
Coastal/Citywide Cleanup Day
Saturday, September 20
th
9:00 am-noon
Starting at CENTRAL PARK
For more information contact 650.259.2388
or callin@ci.millbrae.ca.us
ci.millbrae.ca.us/
sustainablemillbrae
By Joe Mandak
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. On a tour of Flight
93 National Memorial work in progress,
National Park Service ofcials expressed
hope Wednesday the site would keep the
story alive well beyond any anniversary of
the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
The memorial marks the spot where
United Airlines Flight 93 crashed 13 years
ago in a reclaimed strip mine some 75
miles southeast of Pittsburgh after passen-
gers fought back against hijackers. All 33
passengers and seven crew members were
killed.
Gordon Felt, president of the Families of
Flight 93 support group, said the spot is a
living memorial to those who died and
brings peace to a place where violence
occurred. Felts oldest brother, Edward, 41,
was among the passengers who died in the
crash.
It helps one understand the juxtaposi-
tion of violence and peacefulness, Felt
said of the memorial, and more specifical-
l y, the visitor center and learning center
being built on a plateau overlooking the
crash site. Its not just a 93-foot statue in
the middle of the field. Its a living memo-
rial.
Jeff Reinbold, the superintendent of the
memorial, and Keith Newlin, his deputy,
said it was important to the National Park
Service for the memorial to give visitors
multiple vistas from which to reflect on the
events of that day, as well as a way to learn
more about the crash.
Amemorial plaza was completed in time
for the 10th anniversary. It features a white
stone wall with separate panels for each
victim, with one name engraved on each.
The wall traces the path of the doomed
flight, and along with 40 groves of 40
trees are a way to focus attention on the
crash site and the victims memories.
The centers under construction during the
media tour are more about how do we keep
the story alive for future generations,
Reinbold said.
Newlin said the visitor centers structure
should be complete by June, which will
give park officials three months to install
exhibits in time to open for the 14th
anniversary of the crash.
The visitor center will have a window
overlooking the crash site in the distance,
Newlin said, so people may not have to
go to the crash site if they dont feel they
can handle it.
The building will also have a gap in it,
also offering a vista on the crash site.
Newlin said architect Paul Murdoch
designed the memorial so visitors can
pause at various spots to view the site from
the rolling fields that surround it, which
help focus on the deeper meaning of the
park.
Murdoch wanted visitors to have as
many opportunities to reflect on what hap-
pened here, and the healing nature of the
site, Newlin said.
The visitor centers concrete walls are
being formed with molds that make the
exterior look like the hemlock wood used
on the sides of barns that dot the rural val-
ley so the center fits with the landscape,
Newlin said.
The earlier phase of the memorial,
including the stone plaza wall and access
roads, cost about $20.5 million. The visi-
tor and learning centers are earmarked at
between $17 million and $23 million,
Newlin said.
Still to be completed are a 93-foot tall
tower with 40 wind chimes near the parks
entrance. The tower and other access roads
should cost another $3 million to $5 mil-
lion, with the total cost of the park at
about $60 million, Newlin said. The gov-
ernment spent another $10 million for the
land.
Flight 93 site toured on 9/11 anniversary eve
REUTERS
The Tribute in Light is illuminated over New Yorks Lower Manhattan skyline near the Statue
of Liberty, right, during events marking the 13th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World
Trade Center, as seen from Jersey City.
LOCAL/NATION 8
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Seth Borenstein
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Earths protective
ozone layer is beginning to recover, large-
ly because of the phase-out since the 1980s
of certain chemicals used in refrigerants and
aerosol cans, a U.N. scientic panel report-
ed Wednesday in a rare piece of good news
about the health of the planet.
Scientists said the development demon-
strates that when the world comes together,
it can counteract a brewing ecological cri-
sis.
For the rst time in 35 years, scientists
were able to conrm a statistically signi-
cant and sustained increase in stratospheric
ozone, which shields the planet from solar
radiation that causes skin cancer, crop dam-
age and other problems.
From 2000 to 2013, ozone levels
climbed 4 percent in the key mid-northern
latitudes at about 30 miles up, said NASA
scientist Paul A. Newman. He co-chaired the
every-four-years ozone assessment by 300
scientists, released at the United Nations.
Its a victory for diplomacy and for sci-
ence and for the fact that we were able to
work together, said chemist Mario
Molina. In 1974, Molina and F. Sherwood
Rowland wrote a scientic study forecasting
the ozone depletion problem. They won the
1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry for their
work.
The ozone layer had been thinning since
the late 1970s. Man-made chlorouorocar-
bons, called CFCs, released chlorine and
bromine, which destroyed ozone molecules
high in the air. After scientists raised the
alarm, countries around the world agreed to
a treaty in 1987 that phased out CFCs.
Levels of those chemicals between 30 and
50 miles up are decreasing.
Scientists say the ozone layer is recovering
Road, partially still atop the curb line,
according to police. The student teacher, a
28-year-old Belmont woman, suffered head
trauma and broken bones. The three male
students, age 15, 16 and 18, suffered minor
injuries including abrasions and lacera-
tions, according to San Mateo police.
The incident is still under investigation,
but San Mateo police said they do not
believe the man drove on to the sidewalk
deliberately nor was he trying to avoid a
hazard in the road.
The victims were taken to the hospital but
expected to recover, police said. The driver
was also taken to the hospital with minor
injuries and was cooperative with police.
Toxicology results are pending, according
to police.
Sheri Costa-Batis, San Mateo Union
High School spokeswoman, said the
speci al educat i on cl asses regul arl y
t ake wal ks near t he hi gh school t o
help students learn life skills.
The road reopened at 12:34 p.m. and the
vehicle was towed from the scene, police
said.
Meanwhile, the school is working to
keep the rest of the students and the vic-
tims families updated on their status,
Costa-Batis said. They are also providing
counselors for students and staff.
Families of the injured students and stu-
dent teacher were immediately notied, fol-
lowed by the families of the other students
on the supervised eld trip. Hillsdale High
School notied the families, teachers and
administrators of Hillsdale High, which was
followed by communications for the broad-
er community, according to the district.
The SMUHSD family cannot begin to
express our joy that the injured students
and student teacher are reported to have no
life threatening injuries, Superintendent
Scott Laurence said in a press release. An
ongoing priority is to provide counseling
and emotional support to all of our stu-
dents, families and teachers who need help
recovering from the fear that overwhelms
each of us when our students and staff are
injured.
Continued from page 1
CRASH
you threaten America, you will nd no safe
haven.
Obama announced that he was dispatching
nearly 500 more U.S. troops to advise and
assist Iraqi security forces, as well as con-
duct intelligence and reconnaissance
flights, bringing the total number of
American forces sent there this summer to
more than 1,500. He also urged Congress
anew to authorize a program to train and arm
Syrian rebels who are ghting both the
Islamic State militants and Syrian President
Bashar Assad.
Obamas plans amounted to a striking
shift for a president who rose to political
prominence in part because of his early
opposition to the Iraq war. While in ofce,
he has steadfastly sought to wind down
American military campaigns in the Middle
East and avoid new wars particularly in
Syria, a country where the chaos of an
intractable civil war has given the Islamic
State space to thrive and move freely across
the border with Iraq.
Speaking on the eve of the anniversary of
the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, Obamas plans
were also an admission that years of
American-led war in the Middle East have
not quelled the terror threat emanating from
the region.
Obama insisted that his plan to degrade
and ultimately destroy the Islamic State
militants would not involve returning U.S.
combat troops to the Middle East. Even so,
he acknowledged that any time we take
military action, there are risks involved,
especially to the servicemen and women
who carry out these missions.
But I want the American people to under-
stand how this effort will be different from
the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. It will not
involve American combat troops ghting
on foreign soil, he added.
The presidents speech, which lasted
about 15 minutes, followed a summer of
deliberation at the White House over how to
respond to the violent Islamic State mili-
tants. While administration ofcials have
said they are not aware of a credible threat of
a potential attack by the militants in the
U.S., they say the group poses risks to
Americans and interests across the Middle
East. Ofcials are also concerned about the
prospect that Westerners, including
Americans, who have joined the militant
group could return to their home countries
to launch attacks.
In recent weeks, the militants have
released videos depicting the beheading of
two American journalists in Syria. The vio-
lent images appear to have had an impact on
a formerly war-weary public, with multiple
polls in recent days showing that the major-
ity of Americans support airstrikes in both
Iraq and Syria.
The U.S. began launching limited
airstrikes against Islamic State targets in
Iraq earlier this summer at the request of that
countrys former prime minister. But Obama
vowed that he would not commit the U.S. to
a deeper military campaign until Iraq formed
a new government that allowed greater par-
ticipation from all sects, a step Iraqi leaders
took Tuesday.
Continued from page 1
OBAMA
OPINION 9
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Transit-oriented development lie
Editor,
Only 2 percent of transit-oriented
development purchasers use Caltrain
almost 100 percent use cars.
Government agencies, developers,
construction and labor unions want to
hide this fact. Cars are the primary
cause of C02/greenhouse gas emis-
sions and climate change.
Rezoning low car-dense sites, like a
bowling alley, to permanent high-rise
TODs articially brings in thousands
of new cars and C02. TODs are bad for
the environment and our health. The
Metropolitan Transportation
Commission and the Association of
Bay Area Governments forced nine Bay
Area cities to rezone commercial areas
for new TODs or lose millions in state
transportation funds.
Cities out-of-control TOD construc-
tion moved the Bay Area up from fth
worst U.S. commute to second worst in
2014. More TODs in 2015 guarantees
rst worst past Los Angeles. Cities can
place deed restrictions on TOD sales,
limiting units to one car with no over-
ow of cars onto streets.
Better yet is no car(s) per unit, no
street overow and mandated Caltrain
use. Labor unions love TOD construc-
tion, making Sacramento Democrats
happy. But, if cities dont build new
TODs, then thousands of new cars and
C02 cant come, correct? Your health or
TODs?
Mike Brown
Burlingame
Red light cameras
Editor,
According to South San Francisco
Vice Mayor Richard Garbarino, the
$700 red light ne is unfair because it
hurts poor people (Red light cameras
shut down in the Sept. 10 edition of
the Daily Journal).
Heres a tip for everyone who doesnt
want a big trafc ticket: Dont run the
red light. If youre so impatient that
you feel you have to, you plain should-
nt be out driving; youre risking my
life as well as your own.
The ne is supposed to hurt you,
thats what nes are for. And believe
me, trafc tickets hurt a lot less than
auto accidents.
Joseph Cote
South San Francisco
Red light cameras need to go
Editor,
Four of the ve councilmembers of
South San Francisco voted to get rid of
the red light cameras at two intersec-
tions on El Camino Real. On Hickey
Boulevard, the data shows that there
were 16 accidents last year and 24 the
nal year of the red light camera pro-
gram. There is evidence that red light
cameras not only do not promote safe-
ty but also increase the chances of a
rear-end collision.
On Aug. 5, Millbrae reported a spike
in tickets to which I also wrote to City
Council. I havent heard any signi-
cant update except that Millbrae will
continue the heavy ticketing.
Does Millbrae have data to support
that the red light camera program has
even been effective?
The city of Millbrae issued 7,842 red
light violations in 2013. Assuming it
is $500 a ticket, which is $3,921,000
in ticket revenue.
Revenue sharing for outsourced red
light agreements is closer to 33 per-
cent, which would drop that number to
around $1,293,930. Fines and forfei-
tures for 2013 were $1,165.881 (close
enough) on the 2013 CAFR. Ask your-
self, how is leaving $2 million on the
table good policy? Seventy-seven per-
cent or almost $2 million is going to
the city of San Mateo to manage sever-
al cameras every year.
As development is being pushed near
the BARTsites, these red light cameras
will encourage more congestion. We
should follow South San Franciscos
lead and retire the red light camera pro-
gram in Millbrae.
Douglas Radtke
Millbrae
Get water before you build
Editor,
Thank you Robert Nice and Beverly
Kalinin for putting into words loud and
clear about all the new building proj-
ects in San Mateo in the midst of a
serious drought (Problems in San
Mateo in the Sept. 9 edition of the
Daily Journal; Station Park Green in
the Sept. 6 edition of the Daily
Journal). I agree that money is win-
ning over everything else. Fifth
Avenue and El Camino Real is going to
become at least a four-story apartment
building, if the contractor has his way
it will be eight stories and the ball eld
at Central Park will never see the sun.
Of course, where Kmart was and also
almost a whole block on El Camino
Real near the Hillsdale Shopping
Center. Now is not the time to build.
Now is the time to proceed conserva-
tively because if we never get water no
one will live here. Thank you, Beverly
and Robert, for alerting us of what
seems to be obvious to everyone but
City Hall.
Betty Wyren
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
Boston Herald
I
t makes no sense. Its not
on the level. Its just poli-
tics. Plain and simple.
When he uttered those words just
nine weeks ago President Obama was
not (for a change) talking about him-
self. He was referring to Republican
obstruction in Congress on the
issue of immigration reform.
The president said in that June
speech delivered in the Rose Garden
that persistent GOP inaction would
inspire him to take executive action
by summers end to address the status
of millions of illegal immigrants liv-
ing in the United States. But even that
misguided pledge has now gone poof,
with the announcement that the White
House will delay such action until
after the midterm elections.
Now, Obama still plans to wave his
presidential wand and likely render
millions of illegal immigrants legal
residents of the United States. But he
and his party have woken up to the
immediate political risk of doing so
without congressional input par-
ticularly after the administrations
disastrous handling of the crisis of
unaccompanied minors who ooded
the U.S. border over the summer.
But instead of putting his shoulder
to the wheel to build bipartisan sup-
port for comprehensive reform and a
path to citizenship for those living
here illegally the only way out of
this mess the president is insulting
the collective American intelligence.
He claims the reason for the delay is
because he wants to make sure that
the ts are crossed and the is dotted
on his unilateral action. Meanwhile
his staff is whispering to reporters
that it is, in fact, very much about the
midterms.
The presidents team is also
expressing concern that taking uni-
lateral action could dampen the
prospects of comprehensive reform
as if they have any intention of
engaging in meaningful negotiations
once the president takes action on his
own and as if Republicans in
Congress could trust them even if
they did.
It makes no sense. Its not on the
level. Its just politics. Plain and sim-
ple.
We couldnt have put it any better
than the president put it himself.
Presidential punt
Blame the elevator
E
levators dont inflict injury. People do. At
least, thats the stance the elevator industry
folks are probably taking this week as video
footage leaked of Ray Rice coldcocking his then-
fiancee and dragging her knocked-out body from one.
But cmon. The increasing level of elevator-related
violence leaves us with only one conclusion: It is
time to ban elevators outright or at least impose a
very strict set of reg-
ulations. Perhaps a
waiting period before
boarding. Its not
like these crimes are
happening on escala-
t ors.
Lets look at the
evidence.
In February, foot-
baller Rice and his
now-wife were video-
taped entering a casi-
no elevator together
and upright. The first
footage the public
saw was Rice exiting
with the unconscious woman. The romantics at heart
could argue she decided to take a little nap between
floors. We dont know what went on behind closed
doors. But then more graphic footage emerged that
showed Rice punching her dead in the face and the for-
mer Raven got the heave-ho from the team and the
league.
This is obviously not his wifes fault. No person
deserves the blow she received. It is obviously not
Rices fault either, at least in the eyes of his wife who
has lashed out at the media for ruining their lives. And
not in the eyes of the National Football League. Alaw
enforcement officials says the NFL had the video back
in April yet still felt a two-game suspension was ade-
quate punishment. If the league felt Rice was culpable,
wouldnt it send a stronger message? All that leaves
then is the elevator.
Just ask an Oakland school security guard. In April,
he was filmed in an elevator striking a handcuffed and
wheelchair-bound student with cerebral palsy. The boy
allegedly spit on the guard first but its hard to justify
the return force.
The following month the most talked about elevator
incident until the Rice video also happened in August
the smackdown between singer Beyonce, husband
Jay-Z and sister Solange. Tongues wagged over
Solange swinging at her brother-in-law. What hap-
pened? What caused the rift? With the 20/20 of hind-
sight, we all know the answer now. The trio would
have been nothing but sweet to each other had they
just taken the stairs.
In August, the former CEO of Connecticut catering
company Centerplate was videotaped in a Vancouver
hotel elevator repeatedly kicking a puppy and yank-
ing its leash. The companys board initially ordered
Desmond Hague to donate $100,000 to an animal pro-
tection foundation and complete 1,000 hours of com-
munity service. Hague ultimately resigned but not
before telling the press that the Doberman pincher
pooch Sadie, which belonged to a a friend, caused him
to lose control. Thats right. Blame the dog. But
again, the real culprit is the elevator.
Maybe its the piped-in Muzak that drives individu-
als to violence. Perhaps a prior passenger pushed
every single floor button before they got on. The ele-
vator could be headed down when the occupants really,
really need to go up. Possibly the elevators inspec-
tion certificate was expired. That could spike any-
bodys blood.
Granted, the idea that a motorized lift is the reason
for so many stomach-turning incidents is ridiculous
but no more absurd than some of the excuses and feet-
dragging reactions to some of them. If those involved
in the altercations arent willing to adequately point
the finger at those with the clinched fists, why
shouldnt the rest of us simply chalk up the fights to
being just some of lifes ups and downs?
Michelle Durands column Off the Beat runs every
Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached at:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or (650) 344-5200 ext.
102. Follow Michelle on Twitter @michellemdurand
What do you think of this column? Send a letter to the
editor: letters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 17,068.71 +54.84 10-Yr Bond 2.53 +0.03
Nasdaq 4,586.52 +34.24 Oil (per barrel) 91.76
S&P 500 1,995.69 +7.25 Gold 1,253.60
By Bernard Condon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK U.S. stocks broke
two days of losses on Wednesday as a
jump in Apple shares helped push
indexes higher.
Apple rose 3.1 percent, its biggest
gain since April, a day after announc-
ing updated versions of the iPhone, a
new smartwatch and a mobile pay-
ment system. The company is the
largest component of both the
Standard & Poors 500 and Nasdaq
composite indexes.
Gains in the broad market were
muted as investors fretted over the
timing and pace of Federal Reserve
increases in interest rates, which are
widely expected next year.
The economy is getting better,
and that worries people, said John
Manley, chief equity strategist at
Wells Fargo Funds Management.
People are afraid the Fed will raise
rates too quickly.
Adrop in a key oil price to the low-
est level since in nearly 1 ? years
also weighed on the market. Several
oil companies fell. Chevron dropped
0.7 percent.
Apple made the biggest splash on a
slow day for news. Investors scram-
bled to understand the impact of its
new products on the fortunes of other
companies, sending a number of
stocks sharply higher, and others
sharply lower.
EBay fell 3 percent over fears its
PayPal division will lose business to
Apples new payment system. But
GPS device maker Garmin reversed
big losses from Tuesday with a gain
of 4 percent as investors seemed to
dismiss the threat from the Apples
smartwatch.
Apple closed at $101, up $3.01. It
is has gained 26 percent since the
beginning of the year.
The Dow Jones industrial average
ended the day up 54.84 points, or 0.3
percent, to 17,068.71. The S&P 500
rose 7.25 points, or 0.4 percent, to
1, 995. 69.
The Nasdaq rose 34.24 points, or
0. 8 percent, to 4, 586. 52. Apple
comprises 8.5 percent of the tech-
heavy index, so a big move in its
stock price has an outsize influence
on tech-heavy index.
Investors were questioning
whether the U.S. Federal Reserve
might raise its benchmark interest
rate earlier than many had expected
as the economy gains strength. In a
note to clients Wednesday morning,
Steven Ricchiuto, chief economist at
Mizuho Securities, said he thinks the
consensus over the timing of the
first increase will soon shift to early
next year, rather than over the sum-
mer.
The worst things for stocks would
be the Fed to raise rates sooner rather
than later, said Ricchiuto in a phone
interview.
Adding to the nervousness was a
paper earlier this week from two San
Francisco Fed economists that said
the public appears to expect a more
accommodative policy, meaning
low rates for longer, than do Fed
board members.
Investors will be watching a report
on unemployment claims out
Thursday and one on retail sales
Friday for a read on the economy.
Also weighing on markets was a
$1.12 drop in Brent crude to close at
$98.04 a barrel, the lowest price
since May 2013. It was the fifth
straight drop for Brent crude, a
benchmark for international oils
used by many U.S. refineries.
The price of U.S. benchmark oil
also fell to its lowest level since
January after the Energy Department
reported large increases in stocks of
gasoline and diesel. Benchmark U.S.
crude fell $1.08 cents to close at
$91.67 a barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange.
Stocks end higher as Apple shares jump
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Inc., down 54 cents to $17.07
The doughnut shop operator's second-quarter sales rose 6.9 percent
but its adjusted prot fell short of expectations.
AngloGold Ashanti Ltd., down $2.42 to $13.07
The gold mining company plans to spin off its international mining
operations and raise $2.1 billion in capital to pay debt.
Palo Alto Networks Inc., up $9.47 to $98.75
The network security company topped quarterly revenue expectations
and forecast better-than-expected revenue for the next quarter.
U.S. Silica Holdings Inc., up $4.90 to $69.41
The commercial silica company increased its adjusted prot guidance for
the full year and reafrmed its expense guidance.
Nasdaq
On Track Innovations Ltd., up 23 cents to $3.55
The electronic payment technology company said it will bring new add-
on devices to earlier-generation iPhone and iPad products.
Land's End Inc., up $6.86 to $40.20
The clothing and apparel retailer reported a 4.9 percent boost in second-
quarter prot on higher direct and retail sales.
NPS Pharmaceuticals Inc., up $6.47 to $32.24
A preliminary FDA review said the drug developer's potential hormone
replacement therapy for hypoparathyroidism is effective.
GT Advanced Technologies Inc., down $2.16 to $12.78
Big movers
By Mae Anderson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Apple is a habitual party
crasher, but can the companys history of
arriving late and making a big splash in var-
ious gadget categories continue with the
Apple Watch?
The technology company was a late
entrant into many of its most prominent
product categories: the iPod wasnt the rst
digital music player and the iPad wasnt the
rst tablet. But in most cases, the innova-
tion the company infused into its devices
ignited previously dormant markets and
Apple products became must haves.
Smartwatches have been around for a few
years, but makers such as Samsung and Sony
have failed to make them a runaway hit.
Apples stated entry into the smartwatch
arena this week with a gadget that wont go
on sale until early 2015 raises questions:
Can the company work its magic as it has in
the past and convince people that they real-
ly need a smartwatch or will this time be
different?
Experts say Apple is likely to stimulate
interest in smartwatches, but they contend
that the company must overcome a few
hitches before its device can succeed.
Wearable devices is a small but growing
area that technology companies are hoping
to capitalize on as the smartphone and
tablet usage grows. Citi Investment
Research estimates the market for smart-
watches will be $1.4 billion to $1.8 billion
this year and could grow to $10 billion by
2018.
But no company has cracked the formula
for a mass-market success. The entire wear-
ables category includes sport fitness
bands, watches and other apparel every-
thing from Fitbits $99 Flex tness tracker
and Nikes $99 Fuelband tness monitors to
Samsungs $199 Galaxy Gear smart watch.
Experts say the Apple Watchs real test will
come when developers begin to develop
apps for the gadget, which is Apples rst
brand-new product introduction in four
years.
What separates Apple from the others is
partially the design itself its a lot more
elegant than other offerings as well as the
Apple ecosystem and (software) developer
opportunity, said Susquehanna Research
analyst Chris Caso.
T-Mobile to sell phones
that call, text on Wi-Fi
SAN FRANCISCO T-Mobile will sell
more than 100 smartphone models with a
built-in feature that taps into Wi-Fi networks
to make phone calls and send texts when cus-
tomers cant connect to the wireless carriers
cellular network.
The program announced Wednesday repre-
sents T-Mobiles latest attempt to lure wire-
less subscribers away from three larger rivals,
Verizon Wireless, AT&T Corp. and Sprint
Corp.
Over the past 18 months, T-Mobile has
shaken up the industry by replacing two-year
contract commitments with monthly install-
ment plans to pay for smartphones and lower-
ing the cost to upgrade device and stream dig-
ital music.
As part of our DNA, we want to make
changes that dont make us feel bad when rest
of the industry copies us, T-Mobile CEO
John Legere said in an interview.
T-Mobile is trying to exploit the hoopla
surrounding the Sept. 19 release of Apple
Inc.s iPhone 6 with its new twist on Wi-Fi
connections.
Dollar General goes
hostile in bid for rival
Dollar General is going hostile with its
$9.1 billion bid for Family Dollar after its
rival repeatedly rejected previous offers.
The discount chain has commenced an open
offering to investors of Family Dollar Stores
Inc. for $80 per share in cash. That offer was
rejected last week by the companys board,
which has already accepted a deal with anoth-
er discounter, Dollar Tree.
Family Dollar, based in Matthews, North
Carolina, has voiced concerns about Dollar
Generals deal passing antitrust review. In
response, Dollar General has said that it is
willing to divest up to 1,500 stores if the
Federal Trade Commission requires it. The
company also is offering to pay a $500 mil-
lion reverse breakup fee if antitrust hurdles
get in the way.
Dollar Generals offer makes for a com-
pelling nancial argument, Sterne Agee ana-
lyst Chuck Grom wrote. He expects the
Goodlettsville, Tennessee, company to ulti-
mately win the dollar store war.
Family Dollar Stores Inc. has been explor-
ing a sale amid considerable nancial stress
and it has shuttered some of its stores and cut
prices in an attempt to increase foot trafc. In
June, activist investor Carl Icahn urged the
company to put itself up for sale.
Google invests in
California solar power plant
NEWYORK Google is helping to con-
vert a one-time oil eld into a solar power
plant.
The Internet search company is providing
$145 million in nancing so that SunEdison
can build the plant north of Los Angeles in
Kern County.
Theres something a little poetic about
creating a renewable resource on land that
once creaked with oil wells, Google said in a
blog post Wednesday.
The plant will be tted with nearly 250,000
SunEdison solar panels and generate enough
energy to power 10,000 homes. Google said
the project will bring 650 jobs to the area.
Smartwatch: Timely
idea or clocked out?
Busines briefs
REUTERS
Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks about the Apple
Watch during an Apple event.
By Scott Sonner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CARSON CITY, Nev. Critics argued
Nevada lawmakers were gambling with tax-
payers money as they began negotiating in
a special session Wednesday over whether
to approve an unprecedented package of up
to $1.3 billion in incentives aimed at bring-
ing Tesla Motors $5 billion battery factory
to the state.
Gov. Brian Sandoval urged legislators in
the two Democrat-controlled houses to seize
an extraordinary opportunity to land the
electric car-makers gigafactory and tens
of thousands of jobs he said would help pull
Nevada from its worst economic crisis in
state history.
Legislative leaders expected to approve
the package by Friday or sooner, and
Assembly Minority Leader Pat Hickey, R-
Reno, was among those predicting it would
pass by an overwhelming margi n.
Critics protest as lawmaker
mulling Teslas tax breaks
By Rob Maaddi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. Alaw enforcement
ofcial says he sent a video of Ray Rice
punching his then-ancee to an NFLexecutive
ve months ago, while Commissioner Roger
Goodell has insisted the league didnt see the
violent images until this week.
The person played the Associated Press a
12-second voicemail from an NFLofce num-
ber on April 9 conrming
the video arrived. Afemale
voice expresses thanks
and says: Youre right.
Its terrible.
The law enforcement
ofcial, speaking to the
AP on condition of
anonymity because of the
ongoing investigation,
says he had no further
communication with any
NFL employee and cant
conrm anyone watched
the video. The person said
he was unauthorized to
release the video but
shared it unsolicited,
because he wanted the NFL
to have it before deciding
on Rices punishment.
The NFL has repeatedly
said it asked for but could not obtain the video
of the Baltimore Ravens running back hitting
Janay Palmer who is now his wife at an
Atlantic City casino in February.
The league says it has no record of the
video, and no one in the league ofce had seen
it until it was released by TMZ Monday. When
asked about the voicemail Wednesday, NFL
ofcials repeated their assertion that no
Source says Rice video sent to NFL
TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL
CSMs Shelby Chung scored a match-high six goals in the Bulldogs 19-11 loss to Delta.
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
College of San Mateo womens water
polo head coach Randy Wright knew the
odds were stacked against his team jumping
into the pool with powerhouse Delta in
Wednesdays season opener.
Were jumping in with some sharks,
Wright said. Im interested and curious to
see how we respond to stiff game play in
terms of pressure.
The Bulldogs fell 19-11 to a Delta squad
that was just getting warmed up for the day.
The opener at CSM was part of a Wednesday
doubleheader for the Mustangs, who went
on to down Foothill in the nightcap, 11-10.
Physically and condition wise, we did
really well, Delta head coach Nathan
Varosh said. (Against) San Mateo, we
werent ashy or anything to show our t-
ness but it started to show by the end of the
Foothill game. They were kind of gassed
and we still had something left in the tank.
Unlike Delta, which boasts depth with 18
players on roster, CSM has a mere nine
players to start the year. The optimum num-
ber for a water polo roster is 14 to 16 which
allows teams to play scrimmages in prac-
tice, but considering CSMs lack of depth,
tabbing an opening-day matchup against a
powerhouse squad it also optimal, accord-
ing to Wright.
Playing Delta, a strong team, is great,
Wright said. Sure, no one wants to start off
with losing by eight. But at the same time,
its a real-world realization as to what com-
munity college water polo is all about.
Delta jumped out to an early lead against
CSM, and after breaking a 1-1 tie on an
early rst-quarter goal by freshman Brooke
Mahoney, the Mustangs led the rest of the
way. Mahoney went on to score a team-high
ve goals, four of which came in the rst
half. Delta sophomore Nicole Cunningham
added four goals while freshman Cassidy
Waters had three.
CSM sophomore Shelby Chung scored a
match-high six goals, picking up right
where she left off as the Bulldogs leading
scorer of a year ago with 61 goals.
CSM falls in polo opener
See VIDEO, Page 14
I
t will be standing-room only at San
Mateo Saturday afternoon when the
Bearcats host Lynbrook in a non-
league football game.
Its not because there is a huge interest
in the Bearcats and Vikings, its because
the bleachers at San Mateos stadium are
not ready for use yet. Construction and
renovation of the bleachers at San Mateo
and Burlingame started in May with
a targeted nish date, in San Mateos
case, of Oct. 10.
Jeff Scheller, San
Mateos head coach
and the schools ath-
letic director, said he
told Lynbrook about
the situation and the
Vikings agreed to
keep the game in San
Mateo.
The Bearcats were
forced to move last
weeks season open-
er from a home game
to a road game and
had to travel to Palo Alto to take on
Gunn. After Saturday, they will be on the
road for the next two weeks. They travel
to Mountain View next week and the
Carlmont game scheduled for Sept. 26
has been moved to Belmont.
I probably should not have scheduled
so many home games (this season),
Scheller said.
Scheller said the original plan was for
the bleachers to be revamped in the
spring of 2013.
Ayear ago, my principal told me not
to schedule any home games until
October, Scheller said. But when con-
struction did not start in May 2013 and
was delayed to this past spring,
Schellers 2014 schedule was already
made. And based on what had happened in
2013, he was thinking construction
would not start on time again.
Construction
making teams
road warriors
See LOUNGE, Page 14
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When St. Louis Cardinals six-time Gold
Glove-winning catcher Yadier Molina was
serving a two-game rehab stint at Double-A
Springeld in late August, he caught an emerg-
ing young right-hander in Sam Tuivailala.
Tuivailala drafted in the third round of the
2010 MLB Draft out of Aragon hooked up
with Molina for one scoreless inning Aug. 28.
The performance, no doubt, made an impres-
sion as less than two weeks later, Tuivailala
was promoted to the big
leagues Monday.
It wasnt the rst time
Molina got a look at
Tuivailala, however, as the
Cards saw the 21-year-old
reballer in spring train-
ing this season. Even
then, the organization was
abuzz about the potential
of Tuivailalas dynamic
right arm.
Clearly that night that Tui threw to Yadi
was another opportunity for Yadi to see him,
Cardinals farm director Gary LaRoque said.
That started for him back during spring
training games.
In spring camp, a major league promotion
by years end didnt seem realistic. Tuivailala
only began pitching professionally two years
ago, and during midseason at that. He started
the 2014 season at High-A Palm Beach, but
over the course of the year skyrocketed
through the Cards farm system with sensa-
tional strikeout numbers.
Tuivailala notched 97 strikeouts through 60
minor league innings this season, pitching at
three levels which culminated in a brief stint
with Triple-A Memphis for the Redbirds
appearance in the Pacic Coast League
American Conference Championship series.
After Tuivailala pitched in Game 3 of the series
last Friday Memphis was eliminated
Saturday in four games by Royals afliate
Omaha he was informed he was being pro-
moted to the big leagues by Memphis manag-
er Ron Warner.
Tuivailala makes swift ascent to the big leagues
See CALL UP, Page 15
See AOTW, Page 15
<<< Page 12, Bullpen struggles
continue in loss to White Sox
MORE RAY RICE FALLOUT: TED ROBINSON, RADIO VOICE OF THE 49ERS AND THE PAC-12 NETWORK, SUSPENDED FOR COMMENTS >> PAGE 13
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014
Ray Rice Roger Goodell
SamTuivailala
SPORTS 12
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Wednesday
Girls water polo
Woodside 12, Menlo 5
After ending the rst quarter deadlocked at
3-3, the Wildcats got a big performance
from Terez Touhey to outscore the Knights
5-1 in the second quarter and cruise to vic-
tory.
Touhey scored four goals and was a force
on the defensive side of the ball as well.
After Menlo jumped out to an early 2-0 lead,
Woodsides defense settled in and, with
Touhey as the catalyst, soon overpowered
Menlo on fast breaks.
Woodsides Mina Sealund also scored four
goals to tie Touhey for the match-high. The
Widcats also got three goals from Taira
Hovden and two goals from Mia
Montalbano.
Menlo was paced by two goals from
Audrey Flower. Jennie Greenstein, Anna
Miller and Sara Varadharajulu scored a goal
apiece for the Knights.
Girls golf
El Camino holds off South City
Veronica Tangalin red a 48 to lead the
Colts to a four-stroke victory, 288-292,
over the rival Warriors at Golden Gate
Country Club Wednesday afternoon.
Tangalin was the only golfer to break 50
on the day.
South City was led by Adriana Zhang He
and Francis Buendia, who both shot 57s.
Girls tennis
Sacred Heart Prep 4, Carlmont 3
The Gators improved to 3-0 on the season
with a tight victory over the Scots in
Atherton Wednesday.
SHP swept all four singles spots, while
Carlmont dominated the doubles, winning
all three matches.
Sara Choy and Melina Stavropoulos, the
Gators No. 1 and No.4 singles players,
respectively, each dropped only one game
in straight-set wins, 6-0, 6-1 in both cases.
Tuesday
Volleyball
Westmoor defeats Balboa
The Rams (4-2) dropped their rst set, but
rallied back with three straight to top
Balboa Tuesday, 16-25, 25-16, 25-20, 25-
21.
West moor seni or Roni Ni ever a
paced her squad with 11 ki l l s. Seni or
Marlene Alcantara had 41 digs and
Megan Ho had 14 assi st s.
Sacred Heart Prep defeats Sequoia
The Gators needed four sets, but they
eventually got over on the Cherokees, 25-
12, 21-25, 25-19, 25-17.
Victoria Garrick continues her hot play
early in the season, leading SHP (5-2 over-
all) with 22 kills and 20 digs. Ara Peterson
added 11 kills and four blocks.
Natalie Marshall had 27 assists and
Jorden Schreeder nished with 26 digs.
Girls golf
Sacred Heart Prep 237, Leland 238
The Gators held off the Chargers by a
stroke at Sharon Heights Golf and Country
Club in their season opener.
SHP senior Jessica Koenig had low-round
honors with a 6-over 42, one shot better
than Lelands Nicole Winiecki.
Lauren von Thaden and Sinead Haley also
had rounds in the 40s for the Gators, shoot-
ing 45 and 49, respectively.
St.Ignatius 213,Notre Dame-Belmont 290
Notre Dame opened West Catholic
Athletic League play with a loss to the
Wildcats at Crystal Springs Golf Course.
St. Ignatius Sam Gong red a 2-over 38
to earn low medalist honors.
Emily Hens led the Tigers with a 49.
The loss drops Notre Dame to 0-2 on the
season.
College golf
Caada wins at Moffett Field
The Caada College womens golf team
won its second Coast Conference matchup
of the season, topping three other teams at
Moffett Field Tuesday.
Caada (552) improves its record to 1-1,
topping Reedley (354), Fresno City (424)
and West Hills (did not qualify).
Reedleys Alana Loyd took the individual
gold on the par-73 course, shooting a 76 on
the day. Caadas Miranda Wiss paced her
team with an 81 with Sabrina Souryasack
nished with an 86.
College volleyball
Menlo College sweeps Holy Names
The Oaks (4-4) won their second straight
with a 25-23, 25-14, 25-21 victory over
Holy Names Tuesday in Atherton.
Courtney Calicdan scored a match-high
14 kills for Menlo and also tabbed 15 digs.
Bailey Gomez added eight kills and Renn
Isobe had 12 digs.
Holy Names is a Division II program. The
team competed in the NAIA California
Pacic Conference with Menlo until 2011
until it transitioned to D-II status.
Monday
Girls golf
San Mateos Sangha
takes tournament title
Aman Sangha, a junior at San Mateo,
shot a 4-under 67 to capture the Helen
Lengfeld Memorial Golf Tournament at San
Mateos Poplar Creek.
Sponsored by the Pacic Womens Golf
Association and the Womens Golf
Association of Northern California, the
tournament featured 15 teams and 90
golfers from the Central Coast Section.
St. Francis took home the team title with
a ve-golfer score of 423, three strokes
better than runner-up Gunn.
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Local sports roundup
SPORTS 13
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO Avisail Garcia
drove in two runs with a bases-
loaded single in the eighth
inning, and the Chicago White
Sox beat the struggling Oakland
Athletics 2-1 on Wednesday night.
The Athletics were in line for the
win after Jeff Samardzija threw
seven scoreless innings, and Adam
Dunn singled in a run against his
former team.
Instead, they lost for the 10th
time in 13 games because the
bullpen failed again to protect a
lead.
Luke Gregerson (4-4) came on in
the eighth, and things quickly fell
apart.
It was the third time in four
games that the Athletics bullpen
blew a lead.
Gregerson gave up a leadoff sin-
gle to Carlos Sanchez, and rst
baseman Nate Freiman threw wild-
ly trying to force pinch-runner
Leury Garcia at second after eld-
ing Adam Eatons grounder.
The runners moved to second and
third with one out when Gregerson
bounced an 0-2 pitch to Jose Abreu
before striking him out. He inten-
tionally walked Conor Gillaspie
to load the bases, and Garcia lined
a pitch up the middle for a two-run
single that made it 2-1.
The late rally made a winner of
Zach Putnam (5-3), who pitched a
scoreless inning. Jake Petricka
worked the ninth for his 12th save
in 15 chances.
Samardzija looked sharp in his
first start in Chicago since the
Cubs traded him to Oakland on
July 5. He gave up six hits, struck
out six and walked two.
White Sox rookie Chris Bassitt
was almost as good.
In his second major league start,
the right-hander gave up one run
and ve hits. He left to loud cheers
after Derek Norris led off the sev-
enth with a broken-bat single.
As falling apart
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Four pitch-
ers combined on a two-hitter and
Gregor Blanco had an RBI double as
part of a four-run seventh inning
that sent the San Francisco Giants
to a 5-0 win over the Arizona
Diamondbacks on Wednesday
night.
Hunter Pence drew a leadoff walk
from Arizona reliever Oliver Perez
(3-4) to jump-start the Giants
offense. Blanco fell behind 1-2 and
fouled off two consecutive pitches
before lining a double past diving
rst baseman Mark Trumbo.
Diamondbacks right elder
Alfredo Marte fumbled the ball as it
ricocheted off the wall near
Arizona's bullpen, allowing Pence
to score without a throw. Pinch-hit-
ter Matt Duffy then doubled off Evan
Marshall to drive in Blanco.
Jean Machi (7-1) retired the only
batter he faced for the win, and the
Giants remained 2 1-2 games behind
the rst-place Los Angeles Dodgers
in the NLWest.
The late scoring surge extended
San Francisco's winning streak at
home to a season-high eight games.
It also broke up what had been a
stellar matchup of both teams'
pitching staffs.
Diamondbacks starter Josh
Collmenter pitched six scoreless
innings. He struck out three, walked
two and has allowed one run or fewer
in each of his last four starts.
San Francisco's Ryan Vogelsong
gave up just two hits in 6 1-3
innings and, like Collmenter, ended
up with a no-decision. Coming off
his worst start of the season,
Vogelsong struck out three and
walked ve.
Jeremy Affeldt pitched the eighth
and Sergio Romo worked the ninth.
The Giants had only three hits
all singles before breaking out
against Arizona's bullpen.
Brandon Crawford scored on a
wild pitch and Angel Pagan added a
sacrice y in the seventh. Travis
Ishikawa's RBI single in the eighth
made it 5-0.
Giants win with late rally
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Frank Gore
wants those around him to notice
just how hard hes running at age
31, seemingly as energetic as ever
when everybody is beginning to
question when he will slow down.
Or break down.
Ask him how his body is hold-
ing up, how he feels, and Gore
quickly offers a good-natured
retort: You tell me how I look.
So far in 2014, no words neces-
sary. The veteran San Francisco
running back reached another
milestone in Week 1, becoming
the 29th player in NFL history to
run for 10,000 yards and just
the 10th to accomplish the feat
while playing for the same team
for at least 10 seasons.
Yeah, its crazy. I try not to
think about, Gore said of being a
30-something veteran. I try to
still be a young guy on the eld. I
just try to look better than the
other guys, whoever stayed at 10
(years) or if
t h e y r e
younger.
D e s p i t e
Gores youthful
spirit, the
49ers still face
a delicate bal-
ance between
keeping him
fresh and giv-
ing rookie Carlos Hyde chances.
Even with an heir apparent at the
ready, Gore isnt ready to say this
season will be his last. Theres
still so much he wants to prove,
not to mention the unfinished
business of winning a Super Bowl.
I train hard, Gore said. I still
love it. Im still having fun with
it.
Gore produced his seventh
1,000-yard performance in nine
NFL seasons last year, rushing for
1,128 yards and nine touchdowns
one off his career high set in
2009.
He looks good, and he looks
that way every year, running
backs coach Tom Rathman said.
It doesnt surprise us. The bottom
line is weve got to keep him at
that throughout the season. He
knows that. Its hard to go through
a whole season and take the pound-
ing and not having help. Gosh, if
anybody can do it, it would be
Frank Gore. You love what youre
getting from him, you know what
youre getting from him.
Gore passed late Hall of Famer
Joe Perry to become the Niners
all-time leading rusher in 2011.
The 49ers are likely to go with
the hot hand and some combina-
tion of Gore and Hyde as they did
in a season-opening win at Dallas.
Gores rst step, foot speed and
explosiveness havent changed
much.
Gore received more congratula-
tory messages than he could
count.
A lot of people were happy for
me, especially the type of career I
had, coming from college, with
two ACLs, two shoulders and a hip
(injury), he said Wednesday.
Gore still out to prove himself
Frank Gore
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA The San
Francisco 49ers suspended veteran
broadcaster Ted Robinson on
Wednesday night for two upcoming
games following comments this
week to a San Francisco radio station
about the Ray Rice domestic violence
case that were deemed insensitive.
The Pac-12 Networks also
announced late Wednesday it had sus-
pended Robinson for the next two
weeks and that he would undergo sen-
sitivity training. The 57-year-old
Robinson spoke to KNBR radio on
Monday and said Rices now-wife,
Janay, was partly to blame for not
speaking up.
That, to me, is the saddest part of
it, he told the station.
The issue of domestic violence is
particularly sensitive for the 49ers,
who recently had one of their players
arrested on suspicion of domestic
v i o l e n c e .
Defensive tackle
Ray McDonald
has continued to
practice and play
since his Aug. 31
arrest while cele-
brating his 30th
birthday with
friends and team-
mates at his
home. CEO Jed York and coach Jim
Harbaugh have said they will let due
process play out before making a
decision about McDonald, while reit-
erating they have zero tolerance for
domestic violence.
Robinson issued apologies
through the 49ers and Pac-12
Networks.
I want to unconditionally apolo-
gize for my comments the other day,
Robinson said. As a professional
communicator, I am responsible for
my words. My choice of words was
careless and does not reect my true
feelings about domestic violence. I
understand that the cycle of abuse
keeps people in unhealthy relation-
ships. No blame or responsibility
should ever be placed on a victim.
In a statement, 49ers President
Paraag Marathe said he told
Robinson of the decision earlier
Wednesday.
The comments made by radio
broadcaster Ted Robinson on
Monday were offensive and in no way
reect the views of the San Francisco
49ers organization. We have made
the decision to suspend him for the
next two games. I informed Ted of our
decision earlier today, and we will
continue to address this matter with
him internally. Our organization
stands strongly against domestic
violence and will not tolerate com-
ments such as these.
Radio announcer Ted Robinson
suspended for Rice comments
Ted Robinson
White Sox 2, As 1
Giants 5, Dbacks 0
SPORTS 14
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league ofcial had seen the video before
Monday.
We have no knowledge of this, NFL
spokesman Brian McCarthy said Wednesday.
We are not aware of anyone in our ofce who
possessed or saw the video before it was made
public on Monday. We will look into it.
Goodell, who was supposed to attend an
award ceremony for Panthers owner Jerry
Richardson in Charlotte Wednesday night, did
not attend the event and instead changed his
plans and headed back to New York.
The law enforcement ofcial said he sent a
DVD copy of the security camera video to an
NFL ofce and included his contact informa-
tion. He asked the AP not to release the name
of the NFLexecutive for fear that the informa-
tion would identify the law enforcement of-
cial as the source.Goodell initially suspended
Rice for two games following the February
incident, but the Ravens released Rice on
Monday and the NFL suspended him inde-
nitely after TMZ released the video.
Goodell told CBS on Tuesday that no one
in the NFL, to my knowledge had seen a new
video of what happened on the elevator until it
was posted online.
We assumed that there was a video. We
asked for video. But we were never granted that
opportunity, Goodell said.
In a memo to the NFLs 32 teams on
Wednesday, Goodell said that the league asked
law enforcement for the video, but not the
casino. In the context of a criminal investi-
gation, information obtained outside of law
enforcement that has not been tested by pros-
ecutors or by the court system is not necessar-
ily a reliable basis for imposing league disci-
pline, he wrote.
A video shown to the AP on Monday is
slightly longer than the TMZ version, and
includes some audio.
Rice and Janay Palmer now Janay Rice
can be heard shouting obscenities at each
other, and she appears to spit at Rice right
before he throws a brutal punch. After she col-
lapses, he drags her out of the elevator and is
met by some hotel staff. One of them can be
heard saying, Shes drunk, right? And then,
No cops.
Rice had been charged with felony aggravat-
ed assault in the case, but in May he was
accepted into a pretrial intervention program
that allowed him to avoid jail time and could
lead to the charge being purged from his
record. Aprominent New Jersey lawmaker has
called for that decision to be reviewed.
Hours after portions of the video were made
public by TMZ, Goodell suspended Rice indef-
initely and Baltimore terminated his contract.
He had originally been suspended for two
games, and team ofcials had praised him for
his apologies and actions after his arrest for
aggravated assault.
Goodell and team ofcials said they were
taking more severe action because of the vio-
lence in the video.
Pressure mounted from outside the NFL
Wednesday even before the law enforcement
ofcials account was published. Twelve
Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee
sent Goodell a letter calling for greater trans-
parency from the NFL, and Republican Sen.
Dean Heller of Nevada said Goodell had not
acted swiftly enough to punish Rice.
Continued from page 11
VIDEO
[The school district said] its going to
happen at the end of May (2013) and then
May came and went, June came and went,
Scheller said.
When he was told the construction would
begin this past May, he was skeptical. But
when the work started, he was left scram-
bling. Scheller said one construction of-
cial told him, unofcially, there was a good
possibility one side of the bleachers would
be ready in time for Saturdays game and
Scheller took him at his word, only to nd
out it wont be ready for Lynbrook.
I got excited, Scheller said. People at
the district said that I went out and tried to
get the construction company to nish
early. I never should have taken [the con-
struction workers] word for it.
[The district] always said its not sup-
posed to be ready until Oct. 10. They said
it would take four-and-a-half to ve months
(to complete the project).
San Mateo is not the only school experi-
encing construction issues. Burlingame is
in the same predicament as the Bearcats.
The Panthers rst six games are all on the
road and Scheller said Burlingame coach
John Philipopolous told him earlier this
week that the construction at Burlingame
was behind schedule.
***
The Ray Rice situation has put a spot-
light not only on professional football,
but all professional sports.
I have two suggestions to clean up pro
sports: One, get rid of commissioners.
There is not an unbiased bone in the bodies
of Roger Goodell (commissioner, NFL),
Bud Selig (MLB) or Adam Silver (NBA).
The commissioners of the big three
sports are not objective arbiters of their
sports. They are hired by owners of the
teams in their respective leagues and the
commissioners essentially work for the
owners, not for the betterment of the
league or its players.
Its time these professional entities hire
autonomous people to lead these sports.
Leaders who will do what is best for the
players, owner and most importantly
society. People are sick and tired of seeing
professional athletes make a mockery of
the legal system (which is a big part of the
problem as well) and the fans.
My second suggestion is every team
needs to write into players contracts that
any kind of arrest results in a paid suspen-
sion until the legal system has made a deci-
sion to le charges or not. If charges are
led, that player remains suspended until
the legal proceedings play out. And
depending on the severity of the crime,
dole out punishment accordingly.
If no charges are led, theyre free to
play. Seems simple enough to me.
The term due process has been thrown
around a lot recently especially by the
San Francisco 49ers brass in the wake of
defensive lineman Ray McDonalds arrest
on suspicion of domestic assault.
But due process refers only to the legal
system. There is nothing to say a company
including professional sports teams
cant put tougher restrictions on their
employees when it comes to run-ins with
the law. Maybe that would be an entice-
ment for players to think more carefully
about their decisions.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by phone: 344-5200
ext. 117 or by email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com.
You can follow him on Twitter@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
SPORTS 15
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 86 59 .593
Toronto 76 69 .524 10
New York 74 69 .517 11
Tampa Bay 70 76 .479 16 1/2
Boston 63 83 .432 23 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 80 64 .556
Detroit 80 66 .548 1
Cleveland 74 69 .517 5 1/2
Chicago 65 80 .448 15 1/2
Minnesota 62 82 .431 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 90 55 .621
As 81 64 .559 9
Seattle 79 66 .545 11
Houston 65 81 .445 25 1/2
Texas 54 91 .372 36
Wednesdays Games
Minnesota 4, Cleveland 3
Tampa Bay 4, N.Y. Yankees 3
Toronto 9, Chicago Cubs 2
Detroit 4, Kansas City 2
Baltimore 4, Boston 1
L.A. Angels 9, Texas 3
Oakland 11, Chicago White Sox 2
Houston 2, Seattle 1
Thursdays Games
Minnesota (Gibson 11-10) at Cleveland (Kluber
14-9), 9:05 a.m., 1st game
Oakland (Kazmir 14-7) at Chicago White Sox (Sale
11-3), 11:10 a.m.
Minnesota (Nolasco 5-10) at Cleveland (House
2-3), 12:35 p.m., 2nd game
Tampa Bay (Cobb 9-7) at N.Y.Yankees (Pineda 3-
4), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Cor.Rasmus 3-1) at Texas (N.Martinez
3-10), 5:05 p.m.
Boston (Buchholz 7-8) at Kansas City (Hendriks
1-1), 5:10 p.m.
Fridays Games
N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 10:05 a.m., 1st game
N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m., 2nd game
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 4:08 p.m.
Atlanta at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Boston at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 82 61 .573
Atlanta 74 71 .510 9
Miami 71 72 .497 11
New York 70 75 .483 13
Philadelphia 67 77 .465 15 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 80 65 .552
Pittsburgh 75 69 .521 4 1/2
Milwaukee 74 71 .510 6
Cincinnati 68 77 .469 12
Chicago 64 81 .441 16
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 83 63 .568
Giants 80 65 .552 2 1/2
San Diego 67 78 .462 15 1/2
Arizona 59 86 .407 23 1/2
Colorado 59 87 .404 24
Wednesdays Games
Atlanta 6, Washington 2
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 3
Toronto 11, Chicago Cubs 1
N.Y. Mets 2, Colorado 0
Cincinnati 4, St. Louis 2
Milwaukee 4, Miami 1
L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 0
San Francisco 5, Arizona 0
Thursdays Games
St. Louis (Lynn 15-8) at Cincinnati (Cueto 17-8),
9:35 a.m.
Arizona (Delgado 3-3) at San Francisco (Peavy 4-
4), 12:45 p.m.
Pittsburgh (F.Liriano 4-10) at Philadelphia (A.Bur-
nett 8-15), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (Roark 12-10) at N.Y. Mets (B.Colon
13-11), 4:10 p.m.
Miami (Eovaldi 6-10) at Milwaukee (Fiers 5-2),
5:10 p.m.
Fridays Games
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.
NL GLANCE AL GLANCE
Thursday
Volleyball
Washington at Sequoia,5:30 p.m.; Menlo-Atherton
at LosGatos,6:30p.m.;Burlingameat LosAltos,6:45
p.m.
Girls tennis
Menlo-Atherton at Hillsdale,Sequoia at Woodside,
Burlingameat Carlmont,Aragonat SanMateo,Terra
Nova at Capuchino, El Camino at Oceana, Half
Moon Bay at South City, Mills at Westmoor, 4 p.m.
Friday
Football
Los Gatos at Menlo-Atherton, 3:30 p.m.; Sacred
Heart Prep at Riordan, 4 p.m.; Albany vs. Jefferson
at Albany Middle School, 6:30 p.m.; St. Ignatius at
Terra Nova,Burlingame at Leland,Sequoia at Valley
Center, Santa Clara at Half Moon Bay, Lincoln-SF at
Hillsdale,Capuchinoat SouthCity,SanJoseat Kings
Academy, Serra at Notre Dame-Sherman Oaks, 7
p.m.; Carlmont at Gunn, 7:30 p.m.
WHATS ON TAP
Shes a good player, Wright
said. Great arm, great accuracy.
Good all-around player. Shell
probably be our leading scorer
again this year.
Chung is one of two Sonora
High School products in the CSM
mix this season, along with soph-
omore defender Kacee Johnson;
and together they are two of just
three returning Bulldogs players.
But with six players making
their collegiate debut Wednesday,
CSM had reason for optimism
with the performance of freshman
Tayler OConnor.
OConnor is not the typical
freshman. For starters, she is 26
years old. After graduating from
Long Beach State where she
competed in track and eld she
returned to CSM to take prerequi-
site classes in nursing. In her rst
time in a competitive water polo
match in quite some time, the left-
hander scored four goals against
Delta, including the rst of CSMs
season from close range on an
assist from freshman Molly
McEvoy.
Not that OConnor is new to the
pool. Before graduating from
Mercy-Burlingame in 2006,
OConnor played the sport for four
years and was named the 2006
Daily Journal Girls Water Polo
Player of the Year after leading the
Peninsula Athletic League with 88
goals as a senior.
She is a very solid player,
Wright said. Its taken a little
while to get her feet back wet
but [she has] been out of the water
for ve years.
And Wright is optimistic about
the dual threat CSM has in Chung
and OConnor.
They work really well togeth-
er, Wright said. Two live arms
mobile. It gives me the opportuni-
ty to do a variety of different
things in terms of our offense.
Neither of them are going to go in
there and bang and be a big cen-
ter threat. But with their mobility
and their athleticism, they have
the ability to create some opportu-
nities inside.
Deltas defense controlled the
inside all day Wednesday. As testa-
ment to the Mustangs depth, they
employed three different goal-
keepers in the match while manag-
ing to keep the scoring balanced
throughout. CSM scored ve goals
in the rst half against starting
keeper Lindey Kieffer. In the sec-
ond half, facing keepers Taylor
Brown and Dallyce Marglon, the
Bulldogs scored six times.
We ran out of steam, Wright
said. I knew the game-play speed
would be a problem in the second
half. Its not back to the drawing
board, but in terms of team cohe-
siveness and team work, the
defense has to be shored up
instantly. Everybody has an idea,
but nobody has an idea of how to
do it with each other.
A symptom of six newcomers,
but Wright expects the Bulldogs to
do their fair share of scoring this
season.
Theres plenty of teams well
be able to throw up an eight-goal
difference and win on them this
year, Wright said. But if you do
that, you dont understand exactly
what you need to do to be success-
ful. It comes too easy. Im not say-
ing it came really easy for Delta.
At times it came too easy.
Continued from page 11
CSM
Thursdays game
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 5:25 p.m.
Sundays games
Dallas at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
New England at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Miami at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Washington, 10 a.m.
Arizona at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Atlanta at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Detroit at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 1:05 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 1:25 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 1:25 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Green Bay, 1:25 p.m.
Chicago at San Francisco, 5:30 p.m.
Mondays game
Philadelphia at Indianapolis, 5:30 p.m.
NFL SCHEDULE
It was just a crazy feeling as soon
as I heard it, Tuivailala said. I knew
in the back of my head maybe
theres a chance, but obviously I did-
nt want to look into the future and
get my expectations up there. I knew
if I just competed one day at a time,
maybe Id get my chance.
The move makes sense, as
Tuivailala would have been eligible
for the Rule 5 Draft essentially an
off-season waiver selection process
had he not been added to the
teams 40-man roster by December.
What created a dicey situation for
the Cards, however, is the electric
right arm of Tuivailala, which has
touched 100 mph this season, was-
nt groomed on the ordinary ve-
year timetable allotted to minor
league players before being exposed
to the Rule 5 Draft.
Drafted as an inelder in 2010,
Tuivailala did not convert to the
mound until midway through the
2012 season.
Well, hes on the roster now, and
thats the most important thing to
remember, LaRoque said. So, hes
a big part of the organization and
were very pleased for him. And to
know hes done it in two years, its
really a credit to him.
Entering this season, the results
were less than stellar as he accrued a
5.03 ERA through his rst two pro
seasons as a pitcher. The strikeout
numbers were always there through
that time though, as he fanned 73 in
48 1/3 innings.
Learning how to handle the fail-
ures of it daily actually helps you
become more successful and hes
really made the attempt to do that,
LaRoque said. Its still a work in
progress, we know that. And hes
been great with it.
This year, he quickly rened his
best two pitches with a fastball sit-
ting mid-90s and a breaking ball
clocking as low as 80 mph. He has
also worked to incorporate a circle
changeup into his repertoire.
Ill get by batters with my fast-
ball, but as you move up its going
to be a lot harder, Tuivailala said.
Obviously, like [Tuesday] night,
guys can hit the fastball. Everything
is still a work in progress. Its come
along really well and Im glad.
When he made his major league
debut Tuesday against the Reds, he
stuck to his one-two punch, throw-
ing mostly four-seem fastballs while
mixing in two curveballs. And
though he gave up two runs on three
hits, he did record his rst big-league
strikeout against Donald Lutz.
Tuivailala is now just two strikeouts
shy of the 100-strikeout plateau
between the minors and majors this
season.
I felt good, Tuivailala said. I
was relaxed a little bit, just kept
breathing. I was just trying to soak
it in and just trying to have fun out
there. I feel like I pitched well.
Obviously, the results werent there.
But I was just glad to get my feet
wet.
Continued from page 11
CALL UP
16
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Many of us have one room in the house
that doesnt really have a job. Maybe we set
it up with an air bed once in a while for
guests, or shove out-of-season clothing
boxes in there, or use it as a holding zone
for stuff were not sure what to do with.
But when your house is on the market,
every room has a role to play to make the
sale. Next to fixing whatevers broken,
staging decorating rooms in an inviting
way to help people imagine living in them
is important.
The purpose of home staging is to draw
the buyers into the house emotionally so
they say, Wow, we want to live here! says
Melinda Bartling, a real-estate agent and
home stager in Overland Park, Kansas.
Buyers must be able to see themselves
living in the house, not questioning why it
looks the way it does. For example, if you
use your nished basement as a catch-all,
buyers will wonder whats wrong with the
space.
New York-based real-estate agent Nathalie
Clarks motto is minimalism with person-
ality.
The owners presence must be as discreet
as possible, but the rooms have to feel
inhabited and should clearly state their
function, she says.
Some ideas from stagers on what to do
with an unused space:
MAKE IT A CLOSET
Everyone wants good storage. Turn a
potential shortcoming into a valuable fea-
ture by transforming a small room into a
large closet or dressing room.
Install a shelving system; if moneys an
issue, just outt one long wall to achieve
the purpose. Add a chair or ottoman and a
large mirror, perhaps, so buyers can imag-
ine a dressing room.
If your home is short on storage, consid-
er outtting an under-stair niche or other
dead space with shelving, and stock the
shelves with smart-looking boxes and
bins.
But leave some empty space in a closet,
t oo.
Closets filled with items other than
clothes send the message there isnt enough
storage in the house, says Bartling.
MAKE IT CREATIVE
Transform a bedroom with a tiny closet
into creative workspace. Suggest a craft or
art studio with a table and some neatly dis-
played materials. Line up a series of identi-
cal bookshelves and make a small yet invit-
ing library by adding a rug, a comfortable
chair and a side table.
MAKE IT AN OFFICE
Real-estate agents tend to prefer that bed-
rooms be staged as bedrooms, because buy-
ers usually want lots of those. But depend-
ing on your market, it may pay off to stage
one of those rooms as a home ofce.
If youve got more than four bedrooms,
Clark says, turn one into a home ofce. In a
four-bedroom home, use the room farthest
from a bathroom, she advises.
Add a desk, chair and lamp, and lay down
a fresh new rug in either a chic neutral hue or
a style-savvy pattern that ties it into neigh-
boring rooms.
MAKE IT A WORKOUT SPACE
Empty nesters often have basements that
once were playrooms. Clark suggests con-
verting a space like that into a cozy TV
room or gym.
For a gym, you dont need a lot of fancy
equipment, she says. Abench, some neat-
ly stacked weights, a few ropes or bands
hung on pretty hooks, a mirror and a mat
can all easily be arranged to create a power-
ful visual effect.
Sellers, give every room a role
Turn a potential shortcoming into a valuable feature by transforming a small room into a
large closet or dressing room.
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Competition and conict have existed
between people and animals since the
rst gardeners began sowing seeds on
the ground. The critters just as quickly
carried them away.
But coexisting with wildlife in farm
elds or gardens can be a winning
proposition if youre willing to alter
your habitat. Even nuisance animals can
become plant partners with a little plan-
ning.
You can steer your way around a lot of
the usual wildlife-property owner con-
frontations, said Robert Pierce, an
extension sheries and wildlife special-
ist with the University of Missouri.
Do some homework about animal
behavior, Pierce said. Know where
raccoons or deer traditionally utilize
cover or use trafc lanes. Its common
sense that you wouldnt want to plant
gardens in those areas.
And sharing property with wild birds
and animals doesnt necessarily mean
reducing the size of your harvest, said
Tammi Hartung, author of the new The
Wildlife-Friendly Vegetable Gardener
(Storey Publishing).
Welcome pollinators into the gar-
den, Hartung said. Invite animals that
can do your pest management. That will
actually increase your yields in many
cases.
Almost any wildlife species can
become a nuisance, Pierce said. Canada
goose droppings are messy and poten-
tial health hazards. Moles damage
lawns. Squirrels eat freshly planted
bulbs. Small rodents like voles will
strip the bark from grapevines. Feral
hogs damage pastures.
Tolerance levels vary, Pierce said.
Lots of folks just enjoy wildlife and
like having them around. Much depends
upon whether you have the money to
invest to keep them away from your
plants.
The most benign ways to keep
wildlife away from the garden include
repellents, frightening techniques,
rotating crops, decoy plants, fencing,
netting and other barriers.
Consider:
Being proactive. Before the rasp-
berries ripen, put up some tape or nets
so the birds will never taste them and
wont know what theyre missing,
Hartung said.
Modifying food and cover. We have
30 deer coming through our property
every day, she said. The deer wouldnt
leave my tulips alone, so I dont grow
tulips anymore. I grow (deer-resistant)
daffodils instead.
Distractions. Parsley redirects rab-
bits from salad greens, Hartung said.
Plant some sunowers next to your
berry patch. Many birds prefer their
seeds to the fruit.
Growing a surplus for sharing. Add
hedgerows outside the garden that
include fruiting trees and shrubs.
The hose. We use a motion-detector
apparatus that hooks up to a hose,
Hartung said. It sprays water when it
detects motion. When raccoons come at
night, they get a hard spray of water. It
doesnt do them any harm but they stay
away.
Wildlife-friendly gardening has its
challenges, but you can co-exist for the
most part, she said.
Something like a bear may show up
and youll have to deal with it, Hartung
said. Maybe then its as easy as pick-
ing up some fallen fruit and discarding it
someplace else.
You dont really need to trap animals,
use toxic chemicals or shoot them, she
said. You can nd other solutions.
Kindness to wildlife canpay off in the garden
Wildlife-friendly gardening has its challenges, but you can co-exist for the most part
18
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
If the food was canned safely, it should remain safe indenitely.
By Dean Fosdick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Acanners garden is not your typical veg-
etable patch. With its full-scale production,
distinctive varieties and four-season har-
vests, its more for the future than the
moment.
Canners gardens arent really so differ-
ent in what they grow. Where theyre really
different is in how much they grow, said
Daniel Gasteiger, author of Yes You Can!
And Freeze and Dry It, Too (Cool Springs
Press, 2011).
Do some serious planning, said
Gasteiger, of Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.
How often do I serve corn? How often do I
serve broccoli? Then consider how often
youll use it in the form youll use to pre-
serve it. I use broccoli much more often
fresh than I do frozen.
The biggest challenge facing food preser-
vationists tends to be determining how
much to grow. The Louisiana State
University AgCenter has created a vegetable
production chart for expected crop yields
per 100-foot rows of:
Lima beans (Bush): 1 bushel shelled or 32
pounds
Beets: 100 pounds
Cabbage: 85 heads
Corn: 120 ears
Pepper (Bell): 125 pounds
Squash (Winter): 150 pounds
Cucumbers: 170 pounds
Strawberries: 170 pounds
Tomatoes (Slicers) 250 pounds
If you only have a 50-foot row of a crop,
cut the posted yield in half, LSU says. If you
have a 10-foot row, then use one-tenth of
the posted yield.
The smaller your space, the more impor-
tant it is to use succession gardening,
Gasteiger said. That means planting a sec-
ond crop in the same space after the rst one
is harvested. Shop for short-season vari-
eties if planting successive crops.
Also, choose cultivars carefully. Some are
better than others for canning, freezing or
dehydrating.
If youre going to plant to preserve,
youll probably want the highest density
(yielding) producers you can get, Gasteiger
said. Canning tomatoes are typically much
rmer and less avorful than slicing toma-
toes, but better (for canning) because they
hold together when cooked.
How long do canned foods last?
If the food was canned safely, it should
remain safe indefinitely. No pathogens
should grow on them, said Jeanne Brandt, a
professor and Master Food Preserver coordi-
nator with Oregon State University. That
program trains and certies volunteers who
help county Extension staff provide food
safety and preservation information.
Try not to preserve more than you can
consume in a year or two though because the
quality deteriorates, Brandt said. It breaks
down in the jar. It toughens. The color also
changes dramatically.
Kimberly Culbertson of Hillsboro,
Oregon, is a Master Gardener who later
earned a Master Food Preserver certicate.
I got into preserving in part because its
a step up from gardening, she said. I used
to be in a rush to give away any surplus fresh
vegetables before theyd spoil. Now, as
canned, I can share them throughout the
year.
She also recommends freezing, pickling
and dehydrating as a way of preserving dif-
ferent food groups and offering up different
avors.
Canners garden is more
for the future than now
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
acted recklessly when he arrived at
Yanira Serranos home alone and had
no reasonable cause to shoot her in the
June 3 incident.
San Mateo County District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe declined to le crimi-
nal charges in the case last month,
writing in a letter to Sheriff Greg
Munks that Serrano ran screaming
toward Trieu holding a 10-and-a-half-
inch kitchen knife over her head.
The complaint, however, disputes
that version of events, calling the
knife a paring knife and said because
Serrano was obese and disabled with an
atrophied leg, she could not meaning-
fully run and limped badly.
Trieu first responded to the
Moonridge housing complex on
Miramontes Point Road at about 9:30
p.m. on June 3 after Serranos brother,
Lorenzo Serrano, called 911 to report
that his sister had refused to take her
medication and was yelling at his par-
ents but was not violent.
According to the complaint,
Lorenzo Serrano told the 911 dispatch-
er, this is not really an emergency,
Im calling because my sister has
schizophrenia and specifically
requested a medical response.
Trieu was the rst to arrive at the
home after two other deputies got lost
on their way, according to the com-
plaint. When he got out of his patrol
car, the family was inside.
The complaint criticizes Trieu for
not waiting for other deputies to arrive
before getting out of his car, arguing
that standard police training required
him to wait, that there was no immedi-
ate danger and that his arrival could
contribute to the deterioration of
Yanira Serranos state of mind.
She came out of the home holding a
knife that she had been using to cut
fruit, according to the complaint. She
hobbled toward him and he moved
away, but when she came within 10
feet of him, he shot her once in the
chest.
Wagstaffes letter disputes this inter-
pretation of events.
She ran towards the deputy, scream-
ing in what can be described as a pri-
mal, incoherent and garbled tone,
Wagstaffe wrote.
Trieu repeatedly yelled at her to stop
and retreated into the street, looking
for his partner who hadnt arrived.
Trieu did not have time to unholster
his Taser before Yanira would reach
him as he ran backwards and she was
wearing a large sweater that might
have prevented the Taser from work-
ing, so he red his gun, according to
Wagstaffe.
The shooting happened about 30
seconds after Trieu arrived at the home.
He called for medical aid but she died
within minutes.
Wagstaffe said witnesses corroborat-
ed Trieus version of events, describ-
ing Yanira Serrano as swearing in
Spanish as she moved toward the
deputy and saying, You are not going
to take me! You are not going to take
me!
The district attorney concluded that
Trieus life was legitimately in danger
and despite his knowledge of her men-
tal illness, he had no non-lethal way of
preventing her attack.
Yanira Serranos parents and brother
watched the shooting and, according
to the complaint, Trieu prohibited
them from comforting her as she died,
pointing his handgun at them and
telling them to stay away.
The family is seeking unspecied
damages from Trieu and the county for
excessive force and unreasonable
seizure and a substantive due process
violation.
Continued from page 1
SERRANO
THURSDAY, SEPT. 11
Red Cross Blood Donation. 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Notre Dame High School,
1540 Ralston Ave., Belmont. For
more information call (800) 733-
2767.
Start and Grow Smart- Starting a
Business. 9 a.m. to Noon. Sobrato
Center for Nonprofits, 350 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Redwood City.
Registration is $25 for unemployed
and $60 for employed. For more
information go to
www.phase2careers.org.
Lifetree Cafe Conversations: How
to Sniff Out a Scam. 9:15 a.m. to
10:15 a.m. Bethany Lutheran Church,
1095 Cloud Ave., Menlo Park. Lifetree
Cafe Menlo Park hosts an hour-long
conversation discussing how to
avoid being folled by fake charities.
Complimentary snacks and bever-
ages will be served. For more infor-
mation call 854-5897 or go to life-
treecafemp@gmail.com.
San Carlos Library Quilting Club.
10 a.m. to noon. San Carlos Library,
610 Elm St., San Carlos. For more
information call 591-0341 ext. 237.
Peninsula Chorallers. 10 a.m.
Millbrae Recreation Center. For more
information call 593-4287.
Non-Fiction Book Club. 11 a.m. to
noon. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
Rotary Club of Half Moon Bay
Lunch. Noon to 1:30 p.m.
Portuguese Center, 724 Kelly St., Half
Moon Bay. Club member Kendall
Flint speaks on Connect the
Coastside. $25 contribution at the
door. For more information contact
kint@intstrategies.com.
Rotary Club of South San
Francisco presents Vinney Arora.
Noon to 1:30 p.m. Basque Cultural
Center, 599 Railroad Ave., South San
Francisco. Director for Individual
Giving Vinney Arora will speak about
substance abuse and foster children.
For more information contact
Angela Encarnacion at aencarna-
cion@abc-seniors.com.
Senior Center Event 12 Years a
Slave. 1 p.m. City of San Mateo
Senior Center, 2645 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Free. For more
information 522-7490.
Doctor Who Party. 4 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Celebrate the new season
with crafts, games and food. Free. For
more information email
belmont@smcl.org.
Pet Loss Support Group. 7 p.m. to
8:30 p.m. Center for Compassion,
1450 Rollins Road, Burlingame. For
more information call 340-7022 ext.
344.
Food Addicts in Recovery
Anonymous. 7:30 p.m. 1500 Easton
Drive, Burlingame. For more informa-
tion call (781) 932-6300 or visit
www.foodaddicts.org.
Spaceballs (PG). 7:45 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation call 780-7311.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 12
Current status of the Polio Plus
Program. 7:30 a.m. Crystal Springs
Golf Course, 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. Features guest speaker
Bruce Aylward, Assistant Director of
General Polio, Emergencies and
Country Collaboration at the World
Health Organization. Sponsored by
the San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club.
Fee $15, breakfast included. For
more information or to RSVP call
515-5891.
Red Cross Blood Donation. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Imperva, 3400 Bridge
Parkway, Redwood City. For more
information call (800) 733-2767.
Variety Show with Emcee Raoul
Epling and Chicken Cordon Bleu
Lunch. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Tickets
available at the front desk. For more
information call 616-7150.
Rotary Club of South San
Francisco presents Vinney Arora.
Noon to 1:30 p.m. Basque Cultural
Center, 599 Railroad Ave., South San
Francisco. Vinney Arora is the
Director for Individual Giving and
will speak about substance abuse
and foster children. For more infor-
mation call 539-3700.
Red Cross Blood Donation. Noon
to 6 p.m. Alpine Hills Tennis 7 Swim,
4139 Alpine Road, Portola Valley. For
more information call 1-800-733-
2767.
Senior Center Event Armchair
Travel and Adventure. 1 p.m. City of
San Mateo Senior Center, 2645
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.
Free. For more information 522-
7490.
Kids Get Crafty Drop in Crafts. 4
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Burlingame Library,
480 Primrose Road, Burlingame.
Make fun, creative and kid-friendly
crafts in these after-school sessions.
Open to ages 5 and up. For more
information email Kim Day at
day@plsinfo.org.
A Will of the Woods. 6 p.m.
Skylawn Memorial Park, State Route
92, Redwood City. Screening of the
award-winning documentary. Free.
For more information call 575-9448.
Able Forums presents Does a
Rising Tide Really Lift All Boats. 6
p.m. Oshman Family Jewish
Community Center, 3921 Fabian
Way, Palo Alto. Discussion on nan-
cial inclusion in Silicon Valley. Panel
features Jackie Speier, Stephen Levy,
Taia Ergueta and H. Spees. For more
information and to reserve your
seat, visit www.able.is/ableforums.
Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Company presents A Midsummer
Nights Dream. 6 p.m. John L. Carter
Memorial Park, Half Moon Bay.
Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for
seniors and students, and free for
children under 12. For more informa-
tion and to purchase tickets go to
www.hmbshakespeare.org.
Contemporary Organic: A Group
Exhibition. 6 p.m. The Studio Shop,
244 Primrose Road, Burlingame.
Artist reception. Features works by
Dominique Caron, Daniel Phill and
Mirang Wonne. For more informa-
tion call 344-1378 or go to
www.thestudioshop.com.
Movies in the Park: Despicable Me
2. 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. San Bruno City
Park, 251 City Park Way, San Bruno.
Free. Attendees may bring lawn
chairs or blankets. For more informa-
tion call 616-7017.
New Century Chamber Orchestra.
8 p.m. First United Methodist
Church, Palo Alto.
Redwood City Beatles Concert. 8
p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215 Broadway,
Redwood City. Concert benets the
Redwood Symphonys Community
and Cultural Outreach programs. For
more information go to red-
woodsymphony.org.
Groovy Judy Gets Funky. 9 p.m. to
1 a.m. The Pioneer Saloon, 2925
Woodside Road, Woodside. Ages 21
and up. $5 at the door. For more
information go to
www.groovyjudy.com.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 13
Compost Workshop. Daly City
Westlake Library, 275 Southgate
Ave., Daly City. For more information
go to www.recycleworks.org.
San Bruno AARP Chapter 2895
Members Meeting. Pre-meeting
social from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.; meeting
from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno.
Hillsborough-San Mateo Fall
Garden Tour and Plant Sale. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Throughout San Mateo
and Hillsborough, ending at the Kohl
House. Tickets are $35 in for ages 14
and up, free for under 14, $40 day of
tour at Kohl House. For more infor-
mation visit
sanmateoarboretum.org.
PSAT Practice Test. 10 a.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Students will participate in
a full-length, proctored practice ses-
sion under timed, test-like condi-
tions. Sign ups required. Free. For
more information email
belmont@smcl.org.
Walk with a Doc in Millbrae. 10
a.m. to 11 a.m. Millbrae Spur Trail,
Millbrae Avenue near South
Magnolia Drive, Millbrae. Enjoy a
stroll with physician volunteers who
can answer your health-related
questions along the way. Free. For
more information contact
smcma@smcma.org.
Kimochi, Inc.s Fourth Annual
Shown Shine Car Show. 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. College of San Mateo, 1700 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. See great
cars and enjoy a Kimochi teriburger.
Free. For more information visit
www.kimochi-inc.org or call (415)
931-2294.
Rare Books Roadshow Book
Appraisal. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. San
Bruno Library, 701 Angus Ave., San
Bruno. For $1 per book, a profession-
al book appraiser will let you know
how much your book is worth. For
more information call 616-7078 or
email sbpl@plsinfo.org.
Friends of the Millbrae Library
Outdoor Bargain Book and Media
Sales. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. Lots
of great bargains for adults and chil-
dren. From 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., buy as
many books as can t in a bag for $5.
For more information call 697-7607.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
landscape watering to early morning
and evening to minimize water loss
due to evaporation.
The main thing is its to promote
conservation, said Councilman
Reuben Holober. Not to crack down
on people or have the water police go
around and cite people.
The city is restricting the watering
of ornamental landscapes and turf with
potable water to between 6 p.m.-10
a.m. in order to be consistent with the
Millbrae municipal code on water con-
servation while implementing the
states emergency regulations with the
enactment of the water shortage con-
tingency plan.
These are requirements due to severe
drought in California, said Public
Works Director Chip Taylor. Most of
our water users already do these.
Citations can be given for the appli-
cation of potable water to outdoor
landscapes in a manner that causes
runoff to adjacent property, non-irri-
gated areas, private and public walk-
ways, roads, parking lots or structures.
Residents cant use a hose that dis-
penses potable water to wash a motor
vehicle, unless the hose is tted with a
shut-off nozzle. The application of
potable water to any driveway or side-
walk and the use of potable water in a
fountain or decorative water feature,
unless the water is recirculated.
Violations are punishable by nes of
up to $500 for each day the violation
occurs.
The rst citation will be a warning
and there wont be a ne until the third
citation.
In addition to restricting landscape
watering times, the city is implement-
ing additional measures. For example,
hoses need to have positive shut-off
valves. Driveways, streets, sidewalks,
walkways, plazas, houses, businesses,
driveways, patios, parking lots, ten-
nis courts, buildings, awnings or other
hard surfaced areas cant be cleaned
using water from hoses, faucets or
other outlets directly. Additionally,
water used to ll or maintain decora-
tive fountains or pools needs to be
recycled. Stage 1 also encourages the
use of drip and other low-volume irri-
gation systems and gray water sys-
tems.
I think its gonna be just ne, said
Councilwoman Anne Oliva.
Everybodys gonna take responsibil-
ity and participate in what we need to
do. There denitely is a water short-
age.
Ultimately the city will go through
an education phase, informing the
public through Facebook, MCTVand a
mail postcard to water users describing
water regulations. There will also be a
water-wise landscaping workshop 7
p.m. Oct. 8 at the Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave. in Millbrae.
The city relies on the Hetch Hetchy
water system and its snow pack for all
of its annual water supply needs. The
yield of this source in any given year
is directly related to the amount of
snow and rainfall received during the
winter season and the runoff generated
after it.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
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and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n

is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
.
2
0
1
4
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
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n
k
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n
.c
o
m
9
-
1
1
-
1
4
ACROSS
1 Hot-tempered
6 Dressed to the
11 Dispute
12 Martini garnish
13 Roomy sleeve
15 Pager
16 Orchidlike owers
18 Compass dir.
19 Thither and
21 Glamorous wrap
22 Like some juries
23 Soap bubbles
25 Lout
28 Plain-living sect
30 Drain cleaner
31 Aye, aye follower
32 Med. plan
33 PIN prompter
35 Steer clear of
37 Novelist Rand
38 Fibber
40 Made do with
41 AAA suggestion
42 Youngster
43 Series of battles
46 Weak
48 Isis husband
50 Pinafores
54 Ruhr Valley city
55 Eva or Zsa Zsa
56 Stone monument
57 Jungs inner self
DOWN
1 Remote
2 Keogh relative
3 Urge (on)
4 Judges decisions
5 Once around the sun
6 Votes against
7 Seine vista
8 Bites
9 Poets twilights
10 Dried-up
14 Robin beaks
15 Small and shiny
17 Perfect partner (2 wds.)
19 Delicious
20 Edible bulb
22 Merry sound (hyph.)
24 Date regularly
25 Port near Kyoto
26 Came to the rescue
27 Flintstone father
29 2001 computer
34 Bicycle parts
36 Ex-soldier
39 Singer McEntire
43 Adversities
44 Helper, briey
45 Small hill
46 Delicate
47 Links org.
49 Aunt or bro.
51 Ginza purchase
52 de plume
53 Mexican Mrs.
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
HOLY MOLE
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
GET FUZZY
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Dont lend or borrow
anything today. Go over your banking records to
make sure you havent overestimated your balance.
You should curb unnecessary expenditures in order
to get back on track.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Make the most of your
day, regardless of what others say. Take control and
show everyone what you are capable of doing. Your
intuition will lead you in the right direction.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) You will not get far by
being a spectator. Get involved in events that will help
shape your future and change your life. Remember to
leave some time for romance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Expect the
unexpected, and turn a negative into a positive. Dont
stop or let anyone sidetrack you. Its up to you to stay
on track if you plan to reach your goal.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Dont let your
emotions goad you into making a costly mistake.
You know what has to be done in order to get ahead.
When something doesnt run smoothly, assess
matters and reset your course.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) Dont let past
mistakes hold you back. Chalk them up to experience
and get on with your life. Incorporate entertainment
into your schedule to boost your spirits.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Tie up loose ends.
Finish half-completed projects so you can begin to
move forward. Procrastination is the enemy and will
stand in the way of your future goals.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your patience will be
tested. Stay calm and observe whats going on around
you. Getting angry will do more harm than good. If you
must participate, be the mediator, not the dictator.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) It wont do you any good
to force your ideas on others. Surround yourself with
friends and allies, and avoid getting into competitive
situations that could harm your relationships.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Love and romance are
on the rise. Your instincts will be strong, and you will
know just how to win people over. Trust your intuition
and follow your aspirations.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) You will have a
tendency to be overly dramatic. If you practice
patience, the solution will come to you, so dont
waste your energy with emotional displays or
volatile disagreements.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Your high energy level has
you headed in the right direction. Dont slow down or
look back; you must keep your goals in sight if you
wish to fulll your dreams.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
Personals
CHIPS JOYCE
Friends seek you
for reunion.
Mike McLane
(949)466-2332
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
107 Musical Instruction
PIANO LESSONS IN MENLO PARK
All ages, all skill levels
(650)838-9772
Back to School Special
Half off First Month!
Piano Studio of Alita Lake
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS WANTED -- Home Care
for Elderly - Hourly or Live-in, Day or
Night Shifts, Top Pay, Immediate Place-
ment. Required: Two years paid experi-
ence with elderly or current CNA certifi-
cation; Pass background, drug and other
tests; Drive Car; Speak and write English
Email resume to: jobs@starlightcaregiv-
ers.com Call: (650) 600-8108
Website: www.starlightcaregivers.com
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
DRIVERS -
TAXIS AND
LIMO DRIVERS
$500-$700/week
(650)740-9555
FOOD
SERVER
Retirement community
FT/PT morning/afternoon,
understand, write & speak
English.
Apply
201 Chadbourne Ave.,
Millbrae
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
HOUSECLEANERS FOR HIRE
No nights, no weekends
Call (650)369-6243
Limo Driver and Taxi Driver, Wanted,
full time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700, (650)921-2071
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOW HIRING
Certified Nursing Assistants
(Must have Certificate)
$12 per hour
AM-PM Shifts available
Please apply in person
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required
PARK N FLY Off Airport Parking
Shuttle Drivers, Valet, Key Room Super-
visor, Automotive Detailer, and Mainte-
nance positions available. Many shifts
available Apply at
http://www.pnf.com/careers
(650)877-8438
RECEPTIONIST
BURLINGAME, PT/FT, good answering
phones, computer skills, typing. Immedi-
ate opening. 650-697-9431
RETAIL -
RETAIL ASSISTANT
MANAGER
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
23 Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
RESTAURANT -
Weekends Days, Dishwasher, San Car-
los Restaurant, 1696 laurel Street
Contact Sean or Chef
650 592 7258
541 848 0038
Email sean@johnstonsaltbox.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261952
The following person is doing business
as: Solo Soccer Shop, 238 Grand Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Nicolas Garcia, 4716 Pretentious Way,
Sacramento, CA 95842 and Salvador Lo-
pez 2777 Mission St., San Francisco, CA
94110. The business is conducted by a
Copartners. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Nicolas Garcia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/15/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/14, 08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261965
The following person is doing business
as: Julian St. George, 1000 Park Pl. #N,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Bonnie Per-
kins, same address. The business is
conducted by an individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Bonnie Perkins /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/18/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/14, 08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261845
The following person is doing business
as: Crossfit Burlingame, 345 N. Amphlett
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Weiss
Fitness Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2011.
/s/ James Weiss /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/07/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/14, 08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261918
The following person is doing business
as: TanegaProfessional Dental, 124 Ha-
zelwood Dr., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: TanegaProfessional
Dental, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Janet Tanega /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/11/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/14, 08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261709
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Baywide DME co., Inc, 2) Baywide
Medical Supplies 60 Eureka Square, PA-
CIFICA, CA 94044 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Baywide DME
co., Inc, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Teresita Galang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/14, 08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261801
The following person is doing business
as: Glen, The, 200 Davey Glen Rd. BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: CP IV Glen, LLC,
DE. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 07/01/2014.
/s/ Donald Campbell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/05/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/14, 08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261752
The following person is doing business
as: Courtesy Tow, 980 Montgomery
Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: South
City Tow, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 06/01/2010.
/s/ Tracy Koehler /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/14, 08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261667
The following person is doing business
as: iCute iLashes, 17 43rd Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Chini Duong,
8229 Steinbeck Way, Sacramento. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 7/21/14.
/s/ Chini Duongr /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/21/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/21/14, 08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261760
The following person is doing business
as: Thaibodia Bistro, 910 Woodside Rd.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062, is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mr.
Chaus Restaurant, Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Patrick Chau /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261868
The following person is doing business
as: SpeeDee Oil Change & Auto Service,
550 Veterans Blvd., REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94063, is hereby registered by the
following owner: Bellatrac Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Arun Nagpal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/08/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262020
The following person is doing business
as: JEI Learning Center, 1590 El Camino
Real, Ste K, SAN BRUNO, CA SAN
BRUNO, CA 94066, is hereby registered
by the following owner: KSK Learning
Corporation, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Cheryl Yeung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261908
The following person is doing business
as: Kumon Math and Reading Center of
South San Francisco-Westborough,
2288 Westborough Blvd. Ste 103,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
TABB Services, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Peter Tam /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261789
The following person is doing business
as:Sirenita Check Cashing, 352 Grand
Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Maria Reyes, 805 Baden
Ave., Apt. A, South San Francisco, CA
94080. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Maria Reyes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/04/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262056
The following person is doing business
as: CHL Consulting, 34 Oxford Pl., BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Eric Chen, and
Tracy Chen same address. The business
is conducted by a General Partnership.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Eric Chen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/28/14, 09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261796
The following person is doing business
as: Berber Landscaping, 1290 Garden
St., EAST PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Juan Carlos Berber, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Juan Carlos Berber /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/04/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262101
The following person is doing business
as: Blue Line Pizza, Daly City, 511 West-
lake Center, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
The Pizza Alliance 4, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Angela Pace /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/29/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262052
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Breastfeeding, 232 Grand
Blvd., #2, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Angela Burger, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Angela Pace /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262019
The following person is doing business
as: Creative Ps & Qs, 2034 S. Delaware
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Per-
nille Gutschick and Andre Perman same
address. The business is conducted by
Copartners. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Andre Perman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261967
The following person is doing business
as: CAHousefinder.com, 34 Stanfornd
Ln., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Derek
Cunningham, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by Individual. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Derek Cunningham /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/18/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262108
The following person is doing business
as: Young Can Wok, 1200 Broadway,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Yong
Wong and Leanna Wong, 326 Worwick
St., Daly City, CA 94015. The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Yong Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/08/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/04/14, 09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #261923
The following person is doing business
as: AA Supply, 207 Park View Ave, DA-
LY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Donald Do, 546
San Diego Ave., Daly City, CA 94014.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
08/14/2014
/s/ Donald Do /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262135
The following person is doing business
as: Silicon Valley Headshots, 1041 Men-
lo Oaks Dr., MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Transtion Dynamic Enteprises, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Carol McClelland Fields /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262162
The following person is doing business
as: Chriss Puppy Love, 3376 La Mesa
#17, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Marie
Christine Gray, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 08/26/2014.
/s/ Marie Christine Gray /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262010
The following person is doing business
as: Floralart + Decor, 141 Burlingame
Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ne-
lya Srulovich, 9 Banker Rd. Burlingame,
CA 94010. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Nelya Srulovich /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/21/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262211
The following person is doing business
as: Mission Edge Cafe & Rotisserie, DA-
LY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Francisco J. Ca-
nales, 1147 Brunswick St., Daly City, CA
94014. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Francisco J. Canales /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262059
The following person is doing business
as: My Breakfast House, 1137 Laurel St.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: John &
Kay, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Hsiny Yi Chang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262133
The following person is doing business
as: 1) EVER, EVER Skincare, 480 Gate
5 Rd., Ste 130, Sausalito, CA 94965 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Stella & Dot, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Libility Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on August 20,
2014.
/s/ W. Scott Booker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262136
The following person is doing business
as: Stella & Dot, LLC 1111 Bayhill Drive,
Suite 375, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Stella & Dot, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Libility Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on March 22,
2010.
/s/ W. Scott Booker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262138
The following person is doing business
as: Stella & Dot, Foundation, 1111 Bay-
hill Drive, Suite 375, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Stella & Dot, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Libili-
ty Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
July 1, 2010.
/s/ W. Scott Booker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262139
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Stella & Dot, Family Brands, 2)
Stella & Dot Family, 3) Stella & Dot
Family of Brands, 1111 Bayhill Drive,
Suite 375, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Stella & Dot, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Libility Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on July 1, 2010.
/s/ W. Scott Booker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2014. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/11/14, 09/18/14, 09/25/14, 10/02/14).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - silver locket on May 6, Crest-
view and Club Dr. Call to describe:
(650)598-0823
FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14.
Call 650 490-0921 - Leave message if no
answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
210 Lost & Found
LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Center, by Lunardis market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST GOLD WATCH - with brown lizard
strap. Unique design. REWARD! Call
(650)326-2772.
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOKS, PAPERBACK/HARD cover,
Coonts, Higgins, Thor, Follet, Brown,
more $20.00 for 60 books,
(650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
TIME LIFE Nature Books, great condition
19 different books. $5.00 each OBO
(650)580-4763
295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Sign-
ed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
PICTURES, FRAMED (2) 24x25, tem-
ple etchings blue figures on white. $50
(all) (650)200-9730
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169
296 Appliances
CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
296 Appliances
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROCKET GRILL Brand new indoor grill.
Cooks fast with no mess. $70 OBO.
(650)580-4763
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SANYO REFRIGERATOR with size 33
high & 20" wide in very good condition
$85. 650-756-9516.
SEARS KENMORE sewing machine in a
good cabinet style, running smoothly
$99. 650-756-9516.
WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-867-
6042.
297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18 Pink, Looks New, Hard-
ly Used $80 (650)293-7313
298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edi-
son Mazda Lamps. Both still working -
$50 (650)-762-6048
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
UPPER DECK 1999 baseball cards #1-
535. $85 complete mint set Steve, San
Carlos, 650-255-8716.
300 Toys
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695
LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15 boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25 650-
345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
24
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Wildlife
photographs may
be a memento of
one
7 Visit
Overstock.com,
say
11 Its near Miss.
14 Reebok rival
15 Piece of glass
16 Collages
novelist
17 Triangular chip
18 Zero degrees
Celsius, for water
20 Go out with
21 Synthetic rubber,
for one
22 Capacity limit
27 Turn down
28 Bathroom fixtures
29 Airline seat
pocket item,
briefly
30 Word with ball or
cup
32 Molar menders
org.
33 University of
Nevada city
34 Pinnacles
38 Not getting it,
and, in a different
way, what 18-,
22-, 52- and 58-
Across are
42 Pound and Poe
43 Bounders
44 Santa __,
California
45 Attorneys thing
47 I-5, for one
48 Salt Lake City
Winter Olympics
year
49 Abbey recess
52 Moment of
change
55 Viruses, worms,
etc.
57 Bk. after Ezra
58 Sensitive spot
60 Be unable to
stand
63 Squeeze (out)
64 Govt. agent
65 Like most
wedding cakes
66 Who __ Nation:
New Orleans
Saints fans
67 Exists no more
68 Said
DOWN
1 In a funk
2 Stir
3 Diamond corner
4 Parting words
5 Olympic judge,
e.g.
6 Equi- kin
7 Beach lotion
letters
8 Horn honker of
classic comedy
9 Score that often
requires overtime
10 Spa treatment
11 Cartoon genre
12 Hotel
housekeeping
supply
13 Fuming
19 Louisiana music
style
22 Forever __
23 TV feed
component
24 Hymn ender
25 Cranberry quality
26 Practical jokers
cry
31 Kennel sounds
33 Opposite of set
35 American Airlines
Arena team
36 Film composer
Morricone
37 Carpet blemish
39 Scatters, as
petals
40 Private
Benjamin star
41 Nestl ice cream
brand
46 Plays chords, in
a way
48 Medit. hot spot
49 Unlike rock
bands on MTVs
Unplugged
50 Insulated
jacket
51 Winter fall
53 Aired again
54 Not reactive
56 Wine from Italy
59 Otitis-treating
MD
60 Uno y uno
61 Law firm office,
perhaps: Abbr.
62 Journalist
Koppel
By Steve Marron
2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/11/14
09/11/14
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
302 Antiques
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
CASH REGISTER approximate 1930
Solid Oak Document Container with 59"
height; 33"width; 17" deep with compart-
ments. Best Offer.(650)348-3300
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bev-
elled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden Sea Captains
Tool Chest 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
303 Electronics
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD VHS Flat Screen Remote. $55. Cell
number: (650)580-6324
COMBO COLOR T.V. Panasonic with
VHS and Radio - Color: White - 2001
$25. Cell number: (650)580-6324
303 Electronics
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
JVC - DVD Player and video cassette re-
corder. NEW. $80. (650)345-5502
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
OLD STYLE 32 inch Samsung TV. Free
with pickup. Call 650-871-5078.
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
VINTAGE ZENITH stereo console record
player works good cond $50 (650) 756-
9516 Daly City.
WESTINGHOUSE 32 Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available, $175 each. (650)400-4174
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l
304 Furniture
BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safe-
ly.$99 650-375-1414
BURGUNDY VELVET reupholstered vin-
tage chair. $75. Excellent condition.
650-861-0088
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549
COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for key-
board, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72x 21 x39 1/2
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRESSER (5 drawers) 43" H x 36" W
$40. (650)756-9516 DC.
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DURALINER ROCKING CHAIR, Maple
Finish, Cream Cushion w matching otto-
man $70 (650)583-4943.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169
FREE SOFA and love seat set. good
condtion (650)630-2329
304 Furniture
GRACO 40" x28"x28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City
HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mat-
tress (twin size) in great condition. In-
cludes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with addition-
al 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LIVING & Dining Room Sets. Mission
Style, Trestle Table w/ 2 leafs & 6
Chairs, Like new $600 obo
(831)768-1680
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OCCASIONAL, END or Sofa Table. $25.
Solid wood in excellent condition. 20" x
22". (650)861-0088.
OTTOMANS, LIGHT blue, dark blue,
Storage, Versatile, Removable cover,
$25. for both OBO. (650)580-4763
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PIANO AND various furniture pieces,
golf bag. $100-$300 Please call for info
(650)740-0687
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condi-
tion with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762
ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648
SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral
color $99 OBO (650)345-5644
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33 x 78
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STURDY OAK TV or End Table. $35.
Very good condition. 30" x 24".
(650)861-0088
TABLE OCTAGONAL SHAPE 17" high
18" width, made by Baker $75 (650)593-
8880
TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for ster-
eo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
304 Furniture
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condi-
tion $65.00 (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
COOKING POTS (2) stainless steel,
temperature resistent handles, 21/2 & 4
gal. $5. SOLD!
COOLER/WARMER, UNOPENED, Wor-
thy Mini Fridge/warmer, portable, handle,
plug, white $30.00 (650) 578 9208
ELECTRIC FAN Wind Machine 20in.
Portable Round Plastic Adjustable $35
Cell Number (650)580-6324
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
SINGER ELECTRONIC sewing machine
model #9022. Cord, foot controller
included. $99 O.B.O. (650)274-9601 or
(650)468-6884
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SKILL saw "craftman"7/1/4"
heavy duty never used in box $45.
(650)992-4544
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench 20-150 lbs,
new/warranty case $29 650-595-3933
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN POCKET Socket screw-
drivers wrench tape new, $25 650-595-
3933
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
HANDTRUCK DOLLY converts to 4
wheel dolly. $30/obo. (650)591-6842
308 Tools
HUSKY POWER inverter 750wtts.adap-
tor/cables unused AC/DC.$50.
(650)992-4544
HYDRAULIC floor botle jack 10" H.
plus.Ford like new. $25.00 botlh
(650)992-4544
MICROMETER MEASUREMENT
brake/drum tool new in box
$25.(650)992-4544
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
(650) 595-4617
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $99.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scra-
per). Mint. $35. 650-218-7059.
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712
CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC" Smithso-
nian Collection of Recordings, 4 audio-
tapes, annotation booklet. $20.
(650)574-3229
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER selectric II
good condition, needs ribbon (type
needed attached) $35 SOLD!
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
FOLK SONG anthology: Smithsonian
Collection of Recordings, 4 audiotapes +
annotation booklet. $20 (650)574-3229
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840 leave a clear Message
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
OXYGEN AND Acetylene tanks, both for
$99 (650)591-8062
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Ma-
chine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, den-
tures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208
311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, ex-
cellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, ex-
cellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PA SYSTEM, Yamaha 8 channel hd,
Traynor spkrs.$95/OBO - 650-345-7352
ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,
with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owners manual. $500. (415)706-6216
WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40 high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337
312 Pets & Animals
AQUARIUM, MARINA Cool 10, 2.65
gallons, new pump. $20. (650)591-1500
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
DELUX"GLASS LIZARD cage unused ,
rock open/close window Decoration
21"Wx12"Hx8"D,$20.(650)992-4544
DOG CRATE like new, i Crate, two
door, divider, 30"L 19"w 21"H $40.
650 345-1234
GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
25 Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
312 Pets & Animals
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large, Excellent
Condition, $275 (650)245-4084
315 Wanted to Buy
WE BUY
Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2 HAWAIIAN dress shirts 1 Lg, 1
XL, and 10 unopened t-shirts, various
designs $25. (650)578-9208
ALPINESTAR JEANS - Tags Attached.
Twin Stitched. Knee Protection. Never
Used! Blue/Grey Sz34 $65.
(650)357-7484
AUTHENTIC ARIZONA DIAMOND XL
shirt, and 3 Large white/blue t-shirts,
both unopened $10. (650)578-9208
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DAINESE BOOTS - Zipper/Velcro Clo-
sure. Cushioned Ankle. Reflective Strip.
Excellent Condition! Unisex EU40 $65.
(650)357-7484
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
NEW MAN'S Wristwatch sweep second
hand, +3 dials, $29 650-595-3933
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red, Reg. price $200 sell-
ing for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
FLOORING - Carolina Pine, 1x3 T and
G, approximately 400+ sq. ft. $650. CAll
(415)516-4964
STEPPING STONES (17) pebbled ce-
ment, 12 round good condtion $20 San
Bruno (650)588-1946
318 Sports Equipment
2008 EZ GO Golf Cart, red, electric, new
Trojan batteries, new battery charger,
lights, windshield. Excellent condition.
$3,900 obo. Call (650)712-1291 or
(707)888-6025. Half Moon Bay.
3 WHEEL golf cart by Bagboy. Used
twice, New $160 great price $65
(650)200-8935
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
COLEMAN STOVE- never used, 2 burn-
er propane, $40. 650 345-1234
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$20.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
G.I. AMMO can, small, good cond.,
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
GERMAN ARMY Helmet WW2, 4 motor-
bike DOT $59 650-595-3933
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiber-
glass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
NORDIC TRACK Pro, $95. Call
(650)333-4400
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WEIGHT LIFTER'S bench and barbell
weights, located coastside, $75, 650-
867-6042
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALE
316 Malcolm Ave,
Belmont
9/13 and 9/14
9am-4pm
Lots of tools, power
tools, golf clubs,
glasses, dishes, and
misc. housewares.
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $79
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WHEEL CHAIR, heavy duty, wide, excel-
lent condition. $99.(650)704-7025
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
1 bedroom, New carpet and paint $1550
per month, $1000 deposit, 50 Redwood
Ave, RWC, Rented!
SAN MATEO 1 BR IN LAW, kitchen,
bath, liv room, (650)344-8127
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2012 LEXUS ISF - V-8, 420hp, 22k
miles, New Tires, Loaded! sliver exterior
red & black interior, Pristine $45,000
SOLD!
DODGE 99 Van, Good Condition,
$2,800 OBO (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
Well run it
til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 96 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $3500 OBO, (650)481-5296 - Joe
Fusilier
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUVs
DODGE 01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
FORD E150 Cargo VAN, 2007, 56k
miles, almost perfect! $12,000
(650)591-8062
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 04 Heritage Soft
Tail ONLY 5,400 miles. $11,000. Call
(650)342-6342.
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS sales,
with mounting hardware $35.
(650)670-2888
650 RVs
COLEMAN LARAMIE
pop-up camper, Excellent
Condition, $2,250.
Call (415)515-6072
670 Auto Parts
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
SNOW CHAIN cables made by Shur
Grip - brand new-never used. In the
original case. $25 650-654-9252.
USED BIG O 4 tires, All Terrain
245/70R16, $180 (650)579-0933
680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
FOR YOUR CABINET NEEDS
" TRUST EXPERIENCE"
FOCAL POINT KITCHENS & BATH
Modular & Custom cabinets
Over 30 Years in Business !
1222 So. El Camino Real
San Mateo
(650)345-0355
www.focalpointkitchens.com
Cleaning
Concrete
ASP CONCRETE
LANDSCAPING
All kinds of Concrete
Retaining Wall Tree Service
Roofing Fencing
New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435 (650)834-4495
by Greenstarr
Rambo
Concrete
Works
Walkways
Driveways
Patios
Colored
Aggregate
Block Walls
Retaining walls
Stamped Concrete
Ornamental concrete
Swimming pool removal
Tom 650.834.2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
RJ POLLOCK
CONCRETE SERVICE
Driveways Patios Masonry
Brick and Slate Flagstone
Stamp Concrete
Exposed Aggregate
(650)759-1965
Lic# 987912
Construction
LEMUS CONSTRUCTION
(650)271-3955
Dry Rot Decks Fences
Handyman Painting
Bath Remodels & much more
Based in N. Peninsula
Free Estimates ... Lic# 913461
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont/Castro Valley, CA
(650) 318-3993
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Draperies
MARLAS DRAPERIES
& ALTERATIONS
Custom made drapes & pillows
Alterations for men & women
Free Estimates
(650)703-6112
(650)389-6290
2140A S. El Camino, SM
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
INSIDE OUT
ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182
(650)515-1123
Gardening
KEEP YOUR LAWN
LOOKING GREEN
Time to Aerate your lawn
We also do seed/sod of lawns
Spring planting
Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing
Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831 Lic #751832
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGOS FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Housecleaning
CONSUELOS HOUSE
CLEANING & WINDOWS
Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business
Free Estimates, 15% off First Visit
(650)278-0157
Lic#1211534
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Since 1985
Repairs Maintenance Painting
Carpentry Plumbing Electrical
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES
Fences Decks
Concrete Work Arbors
We can do any job big or small
Free Estimates
(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968
contrerashandy12@yahoo.com
26
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
FRANKS HAULING
Junk and Debris
Furniture, bushes,
concrete and more
FREE ESTIMATES
(650)361-8773
Hauling
by Greenstarr
&
Chriss Hauling
Yard clean up - attic,
basement
Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
Demolition
Concrete removal
Excavation
Swimming pool removal
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Chri s 415. 999. 1223
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Landscaping
Free Estimate
650.353.6554
Lic. #973081
NATE LANDSCAPING
Tree Service
*
Pruning &
Removal
*
Fence Deck
*
Paint
*
New Lawn
*
All Concrete
*
Irrigation
*
Ret. Wall
*
Pavers
*
Sprinkler System
*
Yard Clean-Up & Haul
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
Yard Boss
0omp|ete |andscape
construct|on and remova|
Fu|| tree care |nc|ud|ng
hazard eva|uat|on,
tr|mm|ng, shap|ng,
remova| and stump
gr|nd|ng
8eta|n|ng wa||s
0rnamenta| concrete
Sw|mm|ng poo| remova|
Tom 650. 834. 2365
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
BAY AREA
RELOCATION SERVICES
Specializing In:
Homes, Apts, Storages
Professional, Friendly, Careful
Peninsula Personal mover
(650)248-6343
Fully Lic & Bonded Cal-T190632
Painting
CORDERO PAINTING
Commercial & Residential
Exterior & Interior
Free Estimates
(650)372-8361
Lic # 35740 Insured
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960
Screens
DONT SHARE
YOUR HOUSE
WITH BUGS!
We repair and install all types of
Window & Door Screens
Free Estimates
(650)299-9107
PENINSULA SCREEN SHOP
Mention this ad for 20% OFF!
MARTIN SCREEN SHOP
Quality Screens
Old Fashion Workmanship
New & Repair
Pick up, delivery & installation
(650)591-7010
301 Old County Rd. San Carlos
since 1957
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
Windows
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
27 Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Accounting
ALAN CECCHI EA
Tax Preparation
& Representation
Bookkkeeping - Accounting
Phone 650-245-7645
alancecchi@yahoo .com
Attorneys
INJURY
LAWYER
LOWER FEES
San Mateo Since 1976
650-366-5800
www.BlackmanLegal.com
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Cemetery
LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing
$5 CHARLEY'S
Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno
(650)771-6564
Dental Services
ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.
$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO
(650)342-4171
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno
(650)583-2273
www.russodentalcare.com
Food
ALOFT SFO
invites you to mix & mingle at
replay on
Friday, August 15th
from 7pm till midnight!
Live DJs and specialty cocktails at W
XYZ bar to start your weekend!
401 East Millbrae Ave. Millbrae
(650)443-5500
CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities
(650) 295-6123
1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GRILL & VINE
Try Grill & Vines new Summer
menu and get half-off
your second entre of equal or
lesser value when mentioning
this ad! Valid on Friday and Sat-
urday through September!
1 Old Bayshore, Millbrae
(650)872-8141
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Food
PRIME STEAKS
SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com
SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR
Lunch Dinner Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit
(650)372-0888
SEAFOOD FOR SALE
FRESH OFF THE BOAT
(650) 726-5727
Pillar Point Harbor:
1 Johnson Pier
Half Moon Bay
Oyster Point Marina
95 Harbor Master Rd..
South San Francisco
Financial
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay
Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
CALIFORNIA
STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES
(650)591-3900
Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle
Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Housing
CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)
Please call to RSVP
(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$55 per Hour
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $19.99
Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame
(650)389-2468
HEALING MASSAGE
Newly remodeled
New Masseuses every two
weeks
$50/Hr. Special
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)
OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY
Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)
(650)212-2966
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WORLD 28
Thursday Sept. 11, 2014 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISLAMABAD Pakistani warplanes
struck ve militant hideouts in a Taliban
stronghold near the Afghan border on
Wednesday, killing 65 insurgents, the mili-
tary said.
The strikes, carried out in two phases
hours apart, targeted areas in the North
Waziristan tribal region, where the military
has been conducting a major offensive
since mid-June, the army said in a state-
ment.
The strikes came a day after the Pakistani
Taliban took credit for a weekend attack on
a navy dockyard on the other side of the
country, in the port city of Karachi.
Also Wednesday, Pakistans defense min-
ister said authorities investigating a week-
end attack on a navy dockyard in the port
city of Karachi cannot rule out possible
involvement of some navy personnel in the
assault.
North Waziristan has long been home to a
mix of local and al-Qaida-linked foreign
militants, including armed groups which
carry out cross-border attacks on U.S. and
other NATO troops in Afghanistan.
The army launched the much-awaited
operation there on June 15, following a
deadly militant attack on countrys one of
the busiest airports in Karachi.
Wednesdays deaths brought to almost
975 the number of militants the military
says it has killed in air and ground attacks
in North Waziristan. The area, however, is
off limits to journalists, making it impos-
sible to conrm military claims independ-
ently.
Pakistan is a key ally of the United States
in the war on terror, and local Taliban in a
bid to overthrow the government and
install their own harsh brand of Islamic law
often target the countrys security forces,
killing tens of thousands of Pakistanis in
the last decade.
In the rst batch of Wednesday airstrikes,
the military reported killing 35 militants
in three hideouts in Datta Khel, a town in
North Waziristan. Hours later, it said a sec-
ond batch of airstrikes destroyed two more
hideouts in the tribal regions Shawal
Valley, killing 30 more militants.
The strikes came a day after the Pakistani
Taliban claimed responsibility for
Saturdays attack on the dockyard in
Karachi.
Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid
said in a telephone call to The Associated
Press from an undisclosed location on
Tuesday that some naval ofcials helped the
insurgents carry out the attack. He said the
Taliban launched the assault as revenge for
the army operation in North Waziristan.
Navy officials only acknowledged the
attack Monday night, but said nothing
about whether naval ofcials assisted the
militants. The navy said seven of the
sailors were also wounded in the attack,
which killed a sailor and two militants.
Pakistan airstrikes hit
Taliban hideouts,kill 65
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JHANG, Pakistan Raging monsoon
floods across India and Pakistan that have
killed more than 450 people poured into
the plains of eastern Punjab province on
Wednesday, sending a major river over its
banks and threatening to force hundreds of
thousands from their homes.
The Chenab River overflowed early
Wednesday, threatening the nearby
Pakistani district of Jhang in the worst
flooding in the region in years.
Survivor Haleema Bibi, 65, sobbed as
she climbed out of a boat. Her granddaugh-
ter was to be married in the coming days but
the floodwaters swept her dowry away. She
appealed to the rescuers to go back to the
village, saying her grandson was stranded
there.
I have lost everything, Bibi cried out.
The flooding began earlier this month in
Kashmir, which is claimed by both India
and Pakistan. It caused landslides and sub-
merged much of the main city of Srinagar
on the Indian-administered side. The water
is now rushing out of the mountains of the
Himalayan region, affecting communities
downstream and threatening to force nearly
700,000 people from their homes.
From the air, Srinagar looked like a
giant, muddy lake, with row after row of
rooftops peeking out of the murky water.
Frightened survivors clung to tree tops and
waited for rescue helicopters to save them.
An Associated Press reporter, trapped in
his home for four days, said rescue boats
picked up relatives of army and govern-
ment officials before saving stranded civil-
ians.
Major river overflows,
threatens Pakistan city
REUTERS
A Kashmiri man wades through a ooded street in Srinagar, Pakistan.