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We sincerely acknowledge the valuable inputs and support rendered by the following individuals during

the course of this exercise:













We would also like to thank the following individuals for extending their full support and cooperations:







Acknowledgment

Shri. Naveen Patnaik, Honble Chief Minister, Orissa


Shri. Debi Prasad Mishra, Honble Minister of Tourism, Orissa
Shri. Parag Gupta, IAS,Commissionar cum Secretary, MD, OTDC
Shri. Asit Tripathy, IAS, Fromer-MD, OTDC
Mr. M. R. Patnaik General Manager, OTDC
Mr. Dilip kumar Padhi - Member Secretary, Orissa Water Supply & Sewerage Board
Mr. B. N. Mishra Asst. Director, DoT
Mr. P. K. Chand F.C. cum secretary, OTDC
Mr. Sasanka Rath Officer, OTDC
Mr. Tripathi Executive Engg., OTDC
Mr. S. P. Mohanti G. M. (Tech.), CISCO
Mr. Prashantkumar Patnayak Chief Town Planner, Puri - Konark Development Authority
Mr. P. C. Gochikar Asst. Tech., PKDA
Mr. P. Mishra Scientist, ORSAC
Dr. Prasanna Kumar Scientist, ORSAC
Mr. Manojkumar Das Ex. Engineer, Irrigation Department
Mr. B. B. Samat - Sr. Geologist, Ground Water Survey & Investigation Department
Mr. P. K. Mohapatra - Er. RWS&S, Orissa Water Supply & Sewerage Board
Mr. Bhaskar Subramanian Principal Consultant, PWC
Mr. Mihir G Shah Project Coordinator, PWC
Mr. Tejas Vijay Pol - Consultant, PWC
Mr. Satish M. K. Consultant, PWC
Mr. Subrat Mishra Consultant, PWC
Mr. Pranav Potbhare Consultant, PWC


CEPT Project Team
1 Prof. Utpal Sharma Project Leader
2 Prof. Saswat Bandyopadhyay Project co-ordinator
3 Prof. Sejal Patel Engineer-Urban Planner
4 Prof. SK Acharya Urban-Regional Planner
5 Prof. Rajiv Kadam Urban Designer
6 Mr. Kunal Marvaniya Engineer- Planner
7 Mr. P M Patel Senior Engineer
8 Mr. Hiten Desai Senior Engineer
9 Mr. Bhavin Amrutiya Architect
10 Mr. Karn joshi Architect
11 Mr. Aashish Dalwadi Architect
12 Mr. Jaimin Patel Architect
13 Mr. Tarun Patel Architect
S K DAS ASSOCIATED ARCHITECTS Project Team
1 Mr. S. K. Das Principal Urban Designer
2 Ms. Nidhi Batra Urban Designer - Architect
3 Ms. Manjusha Patnaik Conservation Architect
4 Ms. Amrita Minhas Architect
5 Ms. Ginny Sharma Architect
6 Ms. Komal Anand Architect
7 Ms. Madhulika Panwar Architect
Final Master Plan for Shamuka Beach Area, Puri, Orissa










Acknowledgement
Executive summary
1.0 Introduction ... 01
1.1 background.....02
1.2 Need for a Shamuka Beach.02
1.3 Objective of the Shamuka Beach Area.......03
1.4 Terms of reference......03
1.5 Approach & Methodology..04
1.6 Stages of Work....05
1.7 Structure of Draft Master Plan Report.05

2.0 Orissa Tourism Profile.....06
2.1 Important Tourist Destination..07
2.1.1 Tourist spots.......07
2.1.2 Fairs and Festivals.10
2.2 Tourist Population.......10

3.0 Shamuka Beach Area Site & Surroundings.13
3.1 Location...14
3.2 Accessibility....14
3.3 Site location & surrounding....15
3.4 Climate ...17
3.5 Existing Landuse..18
3.6 Geomorphology ...20
3.7 Water Bodies & Canals...20
3.8 Human Settlements..20
3.9 Site Topography ..21
3.10 CRZ regulation.22
3.11 Site analysis23
3.12 Potentials & Constraints Of Project Area .23

4.0 Land suitability and analysis..24
4.1 Parameter considered..25
4.2 Land use Vs Land suitability matrix. ....27
4.3 Composite land suitability index....27

5.0 Case studies.28
5.1 Bali, Indonesia...29
5.2 Nusa dua, Indonesia..33
5.3 Maldives..43
6.0 Final Master Plan...44
6.1 Shamuka Peninsula.....45
6.2 Government Vision.45
6.3 Proposed Activity structure .......46
6.4 Proposed Program Brief....47
6.5 Design Concept..48
6.5.1 Alternative Concept Plan I ....49
6.5.2 Alternative Concept Plan II..50
6.5.3 Alternative Concept Plan III...51
6.5.4 Alternative Concept Plan IV...52
6.5.5 Comparison of various alternatives52
6.6 Final Master Plan..53
6.7 Tentative activity schedule....55
6.8 Master Plan Visuals.56

7.0 Infrastructure 72
7.1 On site infrastructure...73
7.1.1 Road ....75
7.1.2 Street Light .84
7.1.3 Water Supply..87
7.1.4 Sewerage.94
7.1.5 Storm Water Drainage..100
7.1.6 Rain water harvesting..105
7.1.7 Solid Waste..107
7.1.8 Power Distribution ..110
7.1.9 Other Infrastructure facility .112
7.2 Off site Infrastructure...112

8.0 Development Control Regulations..113
8.1 Urban Design Guidelines.114
8.1.1 Courtyard.114
8.1.2 Terrace and Entrance Porch.114
8.1.3 Roof..114
8.1.4 Verandah..115
8.1.5 Entrance Gate115
8.1.6 Compound wall-Hotel.115
8.1.7 Compound wall-Gurukul..116
8.1.8 Compound wall - Villas.116

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Part-III Other Rules and regulation for Shamuka Beach Area128
3.1 Hotels & Resorts.128
3.2 Standard requirements for Museum..129
3.3 Standard requirements for Institution.129
3.4 General rules on the operation and maintenance of Tourism-related
establishment130


Annexure
AnnexureI Costal area classification and development regulations.131
Annexure-II Guidelines for development of beach resorts/hotels in the designated
areas of CRZ-III for temporary occupation of tourist/visitors, with
prior approval of the ministry of environment & forests.132
Annexure-III Tourism Development / Planning guidelines.133
Annexure-IV EIA Notification..134
Annexure-V Plot Level Guidelines..136

8.1.9 Parking116
8.1.10 Basement..117
8.1.11 Height of the Building.117
8.1.12 Building Width..117
8.2 Development Control Regulation.118
Part-I Existing Development regulation118
1.1 General building requirements.118
1.2 Floor area ratio (F.A.R.).118
1.3 Ground coverage..119
1.4 Height.119
1.5 Setbacks or Open spaces..119
1.6 Building line..120
1.7 Off-street parking space.120
1.8 Roofs....120
1.9 Boundary wall.121
1.10 Plantation121
1.11 Material.121

Part-II Special development control regulations...122
2.1 Floor area ratio122
2.2 Ground coverage..122
2.3 Setback & Open spaces123
2.4 Height of the building..123
2.5 Length and width of the building.124
2.6 Parking.124
2.7 Means of access.125
2.8 Roof.125
2.9 Landscape125
2.10 Boundary wall.125
2.11 Building line126
2.12 Material.126
2.13 Verandah.126
2.14 Entrance gate..126
2.15 Floor height126
2.16 Basement126
2.17 Green buffer.126
2.18 Faade controls..126
2.19 Plinth127
2.20 Weather shades.127


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List of Maps
Map no. 1.1: Location of study area
Map no. 2.1: Important tourist destination in Orissa
Map no. 2.2: Tourist attractions of Orissa
Map no. 3.1: Location of site
Map no. 3.2: Regional Linkages
Map no. 3.3: Existing site & Landuse
Map no. 3.4: Existing landuse
Map no. 3.5: Existing landuse
Map no. 3.6: Base map
Map no. 3.7: Geomorphology map
Map no. 3.8: Water bodies, Canals and Human settlements
Map no. 3.9: Site topography
Map no. 3.10: Digital terrain map
Map no. 3.11: Contour relief map
Map no. 3.12: Mauja map
Map no. 4.1: CRZ line
Map no. 4.2: Buffer area of Water body
Map no. 4.3: Slope Analysis
Map no. 4.4: Contour Relief
Map no. 4.5: Buffer area of roads
Map no. 4.6: Land Suitability Map
Map no. 5.1: Location of Bali
Map no. 5.2: Map of Bali
Map no. 5.3: Lovino Beach of Bali
Map no. 5.4: Kuta Beach of Bali
Map no. 5.5: Sanur Beach of Bali
Map no. 5.6: Ubud town of Bali
Map no. 5.7: Location of Nusa Dua
Map no. 5.8 a: Nusa Dua
Map no. 5.8 b: Nusa Dua Beach
Map no. 5.9 : Site Plan of Hilton Resort
Map no. 5.10 : Site Plan of Mimpi Resort
Map No. 5.11 : Nirwana Bali Golf Course
Map no. 5.12 :Ground Floor Plan- BICC
Map no. 5.13 :First Floor Plan- BICC
Map no. 5.14 a :Location of Maldives
Map no. 5.14 b :Location of Maldives


Map no. 6.1: Shamuka Peninsula
Map no. 6.2: Existing site features
Map no. 6.3: Alternative Concept Plan-I
Map no. 6.4: Alternative Concept Plan-II
Map no. 6.5 a: Alternative Concept plan-III
Map no. 6.5 b: Alternative Concept plan-III (with foot print)
Map no. 6.6: Alternative Concept plan-IV
Map no. 6.7: Proposed land use Activities
Map no. 6.8: Proposed built form
Map no. 7.1: Infrastructure development option- I
Map no. 7.2: Infrastructure development option- II
Map no. 7.3: Infrastructure development option- III
Map no. 7.4: Key plan showing road hierarchy
Map no. 7.5: Proposed Road Section for 30m wide road
Map no. 7.6: Proposed Road Section for 24m wide road
Map no. 7.7: Proposed Road Section for 18m wide road
Map no. 7.8: Proposed Road Section for 12m wide road
Map no. 7.9: Proposed Road Section for 6m wide road
Map no. 7.10: Propose water supply network
Map no. 7.11: Location of bore well
Map no. 7.12: Proposed sewerage network
Map no. 7.13: Proposed Storm water network
Map no 8.1 Master plan (with plots)



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Table No. 2.1: Tourist population year
Table No. 2.2: Tourist from different states
Table No. 2.3: No. of Tourists that visited in the identified tourist centres of Orissa
Table No. 3.1: Existing landuse
Table No. 3.2: Existing landuse in CRZ zone
Table No. 6.1: Site constraints
Table No. 6.2: Proposed Program Brief
Table No. 6.3: Comparative statement of four conceptual plan
Table No. 6.4: Proposed landuse
Table No. 7.1: Recommended road widths
Table No. 7.2: Equivalency factors for vehicles
Table No. 7.3: Tentative capacity of urban roads
Table No. 7.4: Recommended carriageway widths
Table No. 7.5: Road sections
Table No. 7.6: Vehicle damage factor
Table No. 7.7: Type of pavements (Proposed for Shamuka beach area)
Table No. 7.8: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for road network option I
Table No. 7.9: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for road network- phase I (option II)
Table No. 7.10: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for road network- phase II (option II)
Table No. 7.11: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for road network- phase I (option III)
Table No. 7.12: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for road network- phase II (option III)
Table No. 7.13: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street light- option I
Table No. 7.14: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street light- phase I(option II)
Table No. 7.15: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street light- phase II(option II)
Table No. 7.16: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street light- phase I(option III)
Table No. 7.17: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street light- phase II(option III)
Table No. 7.18: Water Supply Standards & Guidelines
Table No. 7.19: Total water demand (Option I)
Table No. 7.20: Total water demand
Table No. 7.21: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network - option I
Table No. 7.22: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network phase I (option II)
Table No. 7.23: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network phase II (option II)
Table No. 7.24: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network phase I (option III)
Table No. 7.25: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network phase II (option III)
Table No. 7.26: Cost Estimate: Ground water supply
Table No. 7.27: Sewage Standards & Guidelines
Table No. 7.28: Comparative analysis of sanitation system
Table No. 7.29: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage systemoption I
Table No. 7.30: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage system phase I(option II)
Table No. 7.31: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage system phase II(option II)
Table No. 7.32: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage system phase I(option III)
Table No. 7.33: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage system phase II(option III)
Table No. 7.34: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage Option I
Table No. 7.35: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage phase-I (Option II)

List of Tables
Table No. 7.36: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage phase-II (Option II)
Table No. 7.37: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage phase-I (Option III)
Table No. 7.38: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage phase-II (Option III)
Table No. 7.39: Rain Water Harvesting option: Shamuka Beach Area
Table No. 7.40: Solid Waste Standards & Guidelines
Table No. 7.41: Solid waste estimation
Table No. 7.42: Solid waste equipments
Table No. 7.43: Cost estimate for Solid waste Option I
Table No. 7.44: Cost estimate for Solid waste Phase I (Option II)
Table No. 7.45: Cost estimate for Solid waste Phase II (Option II)
Table No. 7.46: Cost estimate for Solid waste Phase I (Option III)
Table No. 7.47: Cost estimate for Solid waste Phase II (Option III)
Table No. 7.48: Energy standards and guidelines
Table No. 7.49: Total Power demand
Table No. 7.50: Power demand
Table No. 7.51: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network option I
Table No. 7.52: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network phase I (option II)
Table No. 7.53: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network phase II (option II)
Table No. 7.54: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network phase I (option III)
Table No. 7.55: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network phase II (option III)
Table No. 7.56: Development of Sea Beach and River front Area
Table No. 7.57: Infrastructure Cost Estimate
Table no. 8.1: Floor area ratio
Table no. 8.2: Ground Coverage
Table no. 8.3: Building Height
Table no. 8.4: Setback and open spaces
Table no. 8.5: Building line
Table no. 8.6: Off street parking space
Table no. 8.7: Floor area ratio
Table no. 8.8: Ground Coverage
Table no. 8.9: Setback and open spaces
Table no. 8.10: Building Height
Table no. 8.11: Parking
Table no 8.12 Architectural control for Hotel (type -A) Plot-4
Table no 8.13 Architectural control for Hotel (type - B) Plot-10
Table no 8.14 Architectural control for Gurukul (Type -A) Plot-5
Table no 8.15 Architectural control for Gurukul (Type -B) Plot-2
Table no 8.16 Architectural control for Convention Center
Table no 8.17 Architectural control for Art & Craft museum
Table no 8.18 Architectural control for Hospitality institute
Table no 8.19 Architectural control for Condominium & Villas
Table no 8.20 Architectural control for Golf Villas
Table no 8.21 Architectural control for Social Infrastructure housing


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CEPT,Ahmedabad
v


List of Abbreviations

CRZ: Costal Regulation Zone
FSI: Floor Space Index
DCR: Development Control Regulation
CEPT: Centre for Environmental Planning & Technology
SKDAA: S K Das Associated Architects
OTDC: Orissa Tourism Development Corporation
DoT: Department of Tourism
GoO: Government of Orissa
IDCO: Orissa Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation
PKDA: Puri - Konark Development Authority
ORSAC: Orissa Remote Sensing Application Centre
CPHEEO: Central Public Health and Environmental Engineering Organization
NBO: National Building Organisation
IRC: Indian Road Congress
CPCB: Central Pollution Control Board
CTP: Chief Town Planner
PWC: PricewaterhouseCoopers (P) Ltd.
CMAO: City Managers Association Orissa
SH: State Highway
HPS: High Pressure Sodium
LPS: Low Pressure Sodium
CFL: Carbon Filament Lamp
HTL: High Tide Line
RoW: Width of Road
MLD: Million liter per day
LPCD: Liter per capita per day
PCU: Passenger Car Unit
EIC: Engineer in Chief
DTH: Direct to Home
FAR: Floor Area Ratio
EWS: Economical Weaker Section
C.C.: Cement Concrete
R.C.C.: Reinforcement Cement Concrete
DI: Ductile Iron
GI: Galvanized Iron
CI: Cast Iron

Executive Summary
The State of Orissa is an attractive treasure
house of cultures and customs, religions
and traditions, languages and literature, art
and architecture, scenic beauty and wildlife.
Endowed with rich cultural heritage and
bestowed with bounties of nature, Orissa is
a fascinating state with majestic
monuments, beautiful beaches, luxuriant
forests, wildlife, handicrafts etc. In its long
history spanning over several centuries, the
region of modern Orissa is today one of the
most popular with tourists visiting and
within India has emereged as a popular and
enchanting tourist destination.
Puri, is the most important destination of
tourist activities in the State of Orissa.
Jagannath Temple and Rath Yatra festival
draw almost more than 35% of the tourists
visiting the state. Golden triangle of
Bhuvaneswar- Konark Puri attracts 80%
of the tourists visiting the state. Tourists
currently visiting consist mainly of domestic
pilgrims. A strong religious tourism base
exists here, and has restricted the growth
of other tourism related activities.
Twin objectives of providing new tourism
products and unlocking the destination
would offer the tourists an opportunity to
feel and experience the rich culture,
indigenous art & craft, customs and
traditions of Orissa, the Government of
Orissa has decided to develop the Shamuka
beach area near Puri. It is envisaged to tap
the requirements following huge corporate
and industrial investments planned within
the state. Thus Shamuka Beach area, 8Km
to the South of Puri Town has been
identified for the purpose.

The Shamuka beach area with its locational
advantage of being on the main tourist route, as
well as its rich natural beauty, was chosen for
the same. The pre design study, formulation of
conceptual master plan, and final master plan
was commissioned to CEPT, Ahmedabad and
SKDAS Associated Architects, Delhi.
It was envisioned that the project to be Self-
contained, high-end, Exclusive Leisure cum
Business destination aimed at providing a one-
stop rejuvenation facility for the mind and body.
The Overall theme / concept luxury with a
distinct Orissan culture flavor.
Based on various national as well as
international cases, a broad activity structure
for Shamuka was developed. The identified
activities were further shaped up after a series
of discussion with the GoO DoT officials and
feedbacks from the probable investors. The
table below summarises the various activities
proposed for Shamuka beach.



In order to create steady but sustainable
growth, it is proposed to develop Shamuka in
three distinct phases as under:
Phase I will include Convention center, hotels,
heritage town with main street, golf course,
water sports, Phase II will include Health &
wellness tourism focus and Phase III with
High end villas & second homes.


Activities No. of units Land (Acre)
Golf Course (27 Hole Fairways) 1 221
Convention Centre (with Hospitality, Exhibition Spaces, Trade
fairs, Amphitheatres etc.)
1 25
Performing Arts Centre (Amphitheatre, Gurukul, Indoor Class,
Halls, Library etc)
1 30
Art & Craft Museum 1 10
Luxury Hotels 13 230
Golf Villas 200 50
Residential Apartments (2BHK & 3BHK walkups, g+2) 300 15
High street bazaar 1 2
Hospitality Institute 1 18
Condominiums & Villas 450 35
Executive Summary

ii

The Final Master plan perceives the area to


develop into a prime destination, a jewel in
Orissas tourism sector. The plan translates
this into space through interlinked, yet
defined activity sectors. The possible set of
tourism products for development at
Shamuka Beach include 5 / 4 Star Hotels,
Resorts, Spa, Convention Centre, Golf
Course, Exhibition Complex, Eco Parks etc.
These are accommodated within the master
plan with various components of the plan
surrounding the Golf course on all four
sides, reflecting a Necklace kind of
development A true Jewel.

Major factors considered while allocating
landuse were maximum utilization of sea
frontage, river frontage, incorporating
greener environment and ease in
movement of traffic.

All the various components of development
surround the Golf Course on the remaining
three sides. To its north and at the very
entrance is a 24.22 Acre International
Convention Centre with a dedicated hotel
and adjoining hospitality institute of 17.87
acres. Additional hotel plots are carved out
along side that would take care of future
demands as the footfall increases. On the
northwest corner of the site, 15.91 Acres
are dedicated for social infrastructure and
housing for the staff workers in the hotels
and other facilities.

A Shamuka Village inspired by vernacular
style of architecture will showcase the best
of Orissas cultural, artistic and performing
traditions. The village will have a Craft
Museum, workshops for artists and
craftsmen, a performing arts centre,
Gurukul for music and the performing arts.
It will be a sort of daily micro destination
for the tourists to spend idle time and
evenings to get a glimpse of panoramic
Orissa.

The main street will have a shopping
mall, restaurants, bars, food courts, shops
and showrooms.

River front will have a 33.14 acre
Riverdale project with villas and
condominiums.

The location of the site, at the confluence
of river Mangala and Bay of Bengal are
generally associated with certain
constraints pertaining to infrastructure
provisions and demands special attention.
Therefore, The proposed site infrastructure
facilities for the project reflects the distinct
geography and connectivity. Preliminary
cost estimates has also been prepared for
both on site and off site infrastructure
components.

NO ACTIVITY No of Plots
1 Hotel 13
2 Hospitality Institute 1
3 Convention Centre 1
4 Social Infrastructure Housing 1
5 Gurukul 8
6 Street Bazar 1
7 Art & Craft Museum 1
8 Condominiums & Villas 1
9 Public Park 3
10 Golf Course (27 Holes) 1
Executive Summary

iii

For the estimation of infrastructure cost, the


following components have been considered:
A. On-site infrastructure
Road
Water supply
Sewerage
Storm water drainage
Solid waste
Power
B. Off-site infrastructure
Supply of power from main grid upto
site boundary
Construction of Puri by-pass
Surface water intake and raw water
main from upstream water reservoir.
Disposal of treated sewage.

Proposed Development Control Regulation
(DCR) and Urban design guidelines are
prepared to control architectural elements to
shape the built environment of the project
area which will show the glimpse of
Vernacular architecture and Orriya traditional
culture.




















Total Infrastructure cost Option - I
Infrastructure Cost for Road 62.86
Infrastructure Cost for Street Light 2.12
Infrastructure Cost for Water 13.45
Infrastructure Cost for Ground water 4.35
Infrastructure Cost for Sewerage system 17.15
Infrastructure Cost for Storm Water System 7.78
Infrastructure Cost for Solid waste management system 4.89
Infrastructure Cost for Electric supply 7.51
Development cost of Sea Beach And River front Area 4.40
Capital cost of Informatory signages (As per IRC
guidelines)
4.25
Total Infrastructure Cost 128.76
Incidental and Instrumental over heads - 10% of the total 12.88
Grand total 141.64
Off-site Infrastructure cost 25.00
Over all Project infrastructure cost 166.64
*All figure are in crore
Note: 2007 prices







Chapter I
Introduction





















1.1 Background
1.2 Need for a Shamuka Beach Area
1.3 Objectives of the Shamuka Beach Area
1.4 Terms of Reference
1.5 Approach & Methodology
1.6 Stages of Work
1.7 Structure of Final Master Plan Report

FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterI:Introduction

CEPT,Ahmedabad 2

1.1 BACKGROUND
The state of Orissa is an attractive
treasure house of cultures and
customs, religions and traditions,
languages and literature, art and
architecture, scenic beauties and
wildlife. Endowed with rich cultural
heritage and bestowed with
bounties of nature, Orissa is a
fascinating state with majestic
monuments, beautiful beaches,
luxuriant forests, wildlife,
handicrafts etc.

Wedged between West Bengal and
Andhra Pradesh, Orissa lies on the
eastern coast of India with the
waters of the Bay of Bengal swirling
along its eastern and southeastern
boundaries.

With an area of about 1,55,707
square kilometers, the state offers
diverse habitats from lush green
and hilly terrain to coastal plains
and rolling river valleys, crises-
crossed by Brahmani, Mahanadi and
Bansadhara rivers. Beckoned by its
long history spanning over several
centuries, the region of modern
Orissa has emerged as an
enchanting tourist destination.
1.2 NEED FOR A SHAMUKA BEACH
AREA
The twin objectives of providing
new tourism products and
unlocking the destination would
offer the tourists an opportunity
to feel and experience the rich
culture, indigenous art & craft,
customs and traditions of Orissa.
The destination would be ideal
for relaxation in the lap of luxury
and to experience the beautiful
bio-diversity, rich culture and
traditions the very essence of
Orissa.

The possible set of tourism
products for development at
Shamuka Beach include 5/4 Star
Hotels, Resorts, Spa, Convention
Centre, Golf Course, Exhibition
Complex, Eco Parks etc.


Puritown
ToBhubaneswar
ToChilkaLake
StudyArea
BayofBengal
Map No. 1.1 Location of study area
N
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterI:Introduction

CEPT,Ahmedabad 3

1.3 OBJECTIVE OF THE


SHAMUKA BEACH AREA
The main objectives behind the
project preparing a Master plan
for the Shamuka beach area are:
Develop a master plan for:
Shamuka beach.
Identify regional and internal
infrastructure requirements &
assessment of the same.
Define development control
regulations for the project area.
1.4 Terms of Reference for
CEPT-SKDAA
A Site analysis
This will include the following
activities:
A reconnaissance survey to study
the existing physical features,
land use/land cover,
ecologically sensitive areas etc.
Connectivity to hinterland and
major activity nodes.
Assessment of the existing
infrastructure available at the
site
Analysis of the proposed location
in context of prevailing Legal and
Regulatory framework,
essentially CRZ norms and any
other regulation having an
impact on the project e.g. forest
cover related regulations.
Identification of social issues, if
any, related to the project i.e.
rehabilitation requirements

Land Suitability Analysis:
Identification of suitable land for
various activities considering
existing land use, ecologically
sensitive areas etc
B Concept Plan
A study of two similar projects
(case studies) and a consultative
exercise with stakeholders is to
be carried out by the consultant.
Based on the consultative
exercise and case studies, the
consultant should develop the
concept plan.
The concept plan will include:
Demarcation of developable
land
Identify the extent of land under
different uses
Assessment of acceptable price
of land/lease rentals
Estimation of total saleable area,
possible built-up area (based on
proposed building byelaws),
area under common facilities
Zoning Plan: Four schematic
zoning plans illustrating the
placement, relative size, and
relationships of key components
of the proposed site have been
worked out. e.g. in case of a
hotel project, the sizing
requirements would include
number of hotels of various
categories; expected size of
each hotel/resort, area to be
allotted for each project etc.
Circulation and open spaces to
be identified clearly in the
zoning plan.
Precise identification of public,
semi-public and private spaces
in the zoning plan.
C. Preparation of Landuse/
Layout Plan
The consultant shall develop a
landuse Plan based on the
finalized concept plan
comparison the following:
Landuse Plan: Four alternative
landuse Plans shall be prepared
based on the approved concept
plan. The landuse plan shall
explicitly identify the extent of land
under different uses, including
estimation of total saleable area,
possible built-up area (based on
proposed building by-laws and
development control regulations to
be adopted for developing the
area), area under common
facilities, circulation, open spaces,
etc. The plan shall indicate the
zoning and phasing for the entire
site covering 920.04 acres.
The consultant will also carry out
comparative Analysis of the four
alternative landuse Plans.
Landscape Plan: The planning of
open spaces will be an important
component of the master plan. For
the finalized landuse Plan the
consultant shall prepare a detailed
utility and landscape plan covering
all the open areas.
D. Assessment of Infrastructure
Based on the finalized Land Use
Plan, asses the infrastructure
requirements for basic facilities
like water, electricity, sewerage,
solid waste, telecommunication,
storm water drainage etc.
Infrastructure requirements would
be identified using prescribed
norms and normal industry
practice.
Assess the adequacy of the
existing infrastructure networks to
meet the estimated infrastructure
requirements for the proposed
development level in terms of
source, capacity, coverage,
quality, development norms,
standards required / envisaged for
development etc.
Based on the same, identify the
infrastructure gaps and the
resultant infrastructure
requirements that need to be
fulfilled Prepare block cost
estimates for infrastructure
components that are to be
developed based on the
prescribed specifications using
industry norms and best practices.
Infrastructure Development Plan:
Developing distribution network
for water supply, schematic
routing for drainage and other
utilities.



FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterI:Introduction

CEPT,Ahmedabad 4

Clear approach towards disposal


and recycling of wastes such as
solid waste, sewage and storm
water.
E. Cost Estimates and
Development Strategy
The consultant shall estimate
fixed and variable cost of
development, operation and
maintenance of all components
covered in the Master Plan.
The consultant shall arrive at
details of cost estimates under
the following heads:
Land cost
Land development cost
Construction cost
Existing and proposed social
and physical infrastructure
Other costs
The consultant shall also
determine pricing of services i.e.
built up areas, developed plots,
other amenities like water, power,
roads etc. The tariff shall be based
on comparative analysis of prices
for similar projects in the country.

F. Developmental Control
Guidelines and
Regulations
Development Control Guidelines
and Regulations for the project site
shall be identified on the basis of

1. Planning Norms and Building
Byelaws related to various zones
like building heights, ground
coverage, FSI controls etc.
2. Estimation of total saleable area
and possible built-up area (based
on proposed building byelaws)
Urban Design Guidelines: The
consultant shall study the
Architectural character of the area
and come up with suitable design
guidelines and approaches to
create an ambience reflecting the
local character of the area.
This should be reflected in street
layouts, civic spaces, footpaths,
signage, street furniture etc.

G. Plotting of parcels of land
identified for each project:
Using the landuse plan, the
consultant shall physically
demarcate various plots on the
site. Based on this demarcation,
plots would be offered to various
prospective developers. The
consultant may for this purpose,
tie-up with a local survey firm.
The consultant shall be
responsible for the exercise and
shall supervise the site surveying
activities and ensure quality of
and its adherence to the objective
of the proposed master plan.

1.5 APPROACH & METHODOLOGY
Task 1 Pre-design study
Site visits and photo/video
documentation
Primary data collection from site
visits and informal meetings
with stakeholders
Secondary data collection from
various agencies
Site analysis based on survey &
revenue drawings
Preparation of base map

Task 2 Formation of
conceptual master plan for
Shamuka beach
Situational Analysis,
Identification suitable area for
development on the basis of
land suitability analysis.
Proposed activity structure &
design brief
Preliminary urban design
guidelines & DCR
Draft a conceptual master plan

Task 3 Formation of draft
master plan for Shamuka beach
Final urban design guidelines &
DCR
Conceptual infrastructure plan
Block infrastructure
development cost estimates
Draft master plan proposal:
detail of land use


FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterI:Introduction

CEPT,Ahmedabad 5

1.6 STAGES OF WORK


Agreement made between M/s
PricewaterhouseCoopers Private
Ltd and Centre for
Environmental Planning &
Technology (CEPT) on the 6th
of November 2007, for
Shamuka beach project.
CEPT in association with SKDAS
Associated Architects (SKDAA),
Delhi has developed &
presented four concept plans to
Department of Tourism (DoT),
GoO.
Final Concept Plan was
presented to the investors on
24th November 2007.
A detailed topographical survey
has been conducted for
Shamuka beach area.
Draft master plan was
presented to the Honble Chief
Minister on 7th January 2008.
The draft master plan and
infrastructure component are
detailed out based on the
feedback & comments received
during the discussion.
Final Master plan has been
finalized in discussion with
Secretary, DoT on 5
th
April
2008.

Task 4 Formation of final master plan for Shamuka beach
Final conceptual infrastructure plan
Block infrastructure development cost estimate
Final land use details
Final master plan
1.7 STRUCTURE OF FINAL
MASTER PLAN REPORT
This Final Master Plan report
consists of eight (8) chapters.
Chapter I: It includes
background, need for a Shamuka
Beach area, scope and
methodology.
Chapter II: This chapter
discusses the important tourist
destination in Orissa and number
of tourists that visited different
places of Orissa.
Chapter III: This chapter gives
an overview of proposed site and
surroundings, locations,
accessibility, existing land use,
geomorphology of the area, water
bodies.
Chapter IV: This chapter
discusses the methodology for the
land suitability analysis.
Chapter V: It includes two case
studies of special tourism area in
foreign country.
Chapter VI: This chapter
discusses different alternative
conceptual master plans.
Chapter VII: This chapter
discusses the infrastructure
assessment and infrastructure cost
for Shamuka Beach Area.
Chapter VIII: This chapter
discusses Design Guidelines and
Development Control Regulation
(DCR) proposed for the special
tourism area.



Pre Design
Study
Primary Data collection from site visits and informal
meetings with Stakeholders
Site visits and Photo/ video documentation
Secondary Data collection from various agencies
Site analysis based on survey & revenue drawings
Preparation of Base Map
Situational Analysis, Identification of Suitable area for
development on the basis of Land suitability Analysis
Proposed Activity Structure & Design Brief
Preliminary Urban Design Guidelines & DCR
Draft Conceptual Master plan
Final Urban Design Guidelines & DCR
Conceptual Infrastructure Plan
Block Infrastructure Development Cost Estimate
Draft Master Plan proposal: Detail of land use
Final Conceptual Infrastructure Plan
Block Infrastructure Development Cost Estimate
Final Land use details
Final Master Plan
Formation of
Conceptual
Master Plan for
Shamuka Beach
Formation of
Draft Master
Plan for
Shamuka Beach
Formation of
Final Master
Plan for
Shamuka Beach



Chapter II
Orissa Tourism Profile






























2.1 IMPORTANT TOURIST DESTINATIONS
2.1.1 Tourist Spots
2.1.2 Fairs & Festivals
2.2 TOURIST POPULATION







FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterII:OrissaTourismProfile

CEPT,Ahmedabad 7

2.1 IMPORTANT TOURIST


DESTINATIONS
Rich natural resources offering
visual feast and picturesque vistas
along with cultural heritage of one
of the oldest civilization make
Orissa a potential tourist
destination.
Few of the most important tourist
destinations in Orissa are shown in
Map No. 2.1

2.1.1 Tourist spots:
Puri
The Jagannath temple, a majestic
structure of 65 meteres high stands
on the elevated platform in the
heart of the city.

It is a monument of the 12th
century A.D with all the richness
and plasticity of the kalinga style of
architecture.

Though the temple is closed to non-
Hindus, the activities of Jagannath
temple are so immense that they
create enough colour & interest for
tourists to participate in bazzar
element of proceedings outside the
four gates of the temple. Apart from
the main temple, there are many
small temples in Puri.
The Golden beach offers tourists
the rare opportunity of witnessing
the colorful sunrise and sunset on
the same beach where they can
bathe and laze for hours on the
golden sands. One can also see
and enjoy traditional fishermen
playing their catamarans or sail
boats and drawing into their nets
rich catches of prawn, pomfret and
other fish on this long and wide
beach extending for miles.

The other attraction of Puri is its
ancient villages where one can find
the oriyan value and culture.
Raghurajpur the artesian village, is
a living museum itself. Every
house hold here has a painter and
can show the age old traditional
paintings painted lavishly on
canvas, silk and other varieties.

Pipili is a craft village famous for
appliqu work. One can find series
of shops decorated with many
appliqu works with bright colours.
The varieties are like umbrellas,
lamp shades, wall cloths, table
covers, sofa covers, children
clothes, bed covers and many
more.


Map no.2.1 Important tourist destination in Orissa
Map No. 2.2 Tourist attractions of Orissa
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterII:OrissaTourismProfile

CEPT,Ahmedabad 8

Sakhigopal known other wise as


Satyabadi is famous for the shrine
of Lord Krishna. Although the
temple was build during the 19th
century, the legend is very strong.
Sakhigopal is surrounded by full of
coconut trees. One can visit
villages in Sakhigopal. Visitss to
the villages become more
enjoyable during the festive
seasons.

Chilika Lake:
It is the largest inland lake in the
country spreading over 1100
square kilometers. The Chilika is a
paragon of Nature's beauty. The
hills inside the lake namely
Deepamundia, Kalijugeswar,
Ghantasalia, Soleri, Bhaleri and
Jatiya create a beautiful scenery
during sunrise and sunset. Dotted
with many emerald green islands
with colorful names such as
honeymoon island and breakfast
island, Chilika is the home to a rich
variety of aquatic fauna. It is also
the sanctuary and winter resort for
migratory birds, some coming from
as far as Siberia.

The lake is a natural aquarium of
about 160 varieties of fish. Chilika
is home to about 150 species of
the lake is a natural aquarium of
about 160 varieties of fish. Chilika
is home to about 150 species of
birds. One third of which are
permanent residents and the
remaining two third are migratory
birds such as Siberean cranes,
Flemingoes that come from the
Persian gulf and Pelicans from the
north which make the lake their
home during the winter season.
One can persuade the local fisher
folk to take a person on one of
their native wooden boats.
Satapada is another retreat in the
bosom of the nature of Chilika
lake. The thrilling sight of dolphins
round the year and abundance of
migratory and resident birds in
winter make Saptapada a
preferred place for a tryst with
nature.

Konarak:
Konark (35 kms from Puri), known
the world over for the magnificent
Sun Temple, is just an hours drive
from Puri. The Sun Temple, now a
UNESCO World Heritage Site, is
widely considered as one of the
most stunning monuments of
religious architecture in the world.
At Konark, immortalised in stone,
by the sea, is a 13th century
paean of victory transformed
forever into the famous sun
Temple of Konark.


The great building work at Konark
is the inspiration of King
Narashima of the Ganga dynasty,
today, is partly in ruins beacause
of its close proximity to sea and
the softness of the ground. The
construction of sun temple took
1200 masons and sculptors for
twelve years and cost the state
exchequer of twelve years of
revenue.
Many poets of India have
celebrated the beauty and
grandeur of Konark temple in their
verses. So it is little difficult to
describe the architectural
achievements of the temple.

FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterII:OrissaTourismProfile

CEPT,Ahmedabad 9

The porch alone rivals the great


temple at Bhubaneswar in height
and is superior in art to anything
else built in Orissa or may be
anywhere else. Some of the
gigantic statues like the war
elephants or the famous horses
show the artists' power of
expression and carpenters' skill in
handling such massive materials.
And yet the scenes of love and
war, of dance and music have
been furnished with superb
attention to details. The lady with
the suggestion of an enigmatic
smile on her lips, the amorous
coup for whom the rest of world
is irrelevant or the horse,
brimming with power in every limb
is the product of the hands and
minds of masters.
The focal points of the whole
complex are the images of Sun
God that represent the morning,
midday and sunset . The images
are bursting with power and grace.
The whole temple was conceived
with intricately carved out gigantic
wheels at the basement. This
revolutionized architectural
conceptions.
The images of the sun God
standing or mounted, wearing
knee length riding boots, alluding
power and majesty are majestic &
mesmerizing.

Museum of the Archaeological
Survey of India preserve the rare
collection of sculpture from the
ruins of the Sun Temple.

Konark Beach ebbed by sand
dunes, off the Bay of Bengal, is an,
ideal beach for sunbathing. It also
provides a glimpse of traditional
fishing life. An early morning view
of the sunrise here is memorable.

Balighai Beach is an isolated silver
arc, lapped by the sea, girdled by
casuarina forests.

Bhubaneswar:
Lingaraj Temple dating back to the
beginning of the 11th century,
dedicated to Lord shiva, serves as
a pinnacle of Orissa architecture.
The 54 metre spire of the temple
dominates the Bhubaneswar
landscape . Set in a walled
compound, the Lingaraj is
surrounded by smaller votive
shrines and neighbours Bindusagar
and Ananta Vasudeva. The
Lingaraj compound has another
outstanding temple, dedicated to
Parvati. Open only to Hindus, the
Lingaraj temple is the site of major
Shivaratri festival in Feb-March,
when the night preceding the new
moon thousands of pilgrim light
lamps in a nightlong ceremony of
devotion.

11th century Raja Rani temple is
aesthetically endearing, sculpted
with graceful feminine figures.
Another such ancient temple,
Parasurameswara, a 7th century
Shiva temple, classical in style is
sityated in Bhubaneswar.



FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterII:OrissaTourismProfile

CEPT,Ahmedabad 10

Khandagiri and Udaygiri caves,


twin hills honey combed with Jain
caves that reveal the sculptural art
of the 2nd century BC make an
interesting study of the life and
times of Jain ascetics.
Dhauli is the site of the Kalinga
battle where Ashoka's edicts (3rd
century BC) are inscribed on rock.
The illustrious Shanti stupa or
peace Pagoda commemorates the
event.
Nandan Kanan, The garden of the
gods, is a sprawling wildlife and
botanical garden with a pellucid
lake. It is also a home of the rare
white tiger, lion and crocodile.

2.1.2 Fairs & Festivals:


Orissa being a land of ancient and
sacred temples, where three
religions flourished, is thronged by
pilgrims throughout the year.

Festivals in Orissa are mesmerizing
in their raw energy, religious
fervor and a splash of colors
juxtaposed with rhythms that vary
from district to district and tribe to
tribe. The religious undercurrent in
events of all origin and purpose
unite the festivals and fair in a
harmony of dances, music and

Jatras that complete Orissa's


calendar year.
Enamored with temples across its
landscape, Orissa hosts a number
of temple festivals especially
related to Lord Jagannath at Puri
including the world famous Rath
Yatra or the Car Festival.

Orissa constitutes many tribal
communities especially in its
south-western districts, the
festivals in Orissa also include
tribal festivals and fairs that are
sometimes intriguing, sometimes
bewildering but always
entertaining. Some of the tribal
festivals include Chaita Parva and
Bali Yatra.

Festivals in Orissa are not
restricted to temples and tribal
festivals but are also concerned
with celebrating the cycle of life
with all its joys and sorrows. To
showcase the varied folk tradition
and cultural heritage of Orissa,
there are several special festivals
being organized in Orissa such as
the Puri Beach Festival, Konark
Festival and Kalinga Festival.

Festivals in Orissa also include
religious festivals that are unique
to Orissa (Raja, Kumar Purnima)
and the ones that are celebrated at
the national level (Durga Puja,
Maha Shiv Ratri, Dusherra, Diwali
etc).

Tourism of Orissa offers you an
opportunity of your lifetime to
explore the riches of Orissa with its
festivals and fairs

2.2 Tourist Population
Orissa is endowed with rich natural
resource, visual feast of colour
variety picturesque tourist
potential and a cultural journey to
one of the oldest civilization in the
world. Orissa has scope for
tremendous tourist potential owing
to great monuments, historically
important places, long seacoast,
chillika Asias biggest lake,
taxtile products, handicraft
products etc.

The rich tourism potential of Orissa
can be used as an effective
medium to promote overall growth
and generate employment in the
state.





FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterII:OrissaTourismProfile

CEPT,Ahmedabad 11

Orissa has rich tourism potential to


attract a large number of tourists,
both foreign and domestic. Table
2.1 shows a year wise domestic
and foreign tourist population in
Orissa from 1997 to 2006.
Puri is one of the most important
tourist destinations within Orissa.
It is famous for its historic
antiquities, architectural heritage,
ancient temples and breathtaking
seascape. Table 2.3 below shows
tourist population visiting different
places within the Puri district.

railways. Tourist originating from
different state is given in table 2.2.

West Bengal continues to be the
major tourist generating state for
Orissa contributing 10,24,824
tourists (19.56%) out of the total
domestic tourists of 52,39,896
during 2006 followed by Andhra
Pradesh (3.87%). The number of
domestic tourist visiting from
different states and union
territories Orissa during 2006 is
given in table.2.2

The state is overall well connected
with the other states with all the
three modes of transportation.
There is a strong network of
highways and also has major
junctions in the state for the

Year Domestic
%
Change
Foreign %Change Total
%
Change
1997 28,28,131 2 35,081 2.3 28,63,212 2
1998 28,61,788 1.2 33,101 (-) 5.6 28,94,889 1.1
1999 26,91,840 (-) 5.9 25,758 (-) 22.2 27,17,598 (-) 6.1
2000 28,88,392 7.3 23,723 (-) 7.9 29,12,115 7.2
2001 31,00,316 7.3 22,854 (-) 3.7 31,23,170 7.2
2002 34,13,352 10.1 23034 0.8 34,36,386 10.03
2003 37,01,250 8.4 25,020 8.6 37,26,270 8.4
2004 41,25,536 11.5 28,817 15.2 41,54,353 11.5
2005 46,32,976 12.3 33,310 15.6 46,66,286 12.3
2006 52,39,896 13.1 39,141 17.5 52,79,037 13.1
Sl. No.
Name of the State/
Union Territory
No. of Tourist
during 2006
Proportion to
total (in %)
1
West Bengal 10,24,824 19.56
2
Andhra Pradesh 2,02,730 3.87
3
Bihar 86,550 1.65
4
Jharkhand 1,24,635 2.38
5
Madhya Pradesh 1,44,300 2.75
6
Chhatisgarh 1,36,460 2.6
7
Maharashtra 1,54,720 2.95
8
Uttar Pradesh 1,40,825 2.69
9
Uttaranchal 56,200 1.07
10
Tamilnadu 90,540 1.73
11
Karnatak 65,860 1.26
12
Gujarat 56,915 1.09
13
Rajsthan 42,736 0.82
14
Assam 23,600 0.45
15
Punjab 24,840 0.47
16
Haryana 12,300 0.23
17
Keral 15,680 0.3
18
New Delhi 19,850 0.38
19
Tripura 8,200 0.16
20
Goa 1,290 0.02
21
Pondichery 2,040 0.04
22
Jammu & Kashmir 2,360 0.05
23
Orissa 26,99,654 51.52
24
Other States/ UT 1,02,787 1.96
TOTAL: 52,39,896 100
Table No. 2.1: Tourist population year
Table No. 2.2 Tourist from different states
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterII:OrissaTourismProfile

CEPT,Ahmedabad 12

number of people go for Konark


temple.
Table 2.3 gives details of domestic
and foreign tourist visiting
different places in the Puri district
in 2004 to 2006.

Puri is most well known and an


important hindu pilgrimage centre.
The Jagannath Temple, one of the
four most important hindu
pilgrimage sites or the chardhams
is located here. Majority of the
people go to Puri for religious
reasons and also very large








SL No. Name of the
tourist centre
2004 2005 2006
Domestic Foreign Total Domestic Foreign Total Domestic Foreign Total
1 Puri (Hotel
Occupancy)
14,54,988 12,968 14,67,956 15,44,401 14,586 15,58,987 17,59,626 14,627 17,74,253
(Day visitors) 41,50,104 13,225 41,63,329 47,82,420 14,780 47,97,200 51,56,758 14,763 51,71,521
2 Konark (Day
visitors)
19,93,514 7,985 20,01,499 20,06,690 8,310 20,15,000 20,77,360 8,573 20,85,933
(A.S.I.entry ticket) 10,04,494 6,364 10,10,858 9,79,909 6,808 9,86,717 11,96,500 7,883 12,04,383
3 Chilika (Satapara) 70,520 605 71,125 84,880 790 85,670 95,390 814 96,204
4 Biswanath Hill 52,640 - 52,640 56,100 - 56,100 63,280 - 63,280
5 Kakatpur 1,60,871 - 1,60,871 1,78,840 - 1,78,840 1,85,770 - 1,85,770
6 Astaranga 27,560 - 27,560 31,000 - 31,000 36,240 - 36,240
7 Kuruma 9,661 8 9,669 10,720 15 10,735 12,710 24 12,734
8 Satyabadi 4,09,020 423 4,09,443 4,26,222 460 4,26,682 4,88,090 510 4,88,600
9 Baliharachandi 75,380 10 75,390 86,585 16 86,601 91,110 22 91,132
10 Balighai 41,465 650 42,115 42,030 695 42,725 43,120 675 43,795
11 Chaurasi 23,655 - 23,655 26,450 - 26,450 27,160 - 27,160
12 Raghurajpur 31,195 1,525 32,720 32,015 1,760 33,775 34,922 2,232 37,154
13 Brahmagiri 1,41,090 - 1,41,090 1,51,740 - 1,51,740 1,55,390 6 1,55,396
14 Pipli 2,76,561 4,280 2,80,841 2,85,314 4,332 2,89,646 2,87,990 2,409 2,90,399
15 Ramachandi 1,38,798 2,900 1,41,698 1,48,480 3,053 1,51,533 1,64,390 3,218 1,67,608
16 Beleswar 40,940 - 40,940 44,210 - 44,210 50,370 12 50,382
17 Jahaniapira 18,655 - 18,655 20,360 - 20,360 28,114 - 28,114
18 Baligaon 25,200 - 25,200 26,050 - 26,050 31,210 - 31,210
19 Barala - - - - - - - - -
20 Manikapatna - - - - - - - - -
Table No. 2.3: No. of tourists that visited in the identified tourist centres of Orissa



Chapter III
Shamuka Beach Area
Site & Surroundings

















3.1 LOCATION
3.2 ACCESSIBILITY
3.3 SITE LOCATION & SURROUNDING
3.4 CLIMATE
3.5 EXISTING LANDUSE
3.6 GEOMORPHOLOGY
3.7 WATER BODIES & CANALS
3.8 HUMAN SETTLEMENTS
3.9 SITE TOPOGRAPHY
3.10 CRZ REGULATION
3.11 SITE ANALYSIS
3.12 POTENTIALS & CONSTRAINTS OF
PROJECT AREA






FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterIII:Site&Surroundings

CEPT,Ahmedabad 14

3.1 LOCATION
The Shamuka Beach site is
located on the banks of sea to
the south of Puri, between Puri
town and Chilika Lake alongside
the Bay of Bengal. The Mangla
River which separates Puri town
from Shamuka Beach flows on
one side of the proposed site.
It assumes the form of a bare
belt of sandy ridges, which
stretches along the seashore for
almost four kilometer. The
proximity to the pleasant sea and
prominent Jagannath temple and
proportionate distribution of
natural and spiritual amenities in
the nearby pioneer religious
place enhance the potential &
make it a popular tourist
destination in future.
3.2 ACCESSIBILITY
Shamuka Beach is located to the
south of Puri, between Puri town
and Chilika Lake alongside the
Bay of Bengal. The distance to
Shamuka Beach from Puri is 8
kms and from Bhubaneswar is 60
kms.
Site can be accessed through
Puri-Brahamgiri road which is
approximately 3 kms away. IDCO
is constructing a proper two lane
road from the Puri-Brahamgiri
road to the site. The nearest
railway station is at Puri which is
approximately 8 kms from the
site. Bhubaneswar is the nearest
Airport i.e. 60 kms from the site.

Map No 3.2 Regional Linkages
Map No.3.1: Location of site
N
N
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterIII:Site&Surroundings

CEPT,Ahmedabad 15

3.3 SITE LOCATION & SURROUNDINGS


EXISTING SITE CONDITION & CONNECTIVITY
Map no. 3.3: Existing Site & Landuse
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterIII:Site&Surroundings

CEPT,Ahmedabad 16

EXISTING SITE FEATURES


FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterIII:Site&Surroundings

CEPT,Ahmedabad 17

3.4 CLIMATE
Orissa enjoys a typical tropical
climate, mainly because of its
proximity to the sea. Here,
summers are very hot and
monsoons, very obliging. The
average annual rainfall in the
state is about 200 cm. Orissa
experiences three main seasons,
namely summer season, winter
season and monsoons. Though
the weather in the state remains
pleasant throughout the year, the
best time to explore its beauty is
the winter season, which lasts
from October to March. Given
below is more information on the
weather of Orissa.

Summers
The summer season in Orissa
commences from March and
stretches till June. The
temperatures are quite high
during this time and the sun very
harsh. The maximum temperature
of Orissa, in the summer season,
goes well above 40 C.

Winters
The winter season in Orissa lasts
for approximately five months i.e.
from October to February.
The weather during this season is
quite chilly, though not freezing,
and the minimum temperature
dips to as low as 7 deg C.

Monsoons
The monsoon season of Orissa
starts in July and lasts till
October. Southwest monsoons
head its way in the beginning of
June and by July, the whole of the
state is under its influence. By the
mid October, southwest
monsoons withdraw from this
region completely. The coastal
areas of the state usually
experience cyclone and tornado
during this season.







FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterIII:Site&Surroundings

CEPT,Ahmedabad 18

3.5 EXISTING LANDUSE


Shamuka beach is spreaded over
920.04 Acre (Phase I). Project
site is surrounded by Bay of
Bengal on the south and Mangala
river on its eastern edge. A strip
of forests approximately 1200 m
wide starts from middle of the site
and extends beyond its limits.
Apart from this huge chunk of
dense plantation there are smaller
groups of trees scattered all over
the site. The trees are mainly of
casuarinas and kikar which cover
36% and 35% respectively.
Land use map for the project site
is already procured from the
Orissa Remote Sensing
Application Centre (ORSAC).
Based on the land use analysis
from land use map, Forest/ costal
plantation covers 28% area of the
project site.
The site is surrounded by Bay of
Bengal on the south and Mangala
river on its eastern edge. A strip
of forests approximately 1200m
wide starts from middle of the site
and extends beyond its limits. The
other remaining chunk of land is
under a single crop and double
crop.





Proposed
Site
Map no. 3.4: Existing Landuse
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CEPT,Ahmedabad 19

Map no 3.5 Existing Landuse Sourse : ORSAC, Orissa


Table no 3.1 Existing Landuse
Forest/
coastal
Plantation
(acre)
Double
crop
(acre)
Crop land
(kharif)
(acre)
CRZ
(Within
200mts From
HTL)
59.58 7.80 33.10
CRZ
(200mts to
500mts from
HTL)
84.45 32.43 26.50
Developable
without
condition
113.96 311.66 250.56
Total 257.99 351.89 310.16

Map No. 3.6 Base map


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CEPT,Ahmedabad 20

Map no 3.7 Geomorphology Map


Sourse : ORSAC, Orissaa

Map no 3.8 Water bodies, Canals and Human Settlements
Sourse : Irrigation Department, Puri
3.6 GEOMORPHOLOGY
Project site is almost flat with
0.25% gradient. The slope is
towards north with the beach
being at a higher level.
Geomorphological map for the
project site is already procured
from Orissa Remote Sensing
Application Centre (ORSAC).
Based on the geomorphology
analysis from geomorphological
map, costal sand sheet covers
27% area of the project site
while Beach ridge complex and
beach covers 70% and 2%
respectively.

3.7 WATER BODIES & CANALS
The central mountainous region
of Orissa covers almost three
fourths of the area of the state.
Here the deep wide valleys are
crisscrossed by Brahmani,
Mahanadi (Orissas longest
river) and Bansadhara rivers.
Mangala river which is the
tributary of the Brahmani river
is running parallel to the east
side of the project site
boundary. A small canal from
Mangala river passes through
the project site from the east to
west side on the upper edge of
the project site.
3.8 HUMAN SETTLEMENTS
There is no human settlement
within the project site. A small
settlement called Bhagvatpatna
is located on north east of the
project site. Bhagvatpatna
Settlement having 300-400
population with 50-55 household.
Bantapur is another nearest
settlement to the site. It is
located on SH-59 (Brahmagiri
Road).

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CEPT,Ahmedabad 21

3.9 SITE TOPOGRAPHY


Topographical survey has been
carried out for Shamuka Beach
Area. Topographical survey map
gives a detail of contour at an
interval of 0.5m. Topographical
survey shows the existing
features of the site. The site is
almost flat with 0.25% gradient.
The slope is towards north with
the beach being at a higher
level. Apart from this huge
chunk of dense plantation, there
are smaller group of trees
scattered all over the site.
Topographical map has been
incorporated with the existing
Master plan layout on Revenue
map.


Map no.3.11 Contour Relief map
Map no.3.9 Site Topography
Map no.3.10 Digital Terrain map
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CEPT,Ahmedabad 22

3.10 CRZ REGULATIONS


As per the CRZ notification,
Shamuka Beach Area is falling
under the CRZ III. Hence 200
mts from HTL is the no
development zone. However
200-500 mts is the moderate
development zone, where
moderate development will be
permissible under condition.
100.48 acre project area is
falling under 0-200 mts CRZ
line.

Site
constraints
Land
(Acre)
% of Site
Area
Total Site Area 920.04 100
CRZ (within
200 mts of
HTL)
100.48 10.92
CRZ (from
200mts to 500
mts from HTL)
143.38 15.58
Map no.3.12 Mauja Map
Table no 3.2: Existing Landuse in CRZ Zone
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CEPT,Ahmedabad 23

3.11 SITE ANALYSIS


The area selected for
development of Shamuka beach
area is a beautiful site with a
2000mts long sea frontage and
another 2000mts of riverfront on
its adjacent side. These two sides
has tremendous potential for
water front development, five
star hotels with private beaches,
villas etc. These areas will serve
well for various kinds of water
sports and adventure sports and
recreational activities.

The forest within the site can be
utilized for eco tourism and
camping sites. This will help in
conserving the natural resource
and will be an added attraction
for the tourists.

The areas that are away from the
sea as well as the river can be
used for more passive activities
like golf course, convention
centre, sports complex, fitness
centre etc that may not be
affected by the surroundings.

The existing within the site could
be conserved and developed as a
site for rural tourism. Thus the
site has immense prospects to
develop as a high class tourist
destination.

3.12 POTENTIALS &


CONSTRAINTS OF PROJECT AREA
POTENTIALS:
The site has a very large area
hence large scale tourism products
could be proposed here.
The potentials of the site is greatly
increased due to the long stretch
of water front in the form of beach
and river front that are available
on two adjacent sides of the site.
The flat terrain of the site poses
the least constraints for
development.
Puri or the golden triangle will act
as a feeder for this new tourist
destination.

CONSTRAINTS:
A large chunk of usable area
within the site is under dense
plantation.
Majority of area falls under the no
development zone along the sea
as well as river due to CRZ
regulations.
The beach being at a higher level
than the site causes a drainage
problem within the site.
There is no direct access to the
site. The main road is 3km away.
Absence of water supply,
sewerage and drainage network in
and around the site.

Map no.2.5: Contour Relief







Chapter IV
Land Suitability &
Analysis



















4.1 PARAMETERS CONSIDERED
4.2 LAND USE VS. LAND SUITABILITY MATRIX
4.3 COMPOSITE LAND SUITABILITY INDEX













FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterIV:LandSuitability&Analysis

CEPT,Ahmedabad 25

Land Suitability Analysis


This study helps in identification
of land that is suitable for building
upon, in other words suitable for
development of various land uses.
There are several factors that
determine land suitability, but the
most influential and governing are
the environmental factors, like
slopes, soil & geology, flood &
erosion prone areas, expanse of
vegetation, etc.

In order to mitigate the scenario
of haphazard development and
avoid similar growth in future
which would exert tremendous
stress on land and other induced
dimensions, suitable land for
tourism growth can be identified
by considering various ecological
and physical parameters which
are necessary for tourism
development.
III. Construction/reconstruction of
dwelling units between 200 and
500 metres of the High Tide Line
permitted as far as it is within the
ambit of traditional rights and
customary uses such as existing
fishing villages and gaothans.
Building permission for such
construction/ reconstruction will
be subject to the conditions that
the total number of dwelling units
shall not be more than twice the
number of existing units;

Total covered area on all floors
shall not exceed 33 percent of the
plot size; the overall height of
construction shall not exceed 9
metres and construction shall not
be more than 2 floors (ground
floor plus one floor).
4.1 Parameters considered
A set of sensitive parameters
towards tourism developments, will
be affected by the tourist activity in
the study area are considered and
further development in their vicinity
would lead to degraded and
inhabitable situations. Therefore an
optimized distance from these
sensitive areas is maintained to
avoid such undesirable growth.

A) Ecological parameters
(i) Coastal area:
Our area is relatively undisturbed
and do not belong to either
Category-I or II. Project area falls
under CRZ III.

The norms of development are as
under:
I. The area upto 200 metres from the
High Tide Line is to be earmarked
as No Development Zone
II. Development of vacant plots
between 200 and 500 metres of
High Tide Line in designated areas
of CRZ-III with prior approval of
Ministry of Environment and Forests
(MoEF) permitted for construction
of hotels/beach resorts for
temporary occupation of
tourists/visitors.
(ii) Water Bodies:
Environmental sensitivity of
primary drainage ways is high, as
any development in or near them
can alter the local hydrology and
water flow paths. It can also lead
to damage to local ecology as the
water-gathering areas would be
lost because of construction.
Hence a buffer area (or no
development zone) is reserved on
either side of drainage ways this
buffer area is 50mts for primary,
30mts for secondary and 15mts
for tertiary drainage channels. A
distance of 50m on either sides of
the primary channel of the canal,
and 30 m and 15 m on both sides
of secondary and tertiary
channels respectively. Water
bodies also have a 100mt buffer
area all around them.


Map no 4.1 CRZ line
Map no 4.2 Buffer area of Water body
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterIV:LandSuitability&Analysis

CEPT,Ahmedabad 26

Based on these buffer areas,


sensitivity of land will be mapped.
Lands falling within the primary
buffer zones will be considered
least suitable for development,
those within secondary or tertiary
buffer zones will be moderately
suitable, and those outside of any
buffer areas will be considered
most suitable for development.

(iii)Slope:
Uneven land may or may not be
suitable for development,
depending upon the steepness of
slopes. Slope analysis helps
determining the steepness of
slopes throughout the site, using
contour data. The slope of an area
is the ratio of the difference
between the highest and lowest
altitude points of the place (rise)
to the horizontal distance
measured between the points
(run). The slope angle or degree
of slope is determined by:
tan=rise/run. The larger the rise
and the shorter the run, the
steeper is the slope. Slope is also
represented in terms of the slope
percentage (%) The slope
percentage is determined by the
formula: slope %=(rise/run)x100.

The slope analysis for the
identified Master Plan Area and its
environs (Map No. 4.4 - Contour
Relief Map and Map No.4.3
Slope Analysis) clearly shows the
beach front area of the site has
unbuildable area. Slops in most of
the sites outside the beach front
area ranges can be used for
building. Majority of the site area
is suitable for developement.
Height difference between two
contours is 0.5 mts.

Here, the slopes are classified into
four categories:
Steep slopes 0-2.5 mts (05%),
Gradual slopes 2.5 mts-5.0 mts
(5-10%), Moderate slopes 5.0
mts-10.0 mts (10-20%), and Flat
terrains >10.0 mts (> 20%). It is
evident that the steeper the
slope, the less suitable the land
will be for any form of
development.





Map no.4.3: Slope Analysis
Map no.4.4: Contour Relief
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CEPT,Ahmedabad 27


It establishes multiple compatible
land uses within given resource
constraints, and conversely also
identifies factors most suitable for
development of a specific land
use. For example recreational
uses are suitable in areas near
drainage channels, while such
land is not suitable for industrial
uses. Hence, it can be concluded
that reference to the land use vs.
land suitability matrix can be
helpful while designing the future
land use plan, considering the
land suitability.

4.3 Composite Land
Suitability Index
Based on the different criteria of
environmental land suitability, a
composite land suitability map will
be prepared to determine the land
most suitable for development.
This will be done by giving
weightage to each criteria and
then overlapping all the individual
suitability maps. The weightage
will be assigned on a scale of 1 to
10, where 1 is least influential
and 10 is most influential.

4.2 Land Use vs. Land
Suitability Matrix
Land Suitability Matrix is a
comprehensive chart, which
determines the levels of
intercompatibility between urban
land uses and the factors
governing land suitability. This
chart will help to determine the
best use of land and will give its
physical characteristics and
limitations.
B) Physical parameters
Roads:
In addition to these ecological
parameters the major and minor
roads were also buffered in the
following order:

120 m ROW for the National
highway is buffered for the future
widening / development of the
road.
80 m ROW for the State highway
is buffered for the future
widening/development of the
road.
50 m ROW for the Major District
Road is buffered for the future
widening/ development of the
road.
100 m buffer on both sides from
the centre line of the Railway
track is taken for the future
widening/development of the
railway line.















Map no 4.5 Buffer area of Roads
Map no 4.6 Land Suitability Map
N






Chapter V
Case Studies
























5.1 BALI, INDONESIA
5.2 NUSADUA, BALI, INDONESIA
5.3 MALDIVES






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CEPT,Ahmedabad 29

All coastal and oceanic issues


affect coastal tourism and
recreation either directly or
indirectly. Clean water, healthy
coastal habitats, and enjoyable
environment are main
requirements to make coastal
tourism successful. Security from
risks associated with natural
coastal calamities such as storms,
hurricanes, tsunamis, and the like
is a requisite for coastal tourism
to be sustainable. Coastal
tourism means, leisure and
recreation oriented activities that
take place in the coastal zone and
the offshore coastal waters. These
include coastal tourism
development like hotels, resorts,
restaurants, food, vacation
homes, second homes, etc. and
the infrastructure supporting
coastal development, recreational
boating harbors, beaches,
recreational fishing facilities,
ecotourism and recreational
activities.

CEPT carried out the following
case studies :
Bali, Indonesia
NusaDua, Indonesia
Maldives, Sri Lanka
5.1 BALI, INDONESIA
Location
Bali is one of 18 thousand
islands in Indonesia. It is
located between the two
islands Java & Nusa Tenggara,
between 8 03 40.8 South
latitude and 114 25 & 115
42 40 East longitude.
Bali has 5,632.86 square
kilometers of land. The total
population is approximately
3.2 million people.
As a part of 30 provinces in the
Republic of Indonesia, Bali is
divided into 8 regencies (
Badung, Gianyar, Tabanan,
Bangli, Karangasem,
Jembrana, Buleleng and
Klungkung, 1 municipal city
(Denpasar), 51 districts and
666 administrative villages.
Denpasar is the capital city of
Bali province.
Map No. 5.1 : Location of Bali
Bali
Map No. 5.2: Map of Bali
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CEPT,Ahmedabad 30

Features
The island of Bali in Indonesia is a
traveler's dream-come-true - and
offers visitors an exciting variety
of things to do and see.
Rice terraces are always
photogenic. Out of all of them,
those in Bali are the most
beautiful.
Bali has many long, palm-fringed,
white-sand beaches kissed by
clear, warm tropical waters. West
coast beaches face the warm
Indian Ocean waters - and are
admiringly oriented for sunset
watching.
Balinese dance entertains and
uplifts your spirit. And nothing is
more mesmerizing than the
haunting percussion sounds of a
Balinese gamelan orchestra.
On a per capita basis, Bali
probably has the most
accomplished artists and
craftsmen on earth. Skills include
painting, stone carving and wood
sculpting.
Bali is nicknamed the Island of
the Gods because it has over
10,000 temples. No trip to Bali is
fulfilled without observing a
festive temple ceremony.
Bali has world class surfing,
snorkeling and diving facilities.
These sports draw over a hundred
thousand enthusiasts per year.
Bali offers whitewater rafting for
thrill-seeking novices.
Bali is ringed by many clear-water
reefs rich in live coral, colorful
tropical fish and other marine life.
Bali has 18 volcanic peaks above
1000 metres and seven above
2000 metres.
The two most prominent land
forms are the two massive
calderas and four caldera lakes
formed from ancient catastrophic
geological events. Both calderas
have freshwater lake systems, the
largest being Lake Batur (1718ha)
in the Mt. Batur caldera. Mt.
Sangiyang to the west has three
smaller unconnected lakes, the
largest being Buyan (370ha).
Balis second most significant
landscapes are the coastal plains
which are generally deeply
dissected by the numerous
perennial rivers of Bali.
Kuta is blessed with a long,
beautiful white sand beach along
the warm Indian Ocean.
The town of Ubud is the
undeniable artistic heart and soul
of Bali's art. It rests among lush
hills and rice terraces. Bali is also
known as "the island of the
thousand temples". This is an
understatement. There are
probably over a million temples
on the island.
The dance and music art forms
have been performed and
acclaimed in major cultural
centres around the world. Most
Balinese dances relate to
segments of the Ramayana, an
ancient Hindu epic illustrating the
perpetual struggle between good
and evil.
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Map No. 5.3 : Lovino Beach of Bali
Beaches of Bali
Lovina Beach
Kuta Beach Candi Dasa Beach Sanur Beach
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Map No. 5.4: Kuta Beach of Bali Map No. 5.6 : Ubud town of Bali Map No. 5.5 : Sanur Beach of Bali
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CEPT,Ahmedabad 33

5.2 NUSADUA, BALI


A coral reef protectes the
beaches of Nusa Dua from the
splendid, but wild Indian Ocean
creating a lagoon of gentle surf.
The community spirit of the
Balinese people is a feature of
every temple festival, and the
nurturing of these traditions and
the concern for the spiritual well
being of the people is part of the
NusaDua philosophy practiced
by the individual hotels within
the grounds of Nusa Dua.

Location
Located minutes away from the
Ngurah Rai International Airport
on the sun-drenched shores of
beautiful Nusa Dua, Nusa Dua
Beach Hotel & Spa's 23 acres of
sculpted gardens provide an
oasis of space and tranquility in
the heart of exotic Bali.

Map No. 5.7 : Location of Nusa Dua


Nusa Dua
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CEPT,Ahmedabad 34

Features
On the larger island of the two is
a temple called Pura Bias Tugel,
where the 16th Century Javanese
sage Pedanda Sakti Wawu Rauh
composed a beautiful piece of
poetry known as "Sebun
Bangkung". The people of Bualu
look after this temple, bringing
offerings every day.
The most famous nearby temple
is Pura Uluwatu, a breathtaking
site in the evening at sunset and
an exquisite monument of
classical Bali heritage/tradition.
At a few distance from Nusa Dua,
high on the southernmost point of
Bali, the temple stands on a
headland, towering above the
pounding surf 70 metres below.
Home to a small colony of
monkeys, who scamper up and
down the cliffs, Uluwatu is
reputed to be a spiritual place.
Enscosed in a Lagoon, Nusa Dua
is dotted with many five-star
hotels, some of which have
private beaches. This area is a
swimmers haven as the waters
are tranquil and clean.
Surfing. The southern coast of
the Bukit, just a few kilometers
from Nusa Dua, is a surfer's
paradise.


Diving. Good sites for beginners
or refresher dives. Take a boat a
few hundred metres, and the
majority of marine life can be
seen at a depth 8 - 10m.
Other Water Sports: Fishing,
Scuba Diving and snorkeling are
all available at most resorts within
Nusa Dua, and at a few distance
from Nusa Dua, at Tanjung
Benoa, can be found many water
sports companies offering
parasailing, windsurfing, water-
skiing snorkeling and diving.
Attractions of Lagoons Birds.
After operating for approximately
26 years, the lagoon not only
functions to preserve the
environment through the
processing of wastewater, it has
become a home to a variety of
species of fish. These biological
indicators have become an
attraction in their own right.
According to research
approximately 83 different species
and 1,731 birds live here. This
has become a unique attraction.

Lizards. In addition to the above-
mentioned attractions of the
lagoon, the presence of the
lizards within the area is exciting
for travelers to witness.
Fishing Site. In addition to
attracting birds, the beauty of the
lagoon and its population of fish
have made it a popular fishing
site.
Research Objects. The BTDC
lagoon has not only become an
attraction for travelers and
visitors, it is an important site for
academic research on bird
habitats. The lagoon and its fish
also serve as an introduction to
environmental preservation for
school children. It would be no
exaggeration to say that the Nusa
Dua Tourist Resort may be
labeled an ECO LAGOON.
Flowers Garden. The flora view
in Nusa Dua, adds to the
attraction for tourist staying
there.
Puja Mandala Complex set in
Kurusetra Street in Nusa Dua
which is consists of five worship
places of five different religions
that co-exist in Indonesia. Temple
of Jagatnath of Hindu religion, the
mosque of Ibna Batutah stand for
Moslem religion, a Catholic
church, another church of
Christian sub-sect and a Vihara of
Buddhism; all stand harmoniously
on the same street.

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CEPT,Ahmedabad 35

Map No. 5.8 a : Nusa Dua


Map No. 5.8 b : Nusa Dua Beach
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CEPT,Ahmedabad 36

Accommodation
298 spacious guestrooms, 15
suites and a Presidential Suite in
three low-rise wings. All with
private patio or balcony and
panoramic views of the ocean,
lagoons or gardens.

Resort Facilities
Spa
33 metre main pool
4000 square metre swimable
lagoon area
Sunbathing
Two floodlit tennis courts and a
fully equipped fitness centre
A wide range of water sports,
including jet skiing,
parasailing, banana boat,
speed boat, canoeing, water
skiing, wind surfing,
snorkelling and diving
Daily activities including yoga
and aerobic classes
Kids Club
Games room
Library
Business centre
Conference centre
Wedding facilities
Internet access
Resort Facilities
Baby sitting service
Banquet facilities
Beauty salon
Business centre
Cafe
Cocktail bar
Concierge
Conference facilities
Currency exchange
Disabled facilities
Faxing facilities
Golf course
Gymnasium
Internet access
Laundry facilities
Mimpi Resort Tulamben
Accommodation
It sits at the foot of Mount Agung
in the tiny village of Tulamben in
the northeastern coast of Bali,
right on the black lava-rock beach
and some of Bali's most
accessible coral reefs.
The resort retains traditional
ambience of a Balinese fishing
compound with 13 terraced patio
rooms, 12 thatched-roof cottages
and 4 directly facing the ocean.


Some of Luxuries Hotels & Resorts Of Bali
Hilton Resort & Spa
A. Ocean View Cottage
B. Deluxe Cottage
C. Patio Room
D. Lobby & Gift Shop
E. Dive Class
F. Kitchen & Dive Centre
G. Restaurant
H. Swimming Pool
I. Spa
J. Parking
Map No. 5.9 : Site Plan of Hilton
Map No. 5.10 : Site Plan of Mimpi Resort
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterV:CaseStudies

CEPT,Ahmedabad 37

Accommodation
The 390 guestrooms are
generously spacious and exude
the natural warmth of local
culture with comfortable
simplicity.

Hotel Facilities
Business centre
Cocktail bar
Conference facilities
Laundry facilities
Lobby
Restaurant
Sauna
Spa
Swimming pool

Room Facilities
Air conditioning
Balcony / Terrace
Cable / Satellite TV
Hairdryer
In-room safe
Mini bar
Private bathroom / Ensuite
Refrigerator
Tea and coffee making facilities
Telephone

Hotel Facilities
Safety deposit boxes
3 swimming pools
Fitness & spa
Beauty salon
Squash & tennis court
Kids Club
Games rooms
Luggage room
Drugstore
Shopping arcade
In-house medical clinic
Business center
Conference rooms
Room Facilities
Air conditioning
Balcony / Terrace
Cable / Satellite TV
Hairdryer
In-room safe
Mini bar
Private bathroom / Ensuite
Refrigerator
Tea and coffee making facilities
Telephone

The friendliness and hospitality of


people along with all the comforts
make tourist experience an exotic
and intriguing tropical holiday at
Nikko Bali Resort and Spa.

Room Size Information
Approximate size
(sq. metres)
Deluxe garden room 48
Deluxe ocean room 48
Drande garden view 56
Grande ocean view 56
Grande honeymoon 79
Ayodya garden view 56
Ayodya ocean view 56
Ayodya honeymoon 79
Total hotel rooms: 539
Nikko Bali Resort & Spa,
Nusadua
Ayodya Resort & Spa,
Nusadua
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterV:CaseStudies

CEPT,Ahmedabad 38


Nusadua Beach Hotel & Spa

Room Facilities

Room type Room size
Numbers
of room
Features
Superior room for 2
34 square meters
in room size,
178
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar
Superior room for 3
The corner
Superior room with
45 square meters
18
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar
Superior room for 4

8
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar
Family Room 48 square meters 10
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar
Deluxe Room 40 square meters 82
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar
Palace Club Room 46 square meters 56
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar,DVD
player,Shower cubicle,HiFi system,Electronic safety deposit box
Palace Club Suite 80 square meters 25
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar,DVD
player,Shower cubicle,HiFi system,Electronic safety deposit box
Batur Suite 95 square meters 1
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar,DVD
player,Shower cubicle,HiFi system,Electronic safety deposit box
Agung Suite 166 square meters 1
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar,DVD
player,Shower cubicle,HiFi system,Electronic safety deposit box
Nusa Dua Suite
the double storey
suite
1
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar,DVD
player,Shower cubicle,HiFi system,Electronic safety deposit box
The Royal Residence

1
24 hours room service,Air-conditioning, Hair dryer,Tea and coffee making facility,Oversized bathtub,Electronic
safety deposit box,En suite bathroom,IDD telephone,24 hours satellite TV,Private Balcony,Mini Bar,DVD
player,Shower cubicle,HiFi system,Electronic safety deposit box

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CONFERENCE VENUES & FACILITIES


The Keraton
Room
the Keraton Ballroom combines all the
opulence of a Sultan's court with the
conveniences of a multi-purpose banquet
hall, An outdoor foyer provides additional
room for cocktails, coffee breaks and
registration
Room Name Surface
Height
Min
Width /
Length
Theatre
Class
Room
Royal
Square
U-Shape
Round
Table
Cocktail
Keraton Room 336 5.25 16x21 432 130 68 56 210 450
Keraton Ante
Room
68 2.3 7.5x9 84 20 24 20 50 50
Keraton Ball
Room
404 - - 516 150 68 56 260 500
The Kertagosa
Room
Located just off the lobby, the Kertagosa
Room is conviniently situated near the
hotel's internet and business centre.
Kertagosa
Room
540 - 22.5x24 225 120 - - 180 220
The
Klungkung
and Kamasan
Rooms
Adjoining the Kertagosa Room are two
smaller function rooms continuing the
Balinese theme with decorated ceiling
panels.
Klungkung
Room
60 210 7 x 85 25 12 14 12 16 20
Kamasan
Room
84 210 7 x 12 50 24 28 24 32 40
Budaya
Cultural
Theatre
On the stage of the Budaya Cultural
Theatre is where Bali's rich cultural heritage
comes
Budaya
Cultural
Theater
-
Open
Air
- 400 200 - - 400 900
Garuda Room 111 210 6x18.5 60 34 40 34 60 Cocktail
The Executive
Meeting
Rooms
Overlooking the Nusa Dua Beach Hotel &
Spa's stunning Candi Bentar entrance gate
and fountain pools.
Nusa Penida 84 210 6x8 - - - - 12 80
GUEST ACTIVITIES
Cultural
Activities
A range of complimentary cultural
activities are available on the resort for
guests.
Cooking Class
Garden and Cultural
Tour
Janur Weaving Lesson
Recreational
Facilities
A wide range of daily guest activities are
available on the resort.

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Spa Facilities in Bali


12 Treatment Rooms complete
with showers and bath tubs
Categorized as: 3 Cempaka, 2
Sandat, 6 Tunjung, 1 Jepun
2 Separate Sauna facilities with
hot and cold Jacuzzi tubs
Beauty Salon
Open Air Traditional Gazebo
Balinese Garden
Spa Lobby
Treatments
A comprehensive Spa menu
composed of personalized body
treatments and a selection of
massage techniques has been
designed with a holistic approach
towards beauty and healing.
Nurturing the body and soul in a
physical and spiritual manner
creates an overall sense of
wellness. Body treatments, scrubs
and facials are based on
traditional recipes that have been
part of Indonesian heritage for
centuries. Natural ingredients
such as indigenous herbs and
spices and essential oils are
utilized to treat the skin and
enliven the senses.
The Spas signature treatment is
the pampering Javanese Lulur
that originates from the royal
palaces of bygone era to prepare
a young bride for her wedding.
Following a luxurious session in
the sauna and hot/cold Jacuzzi
tubs for complete relaxation, the
treatment commences with a
stimulating traditional body
massage that relieves tension and
improves blood circulation.

Nirwana Bali Golf Course
The award winning Greg Norman-
designed Nirwana Bali Golf Course at
the resort is a haven for golfers. It
is Voted as "Best Golf Course in
Asia".

Information
Designer: Greg Norman
Total Holes: 18
Total Pars: 72
Total Distance: 6,775 Y

Facilities
Club House
Locker
Shower
Pro Shop
Halfway House,
Driving Range,
Club & Shoe Rental
Cart for hire
Billiard
Golfer's Terrace Restaurant,
Tennis Court


Map No. 5.11 : Nirwana Bali Golf Course
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International Convention
Centre, Bali
The Bali International Convention
Centre (BICC), is Asias premier
beachfront convention facility and
has earned a sound reputation
over the past decade as a major
convention destination South East
Asian region.

Facilities
Conferences & Banquets
A main hall with a capacity of
2,500 (or 1,500 for banquets)
seats
A full-size stage for art, music and
theatre productions
An auditorium with a seating
capacity for 506 attendees
Eight additional function rooms,
four of which divide into sections,
provide meeting space totalling
3,490 square metres
Outstanding video conferencing
and teleconferencing facilities
Professional in-house staging,
simultaneous multi-lingual
translation and state-of-the art
audio visual and presentation
facilities
A large conference registration
counter
Exhibitions
5,000 square meters of exhibition
space with an excellent access
through vehicles
Two interior exhibition areas of
1,350 square meters each
2,000 square meters of outdoor
exhibition space
An Exclusive bonded warehouse
Ample on site parking
Business & Communication
Centre
Multi-lingual staff
Complete secretarial services
A high-speed photocopier, a fax
and a scanner
Broadband Internet-ready
terminals
Fast access fiber optic line
services to send, receive,
download and conduct
teleconferencing



Map no. 5.12 :Ground Floor Plan- BICC Map no. 5.13 :First Floor Plan- BICC
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Cultural Villages
A new recreational site -
Kertalangu Cultural Village - is
being developed in Kesiman
Kertalangu, Padang Galak, East
Denpasar, by hundreds of local
farmers under the coordination of
the village head.
The recreation site covers 82
hectares.
Tourism has been driving
business development here, while
other supporting business
activities include the production of
ceramics, earthenware, candles,
incense and glass ornaments. At
the end of the jogging track,
visitors will also be able to
observe the production process of
the above-mentioned goods. A
number of fishing ponds are also
ready for use.
Shopping Enclaves & Markets
Shopping in Bali can offer
excellent bargains, and best buys
include modern artwork, leather
goods, casual summer clothing,
shoes, jeans, CDs, T-shirts,
furniture and pottery as well as
knick-knacks.
Ubud is the place to go if you
want to take home a unique
canvas or two. For more items,
please see list below:
Antiques - Batubulan
Art - Ubud
Bamboo - Bona
Ceramics - Campuhan, Kapal,
Tabanan
Clothes - Kuta, Legian,
Seminyak, Ubud
Jewellery - Celuk, Denpasar -
Jalan Hasanuddin
Masks - Singapadu
Music - Kuta, Legian
Puppets - Klungkung,
Sukawati, Gianyar
Stone carving - Batubulan,
Jimbaran Gallery
Toys - Mas, Tampaksiring,
Peliatan
Wood carvings - Mas,
Kemenuh, Buruan,
Tegallalang, Pujung, Nyuh-
kuning
The Duty Free Shop, Planet
Hollywood and 21 Cinema are
within walking distance Galeria
Nusa.
Galeria Nusa Dua is a huge open
air shopping mall with the stores
has mostly fixed priced selling
high quality items nestled in the
heart of lavish hotels. This
shopping complex is set in a
relaxing and environmentally
friendly atmosphere. The shops
are scattered over a 17-hectare
area so one can browse 150
boutique, souvenir and
handicrafts shops by strolling
along the shaded mall.
Within the complex, a selection of
30 restaurants offer Japanese,
Chinese, Italian, Indonesian and
international fare for breakfast,
lunch and dinner.


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Special Features
The Madives are a group of
islands in the Indian Ocean, to the
SW of India, and astride the
equator.
Of nearly 1200 coral islands and
26 atolls the highest point is only
2.4 metres. 280 islands are
inhabited and 80 are tourist
resorts.
The climate is tropical, with
temperatures from 26-30 deg.C
and rainfall of 1900mm a year.
Tourism began in 1972, and the
number of visitors grew to
430,000 in 1999, but has been
planned as being sustainable.
Local people were fully consulted
on tourism plans- and
environmental impact was also
surveyed.
Resorts are built only on
uninhabited islands, with strict
building codes low and only 20%
of island covered.
New regulations insist of waste
incinerators, recycling water for
gardens, solar water heaters,
sewage processed in septic tanks
and some desalination plants.
Only half 10,000 tourist jobs are
done by locals, who prefer to live
on the settled islands.
At present there are 73 Resort
Hotels in operation with a capacity
of 12,400 beds.
5.3 Maldives

Location
The Republic of Maldives is a
group of coral islands in the
Indian Ocean to the west of India
and Sri Lanka on the equator. The
group of low lying islands consist
of about 1200 islands, some
smaller than a football field and
some of the largest 1- 2 miles
long.
Only about 200 of these islands
are inhabited by a population of
about 250,000.
Sun, sand and sea, a thousand
'Robinson Crusoe' islands,
massive lagoons with different
depths and infinite shades of blue
and turquoise, dazzling
underwater coral gardens; a
perfect natural combination for
the ideal tropical holiday
destination. Over 1,190 islands,
spread over 90,000 square
kilometers - over 99 percent of
which is sea.

Tourist Arrivals
Tourist arrivals in 2006 is 601,000
tourists, 2007 setting new
records: Jan and Feb, 129,000
tourist arrivals up from 113,000 in
2006.







Map no. 5.14 b :Location of Maldives
Map no. 5.14 a :Location of Maldives





Chapter VI
Final Master Plan














6.1 SHAMUKA PENINSULA
6.2 GOVERNMENT VISION
6.3 PROPOSED ACTIVITY STRUCTURE
6.4 PROPOSED PROGRAMME BRIEF
6.5 DESIGN CONCEPT
6.5.1 ALTERNATIVE CONCEPT PLANI
6.5.2 ALTERNATIVE CONCEPT PLANII
6.5.3 ALTERNATIVE CONCEPT PLAN-III
6.5.4 ALTERNATIVE CONCEPT PLAN-IV
6.5.5 COMPARISON OF VARIOUS
ALTERNATIVES
6.6 FINAL MASTER PLAN
6.7 TENTATIVE ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
6.8 MASTER PLAN VISUALS



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6.1 Shamuka Peninsula


To provide new tourism products
attracting high spending domestic
and international tourist, the
government of Orissa has decided
to develop a Shamuka Beach Area
near Puri. Government has
already allotted 3000 acres for
the Shamuka Beach Area near
Puri at Shamukha beach. These
3000 acre are being planned to be
developed in three phases.
Phase I: Shamuka beach resort
development
[Convention center, hotels,
heritage town with main street,
golf course, water sports]
Phase II: Health & wellness
tourism focus
Phase III: High end villas &
second homes
Out of this 3000 acres, 920.04
acres land has been already
acquired. These 920.04 acres of
land has been taken up for
planning and development in first
phase.
6.2 Government Vision
With a Vision to provide new
tourism products that attract high
spending domestic and
international tourist, the
Government of Orissa has decided
to develop the Shamuka beach
area near Puri. It has been
envisioned that the project to be
Self-contained, high-end, exclusive
Leisure cum Business destination
aimed at providing a one-stop
rejuvenation facility for the mind,
body. The Overall theme / concept
luxury with a distinct Orissa
culture flavor.

Map No. 6.1 Shamuka Peninsula
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4/5 Star Hotels


i. Deluxe rooms
ii. Luxury Suites
iii. Cottages
iv. Restaurant
v. Swimming pool
vi. Conference halls
vii. Meeting room

Resorts
Spa
i. Massage centre
ii. Ayurvedic therapy
iii. Aroma therapy
iv. Sauna bath rooms
v. Steam bath rooms
vi. Jacuzzi

International Convention
Centre
i. Convention hall
ii. Seminar/lecture hall
iii. Conference room
iv. Banquet

Golf Course
i. 18 hole golf course
ii. Landscape gardens
iii. Pond & fountains

Fitness & grooming centre


i. Gymnasium
ii. Aerobics
iii. Yoga
iv. Beauty saloon

Cultural Village
High end Shopping Enclave
i. Shopping arcade
ii. Restaurants
iii. Coffee shop
iv. Gaming zone
v. Local handicraft shop
6.3 Proposed Activity
Structure

CEPT SKDAA team reviewed the
various infrastructure and
amenities through case studies of
similar tourist destinations in
India and South East Asia, based
on the findings, following facilities
have been shortlisted for
Shamuka beach area.
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6.4 Proposed Programme Brief


PROPOSED ACTIVITIES IN NO DEVELOPABLE AREA














Site constraint Land
(Acre)
% of Site
Area
Total Site Area 920.04 100
CRZ (within 200 mts of HTL) 100.48 10.92
CRZ (from 200mts to 500 mts from HTL) 143.38 15.58
Developable without any condition 676.18 73.50
Activities No. of
units
Land (Acre)
Golf Course (27 Hole Fairways) 1 221
Convention Centre (with Hospitality, Exhibition
Spaces, Trade fairs, Amphitheatres etc.)
1 25
Performing Arts Centre (Amphitheatre, Gurukul,
Indoor Class, Halls, Library etc)
1 30
Art & Craft Museum 1 10
Luxury Hotels 4 230
Golf Villas 200 50
Residential Apartments (2BHK & 3BHK walkups,
g+2)
300 15
High street bazaar 1 2
Hospitality Institute 1 18
Condominiums & Villas 450 35
Table No. 6.1 Site Constraint
Table No. 6.2 Proposed Programme Brief
Based on the detailed survey conduct, following constrains
have been identified:
The proposed programme brief was evolved considerably:
The site constrain
The industry demand through select interaction
Discussion with the GoO officials.
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6.5 Design concepts


Four conceptual
alternatives were
considered for Shamuka,
taking into consideration
the existing site features
and the proposed
activities.
Concept Plan I
Concept Plan II
Concept Plan III
Concept Plan IV
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6.5.1 Alternative Concept Plan I


The alternative concept plan I has
been presented in Map no. 6.3.
The five star hotels that have
been envisaged get the complete
frontage of Bay of Bengal and
River Mangala and also the Golf
course. Some of the other
activities like the residential area,
commercial, convention centre
have been provided at the
furtherest end of the boundary
plot from the sea. The inter-
connectivity between the
proposed activities has been
provided by a more or less
circular 30m ROW Ring Road.
In between this ring road, is the
proposed 18 hole golf course with
the golf club building and a cluster
of golf villas. Another special
feature of this golf curse is the
provision of a artificial drain right
through the golf course. This
artificial drain will serve a dual
purpose i.e. harvesting of rain
water as this site falls under the
high rainfall area and acting as a
storage space of the water to be
used for watering of the golf
course.
Map no. 6.3:Altenative Concept Plan-I Map no. 6.2: Existing Site Features
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6.5.2 Alternative Concept Plan II


The alternative conceptual plan II
as envisaged right from the
germination stage to the final
concept has been presented in
Map no 6.4. In this alternative as
seen from Map no. 6.4 some of
the main activities like the
convention centre, golf club,
villas, heritage village and the like
have been located close to the
approach entrance of the
boundary area thus providing a
very pleasant sight to the tourists
visiting the Shamuka Beach
Resort. Once again, the five star
hotels will have the frontage of
the Bay of Bengal, golf course and
landward area. Herein also for
better interconnectivity a more or
less 30m ROW ring road has been
considered.
Map no. 6.4: Alternative Concept Plan-II
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The alternative conceptual plan


III right from the germination
stage has been presented in Map
no 6.5a. In this alternative one
can observe that some of the
main activities like the convention
centre, golf club, villas, heritage
village and the like have been
located close to the approach
entrance of the boundary area
thus providing a very pleasant
sight to the tourists visiting the
Shamuka Beach Resort. Moreover
at the time of festivals and
religious festivals.

The location of convention centre


is ideal as it would not disturb the
movement of the tourists within
the rest of resort area. Once
again the five star hotels will have
the frontage of the Bay of Bengal,
golf course and landward area.
Herein also for better
interconnectivity a more or less
30m ROW ring road has been
considered.
6.5.3 Alternative Concept Plan III
Map no. 6.5 a: Alternative Concept Plan- III
Map no. 6.5 b: Alternative Concept Plan- III (With footprint)
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6.5.4 Alternative Concept Plan IV


The concept IV plan envisions the area to
develop into a prime destination, a jewel
in the Orissa tourism sector. The plan
translates this into space through
interlinked, yet defined activity sectors.
The prime core area being the Gold
resort, surrounded by other activities
such as the hotels, convention centres,
spa, EWS Housing etc. The central Golf
resort is projected to consist of 18 to 27
hole Golf course and upto 200 golf villas,
within it.
The chain of Hotels intertwined with the
Golf Course, majority of which are
located at the sea front. Though the
beach is public in nature, hotels get an
exclusive sea front, with jogging tracks,
walkways and sea side furniture. Thereby
improving the sandy landscape for the
exclusive use by the visitors for rest,
exercise etc. This is further enhanced by
a beach side garden consisting of coconut
and Casuarinas plantation.
A 30 acre International Convention
Centre with dedicated Gurukul of 21
Acres has been planned to be located at
the entrance towards the North of the
Complex. It is envisioned to be used by
the tourists on a daily basis for spending
time in the evenings to get a glimpse of
panoramic view of the sea and riverside.
Additional Hotel plots have been allotted
adjacent to the convention centre, at the
entry level to take care of the future
demands.
Table 6.3 below, shows a comparative
statement of different concept alternatives
considered. Different concept a have
incorporated with different features which
show a process of evolution of each activities
in specific manner. The advantage of each
concept plan over another are discussed
below:
Alternative I:- This plan has all the
advantages of sea and river front, green
environment, ease of traffic movement and
investment potential. However it lacks in the
basic logistic approach.
Alternative II:- The advantages of this
plan are that it has a good sea front and
therefore good investment potential. It also
has a proper green environment. However it
lacks in ease of traffic movement, logistic
approach and river front age.
Alternative III:- The basic disadvantage of
this alternative plan is that it lacks in the
river frontage and logistic approach. The
advantages of this plan are investment
potential, ease of traffic movement, green
environment and sea frontage.
Alternative IV:- This has all the
advantages of sea and river front, green
environment, ease of traffic movement and
investment potential.
6.5.5 Comparison of various
alternatives
The main road encircling the golf course, acts not just as a
transition zone but also an activity area. It is envisioned to
consist of malls, restaurants, bars, food courts, shops, show
rooms, shopping areas etc. The North West corner of the site, 30
Acres of land is dedicated for developing social infrastructure
facilities such as housing for staff working in the hotels,
convention centres and others within the whole complex.


Sr.No. Alternate Sea
Frontage
River
Frontage
Green
Environment
Ease of
Traffic
Movement
Investment
Potential
1 Plan 1 Y Y Y Y Y
2 Plan 2 Y Y Y
3 Plan 3 Y Y Y Y
4 Plan 4 Y Y Y Y Y
Map no. 6.6: Alternative Concept Plan- IV
Table no. 6.3: comparative statement of four conceptual plan
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6.6 Final Master Plan


Proposed Landuse Activities
Based on the comparative assessment of
conceptual alternatives, discussion with the GoO
officials and probable investors, the conceptual
alternative IV was selected for further development
as draft master plan.
Map no. 6.8 a clearly shows the probable built form
of Shamuka beach area.
Though a public beach by definition, the hotels
enjoy the exclusivity of the sea front, Jogging
tracks, Walkways, Pavilions and Gazebos along the
Waterfront providing for rest, contemplation,
exercises and passive recreation along the beach;
all set in a beach site garden of Coconut and
Casuarinas trees.

All the various components of development
surround the Golf Course on the remaining three
sides. To its north and at the very entrance is a
24.23 Acre International Convention Centre with a
dedicated hotel and adjoining hospitality institute of
17.88 acres. Additional hotel plots are carved out
along side that would take care of future demands
as the footfall increases. On the northwest corner of
the site, 15.91 Acres are dedicated for social
infrastructure and housing for the staff workers in
the hotels and other facilities.

A Shamuka Village inspired by vernacular style of
architecture will showcase the best of Orissas
cultural, artistic and performing traditions. The
village will have a Craft Museum, workshops for
artists and craftsmen, a performing arts centre,
Gurukuls for music and the performing arts. It will
be a sort of daily micro destination for the tourists
to spend idle time and evenings to get a glimpse of
panoramic Orissa. The main street will have a
shopping mall, restaurants, bars, food courts, shops
and showrooms.
The 2000m river front will have a 33.15 acre
Riverdale project with villas and condominiums.



Map no. 6.7: Proposed Landuse Activities


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The entire development has been conceptualized as


an eco friendly, Low-rise, very low-density
development that merges seamlessly with the
surrounding water fronts, parks and gardens, a
perfect place for leisure in a unique natural and
heritage setting. Hotels will have an access to a
dedicated jetty from where one can navigate in
small silent boats into Chilka Lake and destinations
there-in.

The overriding concept is one of leisure, recreation
and entertainment that are eco sensitive, while the
design and construction of Hotels is the prerogative
of the respective owners, a single Master Developer
will develop the entire site including all
infrastructure, landscape and signages. The quality
benchmarks for each component of development
will be pre-defined in order to ensure coherence and
high quality of delivery. The Master Developer will
also develop the Golf Course including the Club
house and Villas and may benefit from the real
estate components of the project.

The Shamuka Village will be delivered to the Orissa
Tourism Development Corporation by the Master
Developer who in turn will allocate land to users
and regulate and control activities and
developments within.
The special building regulations will govern the
entire development which will be strictly
incorporated and yet user friendly. These
regulations will override the routine development
controls and building bye-laws which are otherwise
applicable in the region.




Map no. 6.8 : Proposed built form
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NO ACTIVITY Area
(Acre)
1 Hotel-1 40.35
2 Hotel-2 20.73
3 Hotel-3 20.02
4 Hotel-4 20.63
5 Hotel-5 23.90
6 Hotel-6 23.14
7 Hotel-7 23.67
8 Hotel-8 21.04
9 Hotel-9 13.13
10 Hotel-10 5.88
11 Hotel-11 5.52
12 Hotel-12 5.66
13 Hotel-13 6.08
14 Hospitality Institute 17.88
15 Convention Centre 24.23
16 Social Infrastructure
Housing
15.91
17 Gurukul 28.03
18 Street Bazar 1.97
19 Art & Craft Museum 9.94
20 condominiums & Villas 33.15
21 Public Park (Helipad) 14.38
22 Public Park
(Road Junction at sea
side)
4.57
23 Public Park
(Road Junction at
Entry)
1.53
24 Green Buffer Around
Golf Course
32.33
25 Golf Course 271.99
30 Utility Plot Area 3.62
32 Green Area 20.80
33 CRZ
a 0 to 200 mts 100.47
b 200 to 500 mts 8.05
34 River Buffer 32.02
36 Road 69.42
Total 920.04
6.7 Tentative Activity schedule
Table no 6.4 Proposed Landuse
An overall horizon of 10 year has been visualized for overall development of Shamuka beach area. A
tentative schedule is presented below:
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6.8 Master Plan Visuals


MASTER PLAN- SHAMUKA BEACH AREA
N
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MASTER PLAN- SHAMUKA BEACH AREA


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Hotel front Loop Road


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Plaza near Hotel Entrance


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Food Courts near Road junction


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Sea & River Front- Plaza on Jogging Track


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Sea & River Front- Plaza on Jogging Track


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Sea & River Front- Plaza on Jogging Track


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High Street Bazaar


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High Street Bazaar


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Public Park - Helipad


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Public Park near Hotel


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Public Park near entrance


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Hotels Built Form


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Golf Course
Golf Villas: View from Sea Front
Golf Villas: Top View
Condominiums & Villas Condominiums & Villas: Plan
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Hospitality Institute
Convention Centre
Convention Centre
Art & Craft Museum Shamuka Village




Chapter VII
Infrastructure


















7.1 ON SITE INFRASTRUCTURE
7.1.1 ROADS
7.1.2 STREET LIGHT
7.1.3 WATER SUPPLY
7.1.4 SEWERAGE
7.1.5 STORM WATER DRAINAGE
7.1.6 RAIN WATER HARVESTING
OPTION
7.1.7 SOLID WASTE
7.1.8 POWER
7.1.9 OTHER INFRASTRUCTURE
FACILITIES
7.2 OFF SITE INFRASTRUCTURE

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INFRASTRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT
The location of the site, at the
confluence of river Mangala and
Bay of Bengal, are generally
associated with certain constraints
pertaining to infrastructure
provisions and demands special
attention. Therefore, CEPT has
worked out various infrastructure
facilities for the project keeping in
minds its distinct geography and
connectivity. Preliminary cost
estimates has also been prepared
for both on site and off site
infrastructure components.

7.1 On-site infrastructure

Infrastructure facilities proposed
for the Shamuka Beach Area
include
Roads(streetlight, pavement,
signages),
247 water supply(source,
treatment & distribution
network) ,
Sewerage(collection, treatment
& disposal ),
Storm water drainage network,
Power(electricity distribution
network)
Sea beach & river front
development cost.

For estimation of infrastructure
cost, three possible development
options has been considered:
Option I
Option II
Option - III


Possible
Development
Options


Option-I


Option -II


Option -III

Phase-I
(695 acre)
Condominium &
villas
7 hotels
221 acres golf
course.


Phase-II
(183.38 acre)
4 hotels
Convention
centre
Heritage village
Hospitality
institute

Phase-I
(402 acre)
Condominium &
villas
4 hotels
141 acres golf
course.



Phase-II
(313.38 acre)
4 hotels
Convention
centre
Heritage village
Hospitality
institute

(920.04 acres)
Development of
Whole master plan
area
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Option 2
In second option proposed
development has been considered
in two phases:
Phase -I
Condominium & villas
4 hotels
141 acres golf course.
Phase II
4 hotels
Convention centre
Heritage village
Hospitality institute

The white shaded area (Refer Map
no. 7.2) shows a second
development phase. Red shaded
area is not taken in development
phase for the cost estimates.
Preliminary cost estimates are
done for the two consecutive
phases for second option.
Option 3
In third option development has been
considered in two phases:
Phase-I
Condominium & villas
7 hotels
221 acres golf course.
Phase-II
4 hotels
Convention centre
Heritage village
Hospitality institute
The white shaded area (Refer Map no.
7.3) shows a second development
phase. Red shaded area is not taken in
development phase for the cost
estimates. Preliminary cost estimates
are done for the two consecutive
phases for third option.

Option 1
In first option the whole master
plan area has been taken for the
cost estimation.
Map no. 7.1 Infrastructure development Option I
Map no. 7.2 Infrastructure development Option II Map no. 7.3 Infrastructure development Option III
Option II
N
N N
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7.1.1 ROADS
The proposed road hierarchy consists of 30m, 24m,
18m, 12m and 6m wide roads. The proposed road
network would facilitate effective movement of
internal traffic within Shamuka Beach Area. Proposed
road hierarchy will be from the main entrance road
to central ring road to internal road. All the roads are
C.C. paved and well featured with proper main traffic
stream lane, well guided informatory signages and
street light (30 m centre to centre). Some of the well
designed road sections are given below for 30m,
24m, 18m and 6m widths. (Refer Map no. 7.4)
Road from Puri Bramhagiri (SH 59) to Shamuka
Beach area is being constructed by IDCO. In the
proposed master plan this 45 m entrance road will
continue and meet internal ring road towards the
north east end of site. Length of road is 3.5 km.
Designed as a 2 lane, 10 m wide bituminous tar
road.

A) RING ROAD - 30 M WIDE:
30 m wide ring road has been proposed in master
plan. It connects all the internal road of Shamuka
Beach area. It circulates the traffic in both direction
and connects all zoning activity. (Refer Map no. 7.4)

B) INTERNAL ROAD - 24 M, 18M & 12M WIDE:
24 m, 18m and 12m wide internal road have been
proposed in master plan. Internal road will serve
access to each property. (Refer Map no. 7.4)

C) JOGGING TRACK & WALK THROUGH PATH
A jogging track from one end of the site area and
running right across the sea front and the river front
has been provided for joggers. Approach paths to the
beach front have been included. (Refer Map no. 7.4)


Map no. 7.4 Key Plan showing Road Hierarchy
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Proposed Road Sections-30m Wide Road


Map no.7.5 : Proposed Road Section for 30m wide
d
Key Plan 30m wide Road
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Proposed Road Sections-24m Wide Road


Map no.7.6 : Proposed Road Section for 24m wide road
Key Plan 24m wide Road
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Proposed Road Sections-18m Wide Road


Key Plan 18m wide Road
Map no.7.7 : Proposed Road Section for 18m wide road
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Proposed Road Sections-12m Wide Road


Key Plan 12m wide Road
Map no.7.8 : Proposed Road Section for 12m wide road
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Proposed Road Sections-6m Wide Road
Map no.7.9 : Proposed Road Section for 6m wide road
Key Plan 6m wide Road
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Basic Design Criteria


Adopted
A. Road width and Designs
Traffic Volumes
The road width carriage way, is
designed to accommodate the
design traffic volume assessed
through demand assessment. This
is restricted by Right of Way
provided in the development plan.
Design traffic is arrived at from
traffic surveys and socio economic
profile of area under the zone of
influence of the road.
The road should be designed to
accommodate the peak traffic
volume computed for the end of
design life.
A design period of 20 years should
be adopted for arterials sub-
arterial and 15 years should be
adopted for local and Collector
Street.
For high volume streets and busy
intersections, peak hour volumes
should be used to determine the
width of road.
The design of main traffic routes
in built-up areas should be based
on peak hour demands unlike in
rural area where it is based on
average daily traffic.
Right of Way recommended for
the various categories of urban
roads are given in table 7.1.

B. Design Approach &
Criteria
Carriage of the road can be
design by the following four
layer structure
Cement Concrete surface
layer(s)
Separation layer
Dry lean Concrete layer
Granular Sub base
This structure rests on sub-grade
which in turn rests on natural
ground.
Tentative Capacities of Urban
Roads between Intersections are
presented in table 7.3 below.
The Equivalency factors for the
passenger car unit (PCU) are
shown in the table 7.2 below.
Carriageway widths recommended
are shown in table 7.4 below.
(IRC 86; 1983)
Minimum width of an urban road
with curb is 7.5 m including
allowance for a stalled vehicle.


Classification Recommended road
width in meters
Arterial 50-60
Sub-Arterial 30-40
Collector
streets
20-30
Local street 10-30
Sr.
No.
Vehicle Type Equivalency
Factor
1 Passenger car,
tempo, auto, jeep,
vans, or agricultural
tractor
1.0
2 Truck, bus,
agricultural tractor-
trailer
3.0
3 Motor-cycle,
scooter and cycle
0.5
4 Cycle-rickshaw 1.5
5 Horse drawn vehicle 4.0
6 Bullock cart 5.0
7 Hand-cart 6.0
No of traffic
lanes and
widths
Traffic
flow
Capacity in PCUs per hour for various traffic
conditions
Roads with no
frontage access,
no standing
vehicles, very
little cross traffic
Road with
frontage access
but no standing
vehicle and high
capacity
intersections
Roads with free
frontage access,
parked vehicles
and heavy cross
traffic
2 lane One way 2400 1500 1200
(7-7.5 m) Two way 1500 1200 750
3-lanes One way 3600 2500 2000
4-lane One way 4500 3000 2400
(14 m) Two way 4000 2500 2000
6-Lane One way 3600 2500 2200
(21 m) Two way 6000 4200 3000
Description Width
(meters)
Single lane without kerbs 3.5
2-lane without kerbs 7.00
2- lane with kerbs 7.5
3-lane with or without
kerbs
10.5 /
11.0
4-lane with or without
kerbs
14.0
6- lane with or without
kerbs
21.0
Table No. 7.1: Recommended Road Widths

Source: IRC 86 -1983
Table No. 7.2: Equivalency factors for Vehicles
Source: IRC 19-2001
Table No. 7.3: Tentative Capacities of Urban Roads
Source: IRC 86 -1983
Table No. 7.4: Recommended Carriageway
Widths
Source: IRC 86 -1983
Note: 1. For access roads to residential areas, a lower
lane width of 3 m is permissible.
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C. Design Traffic
Computation of design Traffic In
terms of cumulative number of
standard axle to be carried by the
pavement during design life.

N = {365 X(1+r)
n
1} x A x D x F
r
Where
N = The cumulative number of
standard axles to be catered for
in design in terms of million
standard axles - msa.
A = Initial traffic in the year of
completion of construction duly
modified as shown below.
D = Lane distribution factor
F = Vehicle damage factor, VDF
n = Design life in years
r = Annual growth rate of
commercial vehicles {this can be
taken as 7.5% if no data is
available}

A = P (1 + r)x
Where,
P = Number of commercial vehicle
as per last count
X = Number of years between the
year of last count and the year of
completion of construction
D = Lane distribution factor
It is the distribution of commercial
traffic over the carriageway. It
should be considered by deciding
the lane of the road. Following
values should be taken for Lane
distribution factor.
F = Vehicle damage factor (VDF).
It is a multiplier to convert the
number of CV of different axle load
and axle configuration to the number
of standard axle load repetition.
VDF depends on vehicle configuration,
axle load, terrain, type of road.
Where sufficient information of axle
load is not available then the VDF
value considered are presented in
table 7.6
In view of the concept of cumulative
axle loads, it is now possible to design
a flexible pavement for a definite
period.

Description Lane
Distribution
Factor (D)
Single Lane Road 1.00
Two Lane Single
Carriageway
0.75
Two Lane Double
Carriageway
0.40
Four Lane single
Carriageway
0.40
Four Lane Double
Carriageway
0.45
Road
Hierarchy
ROW
(In
Mt)
Pavement
Type
Subgrade
500mm
Dry lean
concrete
150mm
(Not less
than 100)
Separating
layer 125
micron
polythene
film
Pavement
quality
concrete
350mm
(Not less
than
M350)
Main Roads
- Arterial
Roads (Four
Lane)
30
Rigid
Pavment

Sub Arterial
Road (Four
Lane)
24
Rigid
Pavment

Internal
Roads -
Collecter
Roads (Two
Lane)
18
Rigid
Pavment

Local
Streets
(Single
Lane)
12
Rigid
Pavment

Infrastructure Cost for Road network Option I
Road Hierarchy
ROW
(In
Mt)
Total
Length
(In Km)
Cost/Km
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Total Cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Four
Lane)
30 5.94 600 3564.0
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 2.61 410 1070.1
Internal collector road (Two lane) 18 2.09 300 627.0
Local Streets (Two Lane) 12 0.84 300 252.0
Joggers Track (Single Lane) 6 4.03 50 201.5
Total 5741.66
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 571.5
Grand Total 6286.1
Initial Traffic
volume in terms
of Commercial
Vehicles per Day
Terrain
Rolling /
Plain
Hilly
0-150 1.5 0.5
150-1500 3.5 1.5
More than 1500 4.5 2.5
Note: 2007 Prices
Table No. 7.8: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Road network (Option I)
Table No. 7.7: Type Of Pavements (Proposed for Shamuka Beach area)
Table No. 7.5: Road Sections
Source: IRC 37
Table No. 7.6: Vehicle Damage Factor
Source: IRC 37
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Infrastructure Cost for Road network - Phase I (Option III)


Road Hierarchy ROW
(In
Mt)
Total
Length
(In Km)
Cost/Km
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Total Cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Four
Lane)
30 2.39 600 1434.0
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Two
Lane)
30 3.25 300 975.0
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 1.11 410 456.7
Internal collector road (Two lane) 18 1.12 300 336.0
Joggers Track (Single Lane) 6 4.03 50 201.5
Total 3403.2
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 340.3
Grand Total 3743.6
Infrastructure Cost for Road network - Phase II (Option II)
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In
Mt)
Total
Length
(In Km)
Cost/Km
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Total Cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Two
Lane)
30 3.25 300 975.0
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 0.74 410 303.4
Internal collector road (Two lane) 18 0.97 300 291.0
Local Streets (Two Lane) 12 0.84 300 252.0
Total 1821.4
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 182.1
Grand Total 2003.5
Infrastructure Cost for Road network - Phase I (Option II)
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In Mt)
Total
Length
(In Km)
Cost/Km
(Rs. in Lakh)
Total Cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Four
Lane)
30 1.96 600 1176.0
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Two
Lane)
30 3.25 300 975.0
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 0.11 410 45.1
Internal collector road (Two lane) 18 0.63 300 189.0
Joggers Track (Single Lane) 6 2.96 50 148.0
Total 2533.1
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 253.3
Grand Total 2786.4
Infrastructure Cost for Road network - Phase II (Option III)
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In
Mt)
Total
Length
(In Km)
Cost/Km
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Total Cost
(Rs. in Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Two
Lane)
30 3.25 300 975.0
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 0.74 410 303.4
Internal collector road (Two lane) 18 0.97 300 291.0
Local Streets (Two Lane) 12 0.84 300 252.0
Total 1821.4
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 182.1
Grand Total 2003.5
Table No. 7.11: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Road network Phase I (Option III)
Table No. 7.10: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Road network Phase II (Option II)
Table No. 7.9: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Road network Phase I (Option II)
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
Table No. 7.12: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Road network Phase II (Option III)
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
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7.1.2 Street Light


A street light, lamp post, street
lamp, light standard or lamp
standard, is a raised source of
light on the edge of a road,
turned on or lit at a certain time
every night. Modern lamps may
also have light-sensitive
photocells to turn them on at
dusk and off at dawn, or activate
automatically in dark weather. It
is also not uncommon for street
lights to be on posts which have
wires strung between them, such
as on telephone poles or utility
poles.
Currently, there are three types of
street lights in use, High Pressure
Sodium (HPS) lights which emit
an amber/white light and Low
Pressure Sodium (LPS), which
emits a monochromatic yellow
light and third type is carbon
filament lamp (CFL). HPS lighting
is the City's standard type of
street lighting. Because of the
need to limit light pollution that
affects Palomar Observatory, LPS
is used in all areas within a 30-
mile radius from the Observatory.
Another type of street light is
often seen now on the street
which is solar light.
Solar light is designed for outdoor
application in un-electrified
remote rural areas. This system is
an ideal application for campus
and village street lighting. The
system is provided with battery
storage backup sufficient to
operate the light for 10-11 hours
daily. The system is provided with
automatic ON/OFF time switch for
dusk to dawn operation and
overcharge / deep discharge
prevention cut-off with LED
indicators.
Street lights with poles made
from locally available materials
are being proposed at Shamuka
beach area. This encourages the
local craftsmanship, rendering a
traditional Oriyan touch to the
area. It not only adds an extra
flavor to the beautifully
landscaped patches by the roads,
but also serves the purpose of
lighting them at night.


Infrastructure Cost for Street Light - Option I
Road
Hierarchy
ROW
(In
mt)
Total
Length
(In mt)
No.
of
Poles
Rs./Pole
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Type
of
Pole
Type of Lamp Total
Amount
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads -
Arterial
Roads(Four
Lane)
30 5939.0 198 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon Filament
Lamp (CFL)
79.19
Sub Arterial
Road(Four
Lane)
24 2614.0 87 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon Filament
Lamp (CFL)
34.85
Internal
collector road
(Two lane)
18 2093.0 70 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon Filament
Lamp (CFL)
27.91
Local Streets
(Two Lane)
12 837.0 28 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon Filament
Lamp (CFL)
11.16
Joggers Track
(Single Lane)
6 4028.0 134 0.3 Single
Arm
Carbon Filament
Lamp (CFL)
40.28
Total 193.39
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 19.34
Grand Total 212.73
Table No. 7.13: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street Light (Option I)
Note: 2007 Prices
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Infrastructure Cost for Street Light - Phase I (Option II)


Road
Hierarchy
ROW
(In
mt)
Total
Length
(In mt)
No. of
Poles
Rs./Pole
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Type
of
Pole
Type of
Lamp
Total Amount
(Rs. in Lakh)
Main Roads
- Arterial
Roads(Four
Lane)
30 1957.0 65 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
26.09
Main Roads
- Arterial
Roads(Two
Lane)
30 3250.0 108 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
43.33
Sub Arterial
Road(Four
Lane)
24 112.0 4 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
1.49
Internal
collector
road (Two
lane)
18 628.0 21 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
8.37
Joggers
Track
(Single
Lane)
6 2958.0 99 0.3 Single
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
29.58
Total 108.87
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 10.89
Grand Total 119.76
Infrastructure Cost for Street Light - Phase I (Option III)
Road
Hierarchy
ROW
(In
mt)
Total
Length
(In mt)
No. of
Poles
Rs./Pole
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Type
of
Pole
Type of
Lamp
Total
Amount (Rs.
in Lakh)
Main Roads
- Arterial
Roads(Four
Lane)
30 2387 80 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp (CFL)
31.83
Main Roads
- Arterial
Roads(Two
Lane)
30 3250 108 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp (CFL)
43.33
Sub Arterial
Road(Four
Lane)
24 1114 37 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp (CFL)
14.85
Internal
collector
road (Two
lane)
18 1123 37 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp (CFL)
14.97
Joggers
Track
(Single
Lane)
6 4028 134 0.3 Single
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp (CFL)
40.28
Total 14527
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 14.53
Grand Total 159.79
Infrastructure Cost for Street Light - Phase II (Option II)
Road
Hierarchy
ROW
(In
mt)
Total
Length
(In mt)
No.
of
Poles
Rs./Pole
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Type
of
Pole
Type of
Lamp
Total
Amount (Rs.
in Lakh)
Sub Arterial
Road(Four
Lane)
24 737.0 25 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
9.83
Internal
collector
road (Two
lane)
18 970.0 32 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
12.93
Local
Streets
(Two Lane)
12 837.0 28 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
11.16
Total 33.92
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 3.39
Grand Total 37.31
Infrastructure Cost for Street Light - Phase II (Option III)
Road
Hierarchy
ROW
(In
mt)
Total
Length
(In mt)
No.
of
Poles
Rs./Pole
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Type
of
Pole
Type of
Lamp
Total
Amount (Rs.
in Lakh)
Sub Arterial
Road(Four
Lane)
24 737 25 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
9.83
Internal
collector
road (Two
lane)
18 970 32 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
12.93
Local
Streets (Two
Lane)
12 837 28 0.4 Double
Arm
Carbon
Filament
Lamp
(CFL)
11.16
Total 33.92
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 3.39
Grand Total 37.31
Table No. 7.14: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street Light Phase I(Option II)
Table No. 7.15: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street Light Phase II(Option II)
Table No. 7.16: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street Light Phase I(Option III)
Table No. 7.17: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Street Light Phase II(Option III)
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

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Proposed Street Furniture for


Shamuka Beach Area
Proposed Signage for Shamuka
Proposed Street light for Shamuka
Types of Street lights
Type of Bollard
Type of Bollard
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 87

7.1.3 Water supply


Water requirement for Shamuka beach area
can be classified into two categories
Water demand for hotels, commercial,
convection centre, villas, art centre and
other use
Horticulture or landscaping water demand.
Water demand for Shamuka beach area was
estimated offer comparing various available
norms and standards in India and abroad for
similar development.

Water Supply Standards & Guidelines


Norms & Standards
List of Activity
CPHEEO NBO CPCB
Ion-
Exchange.
World
Bank
(EHS)
Adopted for
Shamuka
Luxury Hotels (Per Room) 360 360 1300 1500 2000 1500
Residential Villas (Social Housing) (EWS) 135 135 150
Golf Villas (Riverside development) 150
Convention centre 15 15 25
Hospitality Management (Institute) 45 45 50
Cultural Village 150
Golf Course 0.02 MLD
* All figure are in lpcd
Activity

Area (In
Acre)
No of
units
no. of
rooms
lpd/room,
lpcd/persons
No. of
persons
Total Water demand Total water demand (in MLD)
Condominiums and Villas 33.14 450 150 1800 270000 0.27
Hotel - 1 40.35 200 1500 300000 0.30
Hotel 2 20.73 200 1500 300000 0.30
Hotel 3 19.85 200 1500 300000 0.30
Hotel 4 20.45 200 1500 300000 0.30
Convention Centre 24.22 1 60 1000 60000 0.06
High street bazaar 1.96 1 60 1000 60000 0.06
Art & Craft Museum 9.95 1 60 1000 60000 0.06
Hotel 5 24.01 200 1500 300000 0.30
Hotel 6 23.18 200 1500 300000 0.30
Hotel 7 23.66 200 1500 300000 0.30
Hotel 8 21.03 200 1500 300000 0.30
Hotel 9 13.13 200 1500 300000 0.30
Hotel 10 5.92 200 1500 300000 0.30
Hotel 11 5.49 100 1500 150000 0.15
Hotel 12 5.66 100 1500 150000 0.15
Hotel - 13 6.02 100 1500 150000 0.15
Social Housing 15.91 150 1200 180000 0.18
Gurukul 28 60 500 30000 0.03
Hospitality Institute 17.87 60 400 24000 0.02
Golf Course 221 5.80
Public Park 15 0.00
Golf Villas 51.75 200 150 800 120000 0.12
628.48 sub total (1) 10.05
Landscaping (Watering/gardening) Say 15% of total 1.51
sub total (2) 11.56
Maintenance & Losses (Say 15% of total) 1.73
sub total (3) 13.30
Fire fighting (1% of total) 0.13
Grand total(1)+(2) 13.43
Say 14
Table No. 7.18: Water Supply Standards & Guidelines

Table No. 7.19: Total Water Demand (Option I)

FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 88

Water required for the Shamuka


beach area can be drawn from:
Nearby surface water sources
Available ground water
resources

Surface Water sources:
Surface water sources will be
finalized in consultation with
concerned authority. A request
has been forwarded to Engineer
in Chief (EIC), Water Resources
Department, Bhubneshwar, to
find possible surface water
source to full fill the 14 mld
water demand.

Ground Water sources:
The coastal dune sands underlie
the project area that are of
medium to course in size. The
thickness of the sand dune is
about 30 meters. The sand
dunes serve as repositories for
the rainwater storage. The entire
supply of drinking water for the
Puri town is met from the ground
water stored in the sand dune.
At the same time they are
vulnerable to contamination from
external sources such as the
sewage, in particular, as well as
the tidal inflow through the creeks
and drainage channels. The
available data indicate the
following hydro geological and
hydro chemical profile derived
from extensive drilling, data
logging and electrical logging of
the boreholes.
Top fresh zone: 0 to <50 M
depth range
Middle saline zone: 50 to 130M
depth range.
Deep fresh zone: 130 to 230m
depth
Deep saline zone: Beyond
230M depth range.
The top fresh zone is comprised
of the dune sand and old
channels, and gets recharged
from rainfall and other surface
water bodies in the vicinity. The
deep fresh aquifer is found to
occur at a depth of 130 meters in
an average. Thus deep fresh
aquifer is not utilized so far.
A study conducted by IDCO,
Bhubaneshwar highlight the
availability of ground water at
Shamuka site, which is discussed
later, in detail.
Basic design criteria
Pipe diameter Min (100)
Max (200)
Pipe material - DI - K9(IS -
8329/1994
Residual Pressure G (7.0 m),
G+1 (12.0 m)
In design loop program
software is used for finding out
diameter of each pipeline.
DI pipe has been taken into
the consideration for the water
supply distribution network.
Hazen-William formula is used
in the program to find out the
frictional head loss in each
pipeline.
Q = 1.292 x 10-5 x C x D2.53
x S0.54
Where, Q = Discharge in m3/hr.
C = Hazen- Williams co-efficient
= 140 for DI pipe
D = Diameter of pipeline in mm
S = Frictional head loss in m/m

Head at junction points is
balanced by Newton-Raphson
method in the program.
The minimum residual
pressure has been kept as
12.0 m. at the consumers end
in the distribution system.







Development
Options
Phases Water
Demand
(In MLD)
Option - I 14
Option - II Phase - I 2
Phase - II 6
Option - III Phase - I 11
Phase - II 2

Table No. 7.20 :Total Water Demand


c/s of water supply line below G.L.
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 89

Map no.7.10 : Proposed water supply network


FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 90







Infrastructure cost for water supply network - Option I
Infrastructure cost for water ancillaries (Rs. In Lakh)
Water treatment plant Total water requirement (14 MLD) Treatment cost 30 lakh/MLD 420.0
ESR 3 Nos. 1.5 MLD Rs. 67.2 lakh/No. 201.6
Sump 3 Nos. 3.0 MLD Rs.41.07 lakh / No. 141.2
Sub total (1) 762.8
Infrastructure cost for water supply network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of
pipe (Laid both
side of the
road)(in m)
Pipe dia.
(in mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost (Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Four Lane) 30 5939 200 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 2681 159.22
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 2614 5228 150 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1935 101.16
Internal collector road (Two lane) 18 2093 4186 150 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1935 81
Local Streets (Two Lane) 12 837 1674 100 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1225 20.51
Joggers Track (Single Lane) 6 4028 8056 100 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1225 98.69
Sub total (2) 460.58
Total (1) & (2) 1223.39
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 122.34
Grand Total 1345.73
Infrastructure cost for water supply network - Phase I (Option II)
Infrastructure cost for water ancillaries (Rs. In Lakh)
Water treatment plant Total water requirement (2 MLD) Treatment cost 30 lakh/MLD 60.0
ESR 1 Nos. 1.5 MLD Rs. 67.2 lakh/No. 67.2
Sump 1 Nos. 3.0 MLD Rs.41.07 lakh / No. 47.1
Sub total (1) 174.3
Infrastructure cost for water supply network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe (Laid
both side of the road)(in m)
Pipe dia.
(in mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Four Lane) 30 1957.00 200 DI - K9(IS -
8329/1994)
2681 52.47
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Two Lane) 30 3250.00 200 DI - K9(IS -
8329/1994)
2681 87.13
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 112.00 224.00 150 DI - K9(IS -
8329/1994)
1935 4.33
Internal collector road (Two lane) 18 649.01 1298.02 150 DI - K9(IS -
8329/1994)
1935 25.12
Joggers Track (Single Lane) 6 3036.40 6072.80 100 DI - K9(IS -
8329/1994)
1225 74.39
Sub total (2) 243.44
Total (1) & (2) 417.71
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 41.77
Grand Total 459.48
Table No. 7.21 : Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network - Option I
Table No. 7.22 : Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network - Phase I (Option II)
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 91





Infrastructure cost for water supply network - Phase I (Option III)
Infrastructure cost for water ancillaries (Rs. In Lakh)
Water treatment plant Total water requirement (11 MLD) Treatment cost 30 lakh/MLD 330.0
ESR 3 Nos. 1.5 MLD Rs. 67.2 lakh/No. 201.6
Sump 3 Nos. 3.0 MLD Rs.41.07 lakh / No. 141.2
Sub total (1) 672.8
Infrastructure cost for water supply network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe (Laid
both side of the road)(in m)
Pipe dia.
(in mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Four Lane)
30 2387.00 200 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 2681 64.00
Main Roads - Arterial Roads(Two
Lane)
30 3250.00 200 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 2681 87.13
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 1114.00 2228.00 150 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1935 43.11
Internal collector road (Two
lane)
18 1123.00 2246.00 150 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1935 43.46
Joggers Track (Single Lane) 6 4028.00 8056.00 100 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1225 98.69
Sub total (2) 336.39
Total (1) & (2) 1009.20
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 100.92
Grand Total 1110.12

Infrastructure cost for water supply network - Phase II (Option II)
Infrastructure cost for water ancillaries (Rs. In Lakh)
Water treatment plant Total water requirement (6 MLD) Treatment cost 30 lakh/MLD 180.0
ESR 2 Nos. 1.5 MLD Rs. 67.2 lakh/No. 134.4
Sump 2 Nos. 3.0 MLD Rs.41.07 lakh / No. 94.1
Sub total (1) 408.5
Infrastructure cost for water supply network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe (Laid
both side of the road)(in m)
Pipe dia.
(in mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in Lakh)
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 737 1474 150 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1935 28.52
Internal collector road (Two lane) 18 970 1940 150 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1935 37.54
Local Streets (Two Lane) 12 837 1674 100 DI - K9(IS - 8329/1994) 1225 20.51
Sub total (2) 86.57
Total (1) & (2) 495.11
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 49.51
Grand Total 544.92
Table No. 7.23 : Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network - Phase II (Option II)
Table No. 7.24 : Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network - Phase I (Option III)
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 92

Ground water cost estimates


Apart from surface water supply
network, ground water as a back
up is required for the
uninterrupted 247 water supply.
The estimate has been framed to
meet the probable expenditure of
the ground water supply network.
Detail survey of this area has been
done by a hydro-geologist
engaged by IDCO. The survey
highlights that fresh water is
available within 50 m depth below
ground level which can be tapped
for supply of water to Shamuka
beach area. Existing bore well with
10 lps and 20 hrs. working time
for a depth of 184-230 m below
ground level can extract a 4.5
mld.
Based on this survey findings at
site area CEPT has arrived at a
requirement of 33 nos of bore well
at 8 lps and 15 hrs. working time
which can extract 14 mld of water
to satisfy the water demand for
Shamuka beach area.
Five nos. of bore well required to
mitigate a demand of 2mld for
Phase I (Option II). It cost 66
lakhs for five bore wells to extract
a ground water.



Infrastructure cost for water supply network - Phase II (Option III)


Infrastructure cost for water ancillaries (Rs. In Lakh)
Water treatment plant Total water requirement (1 MLD) Treatment cost 30 lakh/MLD 60.0
ESR 1 Nos. 1.5 MLD Rs. 67.2 lakh/No. 67.2
Sump 1 Nos. 3.0 MLD Rs.41.07 lakh / No. 47.1
Sub total (1) 174.3
Infrastructure cost for water supply network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe (Laid both
side of the road)(in m)
Pipe dia. (in
mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost (Rs.
in Lakh)
Sub Arterial Road(Four
Lane)
24 737 1474 150 DI - K9(IS -
8329/1994)
1935 28.52
Internal collector road
(Two lane)
18 970 1940 150 DI - K9(IS -
8329/1994)
1935 37.54
Local Streets (Two Lane) 12 837 1674 100 DI - K9(IS -
8329/1994)
1225 20.51
Sub total (2) 86.57
Total (1) & (2) 260.84
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 26.08
Grand Total 286.92
Cost estimate: Ground water supply
Activity Nos. Per tube well
(Rs. In lakh)
Rs. In
lakh
Sinking of 200 mm dia tube well upto 40 m depth
through hand boring by water jet method.
33
nos.
5.00 165.00
Construction of pump chamber of internal size
4.2m 30 m including internal electrification
33
nos.
1.50 49.50
Laying of 160mm dia C.I. class L.A pipes of 100m
length from tubewell to underground reservoir
33
nos.
3.00 99.00
Supply, installation, testing & commissioning of
submersible pump set with accessories in tubewell
33
nos.
1.17 38.61
Column Pipes 100mm dia 33
nos.
0.23 7.43
Sub Total 359.54
10 % Maintenance and losses with overheads 35.95
Total 395.49
Pre-project investigation/Development expenses -
10% of the total
39.55
Grand total 435.04
Table No. 7.25: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for water supply network - Phase II (Option III)
Table No. 7.26 : Cost Estimate: Ground Water Supply
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 93

Bore well - Location


Map no.7.11 : Location of Bore well
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 94

= Contributing area in Ha. x (4.54 x 0.8)x


100 (1.05 x 2.25)

7.1.4 Sewerage
The sewage disposal and
treatment facilities are proposed
within Shamuka Beach Area. The
quantity of wastewater generated
is considered to be 85% of the
required supply of water. The
quality of waste water will be
predominantly domestic. A
treatment plant with polishing
unit will be installed to get the
best quality of treated water
suitable for watering of
gardens/Golf course.
An appropriate area as per the
contours and the wind direction
will be selected for locating the
plant so that minimum pumping
of sewerage is required and the
foul smell does not spread within
the site and outside. The final
disposal point is to be located in
consultation with the concern
authority.
been taken into the
consideration for the sewerage
network. (RCC NP3 = 0.7
kg/cm2)
4. Flow in MLd when pipe is
running full is found out by
Mannings formula.


Where V = Velocity in m/s
n = Mannings co-efficient of
roughness
= 0.015
D = Diameter of pipeline in mm
S = Gradient of pipeline

5. Velocity in m/s when pipe is
running full is found out by
Mannings Formula.
V =
1
(3.968 x 10
-3
) x (D)
2/3
x (S)
1/2

n
Where V = Velocity in m/s
n = Mannings co-efficient of
roughness
= 0.015
D = Diameter of pipeline in mm
S = Gradient of pipeline

6. Find out discharge ratio Q,
Discharge calculated by
q = Actual discharge (peak flow)
Mannings formula
7. Knowing the value of discharge
ratio, obtain the value of actual
velocity and the depth of flow
from the hydraulic properties
of circular sections.
BASIC DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. First of all length and peak flow
in MLd on each pipe is worked
out. Peak flow on each pipe,



2. Total peak flow served by
section is worked out as shown
in design table by summation
of peak flow at upper end from
branch, peak flow on that
particular section and peak
flow from upper end.

3. Diameter and gradient of the
pipe is selected depend upon
the flow. For Shamuka Beach
area RCC NP3 has

Q =
1
(0.2693 x 10
-6
) x (D)
8/3
x (S)
1/2

n
Sewage Standards & Guidelines
Norms &
Standards
List of Activity
CPHEEO NBO CPCB
Ion-
Exchange.
World
Bank(EHS)
Adopted
for
Shamuka
Luxury Hotels
(Per Room)
288 288 1100 1200 1600 1200
Residential Villas
(Social Housing)
(EWS)
108 108 120
Golf Villas
(Riverside
development)
120
Convention centre 12 lpcd
12
lpcd
20
Hospitality
Management
(Institute)
36 lpcd
36
lpcd
40
Cultural Village 120
Golf Course
* All figure are in lpcd
Table No.7.27: Sewage Standards & Guidelines
c/s of sewerage line 2m below G.L.
c/s of sewerage line 6m below G.L.
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 95

Map no.7.12 : Proposed Sewerage network


SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 96

Details of Waste Water


Treatment Systems
A. OBJECTIVE
The objective of a public waste
water collection and disposal
system is to ensure that sewage or
excreta and sullage discharged
from communities is properly
collected, transported, treated to
the required degree and finally
disposed off without causing any
health or environmental problems.

Waste water disposal systems can
be either the on-site type or the
kind where water borne wastes
are disposed off-site into a water
body or on land. To keep overall
costs down, most urban systems
today are planned as an optimum
mix of the two types depending on
various factors.
B. MAIN CONSIDERATIONS
In designing waste water collection,
treatment, and disposal systems,
planning generally begins from the
final disposal point going backwards
to give an integrated and optimum
design to suit the topography and
the available hydraulic head,
supplemented by pumping if
essential. Once the disposal points
are tentatively selected, further
design is guided by the following
design considerations:
Engineering
Environmental
Process
Design period, stage wise
population to be served and
expected sewage flow and
fluctuations.
Topography of the general area to
be served, its slope and terrain.
Tentative sites available for
treatment plant, pumping stations
and disposal works.
Available hydraulic head in the
system upto high flood level in case
of disposal to a nearby river or high
tide level in case of coastal
discharge or then level of the
irrigation area to be commanded in
case of land disposal.
Ground water depth and its
seasonal variation affecting
construction, sewer infiltration, and
structural design (uplift).
Soil bearing capacity and type of
strata expected to be met at the
time of construction.
Onsite disposal facilities, including
the possibilities of segregating the
sullage water and sewage and
reuse or recycle sullage water
within the households.
Soil bearing capacity and type of
strata expected to be met at the
time of construction.
Onsite disposal facilities, including
the possibilities of segregating the
sullage water and sewage and
reuse or recycle sullage water
within the households.


ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS
Surface water hydrology and quality.
Ground water quality.
Coastal water quality
Odor and Mosquito nuisance
Public Health
Landscaping

PROCESS CONSIDERATIONS
Waste water flow and Characteristics
Degree of treatment required
Performance characteristics
Other process requirements
Cost considerations




Sr.
No.
Item Conventiona
l Activated
Sludge
Process
Conventional
Trickling
Filter
Oxidatio
n Ditch
Facultative
Aerated
Lagoon
Waste
Stabilisa
tion
Pond
UASB
Reactor
Process
1 Performance
BoD Removal
(%)
85-92 80-90 95-98 75-85 75-85 75-85
Clliform
Removal (%)
60-90 60-90 60-90 60-90 60-99.9 insignifican
t
2 Land
requirement
(Sq. Mt./capita
excludingpost
treatment)
0.18-0.25 0.20-0.30 0.15-0.20 0.30-0.40 2.0-2.8 0.15-0.20
3 Energy
requirement
KWH/Person/Year
12-15 7-11 16-19 12-15 nil -
4 Equipment
required
(Excluding Screen
and greet
chamber)
Aerators,recy
cle pumps
scrapper,
thickeners
digestors,
dryers gas
equipment
Trickling filter
arms, recycle
pumps sludge
scrappers,
thickeners,
directors
equipment
Aerators,
recycle
pump
Aerators
only pump
nil Pumps,
gas,
collection
equipment
5 Level of
Supervision
Skilled Skilled Simplest Simpler
than
activated
sludge
6 Cost (Rs. In Lakh)
Capita cost/MLD
O&M
35 25 NA 15 9 24
Cost/MLD/Year 1.5 0.75 NA 1.25 1.25 0.72
Table No.7.28 Comparative analysis of sanitation system
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 97



Infrastructure cost for sewerage system - Option I
Infrastructure cost for sewage pipe network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe (Laid
both side of the road)(in m)
Pipe dia.
(in mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Four Lane)
30 5939.00 900 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7 kg/cm)
(IS-458/1989)
2238 132.91
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 2614.00 5228.00 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7 kg/cm)
(IS-458/1989)
1681 87.88
Internal collector road (Two
lane)
18 2093.00 4186.00 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7 kg/cm)
(IS-458/1989)
1681 70.37
Local Streets (Two Lane) 12 837.00 1674.00 230 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7 kg/cm)
(IS-458/1989)
402.5 6.74
Sub total (1) 297.90
Infrastructure cost for sewage ancillaries
Manhole 30 m C/C 562 Nos. Rs.
12000
62.04
Sewage Treatment 12 MLD Rs. 100 lakh/MLD 1200
Sub total (2) 1262.04
Total (1) & (2) 1559.94
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 155.99
Grand Total 1715.94

Infrastructure cost for sewerage system - Phase I (Option II)


Infrastructure cost for sewage pipe network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe (Laid
both side of the road)(in m)
Pipe dia.
(in mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Four Lane)
30 1957.00 900 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7 kg/cm)
(IS-458/1989)
2238 43.80
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Two Lane)
30 3250.00 900 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7 kg/cm)
(IS-458/1989)
2238 72.74
Sub Arterial Road(Four
Lane)
24 112.00 224.00 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7 kg/cm)
(IS-458/1989)
1681 3.77
Internal collector road
(Two lane)
18 628.00 1256.00 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7 kg/cm)
(IS-458/1989)
1681 21.11
Sub total (1) 141.41
Infrastructure cost for sewage ancillaries
Manhole 30 m C/C 312 Nos. Rs.
12000
35.64
Sewage Treatment 1.7 MLD Rs. 100 lakh/MLD 170
Sub total (2) 205.64
Total (1) & (2) 347.05
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 34.71
Grand Total 381.76
Table No.7.29: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage system - Option I
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
Table No.7.30: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage system Phase I (Option II)
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 98

Infrastructure cost for sewerage system - Phase II (Option II)


Infrastructure cost for sewage pipe network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe (Laid both
side of the road)(in m)
Pipe dia. (in
mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Sub Arterial
Road(Four Lane)
24 737 1474 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 24.78
Internal collector
road (Two lane)
18 970 1940 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 32.61
Local Streets (Two
Lane)
12 837 1674 230 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
402.5 6.74
Sub total (1) 64.13
Infrastructure cost for sewage ancillaries
Manhole 30 m C/C 203 Nos. Rs. 12000 23.28
Sewage Treatment 5 MLD Rs. 100 lakh/MLD 500
Sub total (2) 523.28
Total (1) & (2) 587.41
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 58.74
Grand Total 646.15

Infrastructure cost for sewerage system - Phase I (Option III)


Infrastructure cost for sewage pipe network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe (Laid both side of
the road)(in m)
Pipe
dia. (in
mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total
cost (Rs.
in Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Four Lane)
30 2387.00 900 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
2238 53.42
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Two Lane)
30 3250.00 900 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
2238 72.74
Sub Arterial Road(Four
Lane)
24 1114.00 2228.00 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 37.45
Internal collector road
(Two lane)
18 1123.00 2246.00 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 37.76
Sub total (1) 201.36
Infrastructure cost for sewage ancillaries
Manhole 30 m C/C 432 Nos. Rs. 12000 47.64
Sewage Treatment 9.5 MLD Rs. 100 lakh/MLD 950
Sub total (2) 997.64
Total (1) & (2) 1199.00
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 119.90
Grand Total 1318.90
Table No.7.31: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage system - Phase II (Option II)
Table No.7.32: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage system - Phase I (Option III)
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 99

Infrastructure cost for sewerage system - Phase II (Option III)


Infrastructure cost for sewage pipe network
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe (Laid both
side of the road)(in m)
Pipe dia. (in
mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost (Rs.
in Lakh)
Sub Arterial
Road(Four Lane)
24 737 1474 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 24.78
Internal collector road
(Two lane)
18 970 1940 600 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 32.61
Local Streets (Two
Lane)
12 837 1674 230 RCC NP3 (Test Pressure 0.7
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
402.5 6.74
Sub total (1) 64.13
Infrastructure cost for sewage ancillaries
Manhole 30 m C/C 203 Nos. Rs. 12000 23.28
Sewage Treatment 1.7 MLD Rs. 100 lakh/MLD 170
Sub total (2) 193.28
Total (1) & (2) 257.41
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 25.74
Grand Total 283.15
Table No.7.33: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for sewerage system - Phase II (Option III)
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 100

DESIGN METHODOLOGY
1. First of all the length and area
to be served by each pipe is
worked out.
2. Total area is assumed as
divided in two parts; 50%
built-up area and 50% open
area.
3. The percentage of
imperviousness for built-up
area is considered as 90% and
for open area is considered as
20%. From this total
imperviousness area is found
out.
4. Time of inlet (TI) is taken 25
minutes (Range is 5 to 30
minutes in CPHEEO Manual).
5. Time of flow (TF) is found out
considering velocity of flow 1
m/s.
6. Time of concentration(TC) = TI
+ TF.
7. From graph of I TC, I is
found out and from graph of C
TC, C is found out.
8. From all this runoff reaching
the drain is given by
Q = 10 CIA.
Where Q = Runoff in m3/hour
C = Coefficient of runoff
I = Intensity in mm / hour
A = Area in hectares


7.1.5 Storm water Drainage
The purpose of providing storm
water drains is to carry the rainfall
(storm) runoff from the terraces,
paved courtyards, footpaths, roads
etc. of the developed area; so that
the occurrence of flooding is
reduced to the acceptable
frequencies. Storm runoff is that
portion of the rainfall which drains
over the ground surface. The
estimation of such runoff reaching
the storm water drains therefore is
dependent on the intensity and
duration of rainfall, characteristics
of the drainage area and time
required for such flow to reach the
storm water drains.
Storm water drains are not
designed for the peak flow of rare
occurrence of rainfall such as once
in 10 years or more; but it is
necessary to provide sufficient
capacity to avoid too frequent
flooding of the drainage area.
There may be some flooding when
the precipitation exceeds the
design value, which has to be
permitted. The frequency of such
permissible flooding may vary from
place to place, depending upon the
characteristics of the drainage
area. Though such flooding causes
inconvenience, it may have to be
accepted once in while, considering
the cost economy.
9. From Q diameter is selected
depending upon the availability
of ground slope and Mannings
Formula.


Where n = Mannings co-
efficient of roughness (consider
0.015)
D = Diameter of pipeline in mm
S = Slope of pipeline
Q = Flow in MLd
10. RCC pipe has been taken into
consideration for the storm
water drainage.





Q =
1
(0.2693 x 10
-6
) x (D)
8/3
x (S)
1/2

n
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 101


Infrastructure cost for Storm water drainage - Option I
Road Hierarchy
ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe
(Laid both side of the
road)(in m)
Pipe dia. (in
mm)
Pipe Material
Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Four Lane)
30 5939.00 11878.00 900
RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
2238 265.83
Sub Arterial Road(Four
Lane)
24 2614.00 5228.00 600
RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 87.88
Internal collector road
(Two lane)
18 2093.00 4186.00 600
RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 70.37
Local Streets (Two
Lane)
12 837.00 1674.00 600
RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 28.14
Joggers Track (Single
Lane)
6 4028.00 8056.00 600
RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 135.42
Manhole 120.00
Sub total 707.64
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 70.76
Grand Total 778.40

Table No.7.34: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage - Option I
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 102


Infrastructure cost for Storm water drainage Phase I (Option II)
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe
(Laid both side of the
road)(in m)
Pipe dia. (in
mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Four Lane)
30 1957 3914.00 900 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
2238 87.60
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(two Lane)
30 3250 - 900 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
2238 72.74
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 112 224.00 600 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 3.77
Internal collector road (Two
lane)
18 649.01 1298.02 600 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 21.82
Joggers Track (Single Lane) 6 3036.40 6072.80 600 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 102.08
Manhole 50.00
Sub total 338.00
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 33.80
Grand Total 371.80


Infrastructure cost for Storm water drainage Phase II (Option II)
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe
(Laid both side of the
road)(in m)
Pipe dia. (in
mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Two Lane)
30 3250 900 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
2238 72.74
Sub Arterial Road(Four Lane) 24 737 1474 600 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 24.78
Internal collector road (Two
lane)
18 970 1940 600 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 32.61
Local Streets (Two Lane) 12 837 1674 600 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 28.14
Manhole 60.00
Total 218.26
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total
21.83
Grand Total
240.09
Table No.7.35: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage Phase I (Option II)
Table No.7.36: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage Phase II (Option II)
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 103





Infrastructure cost for Storm water drainage Phase II (Option III)
Road Hierarchy
ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe
(Laid both side of the
road)(in m)
Pipe dia. (in
mm)
Pipe Material
Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Two Lane)
30 3250 900
RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
2238 72.74
Sub Arterial Road(Four
Lane)
24 737 1474 600
RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 24.78
Internal collector road
(Two lane)
18 970 1940 600
RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 32.61
Local Streets (Two
Lane)
12 837 1674 600
RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 28.14
Manhole 60.00
Total 218.26
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 21.83
Grand Total
240.09
Infrastructure cost for Storm water drainage Phase I (Option III)
Road Hierarchy ROW
(In mt)
Total Length
(In mt)
Total length of pipe
(Laid both side of the
road)(in m)
Pipe dia. (in
mm)
Pipe Material Rate/mt
(In Rs.)
Total cost
(Rs. in
Lakh)
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(Four Lane)
30 2387 4774 900 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
2238 106.84
Main Roads - Arterial
Roads(two Lane)
30 3250 900 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
2238 72.74
Sub Arterial Road(Four
Lane)
24 1114 2228 600 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 37.45
Internal collector road
(Two lane)
18 1123 2246 600 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 37.76
Joggers Track (Single
Lane)
6 4028 8056 600 RCC Class P-3 (Test Pressure 6
kg/cm) (IS-458/1989)
1681 135.42
Manhole 55.00
Total 445.21
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 44.52
Grand Total 489.73
Note: 2007 Prices
Table No.7.37: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage Phase I (Option III)

Table No.7.38: Infrastructure Cost Estimate for Storm water drainage Phase II (Option III)
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 104

Map no.7.13 : Propose Storm water network


FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 105


Rain water harvesting at individual building level
Rain water
harvesting option
(Shamuka beach
area)

Master plan level

Individual Building
level
Storm water
collected from Storm
water drain along the
road
Excess irrigated
water from
landscaping and
plantation
Treated
waste water

Individual Activity
level (Activity like i.e.
Convention centre,
gurukul, Villas)
Community level
(Social and EWS
Housing)
Individual
Hotel Level

7.1.6 Rainwater Harvesting Option
Rainwater harvesting (RWH) and recharging of groundwater is
emerging as a sustainable strategy to cope with the increasing
pressure on scarce freshwater resources. Even as efforts are on way
to overcome water shortage through conventional approach of
abstracting freshwater from rivers and underground aquifers.
Rooftop rainwater harvesting practices in urban areas is gaining
significance as an approach to supplement the traditional water
supplies. Flowchart below shows a proposed rainwater harvesting
option at master plan level and individual building level for Shamuka
beach area.

FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 106


No. Block
no.
Built up
(sq mts)
Roof top
area(sq mts)
Built up but
not roof top
(In sq mt)
NON
BUILT UP
(In sq
mts)
Roof top
harvesting
for direct
use (In cu
m)
Rain water
Harvesting
for
Recharge
Purpose
(In cu m)
1 A2 6400 1206.82 5193.18 19214 1339.82 23225.8692
2 A3 67317 38573.43 28743.57 102602 42824.22 124988.448
3 A4 76236 42034.72 34201.28 162771 46666.95 187438.817
4 A5 7386 3373.59 4012.41 28259 3745.36 30709.4711
5 B1 58121 37071.79 21049.21 84458 41157.10 100400.663
6 B2 84411 28688.60 55722.40 157131 31850.09 202551.293
7 B3 63137 21340.73 41796.27 186863 23692.48 217592.161
8 B4 41947 26527.16 15419.84 208053 29450.46 212656.753
9 B5 7547 4141.30 3405.70 51456 4597.67 52206.3966
10 C1 92511 26857.36 65653.64 110133 29817.04 167278.569
11 C2 38539 17189.96 21349.04 211461 19084.30 221542.032
12 C3 11557 601.83 10955.17 238443 668.15 237327.298
13 C4 67581 27541.30 40039.70 182419 30576.35 211691.698
14 C5 4162 1958.18 2203.82 57787 2173.97 57087.269
15 D1 34468 15924.17 18543.83 69035 17679.02 83340.0099
16 D2 85066 33621.48 51444.52 164934 37326.56 205905.803
17 D3 51296 26397.63 24898.37 198704 29306.65 212780.012
18 D4 48715 25426.08 23288.92 178128 28228.04 191668.338
19 D5 5334 3853.50 1480.50 38236 4278.16 37794.217
20 E1 14295 8794.62 5500.38 59874 9763.79 62210.2573
21 E2 44610 0.00 44610.00 172177 0.00 206294.509
22 E3 5410 0.00 0.00 97664 0.00 92937.0624
23 E4 0 0.00 0.00 7291 0.00 6938.1156
24 F1 0 0.00 0.00 15106 0.00 14374.8696
25 F2 0 0.00 0.00 5061 0.00 4816.0476
TOTAL 916046 391124.27 519511.73 2807260 434226.16 3165756
Table No.7.39: Rain Water Harvesting Option: Shamuka Beach Area
434.226 Million Litres of harvested water can be in direct use -
collected from Roof top
By maximum effort we can recharge say 50 % of the 3165.756
million litre of water runoff
If we assume that total annual demand is 14 mld *365 days=
5110 million litres than the harvested water for direct use can
replace the 8 % of annually water demand.
All plots more than 15 acres plot must have at least four ground
water recharge structure, more than 10 acres plot must have two
ground water recharge structure Where as below 10 acres plot
must have at least one ground water recharge structure.
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 107

7.1.7 Solid waste


The solid waste management of any
area revolves around the quantity
and quality of solid wastes. The
quantity decides the magnitudes of
the problems of storage,
transportation and disposal
operations which have to be
undertaken for disposal or any such
other purposes whereas the quality
hints at the precautions to be carried
out in any such operations. For
Shamuka Beach area, type of waste
generated will be mainly from
domestic, commercial, hotels and
green waste from landscaping
gardens and golf course.


Norms &
Standards
List of Activity
CPHEEO NBO CPCB
World
Bank
Adopted
standard
Luxury Hotels
(Per Room)
1.1 2.4 1
Residential Villas
(Social Housing)
(EWS)
0.35 0.35 0.5
Golf Villas
(Riverside
development)
0.35 0.35 0.5
Convention centre 0.5
Hospitality
Management
(Institute)
0.5
Cultural Village 0.35 0.35 0.5
Golf Course
Waste Generation
Hotels
Institutions
Commercial Centre
Residential Houses
Paper/ Plastic/
Glass/ Metal
Food and Agro
Waste
Debris from tree
foliage
Storage, Containers
SWM Network
Rag Picker
Informal Network
Recycled Solid Waste
Collection & Sorting
Collection
SWM Network
Sorting & Processing of
Solid Waste
Public Private Partnership
Disposal
Transportation
SWM Network
Table No.7.40: Solid Waste Standards & Guidelines
Solid Waste
Management
System
Solid Waste container
Solid Waste container Solid Waste container carrier truck
Solid Waste dust bin
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 108

Estimated total solid waste generated for Shamuka Tourism Area is


about 8.45 tonnes. Solid waste generated from all activity will be
collected by bulk storage and collection method. Proposed solid waste
collection and disposal system is much easy and convenient in
practice. Each individual hotels and other proposed activity will be
informed about collection time and will be collected from each activity
at their door step. Collected solid waste will be dumped and disposed
in consultation with government officials at land fill site.

Activity Area
(In
Acre)
Population nos. no. of rooms No. of
persons
Solid waste/person
(in gram)
Solid waste
generated (in
kg)
Condominiums and Villas 33.14 4 450 1800 500 900.00
Hotel - 1 40.35 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Hotel 2 20.73 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Hotel 3 19.85 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Hotel 4 20.45 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Convention Centre 24.22 1 1000 500 500.00
High street bazaar 1.96 1 1000 500 500.00
Art & Craft Museum 9.95 1 1000 500 500.00
Hotel 5 24.01 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Hotel 6 23.18 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Hotel 7 23.66 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Hotel 8 21.03 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Hotel 9 13.13 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Hotel 10 5.92 2 200 400 1000 400.00
Hotel 11 5.49 2 100 200 1000 200.00
Hotel 12 5.66 2 100 200 1000 200.00
Hotel 13 6.02 2 100 200 1000 200.00
Social Housing 15.91 1200 500 600.00
Gurukul 28 500 500 250.00
Hospitality Institute 17.87 400 500 200.00
Golf Course 221 0 0 0.00
Public Park 15 0 0 0.00
Golf Villas 51.75 4 200 800 500 400.00
Total 648.28 13500 8450.00
Solid Waste Generated (in Tonne) 8.45
Table No.7.41: Solid Waste Estimation
Road vacuum sweeper Solid Waste container carrier truck Solid Waste container carrier truck
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 109





















Road (ROW) Length in m Length
in KM
No. of 40
lit
dustbin
No. of 4.5 cu
m capacity
container
30 m 5939 5.94 40 7
24 m 2614 2.61 17 5
18 m 2093 2.09 14 4
12 m 837 0.84 6 2
Jogging Track
6 m
4028 4.03 27 8
15.51 103 27
Cost Estimate for Solid waste Phase II (option II)
Sr
No.
Item Descriptions Qty Per Rate in
lakh
Amount (Rs. in
Lakh)
1 4.5 cu m Capacity
container
9 No 0.5 4.5
2 40 lit - dust bin 39 No 0.012 0.468
Total 4.97
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10%
of the total
0.50
Grand Total 5.46
Cost Estimate for Solid waste Phase I (Option III)
Sr
No.
Item Descriptions Qty Per Rate in
lakh
Amount (Rs. in
Lakh)
1 Animal pick Van 2 No 10 20
2 Dumpers 2 No 10 20
3 Office Building 1 No 25 25
4 JCB 1 No 30 30
5 Road vacuum sweeper 4 No 80 320
6 4.5 cu.m Capacity
container
22 No 0.5 11
7 40 lit - dust bin 79 No 0.012 0.948
8 Land fill site Lump Lump 15 15
Total 441.95
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of
the total
44.19
Grand Total 486.14
Cost Estimate for Solid waste- option I
Sr
No.
Item Descriptions Qty Per Rate in
lakh
Amount (Rs. in
Lakh)
1 Animal pick Van 2 No 10 20
2 Dumpers 2 No 10 20
3 Office Building 1 No 25 25
4 JCB 1 No 30 30
5 Road vacuum sweeper 4 No 80 320
6 4.5 cu.m Capacity
container
27 No 0.5 13.5
7 40 lit - dust bin 103 No 0.012 1.236
8 Land fill site Lump Lump 15 15
Total 444.74
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of
the total
44.47
Grand Total 489.21
Cost Estimate for Solid waste-Phase I (option II)
Sr
No.
Item Descriptions Qty Per Rate in
lakh
Amount (Rs. in
Lakh)
1 Animal pick Van 2 No 10 20
2 Dumpers 2 No 10 20
3 Office Building 1 No 25 25
4 JCB 1 No 30 30
5 Road vacuum sweeper 4 No 80 320
6 4.5 cu.m Capacity
container
16 No 0.5 8
7 40 lit - dust bin 59 No 0.012 0.708
8 Land fill site Lump Lump 15 15
Total 438.71
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of
the total
43.87
Grand Total 482.58
Cost Estimate for Solid waste Phase II (option III)
Sr
No.
Item Descriptions Qty Per Rate in
lakh
Amount (Rs. in
Lakh)
1 4.5 cu.m Capacity
container
9 No 0.5 4.5
2 40 lit - dust bin 39 No 0.012 0.468
Total 4.97
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10%
of the total
0.50
Grand Total 5.46
Table No.7.42: Solid waste equipments
Table No.7.43: Cost Estimate for Solid waste- option I
Table No.7.44: Cost Estimate for Solid waste- Phase I (option II)
Table No.7.45: Cost Estimate for Solid waste- Phase II (option II)
Table No.7.46: Cost Estimate for Solid waste- Phase I (option III)
Table No.7.47: Cost Estimate for Solid waste- Phase II (option III)
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

CEPT,Ahmedabad 110

7.1.8 Power
Electric power supply and distribution
scheme: facility of power supply will
be provided by state power supply
board. Entire Shamuka Beach area
will be divided into the grid zoning
and a main power grid sub station
will be located near to the north east
area of the site. 247 power facility
will be provided to the Shamuka
Beach area with the power generator
backup. In consultation with CISCO,
Bhubaneswar, 132 KV power line will
be supplied to project area. Power
will be received by a sub-station at
North-East corner of the project area.

Activity
Area
(In
Acre)
Area (In
Sq ft.)
FSI
Built -up
area(In
Sq ft)
Norm
w/sq.
ft
Power in W
Power in
kw
Condominiums and
Villas
33.14 1443578 0.75 1082683.8 2 2165367.6 2165.37
Hotel - 1 40.35 1757646 0.50 878823 7 6151761 6151.76
Hotel - 2 20.73 902998.8 0.50 451499.4 7 3160495.8 3160.50
Hotel - 3 19.85 864666 0.50 432333 7 3026331 3026.33
Hotel - 4 20.45 890802 0.50 445401 7 3117807 3117.81
Convention Centre 24.22 1055023 0.50 527511.6 2 1055023.2 1055.02
High street bazaar 1.96 85377.6 0.50 42688.8 2 85377.6 85.38
Art & Craft Museum 9.95 433422 0.50 216711 2 433422 433.42
Hotel - 5 24.01 1045876 0.50 522937.8 7 3660564.6 3660.56
Hotel - 6 23.18 1009721 0.50 504860.4 7 3534022.8 3534.02
Hotel - 7 23.66 1030630 0.50 515314.8 7 3607203.6 3607.20
Hotel - 8 21.03 916066.8 0.50 458033.4 7 3206233.8 3206.23
Hotel - 9 13.13 571942.8 0.50 285971.4 7 2001799.8 2001.80
Hotel - 10 5.92 257875.2 0.75 193406.4 7 1353844.8 1353.84
Hotel - 11 5.49 239144.4 0.75 179358.3 7 1255508.1 1255.51
Hotel - 12 5.66 246549.6 0.75 184912.2 7 1294385.4 1294.39
Hotel - 13 6.02 262231.2 0.75 196673.4 7 1376713.8 1376.71
Social Housing 15.91 693039.6 1.00 693039.6 1 693039.6 693.04
Gurukul 28 1219680 0.50 609840 2 1219680 1219.68
Hospitality Institute 17.87 778417.2 0.50 389208.6 2 778417.2 778.42
Golf Course 221 9626760 0 0 0.00
Public Park 15 653400 0 0.025 16335 16.34
Golf Villas 51.75 2254230 0.50 1127115 2 2254230 2254.23
648.28 28239077 9938322.9 45447563.7 45447.56
In MW 45.45
Say (In MW) 45
Considering 0.8 Overall diversity factor : Total Load (In MW) 36
Considering 0.8 power factor of incoming supply : Total Load (In MVA) 45
Norms & Standards
List of Activity
World Bank
Adopted
standard
Luxury Hotels
(Per Room)
320 320
Residential Villas (Social Housing)
(EWS)

Golf Villas
(Riverside development)

Convention centre
Hospitality Management
(Institute)

Cultural Village
Golf Course
Development
Options
Phases Power Demand (In
MW)
Option - I 45
Option - II Phase - I 18
Phase - II 12
Option - III Phase - I 29
Phase - II 10
Table No. 7.48: Energy Standards & Guidelines
Table No. 7.49: Total Power Demand
Table No. 7.50: Power Demand
FINALMASTERPLAN:SHAMUKABEACHAREA ChapterVII:Infrastructure

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Total Cost of Electricity network - Option I
Cost of LT Line Rupees per KM 149000
Total Length (In KM) 15.51
Total Cost of LT line (Rs. in Lakh) 23.11
Nos of 500-750 kv transformer 24
Cost of 500-750 kv transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 15
Total Cost Transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 360
Nos. Panels 75
Cost per Pannels etc. (Rs. in Lakh) 4
Total Cost of Pannles (Rs. in Lakh) 300
Total for Electric Network (Rupees in lakhs) 683.11
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 68.31
Grand Total 751.42
Total Cost of Electricity network - Phase I (Option III)
Cost of LT Line Rupees per KM 149000
Total Length (In KM) 11.90
Total Cost of LT line (Rs. in Lakh) 17.73
Nos of 500-750 kv transformer 12
Cost of 500-750 kv transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 15
Total Cost Transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 180
Nos. Panels 38
Cost per Pannels etc. (Rs. in Lakh) 4
Total Cost of Pannles (Rs. in Lakh) 152
Total for Electric Network (Rupees in lakhs) 349.73
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 34.97
Grand Total 384.70
Total Cost of Electricity network - Phase I (Option II)
Cost of LT Line Rupees per KM 149000
Total Length (In KM) 8.91
Total Cost of LT line (Rs. in Lakh) 13.28
Nos of 500-750 kv transformer 7
Cost of 500-750 kv transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 15
Total Cost Transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 105
Nos. Panels 22
Cost per Pannels etc. (Rs. in Lakh) 4
Total Cost of Pannles (Rs. in Lakh) 88
Total for Electric Network (Rupees in lakhs) 206.28
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 20.63
Grand Total 226.90
Total Cost of Electricity network - Phase II (Option II)
Cost of LT Line Rupees per KM 149000
Total Length (In KM) 5.79
Total Cost of LT line (Rs. in Lakh) 8.63
Nos of 500-750 kv transformer 12
Cost of 500-750 kv transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 15
Total Cost Transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 180
Nos. Panels 38
Cost per Pannels etc. (Rs. in Lakh) 4
Total Cost of Pannles (Rs. in Lakh) 152
Total for Electric Network (Rupees in lakhs) 340.63
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 34.06
Grand Total 374.69
Total Cost of Electricity network - Phase II (Option III)
Cost of LT Line Rupees per KM 149000
Total Length (In KM) 5.79
Total Cost of LT line (Rs. in Lakh) 8.63
Nos of 500-750 kv transformer 10
Cost of 500-750 kv transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 15
Total Cost Transformer (Rs. in Lakh) 150
Nos. Panels 31
Cost per Pannels etc. (Rs. in Lakh) 4
Total Cost of Pannles (Rs. in Lakh) 124
Total for Electric Network (Rupees in lakhs) 282.63
Pre - project investigation/Development expenses - 10% of the total 28.26
Grand Total 310.89
Table No.7.51: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network - Option I
Table No.7.52: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network - Phase I (Option II)

Table No.7.53: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network - Phase II (Option II)
Table No.7.54: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network - Phase I (Option III)
Table No.7.55: Total Cost Estimate of Electricity network - Phase II (Option III)
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
Note: 2007 Prices
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Based on certain assumption a


broad infrastructure cost estimate
has been prepared by CEPT.
Total infrastructure cost of
infrastructure facilities for
Shamuka beach area is given
below:
7.1.9 Other infrastructure
facility:
STA also will be facilitating with other
infrastructure facility to provide world
class service to its costumers like:
Well connected with electronics
and communications like
telephone network, mobile
network, Wi-fi internet zone,
satellite TV station (DTH) and
world space radio channel.
Development of artificial drain, sea
beach and riverfront development.
Overall infrastructure
development cost will be 141.64
crores for the project area.

7.2 Off site infrastructure
requirement (Estimates)

Power (upgradation of 33KV
substation along with 2 * 8 MVA
line complete)- Rs. 10 crore

Power (identification of 133 KV
tap points on CISCO grid) by
2012

Construction of Puri By-Pass:


NHAI

Water (5 mt diameter surface
water intake & raw water main
from 5000 mt upstream) - Rs.
10 crore

Disposal of treated sewage Rs.
5 crore



Development of Sea Beach And River
front Area

Length
( In Km)
Rate
(Lakh/km)
Total
Sea beach 2 100 200
River front 2 100 200
Total Cost 400
Pre - project investigation/ Development
expenses - 10% of the total
40
Grand Total 440
Total Infrastructure cost Option - I Option -II Option - III
Phase-I Phase II Phase I Phase-II
Infrastructure Cost for Road 62.86 27.86 20.04 37.44 20.04
Infrastructure Cost for Street Light 2.12 1.20 0.37 1.60 0.37
Infrastructure Cost for Water 13.45 4.59 5.45 11.10 2.86
Infrastructure Cost for Ground water 4.35 - - - -
Infrastructure Cost for Sewerage system 17.15 3.82 6.46 13.19 2.83
Infrastructure Cost for Storm Water System 7.78 3.72 2.40 4.90 2.40
Infrastructure Cost for Solid waste management
system
4.89 4.82 0.05 4.86 0.05
Infrastructure Cost for Electric supply 7.51 2.02 3.75 3.85 3.11
Development cost of Sea Beach And River front Area 4.40 4.40 4.40
Capital cost of Informatory sinages (As per IRC
guidelines)
4.25 2.00 2.00 2.15 2.00
Total Infrastructure Cost 128.76 54.43 40.52 83.49 33.66
Incidental and Instrumental over heads - 10% of the
total
12.88 5.44 4.05 8.35 3.37
Grand total 141.64 59.87 44.57 91.84 37.03
Table No.7.56: Development of Sea Beach and
River front Area

Table No.7.57: Infrastructure Cost Estimates
Note: 2007 Prices
*All figure are in crore
Note: 2007 Prices








2.8 ROOF
2.9 LANDSCAPE
2.10 BOUNDARY WALL
2.11 BUILDING LINE
2.12 MATERIAL
2.13 VERANDAH
2.14 ENTRANCE GATE
2.15 FLOOR HEIGHT
2.16 BASEMENT
2.17 GREEN BUFFER
2.18 FAADE CONTROLS
2.19 PLINTH
2.20 WEATHER SHADES

Part-III Other Rules and regulation for Shamuka
Beach Area
3.1 HOTELS & RESORTS
3.2 STANDARD REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSEUM
3.3 STANDARD REQUIREMENTS FOR INSTITUTION
3.4 GENERAL RULES ON THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF
TOURISM-RELATED ESTABLISHMENT



Annexure
AnnexureI Costal area classification and development
regulations
Annexure-II Guidelines for development of beach
resorts/hotels in the designated areas of
CRZ-III for temporary occupation of
tourist/visitors, with prior approval of the
ministry of environment & forests.
Annexure-III Tourism Development / Planning guidelines
Annexure-IV EIA Notification
Annexure-V Plot Level Guidelines










8.1 Urban Design Guidelines
8.1.1 COURTYARD
8.1.2 TERRACE AND ENTRANCE PORCH
8.1.3 ROOF
8.1.4 VERANDAH
8.1.5 ENTRANCE GATE
8.1.6 COMPOUND WALL - HOTEL
8.1.7 COMPOUND WALL - GURUKUL
8.1.8 COMPOUND WALL - VILLAS
8.1.9 PARKING
8.1.10 BASEMENT
8.1.11 HEIGHT OF THE BUILDING
8.1.12 BUILDING WIDTH

8.2 Development control Regulation
Part-I Existing Development regulation
1.1 GENERAL BUILDING REQUIREMENT
1.2 FLOOR AREA RATIO (F.A.R.)
1.3 GROUND COVERAGE
1.4 HEIGHT
1.5 SETBACKS OR OPEN SPACES
1.6 BUILDING LINE
1.7 OFF-STREET PARKING SPACE
1.8 ROOFS
1.9 BOUNDARY WALL
1.10 PLANTATION
1.11 MATERIAL

Part-II Special development control regulations
2.1 FLOOR AREA RATIO
2.2 GROUND COVERAGE
2.3 SETBACK & OPEN SPACES
2.4 HEIGHT OF THE BUILDING
2.5 LENGTH AND WIDTH OF THE BUILDING
2.6 PARKING
2.7 MEANS OF ACCESS

Chapter VIII
Urban Design Guideline
&
Development control Regulation
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8.1. Urban Design Guidelines
15m x 15m.
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FINAL MASTER PLAN: SHAMUKA BEACH AREA Chapter VIII : Urban Design Guideline & DCR

CEPT, Ahmedabad 116

FINAL MASTER PLAN: SHAMUKA BEACH AREA Chapter VIII : Urban Design Guideline & DCR

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FINAL MASTER PLAN: SHAMUKA BEACH AREA Chapter VIII : Urban Design Guideline & DCR

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INTRODUCTION
The Special Development Control Regulation has been proposed for
Shamuka Beach Area, Puri. This includes regulations for Hotels, Convention
centre, Riverside development of condos and villas, Social infrastructure like
housing, housing for Economically weaker section (EWS), hospitality
institute, Golf course and Golf villas.

Part-I
Existing Development Control Regulation
The existing guidelines, explained in Development Control Regulation (DCR) for
this area are given below:
1.1. General building requirement
Without prejudice to any other stipulation in these Regulations, no
permission to construct a building on a site shall be granted :
1.1.1. In areas of natural waterways or drains, as detailed in the
Development Plan, and the drainage plan prepared and approved
by the authority or Government or as modified by them to time;
1.1.2. If the orientation of such building is not in harmony with the
surroundings, as may be decided by the Art Commission;
1.1.3. If the use to which the site is proposed to be put does not
confirm to the use earmarked in the Development Plan;
1.1.4. If the building is to be constructed over or under a municipal
drain, sewerage line, electric line, water main, any other
government or public land, or public utility services;
1.1.5. If the foundation of the external wall along a street is located at a
distance less than 0.5 metre from the edge of the street or road
margin including the drain;
1.1.6. If the construction of proposed building thereon is for public
worship, which in the opinion of the Authority will adversely
affect, the religious feelings of any other class or persons in the
vicinity;
1.1.7. If the site does not have proper drainage or incapable of a good
drainage system;
1.1.8. If the use of the proposed site is for the purpose of establishing
factory, where house or work place which may cause annoyance
and hazard to the health of the inhabitants of the neighborhood;
1.1.9. If the proposed development is likely to obstruct the natural
drainage of the area.
1.1.10. The area is earmarked as sweet water zone in the development
plan or as notified by the Govt. of Orissa.
1.1.11. The area is located in No development zone of Coastal Regulation
Zone.

1.2. Floor Area Ratio (F.A.R.)
1.2.1. The maximum Floor Area Ratio for Group housing project shall be
2.00.
1.2.2. For residential building, where a plot abut a road less than
4.0metres, the maximum coverage may be restricted to 40% with
FAR of 0.80 and where road width is less than 2.4metres no
permission shall be granted.
1.2.3. In case of row housing, FAR shall not be allowed to exceed 1.50 for
row houses.
1.2.4. Where sites for residential and commercial buildings do not face or
abut a road of the required width described under above clauses
front setback and the coverage of the building shall be regulated
according to the size of the plot, but height and floor area ratio shall
be regulated according to the width of the road along the concerned
site is located. The coverage shall be reduced for the plots abutting
roads of lower width.




Activity
Floor Area Ratio
(F.A.R.)
Convention Centre 2.0
Hotels 2.0
Villas & condominium 2.0
Hospitality Institute 1.75
High street Bazaar 2.0
Art & Craft museum 1.75
Gurukuls & workshops 1.75
Social Infrastructure housing 2.0
EWS 2.0
Golf Villas 2.0
Table no. 8.1 Floor area ratio
8.2. Development Control Regulation
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1.3. Ground coverage
1.3.1. The maximum permissible coverage in respect of group
housing shall be 50%.
1.3.2. For row houses the ground coverage shall not be allowed to
exceed 66%.
1.3.3. For institutional building, additional 5% coverage on the
ground floor may be allowed for covered garage for car & cycle
parking which shall not be considered for calculating FAR.

1.4. Height
1.4.1. For buildings of less than 15 metres height to be used for
institutional, educational and assembly.
1.4.2. The height of the building shall be governed by the limitation
of Floor Area Ratio, open space (setbacks), and the width of
the road facing the plot described as detailed below:
A. The maximum height of the building shall in no case exceed
1.5.times the width of the road to which the plot abuts plus
front setback provided
B. If the building abuts on two or more streets of different width
of the building shall be deemed to face upon the street that
the greater width and the height of the building shall be
regulated by the width of the street.
1.4.3. Roof tanks and their supports, not exceeding 1 (one) metre
height, ventilation, air-conditioning, lift-room and similar set
of equipment, stair cover, not exceeding 3(three) metres in
height, chimney other than barsaties, parapet wall and
architectural features including terrace, gardening, plants not
exceeding 1.5 metres in height. It shall not be included in the
height of the building, provided aggregate area of such
structure including barsati shall not exceed one third of the
floor area of the building upon which they are erected.

1.5. Setbacks or open spaces
1.5.1. In commercial building, for every additional floor above two
floors for plots above 100 sqm, the front, side and rear
setbacks shall be increased by at least 0.5 metres.













Activity Ground coverage
Convention Centre 50%
Hotels 50%
Villas & condominium 50%
Hospitality Institute 30%
High street Bazaar 50%
Art & Craft museum 30%
Gurukuls & workshops 30%
Social Infrastructure housing 50%
EWS 50%
Activity
Setbacks
Front
Left
side
Right
side
Rear side
Convention Centre 5.0 3.0 3.0 3.5
Hotels 6.0 2.0 3.0 2.5
Villas & condominium 6.0 2.0 3.0 2.5
Hospitality Institute 12.0 3.2 3.0 3.0
High street Bazaar 5.0 3.0 3.0 3.5
Art & Craft museum 12.0 3.0 3.0 3.0
Gurukuls & workshops 12.0 3.2 3.0 3.0
Social Infrastructure housing 6.0 2.0 3.0 2.5
EWS 6.0 2.0 3.0 2.5
Golf Villas 6.0 2.0 3.0 2.5
Activity Maximum Height (in metre)
Hotels 15 or above
Villas & condominium 15 or above
Hospitality Institute 15
Gurukuls & workshops 15
Table no. 8.2 Ground Coverage
Table no. 8.3 Building Height
Table no. 8.4 Setback and open spaces
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1.5.2. At least one side of all the rooms intended for human
habitation, if such room does not abut on the front or the rear
side setbacks, shall abut on an interior open space whose
minimum dimension shall be 3 metres x 3 metres in cases of
buildings up to a height of 10 metres. In cases where the
height of the building is more than 10 metres, the width of the
interior open space shall be increased rate of nine metre for
every additional 3 (three) metres height. The provision shall
be applicable to all categories of buildings, residential, group
housing, commercial, public, semi-public industrial.

1.6. Building Line
The following building lines shall be maintained for construction
of building abutting arterial roads:-
1.7. Off street parking space
1.7.1. Each off-street parking for one four wheeled vehicle shall not
be less than 15 square metres. For scooters and cycles it shall
not be less than 1.5 and 1.0 square metre respectively.
1.7.2. One parking unit shall have parking space of at least 40
square metre.
1.7.3. In addition to the off-street parking spaces required to be
provided for building to be used for commercial, industrial or
storage purposes, additional parking space at the rate of one
such space for each 1000 square metres of floor area or
fraction thereof exceeding the first 200 square metre of floor
space, shall be provided for loading and unloading activities.
1.7.4. Garage with locking facilities shall be included in the
calculation of floor space for determining the requirement of
parking space, unless this is provided in the basement of a
building or under a building constructed on stilts with no
external walls. The parking spaces to be provided shall be in
addition to the open spaces (setback) required around a
building under these Regulations. However, one row of car
parking may be provided in the front open space and one row
of scooter or motor cycle parking may be provided in any one
of the side open space without reducing the clear vehicular
access way to less than 6.0 metres.
1.8. Roofs
1.8.1. The roof of a building shall be so constructed or framed as to
permit effectual drainage of the rain water from there which
means sufficient rain water pipes of adequate size, wherever
required, so arranged, joined and fixed so as to ensure that
the rain water is carried away from the building without
causing dampness in any part of wall or foundation of building
or those of an adjacent building and also without causing
annoyance or an inconvenience to neighbours or passers-by.
1.8.2. The Authority may require rain water pipe to be connected to
a drain or sewer or to a covered channel formed beneath the
public footpath or to the road gutter on in any other approved
manner, without causing any damage to the property of the
Authority or the Urban Local Body.

Type of use One parking unit shall be provided for every
Commercial
140 square metres of floor space or
proportion there of
Hotels 6 guest-rooms or proportional thereof
Multi-family dwelling 3 dwelling unitsor part thereof
Institutional
140 square metres of floor space or
proportion thereof
Religious/ Assembly
140 square metres of floor space or
proportion thereof
Category of arterial roads
Minimum distance of the
building line from R/W
of the road
18.0 metres (60 feet) 3.0 metres (10 feet)
24.0 metres (80 feet) 4.0 metres (13 feet)
Above 24.0 metres (above 80 feets) 4.5 metres (15 feet)
Table no. 8.5 Building line
Table no. 8.6 Off street parking space
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1.8.3. Rain water pipes shall be affixed to the outside of the external
walls of the building or in recesses formed in such external
walls or in such other manner as may be approved by the
Authority.
1.8.4. The rain water and household waste water shall be channeled
to the road side drain and in no case the same shall be
allowed to flow into the neighboring plot. The Authority shall
have the power to require the owner to undertake drainage
work as deemed necessary at the owner's own expense.

1.9. Boundary wall
1.9.1. Except with the special permission of the Authority the
maximum height of the compound wall shall not be more than
1.5 metres above the centre line of the front street.
1.9.2. The rear and side walls shall not be more than 2.2 metres in
height above the centre line of the service road in case it
exists, shall not be more than two metres in height above the
centre line of the front street.
1.9.3. ln case of a corner plot, the height of the boundary wall
abutting the road shall be restricted to 0.75 metre for a length
of 5 metres on the front and side of the intersections and the
remaining height upto 1.5 metres shall be made up of railings
to increase visibility.
1.9.4. However, the provisions of above clauses are not applicable to
boundary wall of jails, senatorial factories and educational
institutions, like schools, colleges including the hostels,
institutional and assembly buildings.
1.9.5. No building boundaries shall be surrounded by a barbed wire
fence, unless a green hedge is provided along it.

1.10. Plantation
In every building area, at least 10% of the land shall be utilised for
plantation. The plantation shall be completed by the time, the
construction of the building is completed.
1.11. Material
1.11.1. The provisions of these regulations are not intended to prevent
the use of any material or method of design to construct not
specifically prescribed by these regulations, provided such
alternative has been approved.
1.11.2. The Authority may approve any such alternative if it is found that
the proposed alternative is satisfactory and conform to the
provision of relevant parts of this regulation regarding material,
design and construction and that material method of work
offered is, for the purpose intended, at least equivalent to that
prescribed in these regulations with regard to effectiveness fire
and water resistance, durability and safety requirements.

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Part-II
Special Development Control Regulations for Shamuka
Beach Area

There are certain guidelines for such development in existing DCR but they do
not justify some of the issues which are very important for such kind of
development in Coastal Regulation Zone. This special DCR covers those issues.
Other issues which are not explained here in those sectors development will be
laid as per the existing DCR.

2.1. Floor Area Ratio (F.A.R.)








2.1.1. Hotels:
A. Security tower, Pavilions are considered as a part of landscape
feature and will be free from FAR.
B. Size of these pavilions should not exceed 5m x 5m and 4 in
numbers.
C. Hotels having plot area or more than 10 acre shall be considered
as of Type A and rest shall be of Type-B.
D. Only one security tower for security purpose is permitted to be
constructed and is allowed to be within the margin space with a
maximum size of 3.6m x 3.6m and maximum height of 15m.
Tower can be used for other purpose also.






2.1.2. Arts & Craft Museum: Jharokhas and covered galleries are
considered as architectural features and will be free of FAR.
2.1.3. Shopping Mall: Covered gallery of single storey height facing the
street bazaar will be free from FAR.
2.1.4. Covered parking and garage will be free from FAR.
2.1.5. Pavilions and other landscape features will be free from FAR and
Ground coverage but the permissible size of it is 3.6m X 3.6m.

2.2. Ground Coverage








2.2.1. Shopping mall: The building should have minimum 6m wide covered
gallery with a single storey height facing the street bazaar which shall
not be considered for ground coverage.
2.2.2. Entrance Porch/ Portico shall not be considered for calculating the
ground coverage and F.A.R.




Activity Floor Area
Ratio
Hotels Type A (Plot area more than 10 acre) 0.5
Hotel Type B (Plot area less than 10 acre) 0.75
Convention centre with supporting hotel 0.5
Riverside development Condominium
& villas
0.75
Shamuka Village 0.5
Art & Craft Museum 0.5
Social infrastructure housing 1.0
Hospitality institute 0.5
Golf villas 0.5
Activity Ground Coverage
Hotels 25%
Convention centre with supporting hotel 25%
Riverside development Villas &
Condominium
25%
Art & Craft museum 30%
Gurukul 30%
Shopping mall 30%
Social infrastructure housing 30%
Hospitality institute 25%
Golf Villas 15%
Table no. 8.7 Floor area ratio
Table no. 8.8 Ground coverage
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2.3. Setbacks or open spaces
2.3.1. Hotels :
A. The hotel type A will have two front setbacks of 15m each hence
the total setback will be 30m. The first 15m setback abutting the
loop road should be developed for low height landscaping and
visitors parking. The compound wall is permitted only after the
first setback line. The building is permitted to be constructed from
the second setback of 15m from the first setback line. The first
setback space will be maintained by the owner of the plot.
C. In case of B type of hotels the first 12m back setback should be
left for service road and boundary wall must be constructed from
this line. The next 8m setbacks should be left for building and is
considered from the compound wall.
D. Sides facing the river or sea shall have minimum setback of
3.0m.
E. The minimum size of the open to sky courtyard should be 20m x
15m.
2.3.2. Convention centre: 15m setback should be left on all the sides of
the plot.
2.3.3. Shopping mall: The front setback facing the road shall be of 12m.
The central space between buildings if covered should not exceed
40m span and the roof shall be covered with shell roof in steel truss
or other light weight structure.
2.3.4. Gurukul:
A. Plots facing the road on front and back both the sides shall be
considered as B-type and others as A type.
B. At the ground level the front setback facing the main street,
should be 12m.
C. Building should be designed as per courtyard typology and the
minimum courtyard size shall be 15m x 15m.
2.3.5. Social Infrastructure housing : Typology of the cluster should be
of open/closed courtyard type and the minimum size of the
courtyard shall be 10mx10m.

2.4. Height of the building
2.4.1. Hotel: In the zone of Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) the height of
the building should not exceed 9m. Additional 6m height is
permitted for architectural feature and sloping roof in the zone
outside CRZ. On back side of the plot, only single floor is permitted
within the area of 50m from the property line.
2.4.2. Golf Club: The height of Golf Club building should not exceed 12m.
2.4.3. Shopping Mall: The height of the shopping mall building should not
be more than 12m. The additional 6m height is permitted for
architectural features and sloping roof of the building. Only shell
roof/sloping roof is permitted to cover the central open space with
the rise of 5m.

Activity
Setbacks (in metres) Courtyard
Size (in
metres
Front side Left side Right side Rear side
Hotels A type 30.0 15.0 15.0 6.0 20 x 15
Hotel B type 9.0 6.0 6.0 20.0 20 x 15
Convention centre
with supporting
hotel
15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0 -
Riverside
development
Villas &
Condominium
6.0 6.0 6.0 3.0 -
Gurukul A type 12.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 15 x 15
Gurukul B type 12.0 6.0 6.0 12.0 15 x 15
Shopping mall 12.0 12.0 6.0 12.0 -
Arts & Craft
museum
12.0 12.0 3.0 3.0 -
Social
infrastructure
housing
6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 15 x 15
Hospitality institute 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 15 x 15
Golf Villas
7.0
On road
side
10.0
Distance between two
buildings
10.0
On golf
course
side

-
Table no. 8.9 Setback and open space
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2.4.4. River side development (Condominiums & Villas): For
condominiums total height permitted is 12m and restricted to 3 floors
considering ground and first floor as one level apartment and second
floor as a penthouse duplex. In case of villas 9m height is permitted.
2.4.5. The permissible height of the building falling in CRZ zone is 9m and
restricted to 2 floors, which includes the height of sloping roof.
2.4.6. Stair cabin, roof tank, lift-room and similar set of equipment should
not exceed 6m in height. Maximum permissible height of architectural
features is 12m from the roof slab.

2.5. Length & Width of building
2.5.1. The maximum length of a building shall be 40m. The building should
recess if to continue with minimum recess width of 10m and recess
depth of 5m.
2.5.2. Minimum distance between two buildings must be 10m.
2.5.3. Social infrastructure housing: The maximum width of the block
should be 30m.
2.5.4. Golf Villas : The maximum width of the dwelling unit should be 18m
which does not include parking space .
2.6. Parking



























The following are standard space requirements of some typical vehicles.
These may be used as basic minimum reference values but different layouts
such as parallel, herringbone and in-line, have slightly different overall space
requirements and detailed layout of parking spaces will be site specific.
Car 2.4 metres x 4.8 metres
Light Vans 2.4 metres x 5.5 metres
Coaches (60 seats) 3.5 metres x 14.0 metres
Activity Maximum height & floors
Hotels 12 m and 3 floors for Non-CRZ
Convention centre with supporting
hotel
15 m Height and 3 floors
Additional 10m for
architectural features
Riverside development
Villas & Condominium
14 m height and 3 floors for condos,
8m and two floors for villas
Gurukul
8 m and 2 floors
Shopping mall
12 m and 3 floors
Arts & Craft museum
12 m Height and 3 floors
Additional 6m for
architectural features
Social infrastructure housing 14 m and 4 floors
Hospitality institute 12 m and 3 free floors
Golf Course-Club House 12 m and 3 floors
Golf Villas 8 m and 2 floors
Note: All the heights given in table shall not include the height of the sloping roof.
Activity Parking
Hotels
1 car space per bedroom, plus
restaurant, functionroom,
conference and bar at 1 car space
per 5 m2 GFA. Resident staff at 1
space per 3 staff on duty
Convention centre with supporting hotel 2 car space per 3 seats
Riverside
development
Villas &
Condominium
Dwelling unit of 2 beds 1 car space per dwelling unit
Dwelling unit of 3 beds 2 car space per dwelling unit
Gurukul 1 car space per 20 sqm GFA
Shopping mall
1 car space per 20 sqm GFA
Arts & Craft museum
1 space per 30 m2 GFA plus 1 car
space per 3 staff
Social infrastructure housing 1 two-wheeler space per 1du
Hospitality institute
1 car space per teaching staff,
1 space per 2 ancillary staff,
1 space per 4 students,
One third of total staff
provision for visitors
Golf Course-Club house
1 car space per 3 Staff ,
4 spaces per hole for
Players, Bar and restaurant to be
assessed separately 1 spaces
per bay for a golf driving range
Golf
Villas
Dwelling unit of 2 beds 1 car space per dwelling unit
Dwelling unit of 3 beds 2 car space per dwelling unit
Note : Key word GFA refers to Gross Floor area
Table no. 8.10 Building height
Table no. 8.11 Parking
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2.6.1. Convention centre: Two car spaces per three seats for the fixed
seating area. For the other flexible space of the plan, there shall be
one car space per 3 sqm of conference areas and for exhibition hall
one car space per 6 sq.m.
2.6.2. Hotel :
A. One car space per bedroom. Additional parking shall be provided
with respect of restaurants and public bar areas and where
conference facilities are provided there shall be additional
provision of 2 car space per three seats. 1 car space for Staff
parking shall be provided per 40 sq.m. of public area for non-
residential staff.
B. Visitors parking should be provided within the front setback of
15m width from the property line.
2.6.3. Single storey covered parking is permitted in plot area and within the
side setbacks.
2.6.4. Upto 30% of the total parking provided on the ground can be
covered with four side or two sided sloping roof.

2.7. Means of access
2.7.1. Hotels: There should be two entries to the plot in which the main
entry is permitted from the Loop road at the centre of the plot while
the service entry is permitted from the service roads, lying on the
sides of the plot.
2.7.2. Convention centre: It should have two entries but none of them is
permitted from the 30m wide loop road. Both are allowed from 24m
wide road lying on the side of the plot and not within the distance of
50m from the junction of 30m wide loop road and 24m wide road.
2.7.3. Gurukul: Main entry is permitted from the main road abutting the
street bazaar and secondary entry must be from the sides of the plot.

2.8. Roof
2.8.1. Roof of the building should be slopping with four sided or two sided
slope. In case of Hotel, Convention centre and Gurukul slopping roofs
with cladding tiles will constitute at least 75% of the total roof area
while in case of Condominiums, villas and infrastructure housing it
should be 80%.
2.8.2. Angle of the roof must be between 30 to 45 with the projection as
given below :
Single Storey - 1.5m
Two Storey - 2.0m
Three Storey - 2.5m
Four storey - 2.5m
2.8.3. In all the cases it should confirm to vernacular style of architecture
with urban components with slopping tiled roofing.
2.8.4. No cantilever projections are allowed and terraces are permitted on
the internal side at the intermediate level of the building. Entrance
Porch/ Portico must have two or four sided slopping roof.
2.8.5. Convention centre should have slopping roof with an angle of 25 and
projections of it should be between 3m to 5m.
2.8.6. All the components provided on the roof like stair cabins , over head
tanks and towers must have a slopping roof.
2.8.7. The height of the sloping roof is additional to the permissible height
of the building only outside the zone of CRZ and will be free of FAR.
2.8.8. Roof of the parking must be sloping with two or four side slope and
angle of 20.

2.9. Landscape: All the open space within the plot area should be
landscaped adequately.

2.10. Boundary wall
2.10.1. Hotels: It should be constructed after the first setback of 15m from
the property line. Compound wall should be of local stone i.e. finely
dressed laterite /sandstone etc with stone/ concrete coping and will
be 1.35m height. Beyond the 1.35m high compound wall, fencing
by use of creepers is permissible upto a total height of 2m from the
compound wall. Outer side surface of compound wall must have a
low height shrub plantation in stepped manner. Visitor's parking
should be at a distance of 11m from the compound wall with a hard
paving. On the back side facing the sea or river, compound wall is
not permitted.
2.10.2. Gurukul: Entire plot will have a perimeter wall up to 3m height
with windows, jallis and Jharokas. Compound wall must be
constructed from the setback line.
2.10.3. Street bazaar: No boundary wall is permitted to be constructed.
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2.10.4. Villas: Compound wall is not permitted. Only a 0.3m height curb
wall with proper low height landscaping is permitted.
2.10.5. The coping of the wall must be sloping with the projection of 0.2m.
2.10.6. The compound wall can have punctures upto 25% of the total
surface area.

2.11. Building line
2.11.1. Gurukul: The building can be constructed on or from the front
setback line at a distance of 12m from the property line on the front
side and on other sides construction can be started on or from the
compound wall.
2.11.2. Golf Villas: On the Golf course side, Building must be constructed
at 10m from the property line.
2.11.3. For other cases building can be constructed on or from the setback
line.

2.12. Material
2.12.1. All the cases shall confirm vernacular style of architecture with
urban components, integrated stone flooring, mud and stone for
walls, wooden frame windows with glazing and plastered walls with
permanent paint.
2.12.2. The local construction technologies and materials are permitted to
achieve traditional features of Orissa.
2.12.3. Continuous glass faade is not permitted, only small openings with
glass windows are permitted to achieve the traditional character.


2.13. Verandah
2.12.4. Buildings are allowed to have verandahs on the courtyard side.
2.12.5. 50% of the total area of verandah is free from F.A.R. and Ground
Coverage.
2.12.6. Width of the verandah should be as given below:
Width Max. Height
Single Storey 3.0m 3.0m
Two Storey 3.0m to 5.0m 3.0m
Three Storey 3.0m to 5.0m Double height
2.14. Entrance Gate
2.14.1. Hotel : Entrance Gate structure must have an access of 4m for
each entry and exit. Minimum Clear height should be 6.0m. There
must be a cabin of maximum 3.0m x 3.0m in size at one side of the
gate. On the other side of the gate, pedestrian entry is permitted.
Gate must have a steel or wooden truss with tiled roof. Gate must
have two side or four side sloping roof. The projection of the roof
from supports should be minimum 1.5m and for cabin it should be
minimum 0.6m. Cabin should have a minimum plinth height of
0.6m. Cabin should have an opening of minimum 0.9m x 1.1m.
2.14.2. Gurukul: Entrance Gate structure is not permitted but there must
be an access of 5m. There must be a cabin of maximum 3.0m x
3.0m in size at one side of access.

2.15. Floor height
2.15.1. Minimum top to top height should be 3.25m except the double
height spaces and for Social infrastructure housing it should be
minimum 3.0m.

2.16. Basement
2.16.1. Basement is allowed only in the zone outside CRZ and 50% of the
total ground coverage, within the building line but not permitted for
Social infrastructure housing. The minimum height of the basement
should be 2.85m.

2.17. Green Buffer
2.17.1. Green buffer provided on the periphery of the golf course, in front
of convention centre and hotels of B type and Public park will be
taken care and maintained by Authority.

2.18. Faade controls
2.18.1. Hotel :
A. 25% of the faade area can have openings and punctures with a
maximum opening size of 2.0m x 2.0m.
B. Only on the internal courtyard side buildings can have larger
opening with glass cover.
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2.18.2. Gurukul :
A. The entire plot will have a perimeter wall with windows, jallis,
jharokhas and building should start from this wall on the front and
25% of the total faade area is being allowed to have openings and
the maximum size of it shall be 1.5m x 1.5m.
2.18.3. Convention Centre : It can have larger openings with a maximum
size of 2.5m x 2.5m and 25% of the total faade area.
2.18.4. Condominiums & villas: Building should have smaller openings to
achieve the character of Orrisa and the maximum size of the
opening shall be 1.5m x 1.5m.
2.18.5. Social infrastructure housing: The maximum size of openings
shall be 1.2m x 0.9m.
2.18.6. The maximum length of one facade should be 40m. Minimum recess
depth should be 5m and width should be 10m.

2.19. Plinth
2.19.1. Minimum plinth should be 0.3m in all the building except the
convention centre. The minimum plinth height for convention centre
should be 0.6m.

2.20. Weather shades
2.20.1. Weather shades are permitted to cover the openings with a
projection of 0.6m and sloping roof.




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Part -III
Other Rules and regulations for
Shamuka Beach Area
3.1. Hotels & Resorts
3.1.1. Purpose and Intent.
The intent of the Hotel/Resort Campus is to provide opportunities for
overnight accommodations and recreational amenities in a campus
setting with significant open space preserves.
3.1.2. Uses.
In this area, no building, structure, or premises shall be used or
arranged or designed to be used, and no building or structure shall
be hereafter erected, reconstructed, or altered, unless otherwise
provided in this chapter, except for the following permitted uses or
specially permitted uses and their customary accessory uses:
A. Permitted Uses
Bed and breakfast establishments
Country inn
Country club
Recreational / sporting club with or without clubhouse
B. Special Permit Uses
Resorts on parcels of at least thirty (30) acres in size and which
shall include:
a. Health spas
b. Hotels with or without docking facilities
C. Accessory uses
Accessory uses shall include those uses customarily incidental to
any of the above permitted uses or specially permitted uses when
located on the same lot.
Specifically permitted are the following:
Art galleries
Retail stores and personal service shops, as accessory to a hotel
use and enclosed within the hotel building, and intended to serve
guests only. Such accessory shall not exceed ten (10) percent of
the total floor area of rooms provided.


Recreational facilities, including equestrian facilities, accessory to
and restricted to resort guests
Catering halls and restaurants, when accessory to a hotel, not to
exceed a total of three-hundred (300) seats.
Tavern, not to exceed fifty (50) seats.
D. Prohibited uses
Motels
Hotel units converted to condominiums

3.1.3. Lot, yard, bulk, & height requirements.
A. No buildings shall be erected nor any lot or land area utilized
unless in conformity with the Zoning Schedule incorporated into
this chapter by reference and made a part hereof with the same
force and effect as if such requirements were herein set forth in
full as specified in said schedule, except as may be hereafter
specifically modified.
B. In order to foster environmental conservation as well as
preservation of the Towns scenic and rural quality, all properties
shall provide a contiguous open space area equal to at least
seventy (70) percent of the lot area, to be designed as follows:
At least fifty (50) percent of such open space areas shall be
planted with native species or left in its undisturbed natural form
in order to enhance the appearance and function of the tidal
wetlands and other native habitats.
The remaining open space portion on the property shall be
attractively landscaped with lawns, shrubs, flowerbeds, or non-
impervious recreation areas.
3.1.4. Supplementary requirements
The following design and parking requirements shall apply:
A. Design Standards
Driveway openings and curb cuts shall be aligned with the
existing curb cuts along major arterial roads, in order to reduce
the potential addition of traffic lights and conflicting turning
movements.

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In order to protect the health of the waterways, the use of lawns
and other plantings which rely on fertilizers and herbicides is
strongly discouraged along areas bordering waterfronts.
B. Buffering and Transitions.
Resort developments shall provide dense natural or landscaped
buffers along borders with other properties. Buffer planting is not
required along waterfront borders.
C. Parking Standards
Curb cuts to parking lots shall be minimized by sharing
driveways and consolidating entrances for access to adjacent
parking lots.
Planted berms shall be used to screen the view of automobiles
from public roadways.
Internal roads shall be set back at least thirty (30) feet from side
property lines for resort developments.
In order to soften the appearance of parking lots, parking lots
shall be landscaped with ground cover, grasses, or low shrubs for
at least 15 percent of their land area. This landscaping
requirement is in addition to the 70 percent parcel wide
landscaping mentioned above.
Parking lots with twenty-one (21) or more spaces shall have
orchard planting for shade: 1 tree per 10 off-street spaces.
Such trees shall be spread throughout the parking lot, rather
than clustered only along the edges.
In order to provide groundwater recharge and minimize runoff,
at least one of the following stormwater management techniques
shall be used in parking lots where underlying soils support
infiltration of precipitation to the groundwater:
Entire parking areas shall be surfaced with gravel, rather
than pavement.
Landscaped areas of the parking lot shall be sited, planted,
and graded in a manner to provide infiltration and
detention of runoff from paved areas.
Large areas of surface parking shall be broken up by landscaped
walkways connecting sidewalks and parking areas to business
entrances.

3.2. Standard requirement for Museum
Minimum facilities. For purpose of Classification, the following are the
minimum requirements for the operation of a Museum.

3.2.1. Membership The institution shall be a member of the National
Committee on Museums.
3.2.2. Location The locality and environs including approaches shall be
pleasant with proper ingress and egress. The faade and
architectural features shall be appropriately designed.
3.2.3. Parking area An adequate and secured parking space for
customers shall be made available.
3.2.4. Security Adequate security shall be provided at all times.
3.2.5. Reception A well-informed receptionist shall be available to
usher in guests. A waiting lounge with telephone shall be provided.
3.2.6. Conference/ Auditorium There shall be a conference and/ or
auditorium provided with audio-visual equipment and made
available to the public.
3.2.7. Library There shall be a library adequately equipped and made
available to the public.
3.2.8. Public washrooms There shall be an adequate and accessible
toilet facilities provided separately for male and female. Toiletries
shall likewise be provided.

3.3. Standard requirements for Institution
Section 1:Minimum requirements. For purpose of Classification, the
following are the minimum requirements for the operation and
maintenance of a Institution.

3.3.1. Physical requirement
Size of classroom The classroom shall be able to accommodate a
minimum of twenty (20) trainees per class. For purposes of
workshop, the floor area shall be at a minimum of 1.5 square metres
per trainee.
Lighting and ventilation Lighting and ventilation fixtures shall be so
designed to ensure an atmosphere conducive to training. A stand-by
generator shall be made available.
Restrooms There shall be separate male and female restrooms.
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Refreshment/Dinning There shall be a refreshment/ dining area
accessible to the trainees.
Classroom facilities, equipment and supplies The centre shall be
provided with classroom with complete basic facilities, equipment and
supplies needed in conducting a program.
Workshop - Facilities and Equipment depending on the training
program/s being offered, there shall be adequate supply of the
appropriate facilities and equipment.
Reading area There shall be a reading room adequately provided
with relevant reference materials, books, journal, magazines and the
like.
Other support facilities- There shall be tool/storage facilities provided.

3.4. General rules on the operation and maintenance of
tourism-related establishment
3.4.1. Fire-fighting facilities. Fire-fighting facilities shall be provided in
accordance with the rules and regulations and Fire fighting norms of
India.
3.4.2. Maintenance. All facilities of the establishment concerned shall be
properly maintained at all times. A periodic vermin control program
shall be conducted.
3.4.3. Air-condition/ventilation. All enclosed areas of the establishment
concerned shall be fully air-conditioned or well-ventilated.
3.4.4. Prohibited acts and practices.
No pets or animals shall be allowed
Ambulant vendors shall be prohibited from peddling their wares
within the premises.
All forms of gambling, drunkenness or disorderly conduct of any kind
shall be prohibited in the establishments and within its immediate
premises.




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Annexure I
Coastal area classification and development Regulations

Classification of Coastal Regulation Zone:
For regulating development activities, the coastal stretches within 500 m of
High Tide Line of the landward side are classified into four categories, namely:

Category I (CRZ-I):
(i) Areas that are ecologically sensitive and important, such as, national parks/
marine parks, sanctuaries, reserved forests, wildlife habitats, mangroves,
corals/ coral reefs, areas close to breeding and spawning grounds of fish
and other marine life, areas of outstanding natural beauty/ historical/
heritage areas, areas rich in genetic diversity, areas likely to be inundated
due to rise in sea level consequent upon global warming and such other
areas as may be declared by the Central Government or the concerned
authorities at the State/ Union Territory level from time to time.
(ii) Area between the Low Tide Line and the High Tide Line.

Category- II (CRZ-II):
The areas that have already been developed upto or close to the shoreline. For
this purpose, developed area is referred to as that area within the municipal
limits or in other legally designated urban areas which is already substantially
built up and which has been provided with drainage and approach roads and
other infrastructural facilities, such as, water supply and sewerage mains.

Category- III (CRZ-III):
Areas that are relatively undisturbed and those which do not belong to either
Category-I or II. These will include coastal zone in the rural areas (developed
and undeveloped) and also areas within municipal limits or in other legally
designated urban areas which are not substantially built up.

Category-IV (CRZ-IV):
Coastal stretches in the Andaman and Nicobar, Lakshadweep and small islands
except those designated as CRZ-I, CRZ-II or CRZ-III.
Norms for Regulation of Activities
CRZ-III
(i) The area upto 200 metres from the HTL is to be earmarked as 'No
Development Zone'. No construction shall be permitted within this
zone except for repairs of existing authorised structures not
exceeding existing FSI, existing plinth area and existing density.
However, the following uses may be permissible in this zone-
agriculture, horticulture, garden pastures, parks, play fields,
forestry and salt manufacture from sea water.
(ii) Development of vacant plots between 200 and 500 metres of High
Tide Line in designated areas of CRZ-III with prior approval of
Ministry of Environment and Forests (MEF) permitted for
construction of hotels/beach resorts for temporary occupation of
tourists/visitors subject to the conditions as stipulated in the
guidelines at Annexure-II.
(iii) Construction/reconstruction of dwelling units between 200 and 500
metres of the HTL permitted so as far as it is within the ambit of
traditional rights and customary uses such as existing fishing
villages and gaothans. Building permission for such
construction/reconstruction will be subject to the conditions that the
total number of dwelling unit shall not be more than twice the
number of existing units, total covered area on all floors shall not
exceed 33 percent of the plot size; the overall height of construction
shall not exceed 9 metres and construction shall not be more than 2
floors (ground floor plus one floor).
(iv) Reconstruction/alterations of an existing authorised building
permitted subject to (i) to (iii) above.





















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Annexure II
Guidelines for development of beach resorts/hotels in the
designated areas of CRZ-III for temporary occupation of
tourist/visitors, with prior approval of the ministry of environment
& forests.

(1) Construction of beach resorts/hotels with prior approval of MoEF in the
designated areas of CRZ-III for temporary occupation of tourists/visitors
shall be subject to the following conditions:

(i) The project proponent shall not undertake any construction within 200
metres in the land-ward side from the High Tide Line and within the
area between the Low Tide and High Tide Lines:
Provided that the Central Government may, after taking into account
geographical features and overall Coastal Zone Management Plans,
and for reasons to be recorded in writing, permit any construction
subject to such conditions and restrictions as it may deem fit;

Provided further that construction for the purpose of tourism
development may be permitted beyond 50 mts on the landward side
of the High Tide Line in the Union Territories of the Andaman and
Nicobar Islands and Lakshadweep Islands based on integrated coastal
zone management study conducted by the Ministry of Environment &
Forests by itself or through any agency authorised by it in this behalf.

(ia) live fencing and barbed wire fencing with vegetative cover may
be allowed around private properties subject to the condition
that such fencing shall in no way hamper public access to the
beach;
(ib) no flattening of sand dunes shall be carried out;
(ic) no permanent structures for sports facilities shall be permitted
except construction of goal posts, net posts and lamp posts;
(id) construction of basements may be allowed subject to the
condition that no objection certificate is obtained from the State
Ground Water Authority to the effect that such construction will
not adversely affect free flow of ground water in that area.
Explanation:
(i)Though no construction is allowed in the no development zone for the
purposes of calculation of FSI, the area of entire plot including the
portion which falls within the no development zone shall be taken into
account.

(ii) The total plot size shall not be less than 0.4 hectares and the total
covered area on all floors shall not exceed 33 per cent of the plot size
i.e. the FSI shall not exceed 0.33. Further, the total covered area of
all the floors shall not be more than 50% of the plot size both in the
Union Territory of Andaman and Nicobar Islands and the Union
Territory of Lakshadweep Islands.
The open area shall be suitably landscaped with appropriate
vegetation;

(iii) The construction shall be consistent with the surrounding landscape
and local architectural style;

(iv) The overall height of construction upto the highest ridge of the roof,
shall not exceed 9 metres and the construction shall not be more
than 2 floors (ground floor plus one upper floor);

(v) Ground water shall not be tapped within 200 m of the HTL; within the
200 metre 500 metre zone it can be tapped only with the
concurrence of the Central/State Ground Water Board;

(vi) Extraction of sand, levelling or digging of sandy stretches except for
structural foundation of building, swimming pool shall not be
permitted within 500 metres of the High Tide Line;


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(vii) The quality of treated effluents, solid wastes, emissions and noise
levels etc. from the project area must conform to the standards laid
down by the competent authorities including the Central/State
Pollution Control Board and under the Environment (Protection) Act,
1986;

(viii) Necessary arrangements for the treatment of the effluents and solid
wastes must be made. It must be ensured that the untreated
effluents and solid wastes are not discharged into the water or on
the beach; and no effluent/solid waste shall be discharged on the
beach;

(ix) To allow public access to the beach, atleast a gap of 20 metres width
shall be provided between any two hotels/beach resorts; and in no
case shall gaps be less than 500 metres apart; and

(x) If the project involves diversion of forest land for non-forest
purposes, clearance as required under the Forest (Conservation) Act,
1980 shall be obtained. The requirements of other Central and State
laws as applicable to the project shall be met with;

(xi) Approval of the State/Union Territory Tourism Department shall be
obtained.

(2) In ecologically sensitive areas (such as marine parks, mangroves, coral
reefs, breeding and spawning grounds of fish, wildlife habitats and such
other area as may be notified by the Central/State Government Union
Territories) construction of beach resorts/hotel shall not be permitted.

Annexure III
Tourism Development / Planning guidelines

Guidelines for identification of new Tourism Centres of Orissa.
In view of the need for convergence and integration of resources in
development of Tourist Centres Government, after careful consideration have
been pleased to issue a fresh set of Guidelines for identification of new Tourist
Centres in the State.

1. Any proposal for identification of any place as Tourist Centre received by
the department will be forwarded to the Collector of the respective district.
The Collector can also suo moto forward such proposals after observing the
required formalities.

2. The Collector will constitute a District level Committee to consider the
potentiality of the place for its identification and development as a Tourist
Centre.

3. The Collector or his nominee like ADM or PD (DRDA) or Sub-Collector will
be the Chairman of the Committee and Tourist Officer will be the Member
Convener. Officers of the Government Departments like Forest &
Environment, Tourism & Culture (Culture), Works, Rural Development,
Health, Energy, Women & Child Development and the Lead Bank Officers
shall be the permanent members. Besides, Representatives from the
Travel Trade, Hotel Industry, Local People Representatives, Socio-Cultural
Organizations as the Collector thinks appropriate will also be the members.

4. General Criteria for identification will be
i. Potentiality of the place to attract tourists (the main USP of the place)
ii. Present flow of visitors from within Orissa, from outside Orissa and
from foreign countries.
iii. Present infrastructure available
iv. Possibility of increase in the number of visitors if the place is identified
and developed
v. Prospective Areas from where tourists can be expected to come.
vi. The possible developments planned for that site.
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5. If the Collector is satisfied on the recommendation of the Committee to
identify any place as a new Tourist Centre, then he should get a Project
Report prepared for development of the place as a Tourist Centre.

6. The Project Report thus prepared should contain inter-alia details of
i. The activities & infrastructure planned at the site along with its
sustainability including remunerative operation & maintenance.
ii. Land available for Tourism related Activities.
iii. A land use plan along with a site map.
iv. Estimated cost of projects including possible sources of funds and also
indicating the activities, which can be taken up from the schemes
available in the Central & State Governments.
v. District Level Schemes, which can be dovetailed for augmenting
tourism infrastructure at the site.
vi. List of Projects, which can be taken up by Private Sector/ PPP/Joint
venture with special emphasis on community ownership &
participation.

7. The Project Report along with the recommendation of the Committee
should be then forwarded by the Collector with his comments to the DoT
for consideration of Govt.

8. Department of Tourism would try to arrange for the Gap funding through
State Government / Government of India / Donor Agencies / Corporate
Sponsorship / PPP initiatives etc.


Annexure IV
EIA Notification

1. S.O. 60 (E) Whereas a notification under clause (a) of sub-rule (3) of rule
5 of the Environment (Protection) Rules, 1986 inviting objections from the
public within sixty days from the date of publication of the said notification,
against the intention of the Central Government to impose restrictions and
prohibitions on the expansion and modernization of any activity or new
projects being undertaken in any part of India unless environmental
clearance has been accorded by the Central Government or the State
Government in accordance with the procedure specified in that notification
was published as SO No. 80(E) dated 28th January, 1993;
And whereas all objections received have been duly considered;
Now, therefore, in exercise of the powers conferred by sub-section (1) and
clause (v) of sub-section (2) of section 3 of the Environment (Protection)
Act, 1986 (29 of 1986) read with clause (d) of sub-rule (3) of rule 5 of the
Environment (Protection)
Rules, 1986, the Central Government hereby directs that on and from the
date of publication of this notification in the Official Gazette, expansion or
modernization of any activity (if pollution load is to exceed the existing
one, or new project listed in Schedule I to this notification, shall not be
undertaken in any part of India unless it has been accorded environmental
clearance by the Central Government in accordance with the procedure
hereinafter specified in this notification;

2.Requirements and procedure for seeking environmental clearance of
projects:
I.(a)Any person who desires to undertake any new project in any part of
India or the expansion or modernization of any existing industry or
project listed in the Schedule-I shall submit an application to the
Secretary, Ministry of Environment and Forests, New Delhi.

The application shall be made in the proforma specified in Schedule-II
of this notification and shall be accompanied by a project report which
shall, inter alia, include an Environmental Impact Assessment Report,
an Environment Management Plan and details of public hearing as
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specified in Schedule-IV prepared in accordance with the guidelines
issued by the Central Government in the Ministry of Environment
and Forests from time to time.

(b) Cases rejected due to submission of insufficient or inadequate data
and Plans may be reviewed as and when submitted with complete
data and Plans. Submission of incomplete data or plans for the
second time would itself be a sufficient reason for the Impact
assessment Agency to reject the case summarily.

II. In case of the following site specific projects:
(a) mining;
(b) pit-head thermal power stations;
(c) hydro-power, major irrigation projects and/or their combination
including flood control;
(d) ports and harbours (excluding minor ports);
(e) prospecting and exploration of major minerals in areas above
500 hectares;

The project authorities will intimate the location of the project site to
the Central Government in the Ministry of Environment and Forests
while initiating any investigation and surveys. The Central
Government in the Ministry of Environment and Forests will convey a
decision regarding suitability or otherwise of the proposed site within
a maximum period of thirty days. The said site clearance shall be
granted for a sanctioned capacity and shall be valid for a period of
five years for commencing the construction, operation or mining.

III.(a)The reports submitted with the application shall be evaluated and
assessed by the Impact Assessment Agency, and if deemed
necessary it may consult a committee of Experts, having a
composition as specified in Schedule-III of this Notification. The
Impact Assessment Agency (IAA) would be the Union Ministry of
Environment and Forests.
The Committee of Experts mentioned above shall be constituted by
the Impact Assessment Agency or such other body under the Central
Government authorised by the Impact Assessment Agency in this
regard.
(b)The said Committee of Experts shall have full right of entry and
inspection of the site or, as the case may be, factory premises at any
time prior to, during or after the commencement of the operations
relating to the project.
(c)The Impact Assessment Agency shall prepare a set of
recommendations based on technical assessment of documents and
data, furnished by the project authorities, supplemented by data
collected during visits to sites or factories if undertaken, and details
of public hearing.
The assessment shall be completed within a period of ninety days
from receipt of the requisite documents and data from the project
authorities and completion of public hearing and decision conveyed
within thirty days thereafter.
The clearance granted shall be valid for a period of five years for
commencement of the construction or operation of the project.

III A. No construction work, preliminary or otherwise, relating to the
setting up of the project may be undertaken till the environmental
and site clearance is obtained.
IV. In order to enable the Impact Assessment Agency to monitor effectively
the implementation of the recommendations and conditions subject
to which the environmental clearance has been given, the project
authorities concerned shall submit a half yearly report to the Impact
Assessment Agency. Subject to the public interest, the Impact
Assessment Agency shall make compliance reports publicly available.
V. If no comments from the Impact Assessment Agency are received
within the time limit, the project would be deemed to have been
approved as proposed by project authorities.


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3. Nothing contained in this Notification shall apply to:
(a) any item falling under entry Nos. 3, 18 and 20 of the Schedule-I to
be located or proposed to be located in the areas covered by the
Notifications S.O. No.102 (E) dated 1st February, 1989, S.O. 114
(E) dated 20th February, 1991; S.O. No. 416 (E) dated 20th June,
1991 and S.O. No.319 (E) dated 7th May, 1992.
(b) any item falling under entry Nos.1,2,3,4,5,9,10,13,16,17,19,21,25
and 27 of Schedule-I if the investment is less than Rs.50 crores.
(c) any item reserved for Small Scale Industrial Sector with investment
less than Rs. 1 crore.
(d) defence related road construction projects in border areas.

4. Concealing factual data or submission of false, misleading data/reports,
decisions or recommendations would lead to the project being rejected.
Approval, if granted earlier on the basis of false data, would also be
revoked. Misleading and wrong information will cover the following:
False information
False data
Engineered reports
Concealing of factual data
False recommendations or decisions
Annexure V
PLOT LEVEL GUIDELINES

Map no. 8.1 is the key plan showing details of location of hotels,
walkways, Gurukul plots, shopping mall, EWS plot, Convention centre,
hospitality institute, condominiums and villas and golf club, golf villas and
parking areas. The plot level guidelines of the development of the various
designated plots are presented in table 8.12 to table 8.21.
























Map no 8.1 Master plan (with plots)
N
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Architectural Control For Hotel (type -A ) Plot-4

1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 2 floors Guest Rooms & other Facilities
Basement(s) Parking + Services + storage
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 82768 sqm
Envelope Area 64633 sqm 78.08%




Setbacks

First 15m setback for landscape features, visitor's parking
etc to be owned and maintain by Hotel
Front Side setback- 30mts
Left side setback- 15mts
Right Side setback- 15mts
Rear Side setback- 3mts
Per. Ground Coverage 20692sqm - 25%
F.S.I 0.5
Floor heights
all floors 3.25mts. (top to top height)
Basement 2.85 mts.
Maximum Permissible Height
12 mts for zone outside CRZ and 9mts (Including sloping
roof height) for CRZ Additional 6mts for architectural
features and Roof height is additional in zone outside CRZ
3
Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Loop Road)

Building Line 30m from property line
Mandatory Building height 12mts
No of floors G + 2
Building width 40 mts. maximum
Building depth (m) 15 mts. minimum.
4 Distance between buildings
Distance between two buildings within the plot not less
than 10mts
5 Basement
Basement shall not be more then 50% of the plinth area
Excluding courts & niches. It should start on or from the
building line. Basement is not permitted within the zone of
CRZ.
6 Facade Control Maximum width of one block - 40mts
Recess depth-minimum 5mts
Recess width - minimum 10mts
Front faade must have a slopping roof
7 Parking
1 car space per bedroom, plus restaurant, function room,
conference and bar at 1 car space per 5 m2 GFA. Resident
staff at 1 space per 3 staff on duty
Visitor's parking in first 15m front setback
8 Vehicular Access
Only one access of 9 mts (main Entry) from Main loop road
and secondary entry from the service road on the side
9





Boundary or
Compound wall
No Compound Wall, fencing is permitted on Property line. The
boundary wall must be constructed after 15m setback from property
line.
Height 1.35 mts
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction or stone cladding
External finish Paint or color is not allowed

The compound wall should be of local stone i.e. finely dressesd
laterite/ sandstone etc with stone/concrete coping and will be 1.35m
height

Beyond the 1.35m high compound wall, fencing by use of creepers is
permissible upto a total height of 2m from the compound wall.
10
















Bldg element controls
Plinth level
Minimum plinth height 0.3m from road level or plot level which ever is
higher
Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area
Roof top signage is not permitted
Building Facade signage is not permitted
Entrance Gate Entrance Gate must have an access of 4m for each entry and exit
Minimum Clear height should be 6.0m.

There must be a cabin of maximum 3.0m x 3.0m at one side of the
gate.
Gate must have two side of four side slopping roof.
Gate must have a steel or wooden truss with tiled roof
The projection of the roof - 0.6m and it will be same for the cabins
Entrance porch The entrance porch must have a slopping roof
Terrace
Terraces and flat roofs are permitted only on internal side of the
building.
11 Roof
Slope of roof angle -30 degree to 45 degree with 2 side or 4 side slope
75% of the total roof area should have slopping roof

Projection of roof - single storey - 1.5mts
two storey - 2.0mts
three storey - 2.5mts

30% of the total parking provided on ground can be covered with
sloping roof with two side or four side slope and an angle of 20 degree
12
Cantilever /
Projections
No cantilever or projections are allowed

13
Connection between
two building
By colonaded corridor - width 3mts to 5mts- must have slopping roof

14 Courtyard Size Minimum size -20mts x 15mts

15 Verandah Verandah on the courtyard side.

Width Max. Height
Single storey 3.0mts 3.0mts
Two Storey 3.0mts to 5.0mts 3.0mts
Three storey 3.0mts to 5.0mts Double Height
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
Table no 8.12 Architectural control for Hotel (type -A) Plot-4
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Architectural Control For Hotel (type - B) Plot-10
1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 2 floors Guest Rooms & other Facilities
Basement(s) Parking + Services + storage
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 23812 sqm
Envelope Area 17756 sqm 74.56%
Setbacks
12m back setback for service road to be owned and
maintain by Hotel
Front Side setback- 9mts


Left side setback- 6mts


Right Side setback- 6mts


Total Rear Side setback- 20mts
Per. Ground Coverage 5953 sqm - 25%
F.S.I 0.75
Floor heights
all floors 3.25mts. (top to top height)
Basement 2.85 mts.
Maximum Permissible Height
12 mts and additional 6mts for architectural features. Roof
height is additional
3
Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Loop Road)

Building Line 30m from property line
Mandatory Building height 12mts
No of floors G + 2
Building width 40 mts. maximum
Building depth (m) 15 mts. minimum.

4 Distance between buildings
Distance between two buildings within the plot not less
than 10mts
5 Basement
Basement shall not be more then 50% of the plinth area
Excluding courts & niches.
It should start on or from the building line.
6 Facade Control Maximum width of one block - 40mts
Recess depth-minimum 5mts
Recess width - minimum 10mts
Front faade must have a slopping roof
7 Parking
1 car space per bedroom, plus restaurant, function room,
conference and bar at 1 car space per 5 m2 GFA. Resident
staff at 1 space per 3 staff on duty

8 Vehicular Access
Only one access of 9 mts (main Entry) from Main loop road
and secondary entry from the service road
9 Boundary or Compound wall Compound Wall is permitted on Property line.
Height 1.35 mts
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction or stone cladding
External finish Paint or color is not allowed

The compound wall should be of local stone i.e. finely
dressesd laterite/ sandstone etc with stone/concrete
coping and will be 1.35m height

Beyond the 1.35m high compound wall, fencing by use of
creepers is permissible upto a total height of 2m from the
compound wall.
10 Bldg element controls
Plinth level
Minimum plinth height 0.3m from road level or plot level
which ever is higher
Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area
Roof top signage is not permitted
Building Facade signage is not permitted
Entrance Gate
Entrance Gate must have an access of 4m for each entry
and exit
Minimum Clear height should be 6.0m.

There must be a cabin of maximum 3.0m x 3.0m at one
side of the gate.
Gate must have two side of four side slopping roof.
Gate must have a steel or wooden truss with tiled roof

The projection of the roof - 0.6m and it will be same for
the cabins
Entrance porch The entrance porch must have a slopping roof
Terrace
Terraces and flat roofs are permitted only on internal side
of the building.
11 Roof
Slope of roof angle -30 degree to 45 degree with 2 side or 4 side slope
75% of the total roof area should have slopping roof

Projection of roof - single storey - 1.5mts
two storey - 2.0mts
three storey - 2.5mts

30% of the total parking provided on ground can be
covered with sloping roof with two side or four side slope
and an angle of 20 degree
12 Cantilever / Projections No cantilever or projections are allowed
13
Connection between two
building
By colonaded corridor - width 3mts to 5mts- must have
slopping roof
14 Courtyard Size Minimum size -20mts x 15mts
15 Verandah Verandah on the courtyard side.

Width Max. Height
Single storey 3.0mts 3.0mts
Two Storey 3.0mts to 5.0mts 3.0mts
Three storey 3.0mts to 5.0mts Double Height
Table no 8.13 Architectural control for Hotel (type - B) Plot-10
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
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Architectural Control For Gurukul (Type -A ) Plot-5
1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 1 floors Workshops and other facilities
Basement only for Storage
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 17946 sqm
Envelope Area 14218 sqm - 79.22%
Setbacks Front Side setback- 12mts
Left side setback- 6mts


Right Side setback- 6mts


Rear Side setback- 6mts
Per. Ground Coverage 5383 sqm - 30%
F.S.I 0.5
Floor heights
all floors 3.25mts. (minimum clear height)
Basement 2.85 mts.
Maximum Permissible Height 8 mts or restricted to 2 floors
Roof height is additional
3
Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Main Road)

Building Line 12m from property line on front side
Mandatory Building height 8 mts
No of floors G + 1
Building width 40 mts. maximum
Building depth (m) 15 mts. minimum.
4 Distance between buildings
Distance between two buildings within the plot not less
than 10mts
5 Basement
Basement is permitted only for the purpose of storage, on
or from the building line and
50% of the total plinth area.
6 Facade Control Maximum width of one block - 40mts
Recess depth-minimum 5mts
Front faade must have a slopping roof
7 Parking 1 car space per 20 m2 Gross floor area
8 Vehicular Access
Only one access of 5 mts (main Entry) from Main road
and secondary entry from the service road on the side
9 Boundary or Compound wall Compound Wall must be constructed on the setback line.
Height 3 mts
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction or Stone finish
External finish Paint or color is not allowed

the compound wall can have punctures upto 25% of the
surface area

It must have openings of 1.75m x 0.75m at a height of
1.5m
10 Bldg element controls
Plinth level
Minimum plinth height 0.3m from road level or plot level
which ever is heigher
Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area
Roof top signage is not permitted
Building Facade signage is not permitted
Entrance Gate Entrance Gate must have a clear span of 5.0mts
Gate structure is not permitted

There must be a cabin of maximum 3.0m x 3.0m at one
side of the gate.
Entrance porch The entrance porch must have a slopping roof
Terrace
Terraces and flat roofs are permitted only on internal side
of the building.
11 Roof
Slope of roof angle -30 degree to 45 degree with 2 side or 4 side slope
75% of the total roof area should have slopping roof

Projection of roof - single storey - 1.5mts
two storey - 2.0mts

30% of the total parking provided on ground can be
covered with sloping roof with two side or four side slope
and an angle of 20 degree
12 Cantilever / Projections No cantilever or projections are allowed
13
Connection between
two building
By colonaded corridor - width 3mts to 5mts- must have
slopping roof
14 Courtyard Size Minimum size -15mts x 15mts
15 Verandah Verandah on the courtyard side.

Width Max. Height
Single storey 3.0mts 3.0mts
Two Storey 3.0mts to 5.0mts 3.0mts
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
Table no 8.14 Architectural control for Gurukul (Type -A) Plot-5
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Architectural Control For Gurukul (Type -B ) Plot-2
1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 1 floors Workshops and other facilities
Basement only for Storage
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 11419 sqm
Envelope Area 7931 sqm - 72.59%
Setbacks
Front Side setback- 12mts


Left side setback- 6mts


Right Side setback- 6mts


Rear Side setback- 12mts
Per. Ground Coverage 3425 sqm - 30%
F.S.I 0.5
Floor heights
all floors 3.25mts. (top to top height)
Basement 2.85 mts.
Maximum Permissible Height 8 mts or restricted to 2 floors
Roof height is additional
3
Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Main Road)

Building Line 12m from property line on front side
Mandatory Building height 8 mts
No of floors G + 1
Building width 40 mts. maximum
Building depth (m) 15 mts. minimum.
4 Distance between buildings
Distance between two buildings within the plot not less
than 10mts
5 Basement
Basement is permitted ony for the purpose of storage, on
or from the building line and
50% of the total plinth area.
6 Facade Control Maximum width of one block - 40mts
Recess depth-minimum 5mts
Front faade must have a slopping roof
7 Parking 1 car space per 20 m2 Gross floor area
8 Vehicular Access
Only one access of 5 mts (main Entry) from Main road and
secondary entry from the service road on the side
9 Boundary or Compound wall Compound Wall must be constructed on the setback line.
Height 3 mts
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction or Stone finish
External finish Paint or color is not allowed

the compound wall can have punctures upto 25% of the
surface area
It must have openings of 1.0m x 0.75m with grill fix in it
10 Bldg element controls
Plinth level
Minimum plinth height 0.3m from road level or plot level
which ever is higher
Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area
Roof top signage is not permitted
Building Facade signage is not permitted
Entrance Gate Entrance Gate must have a clear span of 5.0mts
Gate structure is not permitted

There must be a cabin of maximum 3.0m x 3.0m at one
side of the gate.
Entrance porch The entrance porch must have a slopping roof
Terrace
Terraces and flat roofs are permitted only on internal side
of the building.
11 Roof
Slope of roof angle -30 degree to 45 degree with 2 side or 4 side slope
75% of the total roof area should have slopping roof

Projection of roof - single storey - 1.5mts
two storey - 2.0mts

30% of the total parking provided on ground can be
covered with sloping roof with two side or four side slope
and an angle of 20 degree
12 Cantilever / Projections No cantilever or projections are allowed
13
Connection between
two building
By colonaded corridor - width 3mts to 5mts- must have
slopping roof
14 Courtyard Size Minimum size -15mts x 15mts
15 Verandah Verandah on the courtyard side.

Width Max. Height
Single storey 3.0mts 3.0mts
Two Storey 3.0mts to 5.0mts 3.0mts
Table no 8.15 Architectural control for Gurukul (Type -B) Plot-2
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
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Architectural Control For Convention Center
1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 2 floors
Conference hall, meeting hall, Exhibition Space, hotel
Facilities
Basement(s) Parking + Services
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 98047 sqm
Envelope Area 79489 sqm 81.07%
Setbacks Front Side setback- 15mts
Left side setback- 15mts


Right Side setback- 15mts


Rear Side setback- 15mts
Per. Ground Coverage 24511 sqm - 25%
F.S.I 0.5
Floor heights
all floors 3.25mts. (top to top height)
Double height is permitted for public spaces
Basement 2.85 mts.
Maximum Permissible Height
15mts and restricted to 3 floors and additional 10mts for
architectural features
Roof height is additional
3
Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Loop Road)

Building Line 15m from property line
Mandatory Building height 15mts
No of floors G + 2
Building Size
100m x 60m max. only for one block, for others max.
40m x 40m
4 Distance between buildings
Distance between two buildings within the plot not less
than 10m.
5 Basement
Basement shall not be more then 50% of the plinth area
Excluding courts & niches.
It should start on or from the building line.
6 Facade Control
recess depth-minimum 5mts
Recess width - minimum 10mts
7 Parking
2 car spaces per 3 seats where there is fixed seating.
Where there is a flexible layout there shall be one car
space per 3 sqm of conference areas and for exhibition
hall One car space per 6 sq.m.
Employees' Parking is permitted in basement
8 Vehicular Access
No access from Main loop road, two entries from the
service road on the sides are permitted
9 Boundary or Compound wall The boundary wall must be constructed on property line.
Height 1 mts
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction
External finish Paint or color is not allowed
10 Bldg element controls
Plinth level
Minimum plinth height 0.6m from road level or plot level
which ever is higher
Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area
Roof top signage is not permitted
Building Facade signage is not permitted
Entrance Gate
Entrance Gate must have an access of 4m for each entry
and exit

There must be a cabin of maximum size of 3.0m x 3.0m
at one side of the gate.
Gate structure is not permitted
Entrance porch
The entrance porch shall have a slopping roof , no
cantilever projection
Terrace
Terraces and flat roofs are allowed on front side of the
building.
11 Roof
Slope of roof angle -25 degree with 2 side or 4 side slope
25% of the total roof area should be of slopping roof
Projection of roof - 4m to 5m

30% of the total parking provided on ground can be
covered with sloping roof with two side or four side slope
and an angle of 20 degree
12 Cantilever / Projections No cantilever or projections are allowed
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
Table no 8.16 Architectural control for Convention Center
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Architectural Control For Art & Craft museum
1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 2 floors Exhibition Space and other r facilities
Basement(s) Parking + Services
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 40229 sqm
Envelope Area 34523 sqm - 85.81%
Setbacks Front Side setback- 12mts
Left side setback- 12mts


Right Side setback- 3mts


Rear Side setback- 3mts
Per. Ground Coverage 12068 sqm - 30%
F.S.I 0.5
Floor heights
all floors 3.25mts. (top to top height)
Double height is permitted for public spaces
Basement 2.85 mts.
Maximum Permissible Height
12mts and restricted to 3 floors and additional 10mts for
architectural features
Roof height is additional
3
Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Loop Road)

Building Line 12m from property line
Mandatory Building height 12mts
No of floors G + 2
4 Distance between buildings
Distance between two buildings within the plot not less
than 10m.
5 Basement
Basement shall not be more then 50% of the plinth area
Excluding courts & niches.
It should start on or from the building line.
6 Facade Control
recess depth-minimum 5mts
Recess width - minimum 10mts
7 Parking 1 space per 30 m2 GFA plus 1 car space per 3 staff
Employees' Parking is permitted in basement
8 Vehicular Access
No access from Main loop road, two entries from sides
are permitted
9 Boundary or Compound wall The boundary wall must be constructed on property line.
Height 1 mts
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction
External finish Paint or color is not allowed
10 Bldg element controls
Plinth level
Minimum plinth height 0.3m from road level or plot level
which ever is higher
Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area
Roof top signage is not permitted
Building Facade signage is not permitted
Entrance Gate
Entrance Gate must have an access of 4m for each entry
and exit

There must be a cabin of maximum size of 3.0m x 3.0m
at one side of the gate.
Gate structure is not permitted
Entrance porch
The entrance porch shall have a slopping roof , no
cantilever projection
Terrace
Terraces and flat roofs are allowed on front side of the
building.
11 Roof
Slope of roof angle -25 degree with 2 side or 4 side slope
25% of the total roof area should be of slopping roof
Projection of roof - 4m to 5m

30% of the total parking provided on ground can be
covered with sloping roof with two side or four side slope
and an angle of 20 degree
12 Cantilever / Projections No cantilever or projections are allowed
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
Table no 8.17 Architectural control for Art & Craft museum
FINAL MASTER PLAN: SHAMUKA BEACH AREA Chapter VIII : Urban Design Guideline & DCR

CEPT, Ahmedabad 143




Architectural Control For Hospitality institute
1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 2 floors Class room, auditorium, Conference hall etc.
Basement(s) Parking + Services
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 72353 sqm
Envelope Area 63420 sqm -87.65%
Setbacks Front Side setback- 12mts
Left side setback- 6mts


Right Side setback- 6mts


Rear Side setback- 6mts
Per. Ground Coverage 18088 sqm - 25%
F.S.I 0.5
Floor heights
all floors 3.25mts. (top to top height)
Double height is permitted for public spaces
Basement 2.85 mts.
Maximum Permissible Height 12mts and restricted to 3 floors
Roof height is additional
3
Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Loop Road)

Building Line 12m from property line
Mandatory Building height 12mts
No of floors G + 2
4 Distance between buildings
Distance between two buildings within the plot not less
than 10m.
5 Basement
Basement shall not be more then 50% of the plinth area
Excluding courts & niches.
It should start on or from the building line.
6 Facade Control
recess depth-minimum 5mts
Recess width - minimum 10mts
7 Parking
1 car space per teaching staff, 1 space per 2 ancillary
staff, 1 space per 4 students, One third of total staff
provision for visitors
8 Vehicular Access
No access from Main loop road, two entries from service
road are permitted
9 Boundary or Compound wall The boundary wall must be constructed on property line.
Height 1 mts
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction
External finish Paint or color is not allowed
10 Bldg element controls
Plinth level
Minimum plinth height 0.3m from road level or plot level
which ever is higher
Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area
Roof top signage is not permitted
Building Facade signage is not permitted
Entrance Gate
Entrance Gate must have an access of 4m for each
entry and exit

There must be a cabin of maximum size of 3.0m x 3.0m
at one side of the gate.
Gate structure is not permitted
Entrance porch
The entrance porch shall have a slopping roof , no
cantilever projection
Terrace
Terraces and flat roofs are allowed on front side of the
building.
Courtyard size 15mts x 15 mts minimum
11 Roof
Slope of roof angle -25 degree with 2 side or 4 side slope
25% of the total roof area should be of slopping roof
Projection of roof - 4m to 5m

30% of the total parking provided on ground can be
covered with sloping roof with two side or four side
slope and an angle of 20 degree
12 Cantilever / Projections No cantilever or projections are allowed
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
Table no 8.18 Architectural control for Hospitality institute
FINAL MASTER PLAN: SHAMUKA BEACH AREA Chapter VIII : Urban Design Guideline & DCR

CEPT, Ahmedabad 144



Architectural Control For Condominium & Villas
1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 1 floors (Villas) Living room, Bed room, Dinning, kitchen
G + 2 floors (Condominium) Living room, Bed room, Dinning, kitchen
Basement(s) Storage
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 134147 sqm
Envelope Area 125817 sqm 93.79%
Setbacks Front Side setback- 6mts
Left side setback- 6mts


Right Side setback- 6mts


Rear Side setback- 3mts
Per. Ground Coverage 46951 sqm - 35%
F.S.I 0.75
Floor heights
all floors 3.25mts. (top to top height)
Basement 2.85 mts.(mandatory clear )
Maximum Permissible Height
15mts and restricted to 3 floors for Condominium
8m and restricted to 2 floors for villas
Roof height is additional

Condominiums- First floor as one level apartment and
second floor as a penthouse Duplex
3
Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Loop Road)

Building Line 18m from property line
Mandatory Building height 8mts plus roof height
No of floors G + 1
Building width 18m max.
4 Distance between buildings Distance between two buildings not less than 10m
5 Basement Basement shall not be more then 50% of the plinth area
6 Parking Dwelling unit of 2 beds-1 car space per dwelling unit
Dwelling unit of 3 beds-2 car space per dwelling unit
7 Vehicular Access
Direct access from Main loop road to the dwelling unit is
not permitted
8 Boundary or Compound wall The boundary wall must be constructed on property line.
Height 1 mts with fencing on it upto a total height of 1.75m
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction or stone finish
External finish Paint or color is not allowed
Plot level compound wall 0.3m height with low height landscape around it
9 Bldg element controls


Plinth level
Minimum plinth height 0.3m from road level or plot level
which ever is higher

Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area

Roof top signage is not permitted

Building Facade signage is not permitted

Main Entrance Gate
Entrance Gate must have an access of 4m for each entry
and exit


There must be a cabin of maximum 3.0m x 3.0m at one
side of the gate.

The projection of the roof - 0.6m

Entrance porch
The entrance porch shall have a slopping roof or flat roof,
no cantilever projection

Terrace
Terraces and flat roofs are allowed on front side of the
building.
10 Roof


Slope of roof angle -30 degree to 45 degree with 2 side or 4 side slope

80% of the total roof area should be of slopping roof


Projection of roof - single storey - 1.5mts
two storey - 2.0mts
three storey - 2.5mts
11 Cantilever / Projections No cantilever or projections are allowed
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
Table no 8.19 Architectural control for Condominium & Villas
FINAL MASTER PLAN: SHAMUKA BEACH AREA Chapter VIII : Urban Design Guideline & DCR

CEPT, Ahmedabad 145



Architectural Control For Golf Villas
1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 1 floors Living room, Bed room, Dinning, kitchen etc.
Basement(s) Storage
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 209477 sqm
Setbacks all sides 6m
Plot level setbacks Front Side setback- 7mts on internal road side
Side setback- 10m distance between two buildings
Rear Side setback- 10mts on golf course side
Per. Ground Coverage 31421 sqm - 15%
F.S.I 0.5
Floor heights
all floors 3.25mts. (top to top height)
Basement 2.85 mts.(mandatory clear )
Maximum Permissible Height 8mts and restricted to 2 floors
Roof height is additional
3 Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Loop Road)

Building Line 18m from property line
Mandatory Building height 8mts plus roof height
No of floors G + 1
Building width 18m max.
4 Distance between buildings Distance between two buildings not less than 10m
5 Basement Basement shall not be more then 50% of the plinth area
6 Parking Dwelling unit of 2 beds-1 car space per dwelling unit
Dwelling unit of 3 beds-2 car space per dwelling unit
7 Vehicular Access Direct access from Main loop road to the dwelling unit
is not permitted
8 Boundary or Compound wall The boundary wall must be constructed on property
line.
Height 1 mts with fencing on it upto a total height of 1.75m
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction or stone finish
External finish Paint or color is not allowed
Plot level compound wall 0.3m height with low height landscape around it
9 Bldg element controls
Plinth level Minimum plinth height 0.3m from road level or plot level
which ever is heigher
Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area
Roof top signage is not permitted
Building Facade signage is not permitted
Main Entrance Gate Entrance Gate must have an access of 4m for each
entry and exit
There must be a cabin of maximum 3.0m x 3.0m at one
side of the gate.
The projection of the roof - 0.6m
Entrance poarch The entrance poarch shall have a slopping roof or flat
roof, no cantilever projection
Terrace Terraces and flat roofs are allowed on front side of the
building.
10 Roof
Slope of roof angle -30 degree to 45 degree with 2 side or 4 side
slope
80% of the total roof area should be of slopping roof
Projection of roof - single storey - 1.5mts
two storey - 2.0mts
11 Cantilever / Projections No cantilever or projections are allowed
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
Table no 8.20 Architectural control for Golf Villas
FINAL MASTER PLAN: SHAMUKA BEACH AREA Chapter VIII : Urban Design Guideline & DCR

CEPT, Ahmedabad 146






Architectural Control For Social Infrastructure housing
1 Floorwise landuse breakup
G + 3 floors Living room, Bed room, Dinning, kitchen

Basement(s) Storage
2 Building Envelope Controls
Plot Area 64405sqm
Envelope Area 58153sqm - 90.29%
Setbacks Front Side setback- 6mts
Side setback- 6mts
Rear Side setback- 6mts
Per. Ground Coverage 16321sqm - 30%
F.S.I 1.0
Floor heights
all floors 3.00mts. (top to top height)
Maximum Permissible Height 14mts and restricted to 4 floors
Roof height is additional
3
Bldg. edge ( along one side
abutting Main Road)

Building Line 18m from property line
Mandatory Building height 14mts plus roof height
No of floors G + 3
Building Size 30m x 30m max. for one cluster
4 Distance between buildings Distance between two buildings not less than 10m
5 Basement Basement is not permitted
6 Parking 1 two-wheeler space per 1du
7 Vehicular Access
Direct access from Main loop road to the cluster is
not permitted
8 Boundary or Compound wall
The boundary wall must be constructed on property
line.
Height 1 mts with fencing on it upto a total height of 1.75m
Material and Technology Exposed stone construction or stone finish
External finish Paint or color is not allowed
Plot level compound wall
0.3m height and constructed in local material i.e. lime
stone and sand stone
9 Bldg element controls
Plinth level
Minimum plinth height 0.3m from road level or plot
level which ever is higher
Signage Signage is permitted in landscape area
Roof top signage is not permitted
Building Facade signage is not permitted
Main Entrance Gate
Entrance Gate must have an access of 3m for each
entry and exit

There must be a cabin of maximum 3.0m x 3.0m at
one side of the gate.
The projection of the roof - 0.6m
Entrance porch
The entrance porch shall have a slopping roof or flat
roof, no cantilever projection
Terrace
Terraces and flat roofs are allowed on front side of
the building.
Courtyard size 15mts x 15mts minimum
10 Roof
Slope of roof
angle -30 degree to 45 degree with 2 side or 4 side
slope
80% of the total roof area should be of slopping roof

Projection of roof - single storey - 1.5mts
two storey - 2.0mts
three storey - 2.5mts
four storey - 2.5mts
11 Cantilever / Projections No cantilever or projections are allowed
NOTE: All other norms except above will be as per the applicable Puri-Konark Development Authority byelaws.
Table no 8.21 Architectural control for Social Infrastructure housing