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Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America

MID-YEAR TRAINING INSTITUTE

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This Program belongs to: _____________________________________

#CADCAMidYear

CADCA Thanks Our Federal Partners & Sponsors

Contents
From Our Chairman and CEO ....................................1
About CADCA ............................................................2
CADCAs National Coalition Institute ........................3
General Information ..................................................5
Special Events ..............................................................7
Hand-outs and Presentations ....................................9
Exhibitors ..................................................................10
Course Tracks ............................................................12
Courses-at-a-Glance ..................................................14
Course Descriptions ..................................................16
National Youth Leadership Initiative (NYLI)............34
Board of Directors and Coalition
Advisory Committee ..............................................38
CEU Form ..................................................................39
Future Meetings........................................................40
CADCAs Mid-Year Training Institute is supported in part by
several federal agencies and corporations. Their support
does not necessarily imply any endorsement of the agenda
or views expressed by CADCA or any other trainer.

Verification of Attendance ......................................41


Hilton/Waldorf Complex Meeting
Room Floor Plans ..................................................45
Schedule of Events......................................Back Cover

From Our Chairman and CEO

elcome to the greatest place on Earth. This week, CADCAs Mid-Year


Training Institute IS the greatest place on Earth. Why? Because 1,700
community, state and federal leaders from all parts of the U.S. and 13
countries have come together with one goal in mindto find solutions to one of our
nations most serious challenges, youth drug use.
Together, we truly are a collective force that can create positive changes in our
communities. Thats why the Mid-Years theme is The Power of the Movement.
Weve designed more than 70 in-depth courses in nine presentation tracks on
everything from marijuana use prevention to communications metrics, branding,
advocacy and sustainability. We were very selective in the content this year, making
sure to include courses designed to make you and your coalition stronger, such as
Coalition Core Essentials, as well as innovative courses in drug-specific categories, such as Faking It! The
Challenge of Synthetics.
And once again, we welcome several hundred youth who have converged here to take part in CADCAs National
Youth Leadership Initiative, our signature youth leadership development training.
Youll hear from a number of national experts and federal leaders this week, such as Kana Enomoto, Principal
Deputy Administrator at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the featured
speaker at our opening plenary and breakfast Monday morning, and Michael Botticelli, Acting Director of the
Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), who will offer remarks at the Drug-Free Communities Grantee
Town Hall Meeting on Wednesday.
While the CADCA Mid-Year is meant to be an intense training, we know youll want to enjoy yourselves when
youre not learning new concepts and skills. Thats why we picked Orlando, so you can take advantage of Disney
World, Universal Studios and the beautiful amenities this hotel complex has to offer.
Regardless of the issues your community is facing, youre sure to leave the Mid-Year with new ideas and a few
new connections who will help you in your efforts to prevent and reduce substance abuse. So, I encourage you to
take full advantage of all of the great learning and networking opportunities this week, and the exciting Orlando
attractions.

Enjoy!

Arthur T. Dean
Major General, U.S. Army, Retired
Chairman and CEO

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 1

ABOUT CADCA

or more than 20 years, CADCA has advanced substance


abuse prevention and built a network of more than
5,000 community anti-drug coalitions. CADCA brings
together sectors of the community to solve their local
substance abuse problemsschools, businesses, parents and
youth, law enforcement, healthcare providers, faith
organizations, and many more. Our model for community
change represents a comprehensive, evidenced-based multisector approach to reduce underage and binge drinking,
tobacco, illicit drugs and the abuse of medicines.

Membership Benefits

CADCA is the premier membership-based non-profit


organization representing adult and youth coalition leaders
throughout the United States and internationallyall
working to make their communities safe, healthy and drugfree.

Discounted rates of 25-30% for members and youth at


CADCAs National Leadership Forum and Mid-Year
Training Institute.

CADCA leads the field in substance abuse prevention


advocacy and public policy. Our training and technical
assistance, through the National Coalition Institute has been
independently evaluated to confirm that our services help
coalitions achieve measureable results faster. CADCA
promotes the coalition model and drug prevention with the
media and the general public. Our significant partnerships
with federal and state agencies, national non-profit
organizations, academic researchers, corporate leaders and
other key stakeholders help CADCA build a global coalition
of concerned professionals, all working to reduce substance
abuse and improve public health and safety. The continued
support and contributions of our members drive CADCAs
influence and enable us to increase awareness of the lasting
impact coalitions have in creating far reaching reductions in
substance abuse.
If you are not already a member of CADCA, JOIN TODAY.
Stop by our booth or visit www.cadca.org/member.

Above all, a CADCA membership helps promote and foster


the effective coalition model and keeps prevention on the
national radar.
Specific benefits include:
Legislative alerts and updates emailed directly to your
inbox with materials to keep you educated and informed
about time sensitive legislative issues and CADCAs public
policy efforts.

Special offers on affinity programs, including discounts


through Office Depot, Dell Computers, Hertz, UPS and
Network for Good.
Use of CADCA logo for co-branding purposes.
Access to media outreach tools, including templates and
sample letters, op-eds and press releases.
Discounted rates on Masters of Prevention program at the
University of Oklahoma (OU), College of Liberal Studies.
Copies of any newly released Strategizer and Practical
Theorist technical assistance publications and discounted
rates on future orders on all publications.
Subscription to Members Edge, a member-only bimonthly
online newsletter devoted to helping you get the most
from your CADCA connection.
Immediate access to Coalitions Online, a free weekly
online publication providing coalition-specific news, policy
updates, funding opportunities and more.
Subscription to Coalitions, CADCAs bi-annual print
magazine.
Exclusive networking opportunities at CADCA
conferences and events.
Scholarships and special project opportunities offered only
to members.

2 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

CADCAs National Coalition Institute

Training can be accessed through:


The National Coalition Academy offered in partnership
with the National Guard Bureau or customized at the
state or system level.

Hel
pi

The Institute trainings are designed to build the skills of both


coalition staff and members. The Institute offers trainings
that address all aspects of coalition development including
sessions that are appropriate for new as well as more
advanced sessions designed to meet the needs of more
established coalitions that want to reinforce or enhance their
current initiatives.

Provides
intensive training
experiences to
immerse coalitions
in best practices and
essential processes

ter
as
rF

Training Services

ng

What the Institute Offers Your Coalition:

ns Get Sm
litio
ar
a
te
Co
Develops
innovative
products and
services to enhance
coalitions' skills and
performance

Collects the latest research


on prevention and coalitions
and translates into practical
application for coalitions

No or low cost state and regional training options.


Fee-for-service options tailored to and presented on-site
for your coalition.
To learn more about the Institute training options,
email training@cadca.org.

Technical Assistance
Whether youre looking for assistance with membership
recruitment, strategic planning, strategy implementation or
developing evaluation plans, you can call 1-800-54-CADCA,
ext. 240 for help. The Institute provides brief, issue-specific
technical assistance (TA) and resources to coalitions on
request and without charge. Institute TA is individualized to
your community and is designed to improve the capacity,
function and efficacy of coalition members and staff.

Print and Web-Based Reference


Materials and Tool Kits
The Institute offers extensive print and
web-based reference materials that can
be used to guide your work or to inform
members and partners on coalition best
practices. New in 2014, the Institute
released the popular Primer Series as
e-books for easier access by coalitions
across the globe. You can access the newly released e-book
Primers and many other print resources through the website
at www.cadca.org.

Online Learning Opportunities


The Institute offers a wide array of online learning
opportunities. Simply visit www.learning.cadca.org to
access:

Science and Strategies for Coalitions and New Research


Since the Surgeon Generals Call to Action to Prevent and
Reduce Underage Drinking.
On-line courses including Coalition Core Essentials, What
Do We Know About Marijuana and Applying the Strategic
Prevention Framework to Prescription Drug Abuse
The effectiveness of CADCAs training and support model
was highlighted in an August 2012 article titled, Testing
A Comprehensive Community Problem Solving
Framework for Community Coalitions (Journal of
Community Psychology, Vol. 40, No. 6, 681-698). The
article provides support that the model is evidence-based,
and accurately describes the process by which coalitions
contribute to population-level decreases in targeted
substance abuse problems. In addition, recent evaluation
findings demonstrate that coalitions that received training
and technical assistance from the Institute moved faster
through the model than those that did not, highlighting
the significant role that the Institute can play in a
coalitions success.

Got Outcomes! Awards


The prestigious GOT OUTCOMES! Coalition of Excellence
Awards recognize coalitions that achieve, and can make
the case for their contributions to positive changes in
community-level substance use/abuse outcomes. Guided
by local data, these coalitions have implemented a
comprehensive set of tailored strategies and interventions
(including program, practice and policy changes) to target
the unique and specific conditions that contribute to
substance use/abuse in their community. To apply for an
award, email gotoutcomes@cadca.org.

Live and archived webinars on topics important to


coalitions including Preventing Marijuana Abuse www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 3

CADCAs National Coalition Institute (continued)


Research into Action
Research into Action is a free, electronic, one page research
brief published six times a year by the CADCA institute.
Research into Action synthesizes recent research and outlines
how coalition leaders can use the findings to improve their
work. Visit the Research and Resources page at
www.cadca.org to access Research into Action briefs
including The Link Between Violent Crime and Alcohol
Outlet Density and Longitudinal Trends in Impaired Driving
Behavior.
Visit our booth for information on new products and
services from the Institute
Coalitions Core Essentials, 12 module on-line course
based on CADCAs community problem solving process

Share Updates on CADCAs


Mid-Year on Twitter, Facebook
& Instagram!
Social media offers great opportunities to share the
stories of special events like CADCAs Mid-Year in real
time. We invite you to let other participants, your
communities and the larger coalition field know whats
happening by sharing information from the plenary
session, courses and special events through our social
media sites using hashtag #CADCAMidYear. Post
photos, videos, blogs or quick updates
and follow what other participants are uploading.
Visit www.cadca.org to learn more.

Twitter: @CADCA
Mid-Year hashtag: #CADCAMidYear

www.facebook.com/CADCA

Instagram: @CADCACoalitions

Connected Communities:
http://connectedcommunities.ning.com

4 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Collecting Qualitative Data, publication and instructor led


course
What do we know about marijuana?, 3 module, NIDA
sponsored on-line course designed to educate community
members and mobilize coalitions
Research Into Action Briefs, The Link Between Violent
Crime and Alcohol Outlet Density and Longitudinal
Trends in Impaired Driving Behavior
Coalition Ideas Exchange, an online forum to highlight
coalition success stories
Impaired Driving Tool Kit, guide for coalitions to plan and
implement a comprehensive response to impaired driving

Come Make a Video


30 Seconds of Success
Wednesday, July 23
Every day, coalitions
around the country are
changing their communities and saving lives.
Theyre reducing youth
drug use rates and creating safer environments where youth can
thrive. At CADCA, we
want to share your
successes with the
world! Join CADCAs
video crew on
Wednesday to share
your 30 Seconds of
Success on camera.
All we need is 30
seconds of your
time so you can tell
us your top success as a
coalition leader. Well capture your sound bite
on camera and then share it through CADCAs various communications and social media channels. Were taking
RSVPs, so if youre interested, stop by the CADCA booth to
sign up for a timeslot. Everyone who participates will receive
a little thank you gift and every 10th person will draw a special prize from our prize bag. Well be filming all day
Wednesday so come find us in the foyer between the Bonnet Creek and Floridian Ballroom (or stop by the CADCA
booth where youll be directed to the video crew). Come
help us show the world the #PoweroftheMovement!

General Information
ATM

Fitness Center

For your convenience, an ATM machine is located in each


guest room tower. The ATM is located behind the front desk
(stop by the hotel registration desk for access) at the Waldorf
Astoria and another is located in the Hilton Orlando Bonnet
Creek lobby by the gift shop.

Each CADCA hotel has a fitness center available on a


complimentary basis. Please contact your hotel for the
location and hours of operation.

Attractions, Activities & Sightseeing


Be sure to visit the concierge in your hotels lobby for
additional information regarding local attractions, activities,
and tickets to the local amusement parks.

Badges
Badges must be worn at all times during the Mid-Year
courses and events.

Business Center
The FedEx Business Center is located on the lower level of
the Hilton tower. The business center is open from 7 am
7 pm, Monday through Friday and 8 am 5 pm,
Saturday-Sunday.

Lost and Found


If you find an item left behind in a CADCA meeting room,
please return the lost item to the CADCA Registration Desk
(located in the Hilton Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer).

Meals
Breakfast will be provided on Monday during the Opening
Plenary (breakfast will be served from 8 am to 8:30 am with
the program to follow). A continental breakfast will be
available on Tuesday and Wednesday in the Bonnet Creek
Ballroom Foyer from 7:30 am 8:15 am. On Thursday, a
continental breakfast with a Closing Dialogue will take place
from 7:30 am 8:15 am in Bonnet Creek Salons 7-12.

Cell Phones, PDAs and Pagers

For lunch, there are quite a number of options located in the


Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek / Waldorf Astoria complex. In
addition, the Wyndham Hotel which is located right across
the street, has a number of restaurant options.

All cell phones, PDAs and pagers must be turned OFF or set
on vibrate mode during courses.

Message Board

Certificate of Attendance
An official letter of attendance on CADCA letterhead is
available on page 41 of this program. No fee is charged to
obtain a letter of attendance after the meeting. Email
training@cadca.org to request a customized letter or for
other special needs related to verifying your attendance.

CEU credits
Continuing Education Unit (CEU) credits are available
through George Mason University. Forms are available on
page 39 of this program and at the CADCA Registration
Desk (located in the Hilton Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer). A
$30 fee for nonprofit organizations and $40 for profit
organizations must be paid directly to GMU.

Child Access
Youth and children (not registered to attend the NYLI
program) are NOT allowed access to the course meeting
rooms. If you need day care assistance, please contact your
hotel to assist with making the necessary arrangements.

Course Evaluations
We kindly ask that you complete an evaluation form for
each course that you attend. A Room Monitor will be
present in each meeting room and will distribute the
evaluation forms. It is important that you complete the
forms. Your comments are incredibly valuable to us to
organize an even better Mid-Year in the upcoming years.

Leave messages for other attendees or check messages for


you at the Message Board near the CADCA Registration
Desk.

Networking Directory
Both during and after the training, you can access the list of
whos attending by visiting the Mid-Year website at
http://midyear.cadca.org and clicking on the applicable link.
The list will include name, organization and state only.

Presentations & Hand-outs


Copies of most course presentations were posted on the
Mid-Year website approximately two weeks before the
training began based on permission from the presenters. Be
sure to visit http://midyear.cadca.org for more details
(password myti2014). See page 9 for more details on handouts and presentations for this years Mid-Year.

Registration & Information Desk


Staff will be available during registration hours to assist with
questions at the CADCA Registration Desk.
Sunday
3 pm 7 pm
Monday Thursday
7:30 am 4 pm

Seating & Temperature


Seating in the various meeting rooms for the courses is on
a first-come, first-seated basis. If meeting rooms are
overcrowded, CADCA will close the course. Bring your layers
and be prepared for air-conditioned meeting rooms!
www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 5

General Information (continued)


Special Needs
If you have a disability or special need that may have an
impact on your participation at the meeting, please contact
any CADCA staff member on site at the Registration Desk.

Wi-Fi, Cyber Caf and Charging Station


Monday Thursday, 7:30 am 4 pm
Location: Hilton Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer
Need to check your emails or print out a presentation?
Computer kiosks with internet access and Wi-Fi will be
provided in the CADCA Cyber Caf. Wireless internet access
is also available on a complimentary basis in the main lobby
at the Hilton Bonnet Creek Hotel and Waldorf Astoria.

If you need to charge


your phone, pda,
tablet, laptop, etc.
we will have a
charging station
set-up for your
convenience. Please
note that CADCA is
not responsible for any items left unattended at the charging
station.
Each CADCA hotel is providing complimentary internet
access in your guest room as part of your room rate. Please
check with your specific hotel on directions on how to access
the internet.

Transportation
Walt Disney World Parks and Downtown Disney
Shuttle Service

Shuttle Busing to/from the Hilton Orlando Lake


Buena Vista

The Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek and Waldorf Astoria


Orlando are located near Walt Disney World Resort,
offering complimentary luxury motorcoach transportation to
all Walt Disney World Theme Parks and Downtown Disney
Area. Pick-up is conveniently located at the Hilton Orlando
Bonnet Creek Porte-Cochere. The daily transportation
schedule is available at the front desk, through the
Concierge (if youre staying at the Wyndham or Hilton Lake
Buena Vista, please visit that hotels concierge for their
transportation details).

CADCA is providing complimentary shuttle service between


the Hilton Lake Buena Vista Hotel and the Hilton Bonnet
Creek Hotel.
The pick-up and drop off locations are as follows:
Hilton Lake Buena Vista Attractions Entrance (located in the
back by the self-parking lot)
Hilton Bonnet Creek

Convention Porte-Cochere (located


between the Zeta Restaurant and
the Disney store).

The shuttle schedule is as follows:


Sunday, July 20:
Monday, July 21:
Tuesday, July 22:
Wednesday, July 23:
Thursday, July 24:

4 pm 7 pm
7:30 am 9:30 am & 5 pm 10 pm
7:30 am 9:30 am & 5 pm 7:30 pm
7:30 am 9:30 am & 5 pm 7:30 pm
7:30 am 9:30 am & 3:30 pm 6 pm

Please note that the last bus departing from the Hilton
Bonnet Creek will depart hour before the end time (this
schedule is subject to change so please refer to the shuttle
sign at the respective hotels for the most up-to-date details).

6 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Special Events
Power of the Movement Welcome
Reception
Sunday, July 20, 5 pm 6:30 pm
Location: Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salons 4-12
The Power of the Movement will be in full force as coalition
leaders from around the globe gather for the official start of
the 2014 Mid-Year. CADCAs Chairman and CEO General
Dean will open the Mid-Year with remarks, and Doug
Hughes, CADCA Board Member and Executive Director of
The Miami Coalition for a Safe and Drug-Free Community,
will provide a Florida welcome. Join senior CADCA team
members Kareemah Abdullah and Mel Elliott, alongside the
National Youth Leadership Initiative training team for
interactive networking complete with trivia and prizes. This
totally revamped reception also highlights the many ways
CADCA fuels YOUR coalition movement as we feature a
room chock full of exciting new resources. Visit with
CADCA staff in areas dedicated to Toolkits, Publications,
Technical Assistance, Online Courses, Advocacy Initiatives,
Research and Member Benefits. Dont miss this opportunity
to connect, learn and power up for your Mid-Year
experience.

Opening Plenary Breakfast


Monday, July 21, 8 am 9:30 am
Location: Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 4-12
Join us for breakfast (to be served until 8:30 am) with a full
program to include:
Speakers:
Major General Arthur T. Dean (Ret.)
Chairman & CEO, CADCA
Arthur T. Dean became the Chairman &
CEO of CADCA in August 1998. His
responsibilities as Chairman and CEO
include providing strategic direction,
diversifying and increasing funding, leading
the board, being the primary spokesman for
the organization and overseeing the
operations and personnel of CADCA.
Before joining CADCA, he spent 31 years in the U.S. Army.
He retired in August 1998, at the grade of Major General.
During his time in the Army, Gen. Dean served around the
world. He saw combat in the Republic of Vietnam and Saudi
Arabia. He served six years with the 82nd Airborne Division
and the 18th Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg, N.C. He also
served four years in Germany. General Dean commanded
Army units from Company to Brigade for 10 years and
served 10 years at Headquarters, Department of the Army, in
Washington, DC. He is a U.S. Army and Republic of Vietnam
Senior Parachutist and an Army Ranger. He possesses

numerous awards with the highest being two awards of the


U.S. Army Distinguished Service Medal.
General Dean currently serves as a member of the Board of
Advisors for U.S. Army Recruiting Command; member of
ASAEs Key Philanthropic Organization Committee (KPOC);
member of Washington, DC and State of New Jersey
Prevention Councils; and member of the Executive
Committee, National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention;
and CADCAs Board of Directors, for which he serves as
Chairman.
General Dean received his undergraduate degree in history
from Morgan State University in 1967 and his masters
degree in management and supervision from Central
Michigan University in 1977. He is also a graduate of the
Stanford Universitys Advanced Management Program and
the U.S. Armys War College.
Sue Thau
Public Policy Consultant, CADCA
Sue Thau is a Public Policy Consultant
representing Community Anti-Drug
Coalitions of America (CADCA). She is
nationally recognized for her advocacy and
legislative accomplishments on behalf of the
substance abuse prevention field. She has
an extensive background in public policy
and has held high positions at the federal,
state, and local levels. She was a Budget Examiner and
Legislative Analyst at the Office of Management and Budget,
in the Executive Office of the President for over ten years.
She has an undergraduate degree from Cornell University in
Human Development and Family Studies and a Masters
Degree from Rutgers University in City and Regional
Planning. Sue was a driving force behind the passage and
full funding of the Drug-Free Communities Act and has
helped to save and enhance the funding for the Safe and
Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, programs funded
through the Centers for Substance Abuse Prevention and
Treatment in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration. She is highly respected as an expert
on demand reduction issues by members of Congress and
staff on both sides of the aisle on Capitol Hill.
Kana Enomoto
Principal Deputy Administrator, SAMHSA
Kana Enomoto was appointed in August
2011 as the Principal Deputy Administrator
for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration (SAMHSA), at the
U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services (HHS). In this capacity, Ms.
Enomoto serves as the principal advisor to
the Administrator on policies and
www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 7

Special Events (continued)


programmatic activities for an agency with more than 600
employees and a fiscal year budget of approximately $3.5
billion.
Ms. Enomoto brings 23 years of experience in the behavioral
health field, 15 of which have been in federal service at
SAMHSA. Prior to her appointment as Principal Deputy
Administrator, Ms. Enomoto served as the Director of the
newly established Office of Policy, Planning, and Innovation,
where she developed, coordinated, and communicated
SAMHSA policies across the full spectrum of mental health
and substance abuse policy issues.
Ms. Enomoto previously served as the Principal Senior
Advisor to three SAMHSA Administrators between 2005 and
2009, and as the Acting Deputy Administrator between
2008 and 2009. She began her tenure at SAMHSA in 1998
as a Presidential Management Fellow and special assistant to
the Director of the Center for Mental Health Services. She
began her career in research and clinical services in
academia.
Among her many accomplishments, Ms. Enomoto was the
chief editor of SAMHSAs Leading Change: A Plan for
SAMHSAs Roles and Activities 2011-2014 which provides
the framework to position SAMHSA as a public health
agency in an era of health services integration, parity, and
health reform. She also led an agency-wide human capital
initiative, championing an employee led PeopleFirst team to
encourage vertical and horizontal communication and
collaboration and to create an environment that promotes a
learning organization across a multi-generational, diverse
and engaged workforce.
Ms. Enomoto received her bachelors degree in psychology
and masters degree in clinical psychology from the
University of California, Los Angeles and is a 2011 graduate
of Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government,
Senior Managers in Government Program. She has received
awards in recognition of her work, including the Arthur S.
Flemming Award, Managerial or Legal Achievement
category, and the American College of Mental Health
Administration (ACMHA) King Davis Award for Emerging
Leadership in Promoting Diversity and Reducing Disparities.

Khiree Smith
CADCA Lead Youth Trainer / Law Student
Born and raised in Hartford, Connecticut, a
place consistently found on the FBIs Top 20
Most Dangerous Cities list, Khiree defied the
norm. He began contributing at age 12
when was recruited to join The Stump the
Violence Youth Leadership Initiative (Stump),
8 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

an organization where young people are coached to master


public speaking, violent crime and substance abuse
prevention, community activism, leadership, and overall
healthy living. Khiree quickly proved to be one of the
programs most valuable assets, being placed in
administrative and supervisory roles at an impressively young
age. Through work with Stump, Khiree led thousands of
local youth. He taught them to conduct research and
Community Assessments then showed them to translate
that data into Logic Models that helped secure $1.5 million
in grants.
In the summer of 2012 Khiree worked as a White House
intern for the Obama Administration in the Office of
National Drug Control Policy, and he recently addressed
United Nations Officials in Vienna, Austria. While there, he
also coached high school aged ambassadors from Peru, Italy,
Austria and Serbia to deliver presentations regarding their
youth empowerment efforts in their countries. Additionally,
Mr. Smith traveled to meet with Italian government officials
in Rome, Italy. There, he acted as a spokesperson for
CADCAs National Youth Leadership Initiative (NYLI) and
spoke with Italys Director of Drug Policies about ways to
effectively manage youth substance abuse issues. This year,
Khiree represented the U.S. and NYLI when he trained with
youth from more than 40 different countries at the 1st
Global Forum for Youth Leaders on Drug Use Prevention in
Abu Dhabi, UAE. He was recently appointed by Secretary of
Health and Human Services to serve on the National
Advisory Counsel for the Center for Substance Abuse
Prevention.
Today, as a Lead Youth Trainer for the NYLI, he leads a team
of powerful young trainers. They utilize prevention science
and multimedia modalities to inspire over 1000 young
people per year in leadership, prevention and intervention.
With CADCA, Khiree has trained groups of over 400 young
people and their adult advisors. To date, he has educated
and helped develop nearly 3,000 youth and adult advisors.
As Founder and President of T.Y.T Youth Training Services,
Mr. Smith strives to create a nation of authentic young
leaders. Khiree is a second year law student at The Catholic
University of America Columbus School of Law and an
alumnus of Hampton University where he graduated with
honors, earning a bachelors degree in Sociology.

Special Events (continued)


DFC Grantee Town Hall Meeting
Wednesday, July 23, 5:15 pm 6:30 pm
Location: Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 10-12
Staff from the Office of National Drug Control Policy
(ONDCP), SAMHSA and CADCA, will host a session for
grantees and others interested in the Drug-Free
Communities (DFC) Support Program. During the session,
DFC grantees will hear recent updates from the programs
Federal staff and will be given an opportunity to ask
questions.
Meet the ONDCP
Acting Director
ONDCP: Michael Botticelli, Acting
Director and Helen Hernandez,
Administrator, DFC Program
SAMHSA: Charles Reynolds, Director,
Division of Community Programs, CSAP
CADCA: General Arthur T. Dean, Chairman and CEO,
Kareemah Abdullah, National Coalition Institute Director
and Sue Thau, Public Policy Consultant

Looking for Hand-outs and Copies of


Presentations?
Access the Mid-Year Website for all the Latest
Materials!
Presentation Slides
In an effort to conserve paper
and make more materials
accessible online, CADCA
will no longer provide
copies of PowerPoint
presentation slides. The
majority of presentations are
posted on the Mid-Year website for you to review both
prior to, during and after the event and if needed, print.
Hopefully you took the time prior to coming to Orlando
to review the courses list and download presentations for
interested courses in advance. But if time got away from
you, we do have computers and printers available in the
Cyber Caf for you to use but you can also access and
download the materials on your mobile device to follow
along.
How to Access the Course Presentations

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Expand your knowledge with our
NEW online course offerings.
http://learning.cadca.org

1. visit http://midyear.cadca.org
2. click on the Presentations tab
3. click on the Interactive Grid link
4. review the list of courses available per day and select
the ones you plan to attend (always have a back-up in
mind in case your first choice is full)
5. click on the course title to find the list of trainers and
description
6. click on the PDF icon to access the presentation slides
7. the password is myti2014 to open the file and print
Hand-outs (Application Documents)
Mid-Year is still expected to be an intensive learning
experience with skills-building training and in-class
application opportunities. Thus, we will print and provide
copies of your application documents for
each applicable course. As you
would expect, application
documents are worksheets,
templates, checklists, case
studies, work application
documents, important
reference documents,
completed examples,
charts/graphs relevant to
interactive sessions, etc. If your course
has a hand-out, look for them in the back
of the room on the materials table.

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 9

Exhibitors
Visit our exhibitors to learn about their important
products and services for your coalition. Their table top
exhibits will be set in the foyer outside the Bonnet Creek
Ballroom.
Exhibit Hours
Monday Wednesday

8 am 4 pm

Community Systems Group, LLC.


3115 S. Grand Blvd., Ste. 600
St. Louis, MO 63118
Tel: 314 287-5163
www.communitysystemsgroup.com
CSG is one of the nations leading evaluators of community
coalitions. CSG has supported DFC grantees since the first
year the grant was offered. CSG continues to support DFC
coalitions from coast-to-coast with expert staff based across
the country. CSG can help you improve your work and show
your impact.

Dover Youth to Youth


46 Locust Street
Dover, NH 03820
Tel: 603-516-3274
www.DoverY2Y.org
Dover (NH) Youth to Youth is a NH-evidence-based Youth
Empowerment Program. The members conduct a wide
variety of activities each year, including: policy change,
presentations, media, and community awareness initiatives.
Their Toolkit, program materials and training resources are
utilized across the country to start, or energize, youth
advocacy groups.

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)


600 Army Navy Drive
Arlington, VA 22202
Tel: 202-307-7936
www.justice.gov/dea/index.shtml
The Drug Enforcement Administrations Demand Reduction
Program supports national efforts to reduce the demand for
drugs through public messaging campaigns that show the
consequences of drug use. DEAs two websites,
www.getsmartaboutdrugs.com and
www.justthinktwice.com provide valuable drug information
for parents/caregivers, educators, and teens.

Innocorp, Ltd.
PO Box 930064
500 So. Nine Mound Road
Verona, WI 53593
800-272-5023
www.fatalvision.com
Innocorp, Ltd, is the maker of the Fatal Vision Impairment
Simulation Goggles, SIDNE (Simulated Impaired Driving
Experience) and other hands-on awareness and prevention
tools. Innocorp tools help you deliver engaging and
memorable programs and campaigns aimed to stop
impaired driving, underage and binge drinking, distracted
driving and much more.

Operation: PARENT
1350 Kentucky 393
LaGrange, KY 40031
Tel: 502-265-9045
www.operationparent.org
Operation: PARENT is a non-profit organization that offers
an exciting new model for educating parents (and
caregivers) of teens and pre-teens about youth substance
abuse utilizing traditional and non-traditional strategies. This
model can be duplicated in any community and customized
to meet specific needs.

PG Creative Prevention Campaigns


14 NE 1st Avenue, Suite 501
Miami, FL 33132
Tel: 305-350-7995
www.preventioncampaigns.com
PG Creative is a communications agency that offers predesigned and custom prevention campaigns on a wide variety
of topics including alcohol and drugs. For over a decade, weve
worked with coalitions, schools, law enforcement, government
agencies and other organizations, implementing prevention
campaigns across the country. Visit our table or website.

PSA Worldwide
11641 Ridgeline Dr., Suite 120
Colorado Springs, CO 80921
Tel: 719-884-7730
www.psacorp.com
PSA sells promotional and educational items.

REACHing Software/Epiphany
Community Services
95 N. Main St.
Swanton, OH 43558
Tel: 419-343-2849
REACHing Software is an internet based software that
enables coalitions to track their work related to intended
10 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Exhibitors (continued)
outcome. In partnership with ECS, REACHing Software is
able to provide full service evaluation products.

The Recovery Village


633 Umatilla Blvd.
Umatilla, FL 32784
Tel: 813-494-5143
www.therecoveryvillage.com
At The Recovery Village, we provide complete wellness care
and specialize in relapse prevention for adults struggling
with substance abuse and/or eating disorders. Located
minutes from Orlando, Florida at the entrance of the Ocala
National Forest, our facility provides a full continuum of
services; which include drug and alcohol detox, eating
disorder medical stabilization, residential care, individualized
and group therapy and post-treatment options.

RxArmory
30 Pecks Lane
Newtown, CT 06470
Tel: 203-304-0049
www.rxarmory.com
RxArmory is a safe, convenient and affordable method of
securing prescription drugs, reducing the risk of diversion
and preventing accidental or intentional misuse. The
RxArmory aims to protect children, teens and visitors from
having easy access to potentially harmful drugs. The patent
pending RxArmory is easy to use and permanently installs
into existing cabinet or storage space without any tools
required. RxArmory is the prescription for responsible
medicine storage.

Satellite Tracking of People, LLC


1212 North Post Oak Road #100
Houston, TX 77055
Tel: 832-553-9506
www.stopllc.com
When you contract with Satellite Tracking of People expect
to receive: inclusive pricing, lifetime warranty on all
equipment, guaranteed equipment delivery and responsive
and solution-oriented support.

The University of Oklahoma-College


of Liberal Studies
1610 Asp Ave., Suite 108
Norman, OK 73072
Tel: 405-325-3266
OU College of Liberal Studies offers 100% online 33-hour
graduate degree in Prevention Science. Its intended to
develop skills and knowledge necessary to elevate your
ability to help others fight addiction. Need a degree? Get a
degree that matters from a large public research institution.
Graduate Sooner than you think!

Find Us on the Foyer!


Community Anti-Drug Coalitions
of America (CADCA)
625 Slaters Lane, Suite 300
Alexandria, VA 22314
Tel: 1-800-54-CADCA, 703-706-0560
www.cadca.org
www.facebook/cadca
Twitter: @cadca
Instagram: @CADCACoalitions
LinkedIn: @CADCA
www.youtube.com/cadca09
CADCA is the premiere membership organization
representing over 5,000 members worldwide working
to make communities safe, healthy and drug-free.
CADCA strives to build and strengthen the capacity of
community coalitions by providing training and
technical assistance, legislative education and advocacy,
communications and media strategies, and conferences
and special events. Contact Membership@cadca.org for
more information.

Tobacco Prevention Initiatives


Resources
Visit the Tobacco Prevention Initiatives Resources table
to obtain various resources developed by CADCA and
its partners. The toolkits, publications and brochures
provided are designed to assist coalitions developing
and implementing tobacco prevention strategies in their
local communities. The resources from our partners at
the Smoking Cessation Leadership Center will provide
coalitions a guide to implementing tobacco cessation
policies and strategies in partnership with the behavioral
health population. Contact tobacco@cadca.org for
more information.

CADCA National Coalition Institute


625 Slaters Lane, Suite 300
Alexandria, VA 22314
Tel: 1-800-54-CADCA, 703-706-0560 ext. 240
www.cadca.org
The Institute serves as a center for coalition training,
technical assistance, evaluation, research and capacity
building. Pick up publications and other resources at its
exhibit table. Contact training@cadca.org for more
information.

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 11

Course Tracks
Tracks:
Training content has been designed to offer new
concepts that are relevant to emerging, established,
and veteran coalition leaders. Half-day to two-day
courses are scheduled to take place Monday through
Thursday in the following thematic tracks.

Track 1:

Achieving Impact
The coalition movement has achieved success with alcohol
and tobacco prevention among youth with use at historic
lows. The focus of this track is collecting outcomes data and
demonstrating effectiveness. Course content will explore
how to develop and utilize outcomes-focused logic models;
how to use statistical findings to justify strategy
implementation; how to use qualitative and quantitative
techniques for collecting assessment and outcomes data;
how to use the research behind coalition effectiveness to
extract lessons learned and proven approaches for
replication and how to tell your communitys impact stories
using data.

Track 2:

Coalition Essentials
Courses in this track are designed to build the fundamental
base of prevention science and strategic planning for new
coalition staff or coalition volunteers. This track includes a
2.5-day course on the essential parts of CADCAs problemsolving process which is predicated on SAMHSAs Strategic
Prevention Framework (SPF). This course, called Coalition
Core Essentials, includes sessions on conducting a
community assessment and problem analysis, developing
logic models and comprehensive strategies, implementation,
evaluation, and building coalition capacity. Each session will
include hands-on application of the content, relevant tools
and resource material as well as opportunities to network
with others engaged in conducting successful community
change efforts. Participants are encouraged to bring along
the latest versions of their coalitions community assessment,
logic models, strategic and action plans to the training.

12 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Track 3:

Coalition Expansion
The coalition movement is filled with leaders who are bold
and smart. Even with great leadership, sometimes the
vehicle for change the coalition organization needs a
tune-up to run more effectively. For those leaders looking to
make improvements, this track will offer course content in
implementing business development strategies to improve
coalition operations; developing board members to be
better leaders of the coalitions mission; recruiting and
maintaining non-traditional sector representatives; engaging
members to carry out the work of the coalition; cross-sector
planning and implementation; and expanding the coalitions
cultural, geographic or mission footprint for place-based
strategic advancement.

Track 4:

Communications
To maintain the movements momentum, coalition leaders
must be ever visible and vocal. Effective messaging,
presence, and image can solidify your coalition as prevention
experts. Course content in this track will cover defining your
coalitions brand; principles of message development and
framing; targeted communications development to support
strategies and activities; partnership development with the
media sector; gaining access to and keeping the attention of
media outlets; and packaging yourself as a subject matter
expert and media contact for drug-related issues.

Track 5:

Community Mobilization
In the wake of competing social issues, increasing drug
demand and shrinking resources, we must align and
mobilize for collective action. At the heart of every
successful movement are citizens ready to become agents
for change to transform their communities. If youre ready
to harness that power and channel it to keep your youth
safe and healthy, this track is for you. Course content will
cover the principles of organizing and mobilizing community
members to create change; leading a mobilizing initiative to
advance the coalitions mission; generating community buyin to create a collective voice on substance use issues and
mobilizing micro-communities to address unique risk and
protective factors of ethnicity and culture.

Course Tracks (continued)


Track 6:

Track 9:

The coalition movement has power because of the large


network of drug prevention champions who are willing to
take a stand and speak out. For those champions looking for
ways to make an impact, this track will offer course content
on cultivating relationships with policy makers;
communicating effectively with them; developing and
executing effective local education and advocacy tactics;
using media to advance policy and systems change; effective
enforcement and adjudication strategies; and the definitions
and distinctions between education, advocacy and lobbying.

To remain effective, the movement must be agile and


mobile. Some of the most alarming trends in substance
abuse are proving to be more than just a passing phase.
CADCA is exploring prevention science, strategies from
related fields, and government responses and bringing them
to you as part of our ongoing role. For example, the rapid
increases in medical marijuana use and the momentum for
recreational legalization requires well-articulated messages
for addressing these issues. New courses on strategic actions
for coalitions will be delivered to develop expertise,
leadership, and capacity to address marijuana specifically
and implement strategies in the wake of these
developments. Other course content will cover promising
and science-based strategies to address drug-specific
problems over-the-counter and prescription drug misuse
and abuse, synthetic drugs, heroin, tobacco, alcohol, and
other illicit drugs and associated consequences.

Education and Advocacy

Track 7:

Interrelated Prevention
Community coalitions are perfectly poised to scale their
successes and serve as the lead organization to a more
sophisticated way of collaborating across systems and issues.
Imagine applying this approach to multi-disciplinary
comprehensive community initiatives. Course content in this
track will explore how to broaden and deepen prevention
work and the application of CADCAs community problemsolving process and how to address nexus issues by forming
a common agenda among groups addressing complex and
interrelated public health and public safety issues.

Whats Trending?

Track 8:

Sustainability
Maintaining the power of the movement requires strong,
sustainable coalitions at the local level. Sustainable coalitions
are those that have enough human, social and financial
resources to maximize their impact over time. This track will
provide coalitions with the skills and tools they need to
safeguard staying power in their community. Course content
in this track will cover topics including strategies to diversify
coalitions funding portfolios; social entrepreneurship; costbenefit analysis of a coalition and institutionalization of the
coalitions work into the communitys mission as essential
tools for sustainability. Additionally, courses will explore
fundraising campaign ideas; and innovative public financing
strategies.

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 13

Monday, July 21

9:45amnoon

1:30pm2:50pm

3:10pm5pm

Tuesday, July 22

8:30am10:20am

TRACK 2

TRACK 3

TRACK 4

Achieving Impact

Coalition
Essentials

Coalition Expansion

Communications

Qualitative Data: Myths, Planning and


Mysteries and Uses
Evaluation for
Room: Flagler-Gilchrist
the Prevention
Specialist
Room:
BC Salon 1

Science of
Prevention
Room:
Hamilton-Indian
River

Becoming the
Community Story Teller:
Environmental Scans,
Town Halls and Focus
Groups
Room: BC Salon 2

Coalition Core
Essentials, Pt 1
Room:
BC Salon 9

Digging Deeper into the Community Story:


One-on-one Interviews and Key Informant
Interviews
Room: BC Salon 6

Coalition Core
Essentials,
Pts 2 and 3
Room:
BC Salon 9

10:40amnoon

1:30pm2:50pm

Have Qualitative
DataNow What Do We Do With It?
Room: BC Salon 6

Wednesday, July 23

8:30am10:20am

10:40amnoon

1:30pm2:50pm

Writing Effective
Applications for the
DFC Support Program
Room: Orange

Overcoming
Challenges to
Building
Successful Innercity and Urban
Coalitions
Room: Palm
Beach

Organizational
The PowerPoint of Beyond Facebook: Harnessing the
Management for the Movement
Power of Social Media for Non-profits
Coalitions
Room: BC Salon 2 Room: BC Salon 3
Room:
FL Salon F

Beyond Facebook: Harnessing the Power of Social Media


for Non-profits
(repeat)
Room: BC Salon 3

Keeping Up With
the Carcinogens:
A Guide to
Ending
CoalitionRetailer Silos
Room:
BC Salon 1

Organizational
Management for
Coalitions
(repeat)
Room:
FL Salon A-B

Working Yourself
Into the Spotlight
The Importance
of Strategic
Communication
Planning
Room:
BC Salon 4-5

New Research
Since the Surgeon Generals
Call to Action to
Prevent and
Reduce Underage Drinking
Room: FlaglerGilchrist

3:10pm5pm
Evaluating Collective Impact:
Understanding
the Effectiveness
of Community
National Data to Local
Partnerships
Application: Findings from and their Comthe DFC Ntl Evaluation
munity Change
Room: Orange
Strategies, Pt 1
Room:
Making the Strategy to BC Salon 3
Outcomes Connection:
Roundtable Discussion
Room: Orange

Coalition Core
Essentials,
Pts 4 and 5
Room:
BC Salon 9

Evaluating Collective Impact:


Understanding the Effectiveness of
Community Partnerships and their
Community Change Strategies, Pt 2
Room: BC Salon 3

The PowerPoint
of the
Movement
(repeat)
Room: Sarasota

Leading from
Behind:
Leadership
Development for
Coalition Staff
Room:
FL Salon A-B

The Urban Caf:


Real
Conversations,
Real Issues, Real
Solutions
Room:
Hamilton-Indian
River

Principles of
Communication
Techniques for the
Prevention
Specialist
Room: BC Salon 2

Communications
Tune Up: Your
Public Face
Collateral
Development &
Review
Room: HamiltonIndian River

Communications
Tune-Up: Be Your
Own Video
Producer
Room: FlaglerGilchrist

Communications
Tune-Up: In Front
of the Camera
Room: BC Salon 1

Onward &
Upward: How to
Use SAMHSA
Communications
Initiatives to Drive
Prevention
Momentum in
Your Community
Room: FL Salon C

Communications Tune-Up: In Front of


the Camera
(repeat)
Room: BC Salon 1

Communications
Tune-Up: Be Your
Own Video
Producer (repeat)
Room: FlaglerGilchrist

Communications
Tune Up: Your
Public Face
Collateral
Development &
Review (repeat)
Room: HamiltonIndian River

Communications
Tune-Up: Be Your
Own Video
Producer (repeat)
Room: FlaglerGilchrist

Communications
Tune Up: Your
Public Face
Collateral
Development &
Review (repeat)
Room: HamiltonIndian River

3:10pm5pm
8:30am10:20am

Thursday, July 24

2014 MID-YEAR TRAINING INSTITUTE COURSE SCHEDULE

Time

TRACK 1

10:40amnoon

1:30pm2:50pm
3:10pm5pm

14 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Ethics for the


Prevention
Specialist
Room: Jackson

Leading from
Behind:
Leadership
Development for
Coalition Staff
(repeat)
Room:
BC Salon 6

Messages and
Metrics: How
Does Your
Communication
Plan Measure Up?
Room: FL Salon C

Communications Tune-Up: In Front of


the Camera (repeat)
Room: BC Salon 1

TRACK 5

TRACK 6

TRACK 7

TRACK 8

TRACK 9

Community
Mobilization

Education & Advocacy

Interrelated Prevention

Sustainability

What's Trending

Community
Mobilizing and
Community
Organizing:
Harnessing People
Power, Pt. 1
Room: FL Salon C

Education &
Advocacy Clinic
Room:
FL Salon A-B

Alcohol Marketing
and Youth: Digital
and Social Media
Room:
FL Salon D-E

Common Causes:
Ramping Up the
Effectiveness of
Community
Efforts, Pt 1
Room: Orange

Media Advocacy to Advance Effective


Policies and Systems Change
Room: FL Salon D-E

Community
Mobilizing and
Community
Organizing:
Harnessing People
Power, Pt. 2
Room: FL Salon C

Principles of the Environmental


Approach for the Prevention Specialist
Room: BC Salon 3

Principles of
Community
Organizing for the
Prevention
Specialist
Room: BC Salon 3

Common Causes:
Ramping Up the
Effectiveness of
Community
Efforts, Pt 2
Room: Orange

Problem Gambling and Drug Addictions:


Hitting Rock Bottom
Room: Hamilton-Indian River

Anyone Can Be A
Fundraiser
Room:
FL Salon A-B

The Naked Truth


About Marijuana
Room:
BC Salon 10-12

Power Session
with your Federal
Partner: Defining
Prevention's Role
in Primary Care
Room:
BC Salon 4-5

World Health
Organizations
(WHO) Global
Strategy to Reduce
the Harmful Use of
Alcohol
Room: BC Salon 2

Building a Strong
Community Together: Increase
Your Capacity with
Unconventional
Strategies to Maintain the Power of
the Movement
Room: Jackson

State & Coalition


Responses to the
Federal
Enforcement
Priority Areas for
Marijuana
Room:
BC Salon 10-12

Faking It! The


Challenge of
Synthetics
Room:
BC Salon 7-8

State & Local


Conditions &
Mapping
Strategies: Illegal
Marijuana Use
Room:
BC Salon 10-12

Coalition
Strategies for
Preventing Illicit
Drug Use
Room:
BC Salon 7-8

State & Local


Conditions &
Mapping
Strategies: Medical
Marijuana Use
Room:
BC Salon 10-12

New Trends
Got You All
Choked Up?
Room: FL Salon C

State & Local


Conditions &
Mapping
Strategies:
Recreational
Marijuana Use
Room:
BC Salon 7-8

Engaging with
State-Level
Partners to Reduce
Prescription Drug
Abuse
Room: FL Salon C

Problem Gambling
and Drug
Addictions: Hitting
Rock Bottom
(repeat)
Room: HamiltonIndian River

How to be an Effective Advocate: Tips


and Tools for Changing Policy at the
National Level
Room: BC Salon 7-8

Building Anti-drug
Coalitions in
Multiethnic /
Latino
Communities
Room: Jackson

The First Date. And, How to Get a


Second: Legislative Relationship
Building
Room: BC Salon 2

Identifying and
Combating
Normative
Influences that
Increase Alcohol
and Other Drugs
Use
Room:BC Salon 2

MEETING ROOM LEGEND


BC = Bonnet Creek Ballroom
FL = Floridian Ballroom

Using Research to Prevent Impaired Driving


Room: BC Salon 4-5

Cost-benefit
Analysis of
Prevention
Room: BC Salon 1

What Works? Sustainability Approaches Informed by Research Coalition


Responding to Marijuana Legalization
and Practice
Sustainability for
Rhetoric
Room: BC Salon 1
Rural Communities Room: BC Salon 4-5
Room:
FL Salon A-B

Both Ballrooms are on the


Lobby Level.
All other meeting rooms are
on the Ground Level.

Responding to Marijuana Legalization


Rhetoric (repeat)
Room: BC Salon 4-5

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 15

Course Descriptions
MONDAY, JULY 21
9:45 am noon
Track 1
Qualitative Data: Myths, Mysteries and Uses
Room: Flagler-Gilchrist
Trainer: Deacon Dzierzawski (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: This course will provide an overview of what
qualitative data is and what it is not; dispelling the myths
and bringing to light how it can be used for assessment and
ongoing evaluation. Participants in this session will become
grounded in qualitative data basics including an introduction
to some commonly used qualitative data collection
techniques. By the end of the course, participants will be
energized and prepared to engage in further discussion and
learn how to conduct and analyze qualitative data. This
course is proceeded by two courses that will provide indepth training on how to actually conduct several qualitative
data collection techniques and a capstone course focused on
the use of qualitative data in the outcome evaluation
process, not just to support coalition assessment. It is
recommended that you attend this course if you plan to
attend one or both of the two courses on methodologies.

Track 2
Science of Prevention
Room: Hamilton-Indian River
Trainer: Heidi Bainbridge (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: This course will offer a glimpse into the history
of prevention theory and major prevention models utilized
with a focus on the evolution of the scientific research
supporting the paradigm shift from individual behavior
change strategies to a comprehensive approach anchored by
community-level behavior change strategies. This course will
emphasize the social ecological model and the research
supporting how coalitions are perfect vehicles to bring about
community-level change. This course is perfect for new
prevention practitioners, particularly those involved in
coalitions.

Track 4
Beyond Facebook: Harnessing the Power of Social
Media for Non-Profits
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 3
Trainer: Curtis Hougland (Founder & Principal, Attention
USA and Member, CADCA Board of Directors)
Description: Social media has transformed the way we
communicate and market what we do to the world.
Nonprofits have much to gain and nothing to lose in
sharpening their social media skills. For coalitions, an active
social media plan is not optional, it is imperative for success.
But how can we go beyond the safe confines of Facebook
16 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

and Twitter, or use these tools more effectively? What are


we doing on YouTube that is unique and sharable? Learn
from social media expert and CADCA Board Member Curtis
Hougland specific ways the non-profit leader can harness
the internet and emerging technology platforms to improve
the coalition brand. Take your current social media and turn
up the volume to have your message heard, build a
following and raise funds.
Note: This course will be repeated in its entirety on
Monday at 1:30 pm.

Track 4
The PowerPoint of the Movement
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 2
Trainer: Kirby Crider (Materials Design Manager, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: We all use tools like PowerPoint to visually
communicate on a regular basis, to community members,
coalition partners, key stakeholders, and even the public.
But how well is our message received? In this session, well
explore the real reasons for standing in front of a room
clicking through a set of slides. Well explore some of the
most common presentation mistakes and learn how to
correct them. Finally, well learn how to think like a
designer and tap into our creative potential to build
powerful, world-changing visual messages.
It is recommended that you bring your laptop and a
presentation file that you would like to revamp and improve.
But, if you dont have a laptop with you, there will still be
plenty of opportunity to think about creating effective
presentations using pen and paper.
Note: This course will be repeated in its entirety on
Thursday at 8:30 am.

Track 6
Alcohol Marketing and Youth: Digital and Social
Media
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon D-E
Trainer: David Jernigan, Ph.D. (Associate Professor,
Department of Health, Behavior and Society, and Director,
Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public Health)
Description: While there is ample research evidence that
young peoples drinking decisions are influenced by
exposure to alcohol marketing of various kinds, there is
relatively little information about young peoples exposure to
such marketing in digital and social media. This course will
introduce participants to various forms of alcohol marketing
in digital and social media, document the pace of increased
alcohol marketing in this space and reveal the preliminary
results of the first-ever survey of youth and adult exposure
to and participation in alcohol marketing in social media. It

Course Descriptions
will close with a discussion of policy and other options
available for reducing or protecting youth from the effects of
this exposure.

Track 6
Education and Advocacy Clinic
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon A-B
Trainer: Sue Thau (Public Policy Consultant, CADCA)
Description: Many coalition leaders understand the
importance of educating policymakers and advocating for
policy and systems change. Even for the most seasoned
coalition leaders, when it comes down to composing emails,
alerts, testimony, talking points, and issue briefs, the exact
language to use causes them to pause with concern that
they are stepping over the line into lobbying. This course will
provide examples of original pieces written by coalitions and
the edits recommended by CADCAs Public Policy Team to
keep the message firmly in the education/advocacy lane
and out of the lobbying lane. During the second portion of
this session, coalitions will be able to obtain advice from Sue
Thau, CADCAs Public Policy Consultant, on their own
written education and advocacy materials so participants are
encouraged to bring any materials they want to be critiqued.

MONDAY, JULY 21
9:45 am 5 pm
Track 1
Planning and Evaluation for the Prevention
Specialist
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 1
Trainer: David Shavel (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs National
Coalition Institute)
Description: This course for coalition leaders and members
addresses the key elements of the Planning and Evaluation
Domain of the Prevention Specialist Certification process
while providing a customized application of several elements
of the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) including
assessment, planning, and evaluation. The course walks
through the SPF steps in a way that provides hands-on
application of the content and material. Participants will be
able to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the session
to enhance their existing coalition processes and outcomes.

Track 3
Organizational Management for Coalitions
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon F
Trainer: Sharon OHara (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: This one-day training will provide a
comprehensive examination of the key elements required to
form and operate a sustainable coalition to create
community-level changes in substance abuse. The focus will
be on the nuts and bolts of effective coalition

management such as: executive committee responsibilities,


delineation of roles and responsibilities, work group
structure and management, collective decision making,
organizational structure, governing documents, meeting
management, and internal communications.
Note: This course will be repeated in its entirety on
Tuesday at 8:30 am.

Track 3
Overcoming Challenges to Building Successful
Inner-city and Urban Coalitions
Room: Palm Beach
Trainer: Carlton Hall (Deputy Director, Training & Technical
Assistance, CADCAs National Coalition Institute)
Description: Given the large populations and significant
consequences of drug use, why are there so few DFCfunded coalitions operating in inner-city urban
environments? The answer is provided in this course which
addresses the key issues keeping inner-city and urban
communities from developing strong coalitions and
receiving DFC funding. During the full-day session, we will
break down the issues and offer practical and realistic
solutions to help new and existing inner-city and urban
coalitions overcome the challenges and grow to become
effective catalysts for change in their communities. In
addition, we will hear from experienced leaders of inner-city
and urban coalitions who will share their successes and
opportunities for improvement while working in their
communities.

Track 5
Community Mobilizing and Community
Organizing: Harnessing People Power, Part 1
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon C
Trainer: Michael Sparks (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: In the context of relentless societal pressure to
expand the availability and access to alcohol and other
drugs (ATOD) in communities, coalitions face significant
challenges to effectively respond. Addressing new and
existing ATOD problems and ever-changing local conditions
requires significant collective action from sectors AND
residents. At the heart of every successful movement are
grassroots community members ready to become agents for
community transformation. If youre ready to build and
harness the power of grassroots local activism in your
community coalition, this 1.5-day course is for you.
The course will begin with the principles of organizing and
mobilizing community members to create change,
understanding the importance of community organizing to
support environmental strategies, and leading a mobilizing
initiative to advance your coalitions policy and system
change strategies. This Monday morning session of the
www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 17

Course Descriptions
Monday, July 21

MONDAY, JULY 21

9:45 am 5 pm (continued)

1:30 pm 5 pm

course is open to all participants. By the end of the Monday


morning session, participants who want to continue in this
course will be expected to have identified a specific ATOD
policy option around which they plan to mobilize community
residents.

Track 1
Becoming the Community Story Teller:
Environmental Scans, Town Hall Meetings and
Focus Groups

During the Monday afternoon session of this course,


participants will learn and apply the steps associated with
conducting a policy campaign, differentiate and utilize
grassroots and grasstops community participation, apply the
community organizing steps to a policy campaign, and
practice conducting relational organizing outreach.
Note: This course continues on Tuesday at 8:30 am.

Track 7
Common Causes: Ramping Up the Effectiveness of
Community Efforts, Part 1
Room: Orange
Trainer: Paul Evensen, Ph.D. (President, CSG, LLC)
Group Facilitators: Brenda Bone (Managing Director,
Community Evaluation), Cindy Pharis (Community
Evaluator), Kim Linkel (Community Evaluator) and Amanda
Sutter (Community Evaluator, CSG LLC)
Description: Both analyzing complex community issues and
turning that analysis into a clear picture really pay off for
community coalitions. The issue analysis process allows
multiple stakeholders to produce a local diagnosis, based on
data, which drives effectiveness of community efforts. The
visualization process allows stakeholders to validate their
assumptions and set the foundation for clear
communications and a rigorous evaluation of community
strategies.
This advanced course will teach partnership staff, facilitators,
and volunteers how to apply four easy issue analysis
techniques to data from their own work and be able to use
these methods with their own partnership members and
volunteers. Participants will also learn the steps for
converting this analysis into a visual picture of how their
coalition will improve community outcomes. Finally,
participants will identify common cause across issues in
the form of shared root causes or local conditions that
contribute to multiple community concerns. This course is
ideal for those who are looking for practical ways to get
more impact.
Note: Part 2 of this course will take place on Tuesday at
8:30 am.

18 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 2


Trainer: Deacon Dzierzawski (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: This experiential course builds off of
Qualitative Data: Myths, Mysteries and Uses. It focuses on
an in-depth conversation and practice of three of the
common qualitative data collection techniques
environmental scans, town hall meetings, and focus
groups/listening sessions. The learning experience will
include creating question paths that can be used for each
technique and trying out tools for data collection and
objective setting. Participants will learn how to carry out
these techniques, their limitations, their strengths and how
to get the most out of them. It is highly recommended, but
not required, that you attend the foundations course on
Monday morning in preparation for this course.

Track 2
Coalition Core Essentials, Part 1
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 9
Trainer: Heidi Bainbridge (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: This course will cover the essential parts of
CADCAs problem-solving process which is predicated on
SAMHSAs Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF). Over 2.5
days of training, participants will learn how to conduct a
community assessment and problem analysis, develop logic
models and comprehensive strategies, implement plans, set
measurable objectives, and build coalition capacity. Each
session will include hands-on application of the content,
relevant tools and resource material as well as opportunities
to network with others engaged in conducting successful
community change efforts. Participants are encouraged to
bring along the latest versions of their coalitions community
assessment, logic models, strategic and action plans to the
training.
Note: Parts 2 and 3 of this course are scheduled to take
place on Tuesday at 8:30 am and Parts 4 and 5 will take
place on Wednesday at 8:30 am.

Course Descriptions
Track 4
Beyond Facebook: Harnessing the Power of Social
Media for Non-Profits
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 3
Trainer: Curtis Hougland (Founder & Principal, Attention
USA and Member, CADCA Board of Directors)
Description: Refer to the Monday, 9:45 am listing for the
description (course repeated).

Track 6
Media Advocacy to Advance Effective Policies and
Systems Change
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon D-E
Trainer: David Jernigan, Ph.D. (Associate Professor,
Department of Health, Behavior and Society, and Director,
Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public Health)
Description: Media advocacy, the strategic use of the mass
media to support community organizing and coalition
building to change public policies, is a powerful and
important tool for reducing excessive and underage drinking
and related problems. This session will introduce the core
concepts of media advocacy, and assist participants to apply
them to campaigns to implement evidence-based
environmental strategies for reducing alcohol-related
problems. By the end of this session, participants will be able
to define media advocacy and apply it to alcohol policy
issues; apply principles of framing to accessing the news
media and shaping news stories about alcohol and public
health; and recognize effective techniques for advancing
public health frames and countering opposing frames about
alcohol policy issues.

Track 7
Problem Gambling and Drug Addictions: Hitting
Rock Bottom
Room: Hamilton-Indian River
Trainer: Myron Quon, Esq. (Executive Director, National
Asian Pacific American Families Against Substance Abuse)
Description: In this training, we will discuss the prevalence of
problem gambling (including gambling disorder) and its
warning signs. The trainer will explore the revised DSM-5 and
its inclusion of gambling disorder with substance use
disorders. The course will then connect gambling disorder
with the high rates of co-occurring behavioral health needs substance use disorders and other mental health issues. The
course will then discuss some of the cultural and language
barriers to accessing treatment, with a focus on women, older
adults, African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and
Asian American problem gamblers. Finally, the course will
explore some of the steps that affected loved ones can take to
shore up the financial stability of the problem gambler.

Track 8
Anyone Can Be A Fundraiser
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon A-B
Trainer: CADCA Facilitated
Description: Whether your coalition has a million dollars in
the bank or is barely getting by on a shoestring budget,
the idea of more funds coming into your coalition is an
enticing one. And, whether, your coalition services a rural
county or the urban core, you, too, can be a fundraiser.
How, you ask? Because coalition fundraising is very much
about connecting the coalitions mission with the interests of
potential stakeholder organizations and people and then
building lasting relationships with those stakeholders,
coalition staff and members are natural sellers to convince
investors.
Join us as we discover the nuts and bolts of fundraising
through dynamic lecture, group activities, and role playing.
This course will explore the fundamentals of fundraising
with plenty of time for applying fundraising principles to
your coalition including determining your coalitions
readiness for fundraising, building an integrated fundraising
plan and mobilizing members to implement the plan.

Track 9
The Naked Truth About Marijuana
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 10-12
Trainers: Sue Thau (Public Policy Consultant, CADCA), Tony
Coder (Assistant Director, Drug Free Action Alliance) and
Tom Gorman (Director, Rocky Mountain HIDTA)
Description: Marijuana continues to be a hot topic in every
community throughout the country. The landscape is
constantly changing and coalitions must be armed with
effective tactics, tools and messages to counteract this.
Participants in this session will gain a better understanding
of the impact of marijuana use on the adolescent brain, how
to translate the science on marijuana, and uncover the
naked truth to develop prevention messages that resonate
at the community level. Participants will also hear from
community leaders who are proactively working to prevent
marijuana laws and initiatives from being passed in their
states, and how to effectively apply the lessons learned.

Note: This course will be repeated in its entirety on


Tuesday at 1:30 pm.
www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 19

Course Descriptions
Monday, July 21
1:30 pm 5 pm (continued)
Track 9
Power Session with your Federal Partner:
Defining Prevention's Role in Primary Care
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 4-5
Trainer: Frances M. Harding (Director, CSAP/SAMHSA)
Description: As the nation continues to work under the
National Prevention Strategy's priorities, specifically tobaccofree living; preventing drug abuse and excessive alcohol use;
and mental and emotional well-being, integrating behavioral
health with primary care is a challenge we face together.
This session will be divided into three interactive
opportunities for learning. First, Fran Harding will provide
insight on SAMHSA's current strategic planning and
proposed prevention initiatives to assist states and
communities with their overall efforts in meeting the
challenges of integration with primary care. Second, a highly
energized learning experience will test the prevention
knowledge, skills, and experiences of workshop participants.
Third, the presenters will wrap up this unique session with a
panel of three communities sharing their success in
connecting current prevention programming with primary
care. Participants can expect to leave this session with
increased knowledge, tools, and strategies to enhance their
skills in meeting the challenge in connecting substance
abuse prevention with the overall health of their community.

TUESDAY, JULY 22
8:30 am noon
Track 1
Digging Deeper into the Community Story: Oneon-One Interviews and Key Informant Interviews
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 6
Trainer: Deacon Dzierzawski (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: This experiential course builds off of
Qualitative Data: Myths, Mysteries and Uses. It focuses on an
in-depth conversation and practice of two of the common
qualitative data collection techniques one-on-one
interviews and key informant interviews. The learning
experience will include creating question paths that can be
used for each technique and trying out tools for data
collection and objective setting. Participants will learn how
to carry out these techniques, their limitations, their
strengths and how to get the most out of them. It is highly
recommended, but not required, that you attend the
foundations course on Monday morning in preparation for
this course.

20 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Track 3
Keeping up with the Carcinogens: A Guide to
Ending Coalition-Retailer Silos
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 1
Trainers: Alicia Smith (Manager, Tobacco Prevention
Programs, CADCA) and Colleen Hopkins (Senior Associate,
Tobacco Prevention Programs, CADCA)
Description: This course illustrates the need for ongoing
data collection and building non-traditional partnerships to
monitor the nature and extent of tobacco use in local
communities. The course will review the environmental
factors that play a key role in creating social norms. The
course content addresses the need for coalitions to
proactively implement strategies that involve retailers in
tobacco prevention work; coalition partnership building
often takes place on unnatural bridges of compromise.
Strong coalition capacity and sustainability are necessary to
support successful long-term implementation of tobacco
control strategies. Therefore, partnering with local tobacco
retailers to educate them about tobacco marketing practices
and its effect on the communitys framework could have an
extensive impact on youth access to tobacco products and
exposure to industry advertising.

Track 4
Communications Tune-Up: Be Your Own
Video Producer
Room: Flagler-Gilchrist
Trainer: Pat Giniger Snyder (Video/Film Producer, Director,
Editor and Writer, Rembrandt Films)
Description: A key to coalition success is to ensure that its
goals, objectives and activities are effectively
communicatedwhether its through a website, on
brochures and posters or producing your own coalition
video. While each coalition has a toolbox of outreach
strategies at its disposal, messaging must be consistent
across each medium. The Communications Tune-up is a
three-part course designed to help coalition leaders and
staff evaluate and improve their organizations messaging,
materials and outreach strategies. From Tuesday-Thursday,
all three half-day courses will be delivered to allow for
maximum opportunities to attend.
Lets assume that your coalition is planning a press
conference, and you are in charge of creating a Public
Service Announcement (PSA) that will be featured at the
event and later used on your website. How can you refine
your coalitions 30-second pitch so it fits into a video
format? What message points are critical? What images will
enhance your storyline? What are some simple editing tips
that you can do yourself OR ask someone else to do? And
then, how do you upload the video so that you can show it
at your press conference AND have it on your coalitions
website? Through a fun learning experience and hands-on
activities, you will understand what goes into the video

Course Descriptions
production process; learn about key elements that make
effective videos; refine a coalitions 30-second pitch so it
visually tells a story through video; create storyboards that
you can take home and use when creating a new video;
practice capturing some of these elements on-camera; and
learn how to upload completed videos to the Internet.
Attendees are strongly encouraged but not required to bring
a camera that captures videowhether its a phone, iPad,
video camera or still camera with video recording
capabilities.

and other materials to this session. If interested, also be


ready to critique your website for effective messaging.

This course, Be Your Own Video Produceris a component


of the Communications Tune-up. You can choose to
participate in this course only or take advantage of all three
to achieve your coalitions optimal Communications Tune-up.
Check out descriptions for Your Public Face-Collateral
Development & Review and In Front of the Camera for
details about the companion courses.

Note: This course will be repeated in its entirety on


Wednesday at 1:30 pm and again Thursday at 8:30 am.

Note: This course will be repeated in its entirety on


Wednesday at 1:30 pm and again on Thursday at
8:30 am.

Track 4
Communications Tune-Up: Your Public Face
Collateral Development & Review
Room: Hamilton-Indian River
Trainer: Barb Cooper (President, Cooper Communications)
Description: A key to coalition success is to ensure that its
goals, objectives and activities are effectively
communicatedwhether its through a website, on
brochures and posters or producing your own coalition
video. While each coalition has a toolbox of outreach
strategies at its disposal, messaging must be consistent
across each medium. The Communications Tune-up is a
three-part course designed to help coalition leaders and staff
evaluate and improve their organizations messaging,
materials and outreach strategies. From Tuesday-Thursday, all
three half-day courses will be delivered to allow for
maximum opportunities to attend.
Lets assume that your coalition is planning a press
conference. What messaging is mission-critical, and what is
your coalitions brand? Do you need brochures and posters?
What about talking points? Will you be featuring your
website? Through experiential and hands-on activities during
this course, you will develop and/or refine your coalitions
brand; identify where to obtain talking points data, create
and/or refine talking points and present them to the rest of
the group for critiquing; and evaluate websites, brochures
and other collateral for consistent messaging and connect
the dots between this exercise and improving website and
materials messaging and content. In order to improve your
coalitions public face, you are strongly encouraged to
bring copies of your brochures, fact sheets, talking points

This course, Your Public FaceCollateral Development &


Reviewis a component of the Communications Tune-up.
You can choose to participate in this course only or take
advantage of all three to achieve your coalitions optimal
Communications Tune-up. Check out descriptions for In
Front of the Camera and Be Your Own Video Producer for
details about the companion courses.

Track 5
Community Mobilizing and Community
Organizing: Harnessing People Power, Part 2
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon C
Trainer: Michael Sparks (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: Any participant, including those from the
Monday morning and Monday afternoon sessions, is invited
to attend this final session on Tuesday morning. During this
session, the instructor along with several coalition leaders
will offer lessons learned and steps for mobilizing microcommunities to address specific risk factors and health and
safety challenges that are unique to some ethnic and
cultural groups.
Note: This course is not a repeat but a continuation
from Monday at 9:45 am (refer to that course for the
complete description).

Track 6
Principles of the Environmental Approach for the
Prevention Specialist
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 3
Trainer: David Shavel (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs National
Coalition Institute)
Description: This information-filled half-day course for
coalition leaders and members addresses key principles
related to content included in the Public Policy and
Environmental Change Domain of the Certified Prevention
Specialist credentialing process. The course provides
foundational information for key concepts underlying
environmental prevention and public policy work. Course
content will be provided in a way that enables participants
to share the information with their coalitions and more
effectively participate in the development and
implementation of effective environmental- and public
policy-based strategies.

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 21

Course Descriptions
Tuesday, July 22
8:30 am noon (continued)
Track 7
World Health Organizations (WHO) Global
Strategy to Reduce the Harmful Use of Alcohol
Room: BC Salon 2
Trainers: Ralph Hingson, Sc.D. (Director, Division of
Epidemiology and Prevention Research, NIAAA) and
Maristela Monteiro, M.D., Ph.D. (Senior Advisor, Alcohol and
Substance Abuse, Pan American Health Organization
[PAHO]), David Jernigan, Ph.D. (Associate Professor,
Department of Health, Behavior and Society, and Director,
Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Johns Hopkins
University School of Public Health) and Eduardo HernndezAlarcn, Ph.D (Vice President, International Programs,
CADCA)
Description: This course will discuss the World Health
Organizations (WHO) global strategy to reduce the harmful
use of alcohol. The course will also discuss best practices in
implementing the strategy, with a particular focus on sharing
experiences in implementing the policy options at national
and international levels. Furthermore, the course will discuss
capacity building at the community level to reduce
problematic alcohol use. The course will also discuss regionspecific issues.

Track 8
Building a Strong Community Together: Increase
Your Capacity with Unconventional Strategies to
Maintain the Power of the Movement
Room: Jackson
Trainers: Lauren Lloyd (VetCorps Project Manager) and
Sarah Dickens (VetCorps Operations Specialist, CADCA),
Sharon Kramer (Executive Director) and Patricia Durham
(AmeriCorps VISTA-CADCA VetCorps Prevention
Coordinator, Manatee County Substance Abuse Coalition)
Description: In this course, participants will learn innovative
ways to connect with their community through nontraditional venues and how service to others impacts both
healthy people and healthy communities. Engaging
community members in the work of a coalition can often be
a challenge, yet volunteers often make up a majority of the
most active members. Learn how to enlist landlords, boat
captains, universities and other local heroes in your coalition
efforts to strengthen the power of the movement.
Hear success stories like that of Manatee County Substance
Abuse Coalition in Bradenton, Florida. They will highlight
how their VetCorps member engaged 29 new community
partners at their very first VetCorps meeting leading to a
successful initiative to bring about community change.
Presenters will share numerous strategies that CADCA

22 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

VetCorps coalitions have implemented and how they are


building sustainability into new processes for coalition
growth.

Track 9
Faking It! The Challenge of Synthetics
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 7-8
Trainers: John Scherbenske (Chief, Synthetic Drugs and
Chemical Section, Office of Diversion Control, Drug
Enforcement Administration) and Carlton Hall (Deputy
Director of Training & Technical Assistance, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: Spice or K2, which is marketed as incense or
synthetic marijuana, and Molly, the powder or crystal
form of MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine), or
Ecstasy are synthetic drugs that are popular among youth.
The plant material in Spice or K2 is sprayed or soaked with
unknown psychoactive substances and Molly, a synthetic
designer drug, may contain any number of psychoactive
chemical compounds making both of these drugs and other
synthetics dangerous and harmful. This course will address
the emergence of synthetic drugs and the dangers posed by
these substances, as well as the federal and local responses
to restrict the sale of these substances. Coalitions will have
an opportunity to discuss and define how to adapt their
responses to the challenges of synthetic drugs by
understanding the differing and unique local conditions that
contribute to the problem.

Track 9
State and Coalition Responses to the Federal
Enforcement Priority Areas for Marijuana
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 10-12
Trainers: Sue Thau (Public Policy Consultant, CADCA), Bill
Geary, Ph.D. (Deputy Director, Evaluation & Research,
CADCAs National Coalition Institute), Tom Gorman
(Director, Rocky Mountain HIDTA) and Derek Franklin
(Project Director, Mercer Island Communities That Care)
Description: Marijuana continues to be illegal as a Schedule
I substance under Federal Law. Coalitions can play an
important role in gathering and organizing information that
might be helpful to federal prosecutors and their own
communities. Participants in this session will learn about the
8 Enforcement Priorities set out by the U.S. Attorney
General. They will then become familiar with the role that
coalitions can play in collecting local information that aligns
with these priority areas and how changes in marijuana law
might impact each area of the Strategic Prevention
Framework.

Course Descriptions
TUESDAY, JULY 22
8:30 am 5 pm
Track 2
Coalition Core Essentials, Parts 2 & 3
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 9
Trainer: Heidi Bainbridge (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: This course will cover the essential parts of
CADCAs problem-solving process which is predicated on
SAMHSAs Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF). Over 2.5
days of training, participants will learn how to conduct a
community assessment and problem analysis, develop logic
models and comprehensive strategies, implement plans, set
measurable objectives, and build coalition capacity. Each
session will include hands-on application of the content,
relevant tools and resource material as well as opportunities
to network with others engaged in conducting successful
community change efforts. Participants are encouraged to
bring along the latest versions of their coalitions community
assessment, logic models, strategic and action plans to the
training.
Note: This course is a continuation from Part 1 on
Monday at 1:30 pm and Parts 4 & 5 will take place on
Wednesday at 8:30 am.

Track 3
Organizational Management for Coalitions
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon A-B
Trainer: Sharon OHara (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: Refer to the Monday, 9:45 am listing for the
description (course repeated).

Track 4
Working Yourself Into the Spotlight The
Importance of Strategic Communications Planning
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 4-5
Trainers: Tony Coder (Assistant Director, Drug Free Action
Alliance) and Tiffani Sherman (Video Producer, Center for
Public Safety Innovation, St. Petersburg College)
Description: Your coalition is doing great work and making
positive changes within your community but no one can
remember the exact name of the organization? Typically,
coalitions are powered by results-driven work, not selfpromotion. However, your status as a leader in the
community and, in many cases, funding decisions can be
influenced because of the coalitions profile. How can you
improve that profile? Through strategic communications
efforts! Communicating strategically is more than just
sending a press release about an upcoming event; it is about
having a plan to maximize your exposure and grab the

attention that your work deserves. This course will help


coalition leaders devise a strategic communications plan for
their coalitions and expand the coalitions reach to the entire
community. During the afternoon portion of the course, a
media professional will offer insights and guidance on
dealing with the media and helpful tips on getting media to
your event.

Track 7
Common Causes: Ramping Up the Effectiveness
of Community Efforts, Part 2
Room: Orange
Trainer: Paul Evensen, Ph.D. (President, CSG, LLC)
Group Facilitators: Brenda Bone (Managing Director,
Community Evaluation), Cindy Pharis (Community
Evaluator), Kim Linkel (Community Evaluator) and Amanda
Sutter (Community Evaluator, CSG LLC)
Description: Refer to the Monday, 9:45 am listing for the
description.
Note: This course is a continuation from Part 1 on
Monday at 9:45 am.

TUESDAY, JULY 22
1:30 pm 5 pm
Track 1
Have Qualitative DataNow What Do We Do
With It?
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 6
Trainer: Deacon Dzierzawski (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: Having qualitative data is a good start but
being able to make it functional is the key for all data. This
course serves as the capstone for the series on qualitative
data. Participants will learn how to quantify qualitative data,
ensuring reliability and validity. Special emphasis will be
given to using qualitative data as part of a comprehensive
outcomes evaluation process, not just assessment. It is
highly recommended, but not required, that you attend the
foundations course, Qualitative Data: Myths, Mysteries and
Uses on Monday morning in preparation for this course.

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 23

Course Descriptions
Tuesday, July 22
1:30 pm 5 pm (continued)
Track 3
New Research Since the Surgeon Generals Call to
Action to Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking
Room: Flagler-Gilchrist
Trainers: Ralph Hingson, Sc.D. (Director, Division of
Epidemiology and Prevention Research, National Institute on
Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism [NIAAA]), Aaron White, Ph.D.
(Program Director, Underage and College Drinking
Prevention Research, NIAAA), Bob Saltz, Ph.D. (Pacific
Institute for Research and Evaluation [PIRE]) and Mark
Wolfson, Ph.D. (Wake Forest School of Medicine)
Description: This course will outline new research on trends
in and consequences of underage drinking as well as
interventions to prevent and reduce underage drinking that
have emerged since the 2007 Call to Action. The course will
explore recent trends in injury deaths linked to underage
drinking, binge drinking and driving under the influence,
effects of underage drinking on the developing brain,
blackouts, overdoses, and academic performance. It will also
examine research on interventions that are individuallyoriented, policy/environmental, and family-, school-, web-,
and community-based.

Track 4
Communications Tune-Up: In Front of the Camera
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 1
Trainer: Stephanie Williams (Owner/Director, Drama
Learning Center)
Description: A key to coalition success is to ensure that its
goals, objectives and activities are effectively
communicatedwhether its through a website, on
brochures and posters or producing your own coalition
video. While each coalition has a toolbox of outreach
strategies at its disposal, messaging must be consistent
across each medium.The Communications Tune-up is a
three-part course designed to help coalition leaders and staff
evaluate and improve their organizations messaging,
materials and outreach strategies. From Tuesday-Thursday, all
three half-day courses will be delivered to allow for
maximum opportunities to attend.
Lets assume that your coalition is planning a press
conference, andyou are a featured speaker. How can you
ensure that your coalitions message is passionately and
uniquely delivered? What are the talking points that you
need to drive home? How do you mentally prepare for this
event, and what helpful strategies might you employ to deal
with those press conference jitters? Through experiential
and hands-on activities during this course, you will create
and refine your coalitions 30-second pitch; have
opportunities to present your baseline and subsequent
pitches on-camera; participate in physical and mental warm24 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

up exercises that will help you prepare for presentations,


enabling you to remain grounded and articulate; and
participate in a mock press conference where you will be
asked questions that are uniquely tailored to situations that
coalition leaders face.
Please note that attendees who took part in the 2013
CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute course titledLights,
Camera, Action, as well asIts a Take! On-Camera & Frontand-Center are encouraged to join us for this class. Rest
assured, you will be challenged with new questions that
reflect your skill levels. All participants are encouraged to
wear comfortable clothes and closed-toed shoes as youll be
moving around. Likewise, bringing your Smartphone or iPad
to class is encouraged but not required.
This course,In Front of the Camerais a component of the
Communications Tune-up. You can choose to participate in
this course only or take advantage of all three to achieve
your coalitions optimal Communications Tune-up. Check
out descriptions forYour Public Face-Collateral Development
& Review andBe Your Own Video Producer for details about
the companion courses.
Note: This course will be repeated in its entirety on
Wednesday at 8:30 am and again on Thursday at
1:30 pm.

Track 4
Onward and Upward: How to Use SAMHSA
Communications Initiatives to Drive Prevention
Momentum in Your Community
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon C
Trainer: David Lamont Wilson (Public Affairs Specialist,
SAMHSA/CSAP)
Description: The momentum of the prevention movement
depends on you! SAMHSA communications initiatives
provide opportunities throughout the year for community
coalitions to take center stage, join activities nationwide to
raise awareness about prevention topics, and inspire
individuals to action. Learn more about SAMHSAs current
campaigns, the tools they offer, and how they can help your
organization strengthen its communications activities. Hear
from a Drug-Free Communities program about how their
community has benefitted from involvement in SAMHSAs
campaigns, and learn how you can benefit, too. During this
session, participants will find out how they and their
community can participate in SAMHSAs National Prevention
Week 2015 observance, annual Prevention Day conference,
Talk. They Hear You Underage Drinking Prevention
National Media Campaign, Recovery Month, National
Childrens Mental Health Awareness Day, National Wellness
Week, and how you can use resources from these
communication initiatives to build momentum around
prevention and behavioral health.

Course Descriptions
Track 5
Principles of Community Organizing for the
Prevention Specialist
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 3
Trainer: Kristy Miller (Innovation & Outreach Manager,
CADCAs National Coalition Institute)
Description: This course is designed for coalition leaders
and members to address the job tasks of the Community
Organizing Domain of the Prevention Specialist credential.
Course content will build knowledge and competency in
forming strategic alliances, building community ownership,
and developing community-based coalitions. Course content
will address getting to know community demographics and
norms, gaining community buy-in, identifying specific
strategies around which to mobilize, and forming coalitions
and alliances to expand your spheres of influence.

Track 7
Problem Gambling and Drug Addictions: Hitting
Rock Bottom
Room: Hamilton-Indian River
Trainer: Myron Quon, Esq. (Executive Director, National
Asian Pacific American Families Against Substance Abuse)
Description: Refer to the Monday, 1:30 pm listing for the
description: (course repeated).

Track 9
Coalition Strategies for Preventing Illicit Drug Use
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 7-8
Trainers: Sarah Wilson (Intelligence Research Specialist,
Drug Enforcement Administration), Allison Stombaugh
(Intelligence Research Specialist, Drug Enforcement
Administration) and Carlton Hall (Deputy Director, Training
and Technical Assistance, CADCAs National Coalition
Institute)
Description: The intent of this course is to provide a forum
for coalition leaders to better understand the specific
characteristics and contributing local conditions that may
manifest differently depending upon which illicit drugs are
present in your community. This course has three sections.
The first section will focus on an overview of marijuana
trends, specifically marijuana concentrates.Marijuana
availability increases are due to large-scale marijuana
importation from Mexico, as well as an increase of marijuana
cultivated in states that have legalized marijuana or passed
medical marijuana initiatives. Marijuana concentrates,
produced with new and dangerous extraction methods that
elevate their THC content, are an increasing concern to law
enforcement, public health officials and community
stakeholders.
The second section will focus on an overview of heroin
trends.Increased demand for and abuse of heroin is largely
being driven by Controlled Prescription Drug (CPD) abusers

switching to heroin.In 2013 and 2014, areas throughout the


Northeast and Midwest reported spikes in overdose deaths
due to fentanyl being sold as heroin, or to heroin tainted
with fentanyl or fentanyl analogs such as acetyl fentanyl.
During the third section, the trainers representing the DEA
and CADCA will shed light on how each illicit drug brings a
unique set of conditions and challenges (often noted by law
enforcement) that can be discussed from a coalition
response perspective. How can coalitions optimize their
relationship with law enforcement to address these
conditions? What might that look like and what
suggestions would the DEA offer?

Track 9
State and Local Conditions and Mapping
Strategies: Illegal Marijuana Use
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 10-12
Trainers: Bill Geary, Ph.D. (Deputy Director, Evaluation &
Research), David Shavel (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute), Tony Coder (Assistant Director,
Drug Free Action Alliance), Pat Bird (Prevention Manager,
Utah County Department of Drug and Alcohol Prevention
and Treatment) and Ellen Morehouse (Executive Director,
Student Assistance Services Corp.)
Description: This course builds off of content from The
Naked Truth About Marijuana and State and Coalition
Responses to the Federal Enforcement Priority Areas for
Marijuana, though it is not required that participants attend
those courses to attend this one. It is one of three in a series
of courses designed to provide support to coalitions
experiencing various climates across the marijuana
spectrum. This particular course is intended for coalitions in
states where any possession, distribution, and/or use of
marijuana is still illegal under state and federal law. As these
courses are designed as intensive working clinics predicated
on CADCAs problem-solving process including its signature
local conditions analysis, participants are highly encouraged
to attend the course that is most closely aligned with the
current climate in their municipalities/states as you will be
challenged in the identification of local conditions and
relevant strategies.
Participants will learn the demographics behind marijuana
use including patterns of use which lead into the definition
of local conditions within the context of illegal conditions.
Strategies to prevent the presence of illicit drugs, specifically
marijuana, that are currently being implemented in similar
communities will be reviewed. Participants will then apply
this information to their own communities to better
understand their data needs and begin to articulate their
own community-specific strategies. Finally, participants will
discuss next steps including sharing this process with their
own coalition and articulating their own data and resources
needed to take action.
www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 25

Course Descriptions
WEDNESDAY, JULY 23
8:30 am 10:20 am
Track 1
Writing Effective Applications for the Drug-Free
Communities (DFC) Support Program
Room: Orange
Trainer: Helen Hernandez (Administrator, DFC Support
Program, ONDCP)
Description: If your community-based coalition is interested
in applying for the FY 2015 Drug-Free Communities (DFC)
Support Program grant, this is the session for you! Come
learn about all the changes that have been made to the DFC
Request for Applications (RFA) to simplify the application
process for coalitions. Hear the Dos and Donts of
submitting a successful application directly from the DFC
Administrator. Coalitions who have never applied before or
who may be applying in the future should come and learn
about the DFC Statutory Eligibility Requirements, hear tips
on how to successfully respond to the Request for
Applications, and how to avoid the pitfalls often made by
applicants.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23
8:30 am noon
Track 3
The Urban Cafe: Real Conversations, Real Issues,
Real Solutions
Room: Hamilton-Indian River
Trainers: Costella Green (Branch Chief, SAMHSA/CSAP),
Ammie Bonsu (Public Health Advisor, SAMHSA/CSAP) and
Tracy Johnson (Expert Consultant, TJ Consulting, Inc.)
Description: Serious delinquency and substance abuse are
not new problems incommunitiesof higher risk.
Throughout history, these communities have not only been
victims of their own substance abuse but have been
constantly under siege with high levels of illicit drug sales by
community members including children and youth of color.
These problems continue to thrive in these communities
unless the concept of CommunityMobilization is
broadened, and the relative viability of local prevention
efforts is understood in the contextofethnicity and culture.
In thissession, executed as a World Caf forum,
presenters and participantswill bring theircollective
knowledge andengage in interactive dialogue;crosspollinate ideas and insights; and gain a deeper
understanding aboutindividual- and community-level risk
factors and protective factors withincommunitiesof higher
risk; andinnovative steps that coalitions are takingto
empowercommunity members in developing culturally
relevant and evidenced based strategies to transform these
communities into neighborhoods of promise.
26 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Track 4
Communications Tune-Up: In Front of the Camera
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 1
Trainer: Stephanie Williams, (Owner/Director, Drama
Learning Center)
Description: Refer to the Tuesday, 1:30 pm listing for the
description.
Note: The course will be repeated again in its entirety
on Thursday at 1:30 pm.

Track 4
Principles of Communication Techniques for the
Prevention Specialist
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 2
Trainer: Kristy Miller (Innovation & Outreach Manager,
CADCAs National Coalition Institute)
Description: This course is designed for coalition leaders
and members to address the job tasks of the
Communication Domain of the Prevention Specialist
credential. Course content will build knowledge and
competency in organizational communication such as
discussion facilitation, effective listening, consensus building,
presentation delivery and public speaking. Also, course
content will address interpersonal communication to the
masses including promotions, public relations, marketing,
and health education of mission and strategies.

Track 6
How to be an Effective Advocate: Tips and Tools
for Changing Policy at the National Level
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 7-8
Trainer: Sue Thau (Public Policy Consultant, CADCA)
Description: Advocacy and lobbying are challenging, even
for the most experienced coalition leaders. This course
provides participants with instruction on how to break
through to the next level of coalition work by effectively
educating and advocating for environmental change and
substance abuse prevention issues at all levels of
government, with a focus on national policy change, while
following the applicable guidelines. Participants will learn
how to most effectively communicate with elected officials,
policymakers and their staff to create better policies and
more funding opportunities for substance abuse prevention
programs.

Course Descriptions
Track 9
New Trends Got You All Choked Up? A Dialogue
with Leading Tobacco Control Organizations
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon C
Trainers: Alicia Smith (Manager, Tobacco Prevention
Programs, CADCA), Colleen Hopkins (Senior Associate,
Tobacco Prevention Programs, CADCA), Christine Cheng
(Partner Relations Director, Smoking Cessation Leadership
Center [SCLC]), Laira K. Roth (Senior Policy Associate,
National Council for Behavioral Health), Billy Rucker
(Manager, Youth Activism Programs, Legacy for Health) and
Michael Freiberg, J.D. (Staff Attorney, Tobacco Control Legal
Consortium)
Description: This course will bring five tobacco control
partners together to discuss trending topics in tobacco
control and prevention. The purpose of this course is to
illustrate the landscape of tobacco control achievements and
challenges in a comprehensive, but strategic way. It is no
secret that tobacco use poses a serious threat to the overall
health of Americans, and this movement must be supported
as a multi-level initiative. Over the last several years, cigarette
manufacturers and others have moved aggressively to
develop, test, and market many non-cigarette commercial
tobacco products, hoping to capitalize on declining cigarette
use and to exploit loopholes in regulations that were written
with cigarettes in mind.

Track 9
State and Local Conditions & Mapping Strategies:
Medical Marijuana Use
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 10-12
Trainers: Bill Geary, Ph.D. (Deputy Director, Evaluation &
Research), David Shavel (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute) and Pat Bird (Prevention
Manager, Utah County Department of Drug and Alcohol
Prevention and Treatment)
Description: This course builds off of content from The
Naked Truth About Marijuana and State and Coalition
Responses to the Federal Enforcement Priority Areas for
Marijuana, though it is not required that participants attend
those courses to attend this one. It is one of three in a series
of courses designed to provide support to coalitions
experiencing various climates across the marijuana spectrum.
This particular course is intended for coalitions that are
dealing with medical marijuana in their
communities/states. As these courses are designed as
intensive working clinics predicated on CADCAs problemsolving process including its signature local conditions
analysis, participants are highly encouraged to attend the
course that is most closely aligned with the current climate in
their municipalities/states as you will be challenged in the
identification of local conditions and relevant strategies.
Participants will learn about the demographics and indicators
of medical marijuana users, consumption methods, and

environmental factors supporting use. Further, participants


will better understand the important legal considerations for
legalization and how those considerations have manifested
differently as local conditions in various medical marijuana
communities/states. Participants will then apply this
information to their own communities to better understand
their data needs and begin to articulate their own
community-specific strategies, including local controls to
address access, availability and norms. Finally, participants
will discuss next steps including sharing this process with
their own coalition and articulating their own data and
resources needed to take action.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23
8:30 am 5 pm
Track 1
Evaluating Collective Impact: Understanding the
Effectiveness of Community Partnerships and
their Community Change Strategies, Part 1
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 3
Trainer: Paul Evensen, Ph.D. (President, CSG, LLC)
Group Facilitators: Brenda Bone (Managing Director,
Community Evaluation), Cindy Pharis (Community Evaluator),
Kim Linkel (Community Evaluator) and Amanda Sutter
(Community Evaluator, CSG LLC)
Description: A collective impact approach requires
agreement on common measures from process through to
population outcomes. Measuring program activities and
supports is straightforward; but how do partnerships
establish common measures for the rest of their work? How
do they account for policy, media or resource alignment?
How do they establish shared measures for capacity and
process? How do they account for changes in public policy,
the effects of media campaigns or aligning resources for
greater impact? Learn about evaluation approaches that
meet these challenges with a focus on tools that can
document the full range of partnership accomplishments.
Learn how communities can collect and report this data and
use it to improve their efforts.
Most partnerships also struggle to show a clear contribution
to community level outcomes. This class will provide the
knowledge, detailed tools, concrete examples, and skills
needed to help your coalition conduct an analysis of
contribution to these outcomes. This advanced course
emphasizes the appropriate application of scientific practice
to coalition evaluation and is designed for coalition leaders,
staff, and evaluators who have already begun to explore
evaluation of community partnerships.
Note: Part 2 of this course will continue on Thursday at
8:30 am.
www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 27

Course Descriptions
Wednesday, July 23
8:30 am 5 pm (continued)
Track 2
Coalition Core Essentials, Parts 4 & 5
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 9
Trainer: Heidi Bainbridge (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: This course will cover the essential parts of
CADCAs problem-solving process which is predicated on
SAMHSAs Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF). Over 2.5
days of training, participants will learn how to conduct a
community assessment and problem analysis, develop logic
models and comprehensive strategies, implement plans, set
measurable objectives, and build coalition capacity. Each
session will include hands-on application of the content,
relevant tools and resource material as well as opportunities
to network with others engaged in conducting successful
community change efforts. Participants are encouraged to
bring along the latest versions of their coalitions community
assessment, logic models, strategic and action plans to the
training.
Note: This course is a continuation from Part 1 on
Monday at 1:30 pm and Parts 2 & 3 on Tuesday at
8:30 am.

Track 3
Leading from Behind: Leadership Development
for Coalition Staff
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon A-B
Trainer: Deacon Dzierzawski (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: The phrase coalition leadership is an oftenused phrase which really describes the expectation that
others must take action. So much of that action falls on the
shoulders of paid staff members. This course will focus on
the practical aspects of leading from behind and creating a
process that brings coalition members to the forefront of
decision-making and, eventually, execution of the work. To
support your learning experience, participants will develop a
leadership action plan.
Note: This course will be repeated in its entirety on
Thursday at 8:30 am.

Track 7
Using Research to Prevent Impaired Driving
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 4-5
Trainers: Jane Maxwell, PhD (University of Texas, Austin),
Robyn Robertson (President and CEO, Traffic Research Injury
Foundation), Bob Saltz, PhD (Prevention Research Center
[PIRE]), Mark Wolfson, PhD (Wake Forest University) and Traci
Toomey, PhD(University of Minnesota)
28 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Moderator: Sharon OHara (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs


National Coalition Institute)
Description: This one-day course is an opportunity to learn
about and discuss current research to prevent impaired driving.
Leading researchers from the United States and Canada will
discuss findings from their own studies, including: trends in
alcohol and drug-impaired driving, effective interventions,
challenges of enforcement and community implementation
case studies. The course will conclude with a facilitated panel
discussion providing an opportunity for the researchers to
respond to audience questions and comments and to make
recommendations for practice.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23
10:40 am noon
Track 1
National Data to Local Application: Findings from
the Drug-Free Communities National Evaluation
Room: Orange
Trainer: Barbara ODonnel, Ph.D. (Principal, DFC National
Evaluation Team, ICF International)
Description: Data is increasingly critical at the local, state
and national level when seeking support for
programs.Presenters will discuss the latest findings from the
Drug Free Communities (DFC) National Evaluation based on
data received from DFC community coalitions through
August 2013. This presentation will focus on changes in
DFC core outcome measures over time and relative to
national trends. Baseline data on new DFC measures
including peer disapproval and unauthorized prescription
drug use among youth will be shared.Participants will be
provided with key talking points and suggestions on how
community coalitions might utilize the national findings in
their own work.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23
1:30 pm 5 pm
Track 1
Making the Strategy to Outcomes
Connection:Roundtable Discussion
Room: Orange
Trainers: Ashley Briggs, Jackie Rhodes, Jean Dauphine,
Ph.D. and James Demery, Ph.D. (Technical Assistance, DFC
National Evaluation Team, ICF International)
Description: The Drug-Free Communities (DFC) National
Evaluation has collected a range of data on DFC coalitions
strategies for building coalitions and preventing/reducing
youth substance use.Strategy data have been collected in
semi-annual progress reports including strategies used,
accomplishments, sectors involved, and open-ended

Course Descriptions
descriptions of accomplishments as well as from more than
30 site visits conducted by the national evaluation team in
states including Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Texas,
Virginia and Washington.Following a brief introduction to
the roundtables, participants will rotate among groups to
discuss what appear to be key strategies for meeting project
goals based on an examination of these data and will
provide additional input on making the connection from
strategies to outcomes. Potential groupings include
strategies for addressing marijuana use, addressing
prescription drug use, engaging parents in community
coalitions, and building coalition sustainability.

Track 4
Communications Tune-Up: Be Your Own Video
Producer
Room: Flagler-Gilchrist
Trainer: Pat Giniger Snyder (Video/Film Producer, Director,
Editor and Writer, Rembrandt Films)
Description: Refer to the Tuesday, 8:30 am listing for the
description.
Note: The course will be repeated again in its entirety
on Thursday at 8:30 am.

Track 4
Communications Tune-Up: Your Public Face
Collateral Development & Review
Room: Hamilton-Indian River
Trainer: Barb Cooper (President, Cooper Communications)
Description: Refer to the Tuesday, 8:30 am listing for the
description.
Note: The course will be repeated again in its entirety
on Thursday at 8:30 am.

Track 5
Building Anti-drug Coalitions in Multi-ethnic /
Latino Communities
Room: Jackson
Trainers: Carlton Hall (Deputy Director, Training & Technical
Assistance, CADCAs National Coalition Institute), Manuel
Medina, Ph.D. (Vice President of Diversity, TERROS, Inc.) and
Angelo Ortiz (Program Director, UNIDOS Coalition)
Description: This course will explore challenges of building
community anti-drug coalitions from a Latino Community
perspective. Research indicates that first generation
(immigrant generation) Latino families demonstrate stronger
familial attachment as protective factors from drug use and
that second and third generation Latino youth are at greater
risk for substance use due in large part to cultural and
generational conflict.Coalition building requires awareness
of these familial value constructs and their application in
building community coalitions. Many local communities with
significant Latino populations have experienced or are

experiencing dynamics that create environments that


exclude the OTHER from engaging or participating in
community institutions. Coalition- and self-awareness will be
challenged and skills for engaging multiethnic communities
will be discussed.

Track 6
The First Date. And, How to Get a Second:
Legislative Relationship Building
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 2
Trainer: Tony Coder (Assistant Director, Drug Free Action
Alliance)
Description: While there are many websites for
matchmaking to help you get a first date, there is no
website that can prepare you for the first date with your
legislator, mayor, councilman, or community leader. First
impressions are everything, and with the right approach and
information, you can become an important ally and valuable
asset to your local, state and federal elected officials. This
course will offer tips and tools to prepare for the first
meeting with elected officials and other community
stakeholders. Participants will leave with a plan to get that
first meeting and continue the relationship building to
eventually become an effective advocate and resource for
community leaders.

Track 8
Cost-Benefit Analysis of Prevention
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 1
Trainer: Kristy Miller (Innovation & Outreach Manager,
CADCAs National Coalition Institute)
Description: Cost-benefit analysis is an economic process
whereby the costs of a product or service is weighed against
the benefit, which will likely translate to revenue, that the
product or service will bring to the consumers in the
marketplace. When applied to substance abuse prevention,
a social economist would place dollar values on all
significant substance abuse consequences and compare it to
the relative cost savings associated with the provision of
prevention services that would be implemented to mitigate
these consequences. This analysis has been done by several
researchers with the latest report setting a savings potential
between $2 and $20. During this course, we will review the
literature on cost-benefit analysis in prevention and discuss
opportunities to conduct similar analysis locally to make the
case for priority funding and sustainability.

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 29

Course Descriptions
Wednesday, July 23
1:30 pm 5 pm (continued)
Track 9
Engaging with State-Level Partners to Reduce
Prescription Drug Abuse
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon C
Trainers: Fran Flener (Arkansas Drug Director and CADCA
Board Member) and Matthew Dunagan (Office of the
Attorney General, Florida)
Moderator: Mary E. Elliott (Vice President, Communications,
Membership and IT, CADCA)
Description: Communities are ground zero for our nations
prescription drug epidemic. It is at the community level
where many of the most innovative solutions are found as
well. At the same time, state-level leaders are crafting
reports, policies and state plans that can have a big impact
on the problem. Are you engaged with your state leaders?
How does your coalition fit into your states plans to reduce
over-the-counter and prescription drug abuse? There is
significant and innovative prescription drug prevention work
taking place at the state-level. Join us for new information
and insights that can help identify or expand your role as an
effective prevention partner at the state-level.
Join this session and get the latest information on the
National Governors Associations Rx Drug Abuse Policy
Academy recommendations. Find out how two states
Arkansas and Florida have partnered with local coalitions.
Gain insight straight from state-level leaders on the best way
your coalition can engage and have an impact.

Track 9
State and Local Conditions & Mapping Strategies:
Recreational Marijuana Use
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 7-8
Trainers: Bill Geary, Ph.D. (Deputy Director, Evaluation &
Research, CADCAs National Coalition Institute), David Shavel
(Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs National Coalition Institute),
Derek Franklin (Project Director, Mercer Island Communities
That Care) and Deborah Williams (Executive Director,
Anchorage Youth Development Coalition)
Description: This course builds off of content from The
Naked Truth About Marijuana and State and Coalition
Responses to the Federal Enforcement Priority Areas for
Marijuana, though it is not required that participants attend
those courses to attend this one. It is one of three in a series
of courses designed to provide support to coalitions
experiencing various climates across the marijuana spectrum.
This particular course is intended for coalitions in states where
recreational marijuana use is being seriously considered at
either the local municipality or state level. As these courses are
designed as intensive working clinics predicated on CADCAs
problem-solving process including its signature local
30 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

conditions analysis, participants are highly encouraged to


attend the course that is most closely aligned with the current
climate in their municipalities/states as you will be challenged
in the identification of local conditions and relevant strategies.
Participants will understand how legalization might impact
patterns of marijuana use, considerations and logistics of
controls for marijuana, and regulations around its use.
Participants will then discuss how the considerations of
marijuana legalization impact both local conditions and risk
factors at the local community level. Participants will also
discuss potential strategies and best practices that can be
utilized as part of a comprehensive approach, including a
strategic opposition initiative. Finally, participants will discuss
how to articulate and disseminate proactive opposition
approaches in their communities and lead community
discussions around the issue.

THURSDAY, JULY 24
8:30 am noon
Track 2
The PowerPoint of the Movement
Room: Sarasota
Trainer: Kirby Crider (Materials Design Manager, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: Refer to the Monday, 9:45 am listing for the
description (course repeated).

Track 4
Communications Tune-Up: Be Your Own Video
Producer
Room: Flagler-Gilchrist
Trainer: Pat Giniger Snyder (Video/Film Producer, Director,
Editor and Writer, Rembrandt Films)
Description: Refer to the Tuesday, 8:30 am listing for the
description.

Track 4
Communications Tune-Up: Your Public Face
Collateral Development & Review
Room: Hamilton-Indian River
Trainer: Barb Cooper (President, Cooper Communications)
Description: Refer to the Tuesday, 8:30 am listing for the
description.

Course Descriptions
Track 4
Messages and Metrics: How Does Your
Communication Plan Measure Up?
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon C
Trainers: Patrick Cook and Jean Synodinos (Contractors,
CDC/Division of Community Health) and Mary Elizabeth
Elliott (Vice President, Communications, Membership & IT,
CADCA)
Description: Launching a media campaign or creating buzz
through social media are great ways to get your public health
messages across, but how do you know if your efforts are
effective? Measuring the effectiveness of your
communications efforts is just as important as the activities
themselves, but for many coalitions, measuring the success of
their communications efforts can seem daunting. Luckily,
there are a number of free tools available in the public domain
at your disposal. During this three-hour course, public health
communications experts will discuss communications metrics,
providing participants with a roadmap for measuring the
success of their traditional communications and social media
efforts. Youll also learn about the many tools and templates
available to help you identify the reach of your efforts and
determine whether your activities are meeting your goals and
outcomes. Participants will leave with a better understanding
of communications measurement techniques and an
assortment of helpful tools to make measuring their success a
little easier.

Track 7
What Works? Sustainability Approaches Informed
by Research and Practice
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 1
Trainers: Carlton Hall (Deputy Director, Training & Technical
Assistance) and Andrea de la Flor (Senior Manager,
Evaluation and Research, CADCAs National Coalition
Institute)
Description: This course is for attendees looking to expand
and improve upon their existing sustainability efforts.
Participants will be provided with a brief overview of key
concepts related to sustainability, followed by a summary of
the current research on coalition sustainability, including how
it is being defined and the variables associated with
sustainability success. Then, we will share real world
examples and approaches from our conversations with
successful coalition practitioners. This information will
provide a foundation for the participant engagement portion
of this course, where we will facilitate group conversations.
Participants will have the opportunity to discuss the concepts
presented and share their own sustainability successes,
challenges, and lessons learned. Before leaving, participants
will take some time to incorporate what they learned into
key action steps to improve their existing sustainability plans.
Outside-of-the-box sustainability approaches are highly
encouraged and we welcome coalitions serving all
community types to participate in this course.

Track 9
Responding to Marijuana Legalization Rhetoric
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 4-5
Trainers: Sue Thau (Public Policy Consultant, CADCA), Tony
Coder (Assistant Director, Drug Free Action Alliance) and Bill
Geary, Ph.D. (Deputy Director, Evaluation & Research,
CADCAs National Coalition Institute)
Description: Every day conversations and news stories are
littered with rhetoric and misinformation about legalization.
Learn to appropriately respond to all of this chatter in a
productive and respectful manner, based on evidence,
science and best practices in communication techniques. This
course will offer participants an interactive opportunity to
engage in mock community discussions on this topic and
practice responding to the rhetoric.
Note: This course will be repeated in its entirety this
afternoon at 1:30 pm.

THURSDAY, JULY 24
8:30 am 5 pm
Track 1
Evaluating Collective Impact: Understanding the
Effectiveness of Community Partnerships and
their Community Change Strategies, Part 2
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 3
Trainer: Paul Evensen, Ph.D. (President, CSG, LLC)
Group Facilitators: Brenda Bone (Managing Director,
Community Evaluation), Cindy Pharis (Community Evaluator),
Kim Linkel (Community Evaluator) and Amanda Sutter
(Community Evaluator, CSG LLC)
Description: Refer to the course description on Wednesday
for full details.
Note: This course is a continuation from Part 1 on
Wednesday at 8:30 am.

Track 3
Ethics for the Prevention Specialist
Room: Jackson
Trainer: David Shavel (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs National
Coalition Institute)
Description: This six-hour course is designed specifically for
coalition leaders, members and other preventionists looking
to fulfill the ethics training requirement to obtain Prevention
Specialist certification. Participants in this course will examine
the Prevention Code of Ethics six key principles and explore
a decision-making model for assessing, addressing, and
evaluating a range of ethical issues. The course covers the
Principles of Ethics through the use of real-world coalitionbased and other examples while building upon the shared
experiences of participants.
www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 31

Course Descriptions
Track 3
Leading from Behind: Leadership Development
for Coalition Staff

coalitions exist in rural and frontier communities, effective


sustainability strategies are particularly hard to adopt.

Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 6


Trainer: Deacon Dzierzawski (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: Refer to the Wednesday, 8:30 am listing for the
description (course repeated).

Against the back drop of CADCAs sustainability planning


framework, coalitions will learn to overcome the unique
aspects of rural environments that can make sustainability
challenging. Sustainability strategies addressing both
institutionalization of coalition mission and strategies as well
as fundraising to support coalition staff and resources will be
shared. Also, the trainers, both coalition leaders in rural
communities situated in rural states, will share successful
efforts to sustain their coalitions efforts.

Track 5
Identifying and Combating Normative Influences
that Increase Alcohol and Other Drugs Use
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 2
Trainer: Michael Sparks (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute)
Description: The structure of a communitys alcohol,
tobacco and other drug (ATOD) environment contributes
to how, when and where individuals use these products. One
method of understanding and diagnosing your community
environment is through the lens of the 4 Ps of marketing
product, promotion, place and price. The 4 Ps are the four
ways used by the alcohol, tobacco and other drug marketers
to reach different parts of the population. This frame is most
useful when understanding the use of substances legally sold
in communities.
Community coalitions are well positioned to understand their
community environments through engaging in a
community tour by using environmental scans focused on
the 4 Ps. These scans include identifying what products are
being sold, where they are being used, how much they cost
and how they are promoted. Environmental scans yield the
kind of information that helps sharpen local conditions and
contribute to the identification of evidence-based
environmental strategies. This course content includes an
explanation of the 4Ps framework, description of how the
use of environmental scans contribute to shaping and
understanding local conditions, practice using environmental
scans and application of the 4Ps framework to participants
local communities.

Track 8
Coalition Sustainability for Rural Communities
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon A-B
Trainers: Heidi Bainbridge (Trainer/Consultant, CADCAs
National Coalition Institute) and Greg Puckett (Executive
Director, Community Connections, Inc. and Member,
CADCAs Coalition Advisory Committee)
Description: It is said that money makes the world go
round. Many coalitions would agree having dedicated
funding helps move the work along by supporting time,
resources, and strategies. Coalitions existing on primarily
grant funds, particularly DFC funding, can struggle to survive
as the end of the funding cycle draws near. When those
32 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

THURSDAY, JULY 24
1:30 pm 5 pm
Track 4
Communications Tune-Up: In Front of the Camera
Room: Bonnet Creek Ballroom Salon 1
Trainer: Stephanie Williams (Owner/Director, Drama
Learning Center)
Description: Refer to the Tuesday, 1:30 pm listing for the
description (course repeated).

Track 9
Responding to Marijuana Legalization Rhetoric
Room: Floridian Ballroom Salon 4-5
Trainers: Sue Thau (Public Policy Consultant, CADCA), Tony
Coder (Assistant Director, Drug Free Action Alliance) and Bill
Geary, Ph.D. (Deputy Director, Evaluation & Research,
CADCAs National Coalition Institute)
Description: Refer to the Thursday, 8:30 am listing for the
description (course repeated).

Geographic Health Equity Symposium


Where You Live Matters to
oY
Your
our Health
Health
H OST ED B Y : G E OGR A P HIC HEAL T H E QU I TY ALLIANCE OP E R A T ED B Y CADC A

F
FRIDAY,
RIDA
AY, JULY
2014,
9:30
0 a.m.
a.m. 3:0
3:00
0 pp.m
.m.
JULY 25,
25, 2
014, 9:3
Wyndham Grand Orlando Resort Bonnet Creek Hotel,
14651 Chelonia Parkway, Orlando, Florida

Cost to attend: FREE,


FREE, Preregistration
Preregistration Required
Required
Make plans to attend this special no-cost Symposium as we focus on social change
interventions impacting tobacco and cancer-related geographic health disparities.
The Geographic Health Equity Alliance (The Alliance) is a national network of
coalitions, state programs, national organizations, researchers and communitybased agencies. Its mission is to raise awareness and support the development,
dissemination and implementation of effective public health practices to reduce
tobacco and cancer in high-impact communities. The Alliance is supported by
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA); Wake Forest School of
Medicine; Michigan State University; and GTM, Inc., an Atlanta-based advertising
agency. The Alliances mission is to raise awareness about geographic health
disparities related to tobacco and cancer
r and to support the
development, dissemination and implementation
entation of effective
public health practices.

Symposium Spotlight
National expert, Dr. Chris Fulcher, (left), who serves
as the Co-Director at the Center for App
Applied
pplied Research
and Environmental
Environmental Systems
y
(CARES)
(CARES)) and operates
Community
y Commons,
Comm
mons, will present as our keynote speak
onMapping the Problem: Health Disparitty by ZIP Code,
at the Symposium. More info rmation on addi tional expert
speakers and program agenda can be found on the
Training
ing
g Institute
e websit
website.
e.
CADCA 2014 Mid-Year Train
With support from the C enters for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking
and H ealth and the Division o f C ancer Prevention and Control, CADCA is proud to
be l eading a new effort to spotlight the fact that place matters wh en it comes to tobacco and cancerrelated h ealth disparities. The Alliance defines geographic h ealth disparities as the differences in health
behaviors and health outcomes related to where people live.
Participate and help us grow this exciting new network as we discuss the impact of geography and the
best public health strategies to combat tobacco and cancer, regardless of your ZIP code.

Followiing the Symposiium, attendees should be familiar with th


he followin
ng learnin
ing objectives:
Understand and define a geographic health d
disparity.
Understand the factors that lead to geographic health disparities.
Understand key geographic health disparities in tobacco and cancer.
Understand how to use and implement the Community Commons maps as a resource.
Understand and utilize the Geographic Health Equity Alliance and its national network
partners as a resource to address cancer and tobacco related disparities in their communities.
CE
EU credits and contact hours available

National Youth Leadership Initiative (NYLI)


Looking for a place to build your strength as a young leader
or adult advisor?

Enter the NYLI course


with passion and zeal for
affecting change,

Welcome to the National Youth Leadership Initiative (NYLI)


a one stop shop for young change agents. The NYLI is a
Youth-Led, Adult Guided training experience designed to
teach young coalition members and their adult advisors how to
dismantle community problems as a team.

PASSION

A young person enters a NYLI course with passion and zeal for
affecting change, and after being taught by a team of experienced
young trainers, that young leader leaves with the tools and instructions for
actually meeting that goal. By training young people to be proficient in
community assessment, problem analysis and comprehensive interventions,
the NYLI transforms them into social scientists. So if you recognize youth as
not only the leaders of tomorrow but also leaders of today, then youll feel
right at home with the NYLI!

Learn from a team of


experienced young
trainers

NYLI
Leave with the tools and
instructions to dismantle
community problems!

CHANGE

NYLI KEY ESSENTIALS

NYLI ADVANCED

Participants will:
Become more engaged Youth Leaders

Participants will:
Demonstrate Key Leadership Skills via critical thinking
applications and oral presentations

Learn and apply the Strategic Prevention Framework


process
Learn and apply components of a Community Assessment

Identify types and methods for collecting data to assess


community problems

Develop a Problem Statement

Develop a Logic Model with Environmental Interventions

Conduct a Problem Analysis

Describe the Functions of Evaluations and how to


measure change

Create a Logic Model


Use 7 Strategies for Community Change to select
interventions for Youth- In-Action Projects

Develop an effective Advocacy Campaign for policy


change
Develop a Strategic and Action Plan to support
implementation of their youth-led projects

Interested in learning more about the NYLI and


how to request a training in your county, city
or state? Please visit the CADCA Table in the
Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer or contact us at
nyli@cadca.org or 1-800-54-CADCA, ext 270.

NYLI is sponsored in part by the Executive Office of the President,


Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP).

34 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

NYLI Schedule of Events


NYLI Key Essentials and Advanced
Sunday, July 20
3 pm - 7 pm

Registration Open

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer

5 pm - 6:30 pm

Power of the Movement Welcome Reception

Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 4-12

7:30 am - 4 pm

Registration Open

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer

8 am - 4 pm

Table-top Exhibits Open

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer

8 am - 9:30 am

Opening Plenary Breakfast

Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 4-12

9:45 am - noon

Key Essentials & Advanced: Welcome &


Introduction to the NYLI

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Monday, July 21

Noon - 1:30 pm

Lunch On Own

1:30 pm - 2:50 pm

Key Essentials: Strategic Prevention


Framework (SPF) Overview

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF)


In Action In Our Community

Union Room

2:50 pm - 3:10 pm

Refreshment Break

Floridian Ballroom Foyer

3:10 pm - 5 pm

Key Essentials: What is a Leader?

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF)


In Action In Our Community & Oral Presentation #1

Union Room

Youth Meet Up and Open Mic

Floridian Ballroom G-J

8 pm - 10 pm

Get to know teens from across the country with a


shared interest of drug abuse prevention. Then, let loose
on the Mic and give it what you got. Poets, Lyricists,
Musicians, Actorsbring your talents to the stage!

Tuesday, July 22
7:30 am- 4 pm

Registration Open

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer

8:30 am - 9 am

Continental Breakfast (delayed time just for NYLI)

Floridian Ballroom G-J

8 am - 4 pm

Table-top Exhibits Open

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer

8:30 am - 10:20 am

Key Essentials: Whats Going On In Your Community? Floridian Ballroom G-J


Advanced: Youth Leadership in Coalitions

Union Room

10:20 am - 10:40 am

Refreshment Break

10:40 am - noon

Key Essentials: Why is There a Problem?

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: Evaluation

Union Room

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 35

NYLI Schedule (continued)


Tuesday, July 22 (continued)
Noon - 1:30 pm

Lunch On Own

1:30 pm - 2:50 pm

Key Essentials: Problem Analysis Part I: But Why?

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: Environmental Strategies Interventions


& Policy Change

Union Room

2:50 pm - 3:10 pm

Refreshment Break

Floridian Ballroom Foyer

3:10 pm - 5 pm

Key Essentials: Problem Analysis Part II: But Why Here? Floridian Ballroom G-J
Advanced: Developing an Effective Advocacy
Campaign for Policy Change

Union Room

Wednesday, July 23
7:30 am- 4 pm

Registration Open

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer

8:30 am - 9 am

Continental Breakfast (delayed time just for NYLI)

Floridian Ballroom G-J

8 am - 4 pm

Table-top Exhibits Open

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer

8:30 am - 10:20 am

Key Essentials: Review of But Why? But Why Here? +


What is our Model for Change?
Floridian Ballroom G-J
Advanced: Preparation for Mock Council Meeting

Union Room

10:20 am - 10:40 am

Refreshment Break

Floridian Ballroom Foyer

10:40 am - noon

Key Essentials: Logic Model Report Out

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: Mock Council Meeting

Union Room

Noon - 1:30 pm

Lunch On Own

1:30 pm - 2:50 pm

Key Essentials: Overview of Interventions

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: Youth Recruitment and


Engagement
2:50 pm - 3:10 pm

Refreshment Break

Floridian Ballroom Foyer

3:10 pm - 5 pm

Key Essentials: Developing Interventions

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: Preparation for Youth In Action


Oral Presentations
5:15 pm - 6:30 pm

DFC Grantee Town Hall Meeting

Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 10-12

5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Youth Pool Splash!

Hilton Pool

You could be anywhere, but you're in Orlando so...


get in some Sun, Sandals, & Swimsuits!

36 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

NYLI Schedule (continued)


Thursday, July 24
7:30 am - 8:15 am

Continental Breakfast with Closing Dialogue

Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 7-12

7:30 am - 4 pm

Registration Open

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer

8:30 am - 10:20 am

Key Essentials: Youth In Action Projects

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: Youth In Action Presentations

Union Room

10:20 am - 10:40 am

Refreshment Break

Floridian Ballroom Foyer

10:40 am - noon

Key Essentials: Youth In Action Projects + Presentations Floridian Ballroom G-J


Advanced: Youth In Action Presentations

Union Room

Noon - 1:30 pm

Lunch on Your Own

1:30 pm - 2:50 pm

Key Essentials: Youth In Action Presentations +


Advocating for Change!

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: The Finish Line

Union Room

2:50 pm - 3:10 pm

Refreshment Break

Floridian Ballroom Foyer

3:10 pm - 5 pm

Key Essentials: Cross Share + NYLI Wrap Up

Floridian Ballroom G-J

Advanced: NYLI Wrap Up/Evaluations

Union Room

www.cadca.org #CADCAMidYear | 37

Board of Directors
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
Chairman and CEO

Vice Chair

Arthur T. Dean
Chairman & CEO
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA)

Jerilyn Simpson-Jordan
Past President & CEO
San Bernardino Communities Against Drugs

Emeritus

Emeritus

Neil Austrian
Former Chairman & CEO
Office Depot, Inc. and former President, The NFL

Gerard R. Roche
Senior Chairman
Heidrick & Struggles, Inc.

Members
Honorable Mary Bono
Former member of U.S. Congress,
Senior Vice President, FaegreBD Consulting

Frank J. Grass
Chief,
National Guard Bureau

Michael A. Braun
Managing Partner
SGI Global, LLC

Curtis Hougland
Founder & Principal, Attention USA

Robert J. Dickey
President, U.S. Community Publishing,
Gannett Company, Inc.

Douglas Hughes
Executive Director,
The Miami Coalition for a Safe and
Drug-Free Community

Kenneth W. Dobbins, MBA, Ph.D.


President, Southeast Missouri
State University

The Honorable Michael J. Kramer


Member, Drug-Free Noble County
Judge, Noble Superior Court, Division 2

Karen Drexler, M.D.


Deputy National Mental Health Program
Director, Addictive Disorders, Veterans
Healthcare Administration

Christopher Kennedy Lawford


Goodwill Ambassador, United Nations
Office on Drugs and Crime

Fran Flener
Arkansas Drug Director

Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D.


Chief Executive Officer,
American Association for the
Advancement of Science;
Executive Publisher, Science Magazine
Willie Mitchell
Chairman of the Board, San Antonio
Fighting Back, Inc.
Thomas J. Reddin
Managing Partner,
Red Dog Ventures, LLC
Nathaniel J. Sutton
Vice Chairman & Partner,
Heidrick & Struggles, Inc.
Donald K. Truslow
Chief Risk Officer, M&T Bank
Kevin M. Warren
Corporate Vice President and President,
Global Growth Opportunities,
Xerox Corporation

CADCA Coalition Advisory Committee


Heidi Bainbridge
Drug Free Communities (DFC) Project
Director/Coalition Coordinator,
Van Buren County SAFE Coalition

Cheryl M. Guthier
Executive Director,
Community Prevention Partnership
of Berks County

Gwendolyn W. Brown
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer,
Genesis Prevention Coalition, Inc.

Cindy C. Hayford
Director,
Deerfield Valley Community Partnership

L. Diane Casto
Manager, Behavioral Health Prevention and
Early Intervention,
Alaska Department of Health &
Social Services

Michael Langer
Prevention Services Supervisor,
Social and Health Services Department,
Washington Division of Behavioral and
Health Services
Erica Leary
Program Manager,
North Coastal Prevention
Coalition/Vista Community Clinic

38 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

Randy Miller
Executive Director,
Drug Free Marion County
Angelo Ortiz
UNIDOS-Inwood Coalition Program Director,
Inwood Community Services, Inc.
Gregory Puckett
Executive Director,
Community Connections, Inc.

CADCAs 25th National Leadership Forum


& SAMHSAs 11th Prevention Day

25
IBLE

MI SSION:

S
S
O
P

AGENTS OF CHANGE

February 25, 2015 | Gaylord National Hotel & Convention Center | National Harbor, MD

CADCAs 14th Annual

Mid-Year Training
Institute
August 2-6, 2015
JW Marriott Indianapolis | Indianapolis, IN

40 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

See You Next Year!

VERIFICATION OF ATTENDANCE
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) verifies that

__________________________________________________________________________
(name of registered delegate)

has attended

CADCAs 13th Mid-Year Training Institute


which took place July 21-24, 2014,
at the Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek/Waldorf Astoria in Orlando, Florida

for a total of ______________ training contact hours


(See reverse to determine contact hours received)

Maximum contact hours available per presentation type:


Tues

Plenary/Special Presentations
Courses

Mon
1.5
5.5

6.5

Wed
1.25
6.5

Thurs
.75
6.5

TOTAL
3.5
25.0

Total Hours

7.0

6.5

7.75

7.25

28.5

A maximum of 28.5 contact hours which equals 2.8 CEUs is available for this conference.

Carlton Hall
Deputy Director of Training & Technical Assistance
CADCAs National Coalition Institute

Do NOT return forms to CADCA.

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America

Building Drug-Free Communities

625 Slaters Lane, Suite 300, Alexandria, VA 22314


P 703-706-0560 F 703-706-0565 1-800-54-CADCA cadca.org

www.cadca.org | 41

Contact Hours
Day

Course

# Contact Hours

_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________

42 | 2014 CADCA Mid-Year Training Institute

C O M M U N I T Y

A N T I - D R U G

C O A L I T I O N S

O F

A M E R I C A

Save the
Date
16th Annual

Drug-Free Kids
Campaign Awards Dinner
October 8, 2014
Mandarin Oriental, Washington, DC

http://drugfreekids.cadca.org

Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek & Waldorf Astoria Complex


Meeting Room Floor Plans
Hilton Guest Rooms

Lobby Level

Escalators to
Ground Level

Office

HILTON ORLANDO BONNET CREEK


FLORIDIAN BALLROOM

CADCA
Registration

HILTON ORLANDO BONNET CREEK


BONNET CREEK BALLROOM

Waldorf
Astoria
Guest
Rooms

Exhibit Tables
Cyber
Caf

Escalators to
Lobby Level

Steps down to
Ground Level

Business
Center

Ground Level

Steps up to
Lobby Level

Bonnet Creek Pavilion

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America

2014 MID-YEAR TRAINING INSTITUTE


Schedule of Events
NOTE: Refer to pages 34-37 for the NYLI detailed Schedule.

SUNDAY, JULY 20
3 pm - 7 pm
5 pm - 6:30 pm

Registration Open
Power of the Movement Welcome Reception

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer


Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 4-12

Registration Open
Opening Plenary & Breakfast
Table-top Exhibits Open
Courses
Lunch On Own
Courses
Refreshment Break
Youth Meet Up & Open Mic

Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer


Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 4-12
Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer
See pages 14-15 for details

Continental Breakfast
Registration Open
Table-top Exhibits Open
Courses
Refreshment Break
Lunch On Your Own
Courses
Refreshment Break

Ballroom Foyers
Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer
Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer
See pages 14-15 for details
Ballroom Foyers

Continental Breakfast
Registration Open
Table-top Exhibits Open
Courses
Refreshment Break
Lunch On Your Own
Courses
Refreshment Break
DFC Grantee Town Hall Meeting
Youth Pool Splash!

Ballroom Foyers
Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer
Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer
See pages 14-15 for details
Ballroom Foyers

Continental Breakfast - Closing Dialogue


Registration Open
Courses
Refreshment Break
Lunch On Your Own
Courses
Refreshment Break
Meeting Adjourns

Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 7-12


Bonnet Creek Ballroom Foyer
See pages 14-15 for details
Ballroom Foyers

MONDAY, JULY 21
7:30 am - 4 pm
8 am - 9:30 am
8 am - 4 pm
9:45 am - noon
Noon - 1:30 pm
1:30 pm - 5 pm
2:50 pm - 3:10 pm
8 pm - 10 pm

See pages 14-15 for details


Ballroom Foyers
Floridian Ballroom G-J

TUESDAY, JULY 22
7:30 am - 8:15 am
7:30 am - 4 pm
8 am - 4 pm
8:30 am - noon
10:20 am - 10:40 am
Noon - 1:30 pm
1:30 pm - 5 pm
2:50 pm - 3:10 pm

See pages 14-15 for details


Ballroom Foyers

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23
7:30 am - 8:15 am
7:30 am - 4 pm
8 am - 4 pm
8:30 am - noon
10:20 am - 10:40 am
Noon - 1:30 pm
1:30 pm - 5 pm
2:50 pm - 3:10 pm
5:15 pm - 6:30 pm
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

See pages 14-15 for details


Ballroom Foyers
Bonnet Creek Ballroom, Salon 10-12
Hilton Pool

THURSDAY, JULY 24
7:30 am - 8:15 am
7:30 am - 4 pm
8:30 am - noon
10:20 am - 10:40 am
Noon - 1:30 pm
1:30 pm - 5 pm
2:50 pm - 3:10 pm
5 pm

See page 14-15 for details


Ballroom Foyers