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280 -

811.111(075)
81.2 -9
92

1000 LEKTIONEN ENGLISCH



Bibliographisches Institut GmbH, Mannheim.

..
03.12.2012. 8410872. . . 15,12. 3000 . 7500.

-005-93, 2; 953005 -

5 . 280 - :
92 / . . .. . : , 2013.
288 .: . - ( ).
ISBN 978-5-271-46128-6
5
,
,
.

811.111(075)
81.2 -9

5
280 -

..
..
. .
..

129085, . , - , .



144003. . , , . . 25

ISBN 978-5-271-46128-6

2001 Bibliographisches Institut Mannheim



? .
282 - 5 ,
,

.
, ,


.
:
,
,
, ,
.
, (
)
, .
:
, .

, ,

(International Phonetic Association - IPA),
.
(. . 6)
,
.
,
, ,
.



(IPA).


[: ] plant, arm, father - plant - (
)
[] but, son but ,
,
[] man, sad - man ;
,
,
[] there, there - ,
[]
[ai] life - life -
[au] house house
[ei] name, lame name -
[e] get, bed - get e (
)
[] ago, better - ago - ,
( :
)
[i:] see, me, beat, belief - see -
[i] it, wish it - (
, )
[is] here here ,
[]
[ou] no, low - ,
[:] law, all - law - ,
[0] not, long - not - ,
; ,

, (
)
[01] boy, oil boy
[:] bird, her - []
[u:] you, do you -
[] push, look - push, look - (
)
[] poor, sure poor - ,
[]
4


[] long ( + !)
youth ,
[] red ,
- ,
( ); ,
(
)
[s]
stand
[J] ship, station , ,

[3] pleasure - , ,

[<fe] bridge ,
[v] voice ,
,
[w] water - ,

[z]
zeal
[5] this ;
,

[0 ] thank -

[b, f, , , , , ]
(f -
)
[h] ,
[d, t] - ( )
[1] ,
( )


[:]

[']

[,]


( )
13, 93, 165, 170, 183, 222, 238, 241, 249
96
37
20, 72, 126, 128, 171, 191, 251, 276
6, 19, 22, 25, 49, 52, 57, 74, 82, 95, 104, 124, 264, 278
17, 18, 280
21, 78, 79
136, 145, 151, 152, 154, 155, 162, 167, 205, 219, 259, 282
3 5, 33, 34, 379
143, 158, 169, 189, 193, 200, 203, 209, 220, 262, 269
47, 161, 174, 192, 239, 247
73, 133, 159, 178, 206, 207, 211, 268
23, 27, 76, 77, 132, 135, 176, 180, 231
54, 67, 68, 111, 185, 210, 225, 230
32, 62, 116, 131, 141, 156, 197, 208, 223, 242, 246, 270
2, 11, 39,44,46, 66, 67, 71, 85, 98, 99, 102, 109, 127, 149, 160,
177, 242,254
166, 179, 218, 235, 237
16, 55, 122
40, 51, 86,100, 107,157,175, 194, 216, 217, 226, 229, 260, 267,
277
- 83, 84, 117, 137, 142, 198, 228
79, 110, 272
10, 88, 94, 130, 221, 232, 236
1, 38, 60, 81, 103, 196
29, 65, 121, 263
28, 43, 275
114 195
7, 8, 24, 48, 50, 64, 108, 113, 139, 164, 188, 201, 202, 244, 271
9, 15, 35, 75, 91, 106, 112, 129, 134, 150, 168, 204, 215, 227, 245,
252, 266, 273, 278
42, 45, 53, 212, 253
144, 184, 240, 265
31, 58, 61, 63, 70
69, 149, 173, 224
56, 115, 119, 120, 123, 125, 256, 257
36, 80, 90, 92, 97, 190, 281
14, 138
12
30, 101, 105, 186, 214, 234
26, 30, 41, 59, 87, 118, 146, 153, 163, 172, 181, 182, 187, 255,256,
258, 261
147, 248, 274

British Weather
When people think o f British weather, they think o f
rain and perhaps even fog. In fact, taken as a whole,
the British weather is no
worse than in any other
country in Europe. It is
perhaps not as warm as
in Spain in summer, but
then again not as cold as
in Germany in winter.
And when it does rain, it
is often just a shower.

EXERCISE

Crossword
1. Tea is a . . . English drink.
2. very warm
3. He plays darts...
4. Im starving. Im ...
5. opposite o f thin
6. not funny
7 .1 was mad at him. I w a s .. .

The bold letters give another word for land or


state.
7


, ,
, .
, . ,
, , ,
. ,
.
weather [Veda]
fog [fog]
taken as a whole [houl]
country f'kAntri]
perhaps [po'haeps]
Spain [spein]
shower I'fauo]

1. ... ().
2. (, )
3. ... ().
4. . (; ).
5. ()
6. ()
7. . (; ).

/ .
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Y
R

S R
G R Y
8

L
G

R
I

R L Y
Y

S

Choosing a Dog
Eric has wanted a dog for a long time. Now that they
have a larger garden, Loma and Eric decide to go to
the local pet home and
~
see if they can find a
suitable animal there.
They do not want an
especially large dog
and it does not have to
be a pure breed either.
What they have in
mind is a medium
sized longhaired
mongrel.

Building a Kennel
Loma:
Eric:

Now you have at last got your dog. You will


have to build a kennel for it.
Yes, I ll go to the building
777
suppliers and get
some wood. At
least I know how
X i1 \
big to make the
kennel as the dog
is fully grown. I
have a plan in a
book somewhere
which I can ad
just to its size.
9


. ,
,
, .
.
.

( )

,

;

, ;

local ['loukdl]
pet home [pet houm]
suitable ['sjuitabl]
pure breed [pjuo bri:d]
medium-sized ['mirdjam saizd]
longhaired [brj'head]
mongrel ['mopgml]


: .
.
: , .
, ,
. -
, .
kennel ['kenl]
building supplier [hildir) sa'plaia]
fully grown ['fuli groun]
plan [plaen]
to adjust [s'd^st]

10

,
,

,
,

5
At the Vets
Eric and Loma take their dog to the vet to have it
checked over and to have it injected against various
diseases which dogs are
prone to. They have to
wait alongside all the
other people with their ill
pets. There are children
with rabbits and tortoises,
cats and dogs. A man
with a snake is sitting on
his own as no one wishes
to sit beside him.

There is an island in the Irish Sea which is famous for


its tailless cats. It belongs to Britain but has home rule
and its own legislature called the Tynwald. The island
is allowed to print its own money. Every year there are
famous motorbike races there. The capital of the island
is Douglas. The traditional Celtic language spoken there
is called Manx.

Can you guess the name o f this island?

11



,
.
.
, .
, .
vet [vet]
to inject [ind3ekt]
to check over [tjek ouva]
disease [di'ziiz]
prone to [proun tu]
pet [pet]
rabbit ['raebit]
tortoise ['to:tes]
snake [sneik]

.
,
,

-.,
-.

6

,
. ,

, .
.
. .
, ,
.
?
Isle o f Man

12

7
New Years Day
Lom a:
Eric:
Lom a:

Eric:

Pete:
Sue:

Pete:

That was a great party last night, wasnt it?


The last guests went home atfour clock.
I m sure Betty
would have
stayed on, but
Paul insisted
that they had to
go home.
Well, they still
had an hours
drive ahead of
them.

Have you already phoned your parents to wish


them a happy new year?
I ve tried several
times, but no one
picks up the re
ceiver.
Maybe their party
was as good as
ours and they
cant get out of
bed.

13


:
:
:
:

, ?
.
, ,
, .
, .

,

New Years Day [nju: p :z dei]


great [greit]
to stay on [stei on]
to insist [in'sist]
an hours drive ['auoz draiv]
ahead of [a'hed o\]


:
:
:

,
?
,
.
, ,
, .

-.



(),

New Years Day [nju: p :z dei]


to phone s.o. up [foun]
several ['sevral]
to pick up [pik]
receiver [ri'skvo]
as good as [oz gud oz]

14

A Famous Author
This famous author was bom in Bombay in 1865.
He was brought to England in 1871 where he spent
five years separated from his parents. He recalls this
period with bitterness in his novel The Light that
Failed. Later he worked as a journalist in India, and
many o f his earlier poems and stories were originally
published in newspapers. Perhaps his most famous
works are his tales for children, The Jungle Book
and Kim which is generally considered to be his
masterpiece.
What is the name o f this author?

Discussing the Weekend


John:
Eric:

John:

Did you enjoy yourselves in Scotland?


Yes, we had a really good time. I think every
one needs a few
short breaks
throughout
the year. One
long holiday in
summer is
not enough.
The trouble is
that you cant
just take time off
work when it suits you.

15


1865 . ().
1871 . ,
. (The Light
that Failed) .
,
.
, -
;
. ?
Rudyard Kipling (18651936)


:
:
:

?
, . ,
.
.
,
, .

to discuss [dis'lcvs]
, ,
break [breik]
,
throughout [0 ru:'aut]
to take time off work [taim] [ws:k]

to suit [sju:t]

16

EXERCISE

Fruitsalad: 7 Types of Fruit


G
L

0
L
A
J
H
Z

P
E
A
R
E
P
0
L
0

I
R
N
T
A
P

E
0

A
D
P
L
U
M
w

H
I
N
R
J
E
E
0
H

E
L
A
E
A
S
R
N
Y

R
T
T
S
M
T
F
I
S

R
0
E
0
R
A
N
G
E

Y
P
R
P
A
G
T
S
E

A New Telephone Directory


Loma:

Eric:

Loma:

Ipicked up the new telephone directory at the


post office today and would you believe it
they have spelt our name
wrong again.
I thought I had
made enough
fuss last year so
that it would not
happen again.
They have chang
ed the name
from last year,
but they made a
different mistake.
17



. ?

:
G
L

I
R
N

I
N
R
J

S
R
N
Y

R R Y

R
S
R
G
F N
I G S
S


:
:
:

,
,
.
,
, .

, .

telephone directory
['telifoun di'rektari]
post office [poust 'ofis]
to spell, spelt, spelt
[spel] [spelt]
fuss [fXs]
different [difrant]
mistake [mis'teik]

,

,

; ,
,

18

Icy Roads
As usual Eric has to hurry as he has spent too long
over breakfast reading the newspaper. When he takes
the car out o f the garage
he gets a nasty surprise.
The roads are very icy.
Instead o f trying to drive
fast he rings up his office
to say that he will be com
ing a bit later. On the way
there are several hold-ups
because cars have run
into each other.

At the Insurance Office


Bill wants to have his car repaired the day after his
accident. So that there are no complications he goes
to the insurance office
personally. He wants a
written statement that
the company will cover
all the costs o f the repair.
When he gets there,
he has to fill in a number
o f forms and give his
version o f how the
accident happened.

19


, ,
, .
, .
. ,
, .
- .
icy ['aisi]
to hurry ['hAri]
nasty [na:sti]
surprise [so'praiz]
to ring up [rip ]
office ['ofis]
hold-up ['houkkp]
to run into sth [ 'inta]

, ;
,
,
; ,
, ;

( )
,

14


,
. ,
.
, .
,
.
insurance [in'Juarans]
accident ['aeksidsnt]
complication [kompli'keifan]
to cover [']
to fill in [fil in]
form [fo:m]
version [Vaijan]

,
, ,

,
()

, ; ,

20

An English Author

The author wanted was born in Portsmouth in 1812.


When his father was imprisoned for debt, he was
forced to work in a factory at the age o f 12. Memories
of this period in his life inspired much o f his writing.
He began writing for several newspapers as Boz.
Later he wrote many famous books such as David
Copperfield and Oliver Twist. When he died
suddenly in 1870 he left unfinished his last novel,
The Mystery o f Edwin Drood.
Do you know the name o f this famous author?

A Sweepstake in the Office


Loma:
Janet:

What are you collectingfor this time? Is it some


ones birthday or has someone had a baby?
No, this time you
can even get some
5
money out o f it.

We are organizing

a sweepstake.

Everyone who pays


a pound draws
the name o f a
horse which runs
on Saturday.

21


1812 . .
,
12 .
.

.
, .
1870 .,
. ,
?
Charles Dickens
:
,
, ,
, , ,
, , ,
.

? -
?
: , - .
- . ,
, , .
sweepstake ['swi:psteik]
to collect [ka'lekt]
to organize [b:gdnaiz]
to draw, drew, drawn
[dro:][dru:] [dro:n]
horse race ['ho:sreis]

,
( )

22

A Letter from America


John had stayed with a host family in America the
previous year. Their son now wishes to visit Britain.
He has written a letter to
John, saying that he
would arrive at the start
of February. The Miller
family has been expecting
this letter and John writes
back immediately saying
that they will be delighted
to have him stay with
them.

Preparations in the Guest-Room


Loma:

Eric:

Loma:

Actually, Mikes coming is a good excuse to


clear up the spare room. Perhaps we should
buy some new
bedclothes.
Thats a good
idea. Those
sheets are about
15 years old.
We would also
have to buy new
curtains to match
the new duvet
covers.

23

17

.
.
, ,
. ,
, , .
host [houst]
previous ['priivjss]
to expect [iks'pekt]
immediately [i'mkdjdtti]
delighted [di'laitid]

( )
,

, , ,

,

, -
. ,
.
:
.
.
: ,
________ .
preparation [prepa'reijbn]
excuse [iks'kju:s]
to clear up [ ]
bedclothes ['bedkloudz]
sheet [fi:t]
curtain ['ka:tn]
to match [maetj]
duvet cover ['dju:vet 'kAva]

; ,
; ,
, ,

24

A Town in Scotland

It is the capital city o f Scotland, situated south of


the Firth o f Forth. A famous castle stands on a rock
looking down on the city. The Queens husband,
Prince Philip, is Duke o f this city. The university here
was founded as early as 1583. Princes Street is one of
the main streets in the city centre where one can find
many interesting shops.
Do you know the name o f this second-largest city in
Scotland?

In the Bank
Normally Eric has his bank statements sent to his
home. But something must have gone wrong as he
has not received any for
over four weeks. Eric
points this out to the bank
clerk who is most apolo
getic. He promises that
Eric will receive all the
outstanding statements
within the next days. As
usual, no one is to blame,
its all the fault o f the
computer!


, -. , ,
. , ,
. 1583 .
-,
.
?
Edinburgh
Royal Tattoo ( )

.
,
.


. , .
,
. ,
. ,
, !
bank statement
[baegk 'steitmsnt]
to receive [ri'siiv]
bank clerk [baerjk kla:k]
apologetic [9,pobld3etik]
outstanding [aut'staendirj]
to blame [bleim]
fault [fo:lt]



,
,
,

26

A Private Detective

This fictitious detective, who appears in novels


written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, lived in Baker
Street in London. He was often accompanied by his
friend, Dr. Watson, on his mystery solving adven
tures. He was famous for being able to disguise him
self so well that not even his closest friend was able
to recognize him. He used science to solve crime and
was often called in by Scotland Yard to help.

What is the name o f this world-famous detective?

A City in Somerset

This city is located at the site of a Roman spa which


was called Aquae Suli. It was probably built in the 1st
and 2nd centuries AD. Many o f the extensive Roman
baths have been excavated, and fragments o f a temple
as well as tombs and altars have been found. The
Kings Bath was built in 1597 and was used in the
17th century for medicinal purposes. In the 18th
century the city was transformed into a social resort
by Richard Nash and John Wood.
Can you guess the name o f this city?

27

21


,
, - .
, ,
, .
, .
, -
.
?
Sherlock Holmes

22


, (Aquae Suli).
III .
,
, .
1597 .
XVII . . XVIII .
.
?

Bath

28

23
A Broken Arm
Sarah had an accident while cycling. She turned a
comer and did not see a brick lying in the road.
Unfortunately she fell off her
bike in such a way that
she landed on her arm
and broke it. A man in
a passing car, who had
watched the accident, imme
diately stopped and gave her
a lift to the nearest hospital.
There she had her arm put
in plaster.

24
Rag Day
Eric:

Loma:

Eric:

Did you see the students in town today? They


were collectingfor several charities. The ones I
saw were all dressed up like
Walt Disney figures.
When they come
towards you in
groups,you dont
have much
chance to refuse.
When it is for a
good cause,
I dont mind.

29


,
. ,
. ,
. , ,
.
.
to cycle [saikl]
brick [brik]
to break [breik]
passing ['pa:sir)]
immediately [i'mkdjotli]
hospital [hospitl]
plaster ['pla:sto]

,
, ,

Rag Day * ( )
:
:
:

?
. , ,
.
,
.
, .

* . , .

.

30

A Country of Poets and Singers

The country we are looking for lies in the western


part o f the United Kingdom. The people who live
there are proud to speak their own language which
looks almost illegible to foreigners. The second
highest mountain in Britain, Snowdon, is here in the
Snowdonia National Park. The local people hold
annual competitions in music, poetry, arts and crafts.
These are called the National Eisteddfod and attract
many visitors.
What is the name o f this country?

A Sightseeing Tour
John:
Mike:

John:

There isn 't much o f interest to see here in


Milton Keynes. Everything is so new here.
/ wouldnt say
that. The style of
the buildings is
so different to back
home in the USA.
I suppose thats
true. A few o f the
public buildings
won prizes in na
tional architectur
al competitions.

31

25

, ,
.
,
. , ,
, .
, ,
. .
?
Wales


Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwymdrobwllllantysiliogogogoch
,
, .
.


:
:
:

, -, .
.
.
, , .
, .

.

,

,

sightseeing tour ['saitsi:ir) ]


style [stail]
different ['difront]
back home [baek houm]
to suppose [sa'pouz]
public building [' bildir)]
architectural [.crki'tektjbrol]
competition [.kompi'tijsn]

32

Removing the Plaster Cast


Sarahs broken arm has healed well. The doctor in the
hospital decides to remove the plaster and X-ray the
arm again to see if the plaster
can stay off or not.
Sarah cannot look when
the nurse cuts off the
plaster with her electric
scissors. But the nurse has
done this many times
before and is finished in
two minutes.

Post
Sue:

Jill:

Would you take these letters to the post office


for me, please? They should have been posted
at the start o f the
week, but I forgot
all about them.
We had better
put first class
stamps on them
then so that they
dont take ages
to arrive.

2 - 5

33


.
, , ,
. ,
.

.
to remove [ri'mu:v]
to decide [di'said]
to stay off [stei of]
to cut off [kAt of]
electric [i'lektrik]
scissors ['sizoz]
to be finished [bi: 'finift]

28

?
,
.
: ,
.
letter ['leto]
post office [poust 'ofis]
to post [poust]
start [sta:t]
first class stamp
[fo:st kla:s staemp]
to take ages [teik 'eicfeis]

,
(),


( )
,

34

A British Statesman

He was bom in 1874 and was Secretary o f State for


the British colonies from 1906 to 1908. He became
president o f the Board o f Trade in 1910. From 1911
to 1915 he was First Lord o f the Admirality. After
several other posts in the government, he became
Chancellor o f the Exchequer in 1924 where he re
mained until 1929. He is, however, most famous for
his periods as Prime Minister, from 1940 to 1945 and
1951 to 1955. He was often seen in public, smoking a
large cigar.
Do you know the name o f this great politician ?

30
Going to London by Train
John is taking his American guest, Mike, to London.
John has several friends there and they arrange to
stay overnight with one o f
them. They leave on the
10 oclock train which is
./
r
quite empty as the rush
hour is over. Within a
short time they enter the
suburbs o f London, and
soon after they arrive at
-.jCT.___ I
Euston Station.

35

29

1874 . 1906 1908 .
. 1910 .
. 1911 1915 .
. 1924 .
( ),
1929 .
- 1940 1945 . 1951 1955 .
.
Winston Churchill (18741965)


.
,
- .
, , .
,
.
to take someone
somewhere [teik]
several ['sevral]
to arrange [']
to stay overnight
[stei 'ouva'nait]
rush-hour ['/]
to enter [enta]
suburb ['8:]

-.
-; -

;
-.

36

31
Invitation to a Wedding
Sarahs cousin plans to get married in May. Because
so many arrangements have to be made in advance,
she starts sending out
invitations. Sarah is to be
a bridesmaid. Her cousin
sends her pictures from a
catalogue, showing
dresses the bridesmaids
are supposed to wear.
When Sarah sees the frilly
style she is almost in
clined not to go.

32
A Famous Robber

A legendary outlaw is supposed to have lived in


Sherwood Forest with a group o f followers in the
12th13th centuries. He is the hero o f many ballads
and plays because he is said to have robbed the rich
to help the poor. According to legend he was bom of
a noble family, but when his family did not want to
follow the countrys leader their lands were confis
cated, and he became an outlaw.
Do you know the name o f the man whose worst enemy
was the Sheriff o f Nottingham ?

37


.
,
.
.
, .
,
.
cousin [kAzn]
arrangement [' ]
in advance [in ddVa:ns]
bridesmaid ['braidzmeid]
catalogue ['kaetabg]
to be supposed to do sth
[sa'pouzd]
frilly ['frili]
style [stail]
to be inclined [in'klaind]

-.
,

-.



XIIXIII .
, , , ,
. ,
,
, ,
. ,
?
Robin Hood

38

33
A Door for the Cat
Eric:
Loma:
Eric:

Loma:

I am fed up opening and closing the door to


the garden for that cat.
Rememberyou
wanted to build
in a cat door?
So I did. I think I
saw a ready-made
cat door in the
supermarket.
I f it isnt too dear,
I ll bring it back
next time I go
shopping.

34
Do It Yourself
Loma bought a cat door for Eric to build into the
kitchen door which leads out to the garden. It all
looks quite simple on the
plan. There is a template
to saw around so that
the cat door is guaranteed
to fit. When Eric has
sawn the hole, he places
the cat flap in and screws
it in from both sides.
Now the cat just has to
learn to use it.

39

33

:
:
:
:


.
, ?
. ,
.
, ,
.

to be fed up [fed ]
cat door [kaet do:]
to build in [bild in]
so I did [sou ai did]
ready-made ['redi meid]
dear [dio]

34

- .1


,
, .
. ,
. ,
.
.
to lead out to [li:d aut to]
template ['templit]
to saw [so:]
to guarantee [.gaeron'ti:]
flap [flaep]
to screw in [skru: in]

-.

40

35

A World-Famous Book

The book we are looking for is a novel by George


Orwell which was published in 1945. It is a satire on
revolutionary and post-revolutionary Russia, jMiimals
take over the running o f a farm and revolt against the
humans, but soon a new tyranny replaces the old one.
The slogan becomes, all animals are equal but some
are more equal than others.
Can you guess the name o f this famous book?

Golf
Golf is a wide-spread pastime for many people in
Britain. Every weekend, no matter what the weather
is like, thousands o f people
take their golf bags and
play a round o f 18 holes
before meeting for a drink
in the clubhouse. Most
golf courses offer the
opportunity for visitors
to play for the day
without actually
joining the club.

41


, , ,
1945 .
.
, .
: , , .
?
Animal Farm


( , 19031950) . 1984.


. -
, 18 ,
.

, .
wide-spread [\vaidspred]
pastime ['paistaim]
no m atter what ['maeta]
round [raund]
hole [houl]
clubhouse ['kkbhaus]
opportunity [ops'tjuiniti]
to join [d3oin]

,
,

42

A Scottish Architect

He was bom in Glasgow in 1868. Along with three


fellow students at the Glasgow School o f Art he
designed a completely new style o f metalwork, post
ers, embroideries etc. After qualifying as an architect
he designed many houses and public buildings which
gained him fame in the whole o f Europe. Some o f
the ftxmiture he designed is still produced today by an
Italian furniture company.
What is the name o f this famous architect?

A Thunderstorm
Loma:
Eric:
Loma:

Eric:

Just look out the window at that lightning!


The storm seems tobe getting closer all the
time.
Oh dear! The tel
evision has gone
blank. The light
ning must have
struck the aerial.
What a nui
sance, the pro
gramme was just
beginning to get
interesting.

43

37

1868 . -
, ,
.. ,
,
.

. ?
Charles Rennie Mackintosh

-

.
.
,
.

38
1]
:
:
:
:

, !
, .
! . ,
.
, .

thunderstorm ['6Anddsto:m]
lightning ['laitnir)]
to get closer [get klouss]
to go blank [gou blaegk]
to strike [straik]
aerial ['1]
nuisance ['nju:s9ns]
programme ['prougraem]

( )

44

39
---------------------- EXERCISE
Crossword
1. A place for books
2. You put it on bread.
3. fish and . . .
3[
4. It is made from milk.
5. a fruit or colour
6. a baby sheep
7. bread with meat or cheese
8. a fruit
*T
9. a little hen
9
10. a loaf o f ...
11. You need it for camping.
1 down: A big shop

Winter Sale
Jill:

There are some really good bargains at that


expensive boutique down the road.
Pete: Has the winter sale
started already?
Jill:
Yes, there is a large
sign in the window,
saying everything is
halfprice.
Pete: / bet you ve already
got your eye on
some things!

45


1.
2.
3. ... ( )
4.
5.
6.
7.
8. ()
9.
10. ...
11. ()

L

I

1 :



S
S
N

N D

L F
R

G
W I

N
D
N


:
.
:
?
: , , ,
.
:
, - !

winter sale [Svinte seil]


bargain [:]
expensive [iks'pensiv]
large [la:d3]
half price [ha:f prais]
to have an eye on sth
[hav ai]


;
,
,

-. (.),
-.

46

A Landmark of London
There is a large group o f buildings on the north bank
of the river Thames. It began as a fortress and palace
and later became a state prison. Many traitors spent
their last days there before being executed. Today the
buildings are used as a store for ancient armour and
weapons and other items o f public interest. They are
guarded by the beefeaters, which is the popular
name for the Yeomen o f the Guard.
Do you know the name o f this landmark?

Late for Work


Loma was convinced that she had set the alarm clock
the previous night. But when she woke in the morn
ing, it was already an hour
later than she normally
got up. She phoned her
office and told them that
she would arrive a bit
later. She explained that
the alarm clock had not
rung that morning, but
her colleague at the other
end just laughed.

47

41


. ,
.
.
,
, .
()
. ?

The Tower o f London



, .
,
. ,
. , ,
.
late [leit]
to convince [kanVins]
alarm clock ['1 : klok]
previous ['priivjss]
to explain [iks'plein]
to ring [rip]
colleague ['koliig]

( ..)

48

43
A Subscription
Tom:
Lyn:

Tom :

Lyn:

There was an art m agazine in the post.


There was an offer
o f a free copy in the
newspaper. I f its
interesting, I might
subscribe.
I suppose they 11
offer all sorts o f free
gifts, i f y o u do.
I havent even
looked a t the letter
which accompanies
the magazine.

A Crossword Puzzle
Sue and Pete always solve the crossword puzzle in
the Sunday newspaper. When they complete it they
send it off to try and win a prize. This week it is
especially worthwhile: The first prize for the lucky
winner is a cruise
in the Caribbean.
Sue and Pete are
especially keen on
winning as they
have always want
ed to have a holi
day on a ship.

49


:
:
:
:

- .
.
, .
.
,
.

subscription [sAb'skripJbn]
art magazine [a:t .maega'zim]
offer ['ofo]
copy ['kopi]
gift [gift]
to accompany [' ]

.
,
, .
:
. ,
.
crossword puzzle
['krosw9:d '1]
to complete [kam'plirt]
especially [is'pejbli]
worthwhile [.wa^'wail]
cruise [kru:z]
Caribbean [.kaerihian]
keen [ki:n]

, -.


-.,
-.

50

A New Fax Machine


Tom has bought a fax machine as he intends to
work more from his office at home in the future.
The service engineer
who delivers the machine
has to put in Toms fax
number and name, the
time and date. This in
formation is printed auto
matically on all messages
which Tom sends.

EXERCISE

Crossword Puzzle
1. A room with a desk,
typewriter etc.
2. A young horse
3. You ... a book
4. You eat from it
5. The cover o f a pot
6. An alcoholic drink
7. One o f the four directions

1
2

5
6
7

The bold letters read a word for something coming


from another country.
51

45

,
. , ,
, , .
, .
fax machine [faeks ma'Jim]
to intend [in'tend]
in future ['fjuitja]
to deliver [di'liva]
date [deit]
to print [print]
message ['mesid3]

1. , .. ()
2. ()
3. ... ()
4. ()
5. , ()
6. ()
7. ()
,
- ().
F F
F
R
L
L I D
G I
N
52

I
L
D

N
R

47
An Irish Playwright
This Irish playwright was bom in Dublin in 1880
and was, according to his biography, educated in the
streets o f Dublin. At the early age o f 14, he was
already labouring on the railroad. His first fame as a
playwright came in 1923 with Shadow o f a Gunman.
His play The Plough and the Stars provoked nation
alist riots in 1926. He moved to England in 1926 and
settled there permanently. Later works include Red
Roses for Me (1942) and The Bishops Bonfire
(1955). He died in 1964.
What is the name o f this playwright?

A Treat for Easter


Loma:
Eric:

Loma:

I have ordered lamb for Easter. With the left


overs I can make a curry.
I f it tastes as good
as the roast lamb
you made last
Easter, there wont
be any left.
It is not often that
I get compliments
for my cooking.
The spring weather
must be affecting

53


1880 . ,
, .
.
1923 . .

1926 . 1926 .
.
(1942) (1955).
1964 . ?

Sean O'Casey

48

:
:
:

.
.
,
, .
.
.

treat [tri:t]
lamb [laem]
leftover [leftouva]
roast [roust]
compliment ['komplimant]
spring [sprig]
to affect [a'fekt]

54

A Town in Warwickshire

This town is the birthplace o f the most famous Eng


lish playwright, William Shakespeare. It is situated on
the river Avon which is in fact a part of the name of
the town. On April 23rd, Shakespeares birthday, the
Shakespeare Festival begins here every year. It is
visited by people from all over the world. Many
quaint houses in the Tudor style, which was the
building style o f Shakespeares day and age, still exist
in this town.
What is the name o f the town ?

50
Easter
Loma:
Eric:

Loma:

A fter lunch, shall we go out on our bikes, or


w ould y o u rather laze around in the garden?
I t depends on
how m any bottles
o f wine we get
through with our
roast lamb.
You could o f
course drink tea,
but I suppose a
cool bottle o f
rose w ould be
nice.

55

49


. , ,
, . 23 ,
,
. .

.
?
Stratford- upon - von
--

50

:
:
:


?
,
.
, , , ,
.

lunch [L\ntJ]
to laze around [leiz]
to depend [di'pend]
to get through [get 0 ru:]
of course [av ko:s]
to suppose [sa'pouz]
cool [ku:l]

56

51
At the Greengrocers
Loma: Those are very nice-looking tomatoes.
Grocer: They are fresh in today. They come fro m a fa rm
which grows veg
etables organically.
Loma: Then I will take
six. Do y o u have
lettuce a n d cu
cumber fro m the
sam e fa rm ?
Grocer: Yes, o f course.
A n d these p o ta
toes are also fro m
the sam e place.

52
A Duchy

We are looking for a duchy situated in the extreme


south-west o f England. Many ships have come to
grief on the rocky coast there. In bygone centuries
pirates were at work there, misdirecting ships so that
they would run aground. In olden days brandy and
wine were smuggled across from France. Today it is a
popular area for tourism as the Gulf Stream warms
the waters around the coastline.

What is the name o f this duchy which belongs to the


Prince o f Wales?

57

51

:
.
: . ,
.
:
. -
?
: , . .
greengrocer ['grimgrouss]
tomato [td'maitou]
to grow [grou]
vegetable ['vedytsbl]
organically [o:'gaenikli]
lettuce [letis]
cucumber [:]
potato [pa'teitou]

,
;

52

, -
. .
,
.
. ,
.
, ?

Cornwall

58

53
Taking Work Home
Eric has had a lot of work in his office lately. As he
did not manage to complete everything, he decides to
take some papers home
with him. His wife is not
exactly pleased when she
sees him arrive with a
briefcase full o f work.
But when Eric explains
that he would otherwise
have to work late in the
evenings, she agrees that
he has chosen the better
alternative.

54

9
Who is it?

The authoress, sketcher and painter we are looking


for was bom in Kensington in 1866 to wealthy
parents. She was never sent to school and grew up a
very lonely child. She is famous for her childrens
books such as The Tale o f Peter Rabbit or Squirrel
Nutkin which was her first great success, published
in 1903. All o f her books concern small animals, and
they have been enjoyed by generations o f children
and adults alike.

What is the name o f the artist?

59

53

.
,
. , ,
, .
,
, , .
[leitli]
to manage ['maenid^]
to complete [kam'pli.t]
not exactly [ig'zaektli]
pleased [pli:zd]
briefcase ['bri.fkeis]
to explain [iks'plein]
to agree [a'gri:]
to choose [tju:z]
alternative [od'tamativ]

;
,

54
?
, , ,
1866 . .

.
(1900 .) ,
1903 . .
.
?
Beatrix Potter (1866-1943)

60

55
A Win in the Pools
Eric:
John:
Eric:

John:

I think I have won some money on the pools.


A lot?
No, we will cer
tainly not be mil
lionaires, but it
should be one or
two hundred
pounds.
Thats not bad.
But you have
probably paid
more in during
the last two years.

56
At the Tailors
Eric wants to buy a new suit, He needed one anyway,
but as he has been invited to a wedding he thinks that
this is a good reason to
have a new suit made
now. At the tailors shop
he is shown a lot of dif
ferent materials and even
tually is able to choose
one. Then he is measured
by the tailor and is told to
come back next week for
the first fitting.

61

55

:
:
:
:

, .
?
, , ,
.
. , ,
.

pool [pu:l] (pi)


certainly ['s9:tnli]
millionaire [.miljs'nea]
to pay in [pei]
probably [']
during ['djuorirj]

56

.
, ,
.
,
. ,
.
tailor ['teita]
suit [sju:t]
reason ['ri:znj
material [ms'tiarial]
eventually [i'ventjuali]
to be able to [eibl]
to choose [tju:z]
to measure [ ]
fitting f'fitir)]

,
,

, ;

62

A Discoverer
A famous sailor, bom in 1728, left records o f his three
main voyages in An Account o f a Voyage around the
World 1768-71 compiled from his log-book and
diaries from one o f the botanists who accompanied
him. He discovered the east coast o f Australia and
also a strait and islands which are named after him.
He rediscovered the Hawaii islands. On his third trip
to Hawaii in 1779, he was murdered by natives there.
What is the name o f this great seaman ?

A List of Wedding Presents


Sarah has received a list o f wedding presents from her
cousin, which seems quite a sensible idea to her.
There are quite a few
household items written
down, as her cousin will
immediately move into a
house o f her own with
her husband. Sarah
chooses a series o f ex
pensive pots and pans
which she will buy to
gether with her parents
and her brother.

63

57

, 1728 .,

176871 .,
,
.
, , .
.
1779 . .
?
James Cook (17281779)

58


, .
, ,

. ,
.
list [list]
sensible ['sensabl]
quite a few [kwait] [fju:]
household ['haushould]
item ['aitdm]
immediately [i'mkdjatli]
of her own [oun]
series ['sidri:z]
expensive [iks'pensiv]



;
,

; ,
,

64

59
In the Travel Agency
Eric:
Agent:

Eric:

We would like to go to Paris for a long week


end. Could you arrange the flight and hotelfor
us, please?
Of course. Which
standard of
hotel would
you like?
Well, some
thing in the
centre of Paris
which does
not cost the
earth.

60

April Showers
There is a saying that Aprils showers make way for
Mays flowers. It is true that there is a lot of rain in
April, but often there is
not enough. This can
cause problems for the
water authorities in
Britain who always fear
a water shortage in sum
mer, when people in
certain areas have to get
their drinking water
from tanks.

3 - 5

65

59

:
:
:


. ,
?
. ?
, -
.

to arrange [']
flight [flait]
of course [av 'ka:s]
standard [staendad]
centre ['senta]
to cost the earth [kast 5i a:0 ]

,
,

(
; , )

60

, . ,
,
.
,
,
.
shower ['Jaua]
to make way for [meik wei]
often ['afn]
to cause a problem
[av ka:z] ['prablam]
water authority
['wa:ta a:'0 ariti]
shortage ['Jb:tid3]
certain [sa:tn]
tank [taepk]

-.,
-.



,
; ,

66

61
Wedding Anniversary in Paris
Eric and Loma are spending their 25th wedding anni
versary in Paris. In the past years they did not cele
brate much. Occasionally
they went for a meal, but
this time they decided to
do something special.
They have a lovely hotel
in the centre of Paris.
Eric only booked bed and
breakfast as they intend
eating in a different
restaurant every day.

62

An Inventor

We are looking for an American inventor who lived


from 1847 to 1931. He registered 1,200 American
patents and 1,300 foreign ones. His most famous
inventions include the phonograph, invented in 1877,
the electric light bulb, invented in 1879 together with
Sir J. W. Swan, and the technique o f pouring
concrete, 1907.
What is the name o f th is famous man ?

67

61

.
.
,
- .
.
,
.
to spend [spend]
past [pa:st]
to celebrate ['selibreit]
occasionally ['1]
to decide [di'said]
lovely [lAvli]
to book [buk]
to intend [in'tend]

,
,
;

,
,
,

62

, 1847
1931 . 1200 1300
.
, 1877 .,
, 1879 . . . ,
(1907).
?

Thomas Alva Edison


68

63
Buying a Wedding Present
Sarah:
Loma:

Sarah:

Have you got time today to come to London


with me to buy the kitchen set for Lauras
wedding?
Yes, Ive got noth
ing else planned.
Somewhere in the
city centre a new
kitchen shop open
ed up last week.
Maybe theyll
have some
special offers.

64
April Fools Day
Sue:
Pete:

Sue:

I suppose you think that it was funny setting


my alarm clock an hour too early.
Yes, it was quite
amusing seeing
you rush around
the bedroom. To
day is April 1st.
You wait and
see. I will get my
own back before
the day is fin
ished.

69

63

:

,

?
: , .
.
:
, .
to have time [taim]
kitchen set ['kitjin set]
to have sth planned [plaend]
kitchen shop ['kitjin Jbp]
maybe ['meibi]
special offer ['spejbl ofe]

,
,

64

:
:
:

, , ,
.
, ,
. .
. .

to make an April fool of sb.


['eiprol fu:l]
to suppose [so'pouz]
to set a clock [set] [kbk]
amusing [o'mju:zir)]
to rush around []]
to get ones own back on sb.


,
,
-.

70

65
A Local Election
Pete:
Sue:

Pete:

Sue:

I really dont know who to vote for in the local


election.
You will have
to decide soon
since the polling
stations close at
eight.
Perhaps I will
just close my eyes
and put a cross
somewhere.
Thats very de
mocratic, isnt it?

66
-------------------------

EXERCISE

A Crossword Puzzle
1. Plays are staged there.
2. Oil and ... make a
salad sauce.
3. You hang it on the wall.
4. You need it for painting.
5. An old Celtic instrument.
6. You sleep in it when you
are camping.

2
3

The bold letters read another word for


to come back.
71

4
5

65

:
:
:
:

,
.
,
.
, -
.
, ?

to vote [vout]

to decide [di'said]
polling station ['poulip 'steijbn]

to close [klouz]
,
democratic [dema'kraetik]

local election ['loukal i'lekjbn]

66

1. , ()
2. ... , ()
3. , ()
4. , ()
5. , ()
6. , ()

.
T H E A T R E
V I N E G A R

P I C T U R E
B R U S H
H A R P
T E N T
72

67
The British Electoral System
In Britain as opposed to Germany, for example, the
people vote less for a party than for a candidate. This
explains why a party
which would maybe
only get 30 per cent of
the votes gets 50 per
cent or so of the mem
bers of parliament. The
smaller parties, in partic
ular, like the Liberals,
oppose this system as
being unfair.

68
An English Artist
This English illustrator and writer was bom in 1872.
He was Englands main representative o f Art Nou
veau. He worked as art editor o f The Yellow Book
but was dismissed in 1895 because o f a scandal. His
greatest achievement as a writer is The Story of
Venus and Tannhauser, a rather erotic romance.
He became very popular with his illustrations for
Oscar Wildes Salome.
What is the name o f this artist who died o f tuberculosis
when he was only 2 5 years old?

73

67

, , , ,
, .
, , 30
, 50
. , , ,
, .
electoral system
[i'lektersl 'sistimj
candidate ['kaendidot]
per cent [ps'sent]
member of parliament
['member av 'paibmant]
especially [is'pejbli]
to oppose [s'pouz]

68


1872 .
.
,
1895 . - .

.
.
, 25 ?

Aubrey Beardsley (18721898)

74

69
Fairy-Tales
Children today, in the age o f television and video
recorders, still like to be read fairy-tales before they
go to bed. The old stories
such as Snow White and
the Seven Dwarfs or Cin
derella are still popular.
Puss in Boots or Hansel
and Gretel are still as
well-known to children
today as they were to
their parents and grand
parents.

70
A May Wedding
Sarahs cousin is going to get married today on May
1st. About a hundred people have been invited to the
reception after the wedding.
A function room has been
booked in a hotel and
a three man band hired
to provide music.
Food and drink have also
been ordered. When the
buffet is layed out it looks
as if it would feed twice
the amount o f people.

75

69

, ,
, . ,
. >
, ,
.
fairy-tale ['feariteil]
age [eid3]
Snow White [snou wait]
dwarf [dwo:f]
Cinderella [.sinds'reta]
popular ['popjub]
Puss in Boots [pus in bu:ts]

70

, 1 .

,
. .
, , ,
.
reception [ri'sepjbn]
function room ['fXgkJbn rum]
to hire ['haid]
to provide [praVaid]
buffet ['bufei]
to lay out [lei]
to feed [fi:d]
twice [twais]
amount [s'maunt]

; (

76

71
EXERCISE

A Crossword Puzzle
1. You write letters on it.
2. A spring flower
3. Where you watch movies
4. A piece o f jewellery
5. A political group
6. A piece o f furniture in
an office

1
2
3
4
5
6

The letters in the bold squares give the name o f a tool.

72

Mail from the Bank


The postman has just brought the mail and Pete sees
the familiar envelope containing his bank statement.
On opening the letter he
finds that his account is,
as usual, overdrawn. He
tells himself and Sue
V cP a
that they must spend
less for a while so that
the account is balanced
again. But he says this
almost every month and
.
it never seems to work.

77

71
1. ( )
2. ()
3. , ()
4. ()
5. ()
6. ( )

. ()
T Y P E W R I T E R
U L I
I N
N E C K L A C E
P A R T Y
D E S K

72

,
, .
, , , , .
, ,
.
, , , .
to bring [brir)]
mail [meil]
familiar [fe'miljs]
envelope ['enviloup]
to overdraw [.ouva'dro:]
to balance ['baetans]
to work [w9:k]

( )
,

,
;
-.

78

73
A Typical English Dinner
Loma wants to cook at least one special meal for their
American guest. She has bought a large piece o f beef
from the butcher and
prepares the traditional
English meal of roast
beef, Yorkshire pudding,
potatoes and peas. Mike,
the young man from
America, is very impress
ed and asks Loma to
give him the recipe for
Yorkshire pudding.

74

A Town in Scotland

The town we are looking for is situated in the county


of Fife on the east coast o f Scotland. It is the site of
one of the oldest universities in Britain which was
founded in 1410. There is also an ancient castle there
and a cathedral. Golfers will know the town because
it is the seat o f the Royal and Ancient Golf Club, the
governing body for the game o f golf.
What is the name o f this town ?

79

73


.

,
. , ,
.
special ['spejal]
to prepare [']
Yorkshire pudding
[!:| 'pudip]
pea [pi:]
to impress [im'pres]
recipe ['resipi]


( ,
)

74

, ,
.
,
1410 . .
,
-
. ?

St. Andrews
-

80

75
An American Writer

We are looking for an American short story writer


and novelist who was bom in Illinois, the son o f a
doctor. In 1918 he served with an ambulance unit on
the Italian front. Then he worked as a reporter for the
Toronto Star before settling in Paris. In his books he
celebrated bull-fighting and big-game hunting. He
actively supported the Republicans in the Spanish
Civil War. In 1954 he was awarded the Nobel Prize
and wrote very little after this.
What is the name o f this world-famous author?

76

A Broken Crown
Eric:
Loma:

Eric:

Ouch! I think that bit o f toast has broken my


crown off.
You had better
make an ap
pointment at the
dentists then.
I dont want an
appointment,
I will drive there
right now. I cant
possibly go to
work with this
pain.

81

75


, . 1918 .
.
,
, .
.
.
1954 .
. ?
Ernest Hemingway (18991961)

, , , !,
, ,
, ,
,
The Torrents of Spring, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, Men
Without Women, Winner Take Nothing, Death in the Afternoon, The
Green Hills of Africa, For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Old Man and
the Sea

76

:
! , .
: .
: , .
.
to break [breik]
crown [kraun]
appointment [a'pointmant]
dentist ['dentist]
possibly ['posibli]

; {)
,
( ..)

82

77
At the Dentists
Eric is back at the dentists to have his new crown
fitted. For a couple o f days, he just had
a temporary crown which was
awkward for chewing.
Now the dentist removes
the cover and tries the
new crown for size.
Fortunately it fits first
time. The dentist
mixes up the adhe
sive and sticks the
new crown in place.

78
An English Writer

This English journalist and thriller writer was bom in


1908 and was educated at Eton and Sandhurst.
He subsequently worked for Reuters and as foreign
manager for Kemsley newspapers. His first novel,
Casino Royale, published in 1953, introduced his
handsome, tough, romantic hero James Bond who
appeared in many different settings in later books,
e. g.Live and Let Die(1954),Diamonds are Forever
(1956) andGoldfinger(1964).
What is the name o f this author?

83

77

, .
,
.
. , .
.
temporary []
awkward ['oikwad]
to chew [tju:]
to remove [ri'muiv]
cover ['kAvs]
to mix up [miks]
adhesive [ad'hiisiv]
in place [pleis]

;
( )

78


1908 . .

.
, , 1953 .
, ,
,
,
(1954), (1956) (1964).
?
Ian Fleming (19081964)
()

84

A National Drink

This national drink was first introduced to Britain in


the 17th century by the Dutch who imported it from
China. 430 million pounds o f it are bought in Britain
annually which means approximately six cups per
head per day. Until 1830, this product came exclu
sively from China, but the founders o f the British
Empire planted bushes in Assam. From there it
spread to Darjeeling and from there towards Ceylon.
After all these explanations it should not be too difficult
to guess which drink is meant!

80
Bowling
John:
Eric:

John:

Would you like to come bowling with us


tonight?
I dont know if
Im fit enough,
last time I had
backachefor
days afterwards.
If you take it
easy, youll be
alright. I know
the old bones are
not what they
used to be.

79


XVII , .
430
,
. 1830 .
,
.
, .
, !
tea

80

:
:
:

?
, ,
.
, .
, , .

bowling ['boulip]
backache ['baekeik]
afterwards ['aiftdwadz]
to take it easy ['i:zi]
what they used to be [ju:st]


, ,
-.
; -.
...

86

81
A Shower
Eric:
Loma:
Eric:
Loma:

Look at those clouds. I bet it will rain any min


ute, and we dont have an umbrella with us.
A little bit o f rain
wont do you any
harm.
Well, this morn
ing I got abso
lutely soaked.
Look, theres a
cafe across the
road. Lets go in
there until the
clouds have passed.

82

A Mystery Trip
Loma and Eric cannot decide where to go on holiday.
While browsing through various catalogues they
come across an offer for
a mystery trip. There is a
guarantee o f a good hotel,
sun and sand, but no clue
as to where it is. Eric and
Loma decide to give it a
try. In the travel agency
they are only told that
it is somewhere on the
Mediterranean.

87

81

:
:
:
:

, . ,
, .
.
, .
, . ,
.

shower ['Jaud]
cloud [klaud]
umbrella [']
harm [ha:m]
absolutely ['aebsolu:tli]
to get soaked [soukt]
to pass [pa:s]

82

, .
,
. , ,
, .
. ,
- .
mystery ['mistori]
to browse through
[brauz] [0 ru:]
to come across [] [o'kros]
guarantee [.gaeron'ti:]
clue [klu:]
to give sth a try [giv] [trai]
Mediterranean [.medito'reinjon]

88

;
(, )
-.,

83
A Famous Newspaper

This English newspaper was originally published


under the name o f The Daily Universal Register in
1785. The name was changed in 1788, and it has kept
this name ever since. The founder John Walter and
his son introduced great improvements both in the
mechanism o f newspaper printing and in the collect
ion of news. Today the newspaper belongs to The
News Corporation Limited, headed by Rupert
Murdoch.
What is the name o f this famous daily newspaper
which is also published in a Sunday edition ?

84
T.V. Programmes
Eric:
Dave:

Eric:

Did you see the new so-called comedy show on


television last night?
I turned the box
off afterfive min
utes. These . V.
stations just
seem to offer rub
bish these days.
I quite agree.
I dont think I
would miss the
television at all if
I got rid of it.

89

83

, 1785 .,
.
1788 ., .

.
, . ,
?
The Times and The Sunday Times


;
.

84

:
:
:


?
. ,
.
. ,
, .

programme ['prougrsem]
so-called ['sou ko:ld]
comedy show ['komidijou]
to turn off [tom]
box [boks]
station ['steijon]
rubbish ['rAbiJl
to agree [o'gri:]
to miss sth [mis]
to get rid of sth [rid]

(. )
, .\

,,

-.
-.

90

EXERCISE

Around the House


1
2
3
4
5
6
7

1. When you come into the


house you walk into the ...
2. It grows outside.
3. Part of the garden.
4. You go u p ... to the 1st floor.
5. You eat in this room.
6. You enter a house through it.
7. You put your car there.
1 down keeps the house warm.

86

At the Bakers
Baker:
Eric:

Baker:

Eric:

Good morning, what can I do for you today?


I would like a loaf o f bread and some rolls.
What kind of
bread would you
like? I have nor
mal white bread
or several differ
ent breads made
from dark flours.
I think I will try
that one over
there with the
sunflower seeds on

85
1. ,
...
2. .
3. .
4. ...
*.
5. .
6. .
7.
.
1 - .

L L
R
L W N

S I
D I N I N G
F R N D
G R

R
R

S

R
G

------------------------------ ----------------------------A Tongue Twister


Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper. If Peter Piper picked
a peck of pickled pepper, wheres the peck of pickled pepper Peter
Piper picked?

86

: , ?
:
.
: ?
.
:
, ,
.
baker ['beiks]
loaf of bread [louf] [bred]
roll [roul]
what kind ... [kaind]
several ['sevrol]
flour ['flauo]
sunflower seed ['sAnflauo si:d]

* , .

92

87

A Street in London

This street was until recently the headquarters of


London journalism. It takes its name from a river
which flows into the Thames at Blackfriars. Now,
with modem printing technology, most o f the larger
newspapers have moved away from here, some even
completely out o f London, but the name o f this street
has become synonymous with the British press.
What is the name o f this street?

88
Off on Holiday
Eric and Loma are at the airport, waiting for their
plane to take them on holiday. Two days ago they
received the tickets for
the mystery trip, and
now they know at
least that they are fly
ing to Italy. When
they arrive at their
destination, a bus
will take them to
their hotel.

93

87

-
. ,
. ,
,
, ,
.
?
Fleet Street
-

88


,
.
, ,
. ,
.

airport ['o:t]
plane [plein]
two days ago [tu: deiz a'gou]
to receive [ri'si:v]
ticket [tikit]
at least [at li:st]
Italy ['itali]
destination [.desti'neijan]

()

94

89
The Lady of Crime

The English authoress we are looking for worked


during the First World War as a hospital dispenser,
which gave her a knowledge o f poisons which was to
be useful when she started writing detective stories.
In her first novel she introduced the famous Hercule
Poirot, another main detective being the elderly Miss
Marple. She wrote about 66 detective novels and
several plays, including The Mousetrap, which has
been running in London for more than 30 years.
What is the name o f this famous crime novelist?

90
Tickets for Wimbledon
John:

I have just received a phone call informing me


that I have won tickets for Wimbledon.
Robert: Forjust one match
orfor the whole
tournament?
John:
I will receivefull
details in the
post tomorrow.
Thefirst prize
was two tickets
for the centre
court for the
whole tournament.

95

89

, ,
, -
. ,;
.
,
- . - \
66 ,
,
30 . ?
Dame Agatha Christie (18901976)

,
.
,
, .

90

:

,
.
: ?
: .

.
to inform [in'fD:m]
match [maetj]
tournament ['tuansmant]
full [ful]
detail [df.teil]
centre court ['senta ko:t]

96

An American Writer
This American writer, bom in 1835, started off as a
printer and newspaper writer. In 1865 he published
his first successful story which established him as a
leading humorist. His most famous works, deeply
rooted in his own childhood, The Adventures of
Tom Sawyer and its sequel The Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn, appeared in 1876 and 1885.
What is the name of this American writer who died
in 1910?

92
Tennis
John:
I really must train harder in tennis.
Robert: I dont think you. will ever become good
enough to become
a professional.
John:
I realize that.
When I seethe
players in big
tournaments I
think I should
have started
playing ten hours
a day when I was
five years old.

4 - 5

97


, 1835 .,
. 1865 .
,
. ,
, -
, ,
1876 1885 . ,
1910 .?
Mark Twain, pseudonym o f Samuel Langhome Clemens
-

92


.
: , -
.
: .
, ,
.
to train [trein]
hard [ha:d]
professional [pra'fejbnl]
to realize ['ridlaiz]
tournament ['tuansmant]
ten hours a day
[ten 'au9z dei]

, ;

93
Hiring a Car
Loma and Eric think it will be a good idea to hire a
car during their holiday. In the hotel where they are
staying there is an office
from a well-known car
hire firm. Eric has to
produce his driving
licence so that the
contract can be drawn
up. He pays a fixed
price for a week with
no additional charges
for kilometres driven.

94

At the Beach
Loma:
Eric:

Loma:

This really is beautiful: ju s t lying here in the


sun a n d doing nothing else.
I d o n t think I could
lie here roasting
away fo r the whole
holiday though.
I couldnt either.
I never understand
those people
who do that.
They m ight as well
stay at hom e
a n d go to a solarium.

99

93

,
. ,
, .

.
.

to hire []
well-known [.wel'noun]
to produce [pre'djurs]
to draw up a contract
[dro:] f'kontrsekt]
fixed [fikst]
additional [d'dijhnl]
charge [tja:d3]

; ,

94

:
:
:

:
.
,
.
. ,
.
.

beach [bi:tj]
to lie [lai]
to roast [roust]
whole [houl]
to understand [.Ands'stend]
solarium [sou'lcariam]

100

An English County

We are looking for a county in the north o f England


which the river Trent runs through. The area is also
known as The Potteries due to the fact that it is the
centre o f the British ceramic industry. Josiah Wedgewood founded a pottery at Etruria in the 18th century.
The quality o f ware he produced was very high, and
his factory became world famous.

Can you guess the name o f this county?

96
An Archaeological Site
Loma:

Eric:

These archaeological sites always sound so in


teresting, when one reads about them, but all
one ever sees are
boring old stones.
Yes, they always
take away the in
teresting pieces,
the ceramics and
jewellery. But la
ter on we can go
and have a look
at those finds in
the local museum.

95

,
. ,

. XVIII .
.
,
. ?

Staffordshire

96

:
:


, , -
.
, , ,
.
.

archaeological [,:1'111]
site [sait]
boring [:)]
piece [pi:s]
ceramics [si'raemiks]
jewellery [ 6311:olri]
find [faind]

102

97
Tennis
Lyn:
Tom :

Lyn:

Tom :

1 th in k I m ight take tennis lessons.


W h a ts the sudden interest in sport? A re you
worried about
getting old and
infirm ?
1ju s t fe e l that I
w ould like to be
fitter.
You d o n t have to
take expensive
tennis lessons to
be fit. You could
swim or jo g more.

98

Crossword Puzzle
1. When you are on
holiday, you hope
that the ... is nice
2. You pack your
clothes into it.
3. Another word for
vacation.
4. Many ... cross
the Channel.
5. You show it
at the border.

3
4
5

The bold letters down read a part of Great Britain.

103

97

:
:
:
:

, .
?
?
, .
,
.
.

lesson [lesn]
sudden [sAdn]
interest ['intrist]
to be worried about f'wArid]
infirm [in'fo:m]
expensive [iks'pensiv]

98

1. , , .
2. , ()
3. .
4. - .
5. , ()

.

W E A T H E R
S U I T C A S E
H O L I D A Y
F R R I E S
P A S S P O R T

104

99
EXERCISE
Puzzle
1. You eat it in fast food
restaurants.
2. You can make one from
tomatoes.
3. A fruit.
4. It comes out o f an egg.
5. You eat it for breakfast.
6. People drink lots o f it
in England.
The bold letters down give a place where you can buy
fresh food.

100

Shopping
Sue:

Pete:

I ll have to buy a new sw im m ing costum e fo r


our holiday. The one I ve got is several years
old a n d probably
does n t f i t
any more.
I need a p a ir o f
short trousers. I
c a n t really wear
my old cut o ff
jea n s on board a
cruiseship.

105

99
1. , ()
2. , ()
3. , ()
4. , ()
5. , ()
6. , ()
,
.
H A M B U R G E R
S A L A D
P E A R
C H I E N
B R E A D
T E A

100

:
:


. , , ,
, , .
.

.

swimming costume
['swimip ,kostju:m]
several ['sevrol]
to fit [fit]
pair []
to cut off [kAt]
on board [bo:d]

106

101
A Bus Trip
After Sue and Pete have returned the hired car to the
rental firm, they pick up some brochures describing
bus tnps around the island. They plan to go on a bus
journey which will
take them to
many places of
interest. The
buses are all airconditioned and
during the trip
one can buy cool
drinks from the
driver.

----------------------- EXERCISE ----Puzzle


1. A place you put books on.
2. You can look through it.
3. High buildings have...
3
4. The postman brings the...
5. You count with. . .
p
6. There i s ... on the road.
___
7. You hit it with a hammer.
8. Another word for fury
[*~
or anger.
The bold letters down read a watersport.
107

101


,
.
,
.
,
.
bus trip [bAS trip]
to return [ri'ta:n |
brochure [/]
to describe [di'skraib]
airconditioned ['eakandifand]
cool [ku:l]

1. , ()
2. , ()
3. ... ()
4. ... ()
5. ... ()
6. ... ()
7. , ()
8. , ()

, ()
S L F
W I N DOW
L I F S
I L
N U MB R S
F F I
N I L
R G
108

103
Heat Wave
A heat wave is affecting most o f England and every
one is complaining. The British never seem to be
happy about the weather.
Either its too cold, too
wet or too warm. The
weather is also a great
subject of conversation.
As soon as two people
come together, the usual
comment is Nice day
today or, alternatively,
Were having a lot o f rain
for this time o f year.

A Village in Scotland
This small village lies just on the Scottish border to
England. It became famous as a place where young
couples eloped to from home to get married without
their parents consent. Until 1940, these marriages
could be carried out by the village blacksmith.
Today, it is still a popular place for tourists, and many
marriages are still carried out here. However, nowa
days one of the partners must be of age and must
have lived in Scotland for at least three weeks.
What is the name o f this village ?

109

103

, .
, .
, , .
- . ,
, ,
.
heat wave ['hi:t weiv]
to affect [o'fekt]
to complain [kam'plein]
subject [fSAbd3ikt]
conversation [.konva'seijbn]
comment ['koment]
alternatively [o:l't3:nstivli]

(, )

, ,



. ,
, . 1940
. .
, -
.

.

Gretna Green
-

110

105
Ordering a Taxi
Eric:
Recep
tion:
Eric:

Hello, reception, could you please give me the


number o f a taxi company?
If you would prefer,
/ can order a taxi
foryou.
Yes, please, that
would be very
nice. My Italian
isnt that bril
liant. We would
like to be picked
up at 12.15.

qp

106
An American Writer

The writer in question was bom in Boston, Massa


chusetts in 1809. In 1827 he published his first vol
ume o f verse anonymously. A collection o f stories
entitled Tales o f the Grotesque and Arabesque in
cludes one o f his most famous works, The Fall o f
the House o f Usher. His end was as tragic as his
stories: He died o f heart failure in Baltimore five days
after having been found semi-conscious and delirious
from alcohol.
What is the name o f this author?

Ill

105

:

,
?
: , .
:
, , . -
. 12.15.
reception [ri'sepjbn]
taxi company
['taeksi ' ]
to prefer [pri'fb:]
Italian [i'taeljsn]
brilliant [*brilj3nt]
to pick up [pik]

;
( ..)

106

() 1809 . 1827 .
.

.
, :

,
- . ?

Edgar Allan (1809-1849)


112

107
In a Bookshop
John, who is an avid reader, is visiting a big bookshop
in London which has several storeys. He spends a
long time, browsing
through the shelves.
There are stands with
all the latest best-sellers
and different sections
with various headings
such as subject or author.
When he leaves the
shop, he is loaded
with eight new books.

A Festival
One o f the most important festivals of music and
theatre performance in the world takes place every
year in Edinburgh from the middle of August to the
start o f September. The main place where the per
formances can be seen is the Usher Hall and the
Kings Theatre. Since it was founded in 1946, the
number and variety o f acts have constantly increased.
As well as opera and ballet, theatre and concerts,
there are also art exhibitions, film shows and poetry
readings.

What is the name o f this festival?


113

107

, ,
, .
, .

.
, .
bookshop ['bukjbp]
avid ['sevid]
storey ['sto:ri]
latest [leitast]
section ['sekjbn]
various [Vearias]
heading ['hedir)]
subject ['sAbd3ikt]
author [':]

,
,



. ,
, - .
1946 . ,
. ,

, .
?
Edinburgh International Festival o f Music and Drama
-

114

109
------------------------ EXERCISE Crossword Puzzle
1. a hot spice
1
2. a spice and a vegetable
3. a red vegetable
4
and pepper

5. a long, green vegetable


6. usually accompanies
a curry
7. the sauce for a salad
The bold letters read another ingredient for a salad.

110
Wine
Pete:

Sue:

I discovered a new wine shop in a small street


near my office at lunchtime. I bought some claret
and some bottles of
dry white wine. One
of them comes from
Australia, the
others are all
French.
Lets open the A ustralian wine tonight
to go with the New
Zealand lamb.

115

109

1. ()
2. ()
3. ()
4 .... ()
5. ()
6. ()
7. ()

(-)

I L I


S L

R I
D R S

R

R
S

I N G

110


.
.
, .

.

to discover [dis'kAva]
office f'afis]
claret ['klaerat]
Australian [a'streiljan]
to go with sth

( )

116

Ill
An Art Exhibition
When Eric and Loma arrive home, they find an invi
tation to an art exhibition among their mail. The
exhibition is by a group of
young artists and includes
paintings, sculptures and
video art. At the opening
there will be several per
formance artists there as
well. Loma and Eric are
both interested in the
visual arts and therefore
plan to attend.

112
A Novel (not only) for Children

In 1883 R. L. Stevenson published a romance in book


form which had previously appeared as a sequel in
Young Folks. The book tells the adventures of
young Jim Hawkins, Squire Trelawny, Long John
Silver and a group of old buccaneers who set out in
the schooner Hispaniola. The story, which is a
favourite with children, has also been turned into
several films.

With this information in mind, it should not be


very difficult to guess the title o f the book.

117

Ill

,
.
, ,
. .

.
art exhibition [a:t .eksi'bijbn]
artist ['a:tist]
painting ['peintir)]
sculpture ['skAlptJb]
to be interested in ['intristid]
visual arts [Visual]
to attend [s'tend]


, ,

112
( )
1883 . .. ,
.
, ,
,
. ,
, .
, .
Treasure Island


1850 1894 .
. ,
.
118

113
A Garden Party
Peter:
Eric:

Its always a bit risky planning a garden party.


One never knows what the weather is going to
be like.
*.........ib<
Thats the interesting thing
about living in
England. You
never know when
the next shower
will come. Come
on, help yourself
to a beer, Ill start
the barbecue.

A Poem
This narrative poem was published by Robert Bums,
Scotlands most famous poet, in 1791. Tam, a farmer,
spends the evening in an alehouse. When he is riding
home, he passes a church which is lit up. He stops
and sees warlocks and witches dancing to bagpipe
music. Tam, roused by the sight o f one winsome
wench, shouts to her. The lights go out and the
witches rush out in pursuit of Tam. He races off and
only just escapes by crossing running water.

What is the name o f this poem ?


119

113

:
:


. , .
.
, . , ,
.

garden party ['ga:dn pa:ti]


risky ['riski]
weather [Veda]
to help oneself [help]
barbecue ['ba:bikju:]


, , 1791 .
. ,
, .
, .
,
. , .
, .
?
Tam OfShan ter (Robert Burns, 17591796)
( )
-- .
120

115
A Power Cut
In the estate, where the Millers live, workmen have
accidentally cut through a power cable while repairing
the road. All the houses
were without electricity
for several hours. The
food in the Millers deep
freeze began to thaw, and
when Loma came home
from work, she immedi
ately wrapped it up in
newspaper. Nevertheless
a lot had to be thrown
away.

116

Who Were They?

We are looking for the name o f a group o f Puritans


who felt persecuted in their English homeland.
In 1620, they left Plymouth in Devon on the May
flower bound for America. They settled in Massa
chusetts and named the first settlement Plymouth
after the town they had left behind. The day o f their
landing in New England, December 22nd, is a public
holiday in the United States o f America.

What were these people called?

121


, ,
, .
.
,
,
. .
power cut [' kAt]
estate [is'teit]
accidentally [.seksi'dentli]
cable ['keibl]
electricity [i.lek'trisiti]
deep-freeze [,di:p'fri:z]
to thaw [Go:]
to wrap up [raep]


;
,

?
,
. 1620 .
() ,
.
- ,
. , 22 , -
.
?

Pilgrim Fathers -

122

117
Radio News
John:

Eric:

I heard on the radio this morning that people


are not allowed to wash their cars or water
their gardens
because o f the
water shortage.
This happens
almost every year
in summer. I
dont understand
why, considering
all the rain we
get here in
Britain.

1X8

A Famous Statue

A colossal bronze figure o f a woman holding a torch


was a gift of the French people to America to com
memorate the centenary o f American independence.
The figure was erected on a high granite pedestal on
Bedloe Island in New York harbour. It is a great at
traction, and many thousands o f tourists use the lifts
inside the statue to go to the top from where they
have a wonderful view o f New York.
What is this statue called?

123

117

:
:

, -

.
. , ,
, .

water shortage ['wo:t3 Jb:tid3]


to be allowed [a'laud]
almost [o:lmoust]
to consider [karisids]




.
- .
,
, ^ ,
-. ?

Statue o f Liberty

124

119
Water Shortage
It is quite common in England that water is short in
summer. When it has not rained for two or three
weeks, orders are generally
v
given that cars should not be
washed. The Southwest o f
England is usually worst
hit, but in exceptional
summers even Scotland
has to suffer. Sometimes
even drinking water has
to be delivered to some
villages in tanks.

120
A New Suit
Loma:

John:

Loma:

When are you going to buy a new suit? The


one that you are wearing looks as if you have
inherited it from
your grandfather.
Theres no need
to exaggerate.
Apart from that
its thefashion
today.
Still I think you
should go to the
tailor before you
start your new job.

125

119

.
,
. - ,
.
.
to give orders [giv 'o:daz]
usually ['ju:3U9li]
worst [wa:st]
exceptional [ik'sepjanl]
to suffer ['sAfo]
to deliver [di'liva]
village [Vilid3]

,
,

120

:
:
:

? ,
, ,
.
. ,
.
, ,
.

suit [sju:t]
to wear [wes]
to inherit [in'herit]
to exaggerate [ig'zaed39reit]
fashion ['faejbn]
tailor fteib]

126

121
A President

The 16th president o f the United States was bom in


1809 and assassinated by John Wilkes Booth in 1865
while visiting a theatre. He was a Republican and
demanded an end to negro slavery. Therefore his
election in 1861 caused a split with the eleven
Southern states. This led to the American Civil War
in which this man was the political leader o f the
Northern states.
What was the name o f this famous president?

122
At the Bookmakers
Eric:
Book
maker:
Eric:
Book
maker:
Eric:

What odds are you offering on Redwing in


the third race today?
6 to 4.
Is he the favour
ite then?
Yes, he has won
his last four
races.
Then I d like to
place 5 to win.

127


1809 .,
1865 .
.
. 1861 .
.
,
.
?

Abraham Lincoln

122


?
: .
:
?
: , .
:
.
bookmaker ['bukmeika]
odds [odz]
race [reis]
favourite ['feivarit]
to place [pleis]

; ()

128

M w M tta
Loma:

Eric:

Loma:

The most awful thing happened today. I start


ed the washing machine and went shopping.
When I got back, the
kitchen was flooded.
/ hope the water
didnt run
through to the
living room.
No, thank God.
It would have
made a right
mess o f the new
carpet.

A Famous Scotsman
This Scottish missionary and explorer was bom in
1813. He educated himself while working in a cotton
factory. He took his medical degree in 1840. In the
following 30 years he travelled across the African con
tinent. His many geographical discoveries include for
example the Victoria Falls. During his last expedition
to discover the sources o f the Nile, he was thought
lost, but was rescued by H. M. Stanley. He died in
1873 and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
What is the nam e o f this doctor?

129

123

:
:
:

.
. ,
.
, .
, .
.

awful ['o:ful]
washing machine
['wojlp mo'JIm]
kitchen ['kitfin]
through [0ru:]
thank God [Gaerjk god]
to make a mess of sth [mes]

,

,


1813 .
,
. 1840 . .
30
.
, , .
,
.. . 1873 .
. ?

D avid Livingstone

130

125
The Plumber
When Loma had cleaned up the kitchen after the leak
tram her washing machine, she had time to look for
the cause o f all this trouble.

She discovered that a


rubber pipe, which
takes the dirty water
from the machine, had split.
The plumber came with
an assortment of pipes,
and the repair only
took a few minutes.

126
The Lost Credit Card
Bill:
Eric:
Bill:

Eric:

I wanted to pay with my credit card yesterday


and discovered that it was not in my wallet.
Have you lost it then ?
I must have. I
searched all the
cupboards at
home and
couldnt find it.
Youd better re
port it to the
bank immedia
tely before some
dishonest person
tries to use it.
131

125


, , ,
. , ,
, .
,
.
plumber ['1]
to leak [li:k]
to discover [dis'kAvs]
rubber pipe [' paip]
to split [split]
assortment [a'saitmant]

,
-


,
,

126

:
:
:
:


, .
?
.
.
,
- .

credit card ['kredit ka:d]


wallet ['wolit]
to search [ss:tj]
cupboard [']
to report [ri'po.t]
dishonest [dis'onist]

132

127
------------------------

EXERCISE

A Crossword Puzzle
Across: l.Cows and pigs
live on .... 4.We need it to
breathe. 5. Not new.
6. Tennis and soccer are
two kinds o f ....
Down: 1. Everybody
knows him; hes ....
2. Many people can neither
... nor write. 3. A road in
the middle o f town with
houses on one or both
sides.

128
Report at the Bank
Bill followed Erics advice and phoned his bank as
soon as he discovered that his credit card was
nowhere to be found.
He was told that he
would be responsible
for any charges to the
card until he reported
*/
it missing. He is not
at all sure how or
where he could have
lost it and hopes that
no one went on a buying
spree with it.
133

127

: 1. ... 4.
. 5. . 6. ...
: 1. ; ... 2.
..., . 3.
.
f m s

t
m
i
1 d

S t

128

,
, . ,

, .
, , ,
, .
to follow ['folou]
advice [od'vais]
responsible [ris'ponsobl]
charge [tja:d3]
to report missing
[ri'po:t 'misip]
to be sure [fuo]
buying spree [ spri:]

134

129
A Novel

We are looking for the two characters in a novel


published by R. L. Stevenson in 1886. One is a doctor
who is conscious o f the mixture of good and evil in
his own body. He discovers a drug which enables him
to separate the evil personality in himself. The second
person appears, gradually takes over the body and
commits a murder. The doctor now finds that he is
no longer able to control the changes o f personality
and finally commits suicide.
W hat are the names o f these two characters?

130
An Extended Weekend
John:
Lorna:

It is always good when a public holiday falls


on a Monday. It means that one has an extended weekend.
The only thing
which disturbs
me today is that
all the shops are
closed. I had
completely for
gotten about the
bank holiday
and didnt buy
enough bread on
Saturday.
135

129

, . .
1886 ,
. ,
.
,
. ,
,
. ?

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde


:
:

,
. ,
.
, , ,
.
.

bank holiday [baepk 'hobdi]


public [']
extended [iks'tendid]
to disturb [dis't9:b]
completely [kam'plirtli]

;
,

, ,

136

131
An English King

This English king reigned from 1491 to 1547. When


he wrote a book directed against Luthers teachings
and presented it to the pope he received the title
Defender o f the Faith1. We have a pretty good idea
of what he looked like because he was painted several
times by his court painter Holbein. The kings private
life is the subject o f many dramas and works o f fiction
including a play by Shakespeare. He is probably best
known because o f his six wives.
What is the name o f this king?

132
At the Ophthalmologists
Loma has had headaches for some time while reading
or working at the computer screen and decides to go
to the ophthalmologists to
have her eyesight tested.
The doctor measures
her eyes with a special
device. He tells her that
her left eye is slightly
weaker than the other
one and that she
should wear glasses
for reading and
writing.

137

131

1491 1547 .
, ,
, .
, ,
.
- ,
. , ,
. ?

Henry VIII



,
.
. ,
.
ophthalmologist
[pfBasl'mobd^ist]
headache [hedeik]
screen [skri:n]
eyesight f'aisait]
device [di'vais]
weak [wi:k]
glasses {pi) ['gla:siz]

, ,

138

133
Making Jam
The Millers have a lot o f apples and rhubarb in their
garden. As usual Loma makes some jam so that all
the fruit gets used up.
It isnt really cheaper than
buying it in the shop, but
the family always prefers
home-made jam. The
other day she found a
recipe for apple and
elderberry jam and
she asks Eric to pick
some berries.

134

An American Authoress

She was bom in Pennsylvania in 1874. Before she


moved to Paris in 1902, she studied psychology and
the anatomy o f the brain. In Paris her home became a
meeting place of the artistic avant-garde. Of her
highly idiosyncratic poetry she said, I struggled with
ridding myself of nouns. Her many published works
include essays, sketches of life in Paris, literary
theory, short stories and a drama. She died in 1946.

What is the name o f this woman ?

139

133

. ,
, .
, ,
.
,
.
jam []
rhubarb [*ru:ba:b]
fruit [fru:t]
home-made [.houm'meid]
recipe ['resipi]
elderberry ['eldsberi]
to pick [pik]

134

1874 . .
1902 . .
-.
:
.
,
, , .
1946 . ?

Gertrude Stein

140

135
New Glasses
Loma:

You pho n ed up to say that my new glasses


were ready.
Optician: Yes, Mrs. Miller,
I ll ju s t fetch
them fro m the
workshop.
Loma: It feels strange to
look through
glasses, I sup
p o se I will have
to get used to it.
Optician: I m sure it w ont
ta ke long.

A New Kitchen
The Browns who live next door to the Millers want
to buy a new fitted kitchen. They have had theirs for
more than fifteen years,
and it is a bit old-fashion
ed. They draw up a plan
and take it to a kitchen
fitters. Sue would like to
move the gas-cooker and
the sink, and they are told
that they will have to call
the plumber to fit new
appliances.

141

135

:
:
:
:

, .
, , .
,
.
, .
;

-.

to fetch [fetj]
workshop ['wo:kJbpj
strange [streind3]
to get used to sth Ljuist]
to take long [teik bp]

136

, ,
. , ,
, .
.
, ,
,
.
next door [nekst do:]
fitted kitchen ['fitid kitjln]
old-fashioned [.ould'fsejond]
to draw up a plan [dro:] [plaen]
to move [mu:v]
gas-cooker [gaes^uko]
sink [sigk]
appliance [o'plaions]

142

137
A Quiz Show on Television
Sean:
Jill:
Sean:

There was a really daft quiz show on T V last


night.
I f it was so daft,
why did yo u
watch it?
It always interests
me to see how the
contestants win
these enormous
sum s o f money by
answering ridicu
lous questions.

138

An Insurance Salesman
There was an insurance salesman at Sean and Jill
Whites door today, trying to sell them a new policy.
Jill told him that they
already had all the
insurance they needed,
but he started to go
through a list o f all the
policies which only his
company could offer.
Eventually Jill had to
be rude and close the
door in his face.

143

137

:
.
: , ?
:
,
,
.
Sean :]
daft [da:ft]
contestant [kan'testant]
enormous [i'no:ni9s]
sum [sAm]
ridiculous [ri'dikjubs]

(
)
,
,


,
.
, ,
,
.
.

insurance [in'Juarans]
salesman ['seilzman]
policy ['polisi]
eventually [i'ventjuali]
rude [ru:d]
to close the door in sbs face

()
,

144

139
A Birthday Present
Jill:
Sean:

Jill:

We still have to buy a present fo r Sam .


I bet h e s glad that his birthday comes so soon
after Christmas.
This m eans he
gets two sets o f
presents within
two weeks.
There is an
additional benefit
fo r us, too:
toys are much
cheaper after
the holidays.

-------------

EXERCISE ------------

An Old Rhyme
2 lovers sat beneath the shade,
And 1 un 2 the other sayed,
How 14, 8 that you, be 9,
Have smiled upon this suit of mine.
If 5 a heart it beats for thee.
Thy voice is mu 6 melody.
My 10 drest feelings are 4 you;
Tis 7 to be thy loved 1,2;
Say, oh nymph, wilt marry me?
Then lisped the maid, Why, 13 ly!

145

139

:
:
, ,
. ,
.
: :
.
birthday present
['bo:0dei preznt]
to bet [bet]
soon [sum]
within [wi'din]
benefit ['benifit]
toy [toi]
cheap [tji:p]

, ,
,


Two lovers sat beneath the shade,
And one unto the other sayed,
How fortunate that you, benign,
Have smiled upon this suit of mine.
If I ve a heart it beats for thee.
Thy voice is musics melody.
My tendrest feelings are for you;
Tis heaven to be thy loved one, too;
Say, oh nymph, wilt marry me?
Then lisped the maid, Why, certainly!
. : ,
, , .
. .
; - . , ,
? : , !
146

141
A Philanthropist
This famous philanthropist was bom in Scotland in
1835, but was taken to America by his parents during
the so-called hungry forties. At the age of thirteen
he began to work in a cotton factory, but later,
through much energy and shrewd speculation, be
came incredibly rich as one o f the leading iron pro
ducers of the U.S. In 1900 he published The Gospel
of Wealth, maintaining that a man who dies rich
dies disgraced and then set about distributing his
surplus wealth.
What is the name o f this philanthropist?

142
Zapping
Sean:
Laura:
Sean:

Laura:

W ill yo u please stop changing the channels on


the television set all the time.
I ju s t w ant to see
w hats on the other
stations.
It was much easier
when I was your
age. There were
only two channels
to choose fro m B B C a n d ITV.
That m ust have
been really boring.

147

141

1835 .,

.
, ,
,

. 1900 .
, , , ,
,
. ?

Andrew Carnegie (18351919)


142

:
:
:
:

, ,
.
, .
,
. -- -.
, .

zapping [zaepio]
to change [tjeind3]
channel [tjaenl]
station ['steijhn]
age [eid3]
to choose [tju:z]
boring ['bo:rir)]

148

143
Planting Bulbs
Eric has bought some flower bulbs to plant in his
garden. He has daffodils, hyacinths and tulips He
planted quite a lot o f daf
fodils in the previous
year, but there are still a
lot o f empty patches in
the garden. Eric and his
wife like to have a lot of
colour in the garden in
spring. It is always nice to
see the first snowdrops
after a long winter.

Invitation to a Restaurant
Eric:

Loma:
Eric:

The head o f m y departm ent has invited a fe w


o f us to dinner on Friday night. Wives a n d
husbands are
invited, too.
W hat is the rea
son fo r this then?
Our section has
m ade an even
bigger profit than
last year. I think
th a ts worth a
little celebration.

149

143

,
, .
, .
, .
.
bulb [1]
to plant [pla:nt]
daffodil [ dasfodil]
hyacinth ['haiosinG]
tulip ['tju:lip]
patch [paetJl
spring [sprig]
snowdrop ['snoudrop]

, ; ,

144

:
:
:


. .
?
,
. , .

head [hed]
department [di'pa:tmont]
wife,/?/wives [waif] [waivz]
husband ['hAzbondj
reason ['ri:zn]
section [sekfon]
to make a profit
[meik] ['profit]
worth [wo:0]
celebration [.seli'breijon]

150

145
In the Kitchen
Sean:
Jill:

Sean:

I fo u n d this piece o f m ouldy old cheese at the


back o f the fridge.
It m ust have been the kids. You know that
they ju s t throw
everything into the
fridge and into the
cupboards when
they clear the
breakfast table.
I th in k I ll have to
have words with
them, it was quite
disgusting.

146

New York Bridges


Because of New Yorks geographical position on the
East and Hudson Rivers, it is a city o f bridges. There
are no less than sixty-five bridges, eighteen of which
connect Manhattan with the other boroughs and New
Jersey. There is another famous bridge between the
Brooklyn Bridge and the Williamsburg bridge.

What is its name?

151

145

:


.
: , , . ,
,
.
:
, ,
.
kitchen ['kitjln]
piece [pi:s]
mouldy ['mouldi]
to clear the table
fridge [frid3]
cupboard ['lovbod]
to have words with sb.
disgusting [dis'gAStip]

,
,
-.
,

-

-, - .
,
-.

. ?
Manhattan Bridge

,
-:

= Brooklyn Bridge

= M anhattan Bridge
W
= Williamsburg Bridge.
152

147
A Presentation
Jill:

Sean:
Jill:

Laura told m e they had som eone in school


today, who gave a presentation on his ex
perience as a m is
sionary in Africa.
In which lesson geography or reli
gion?
1 d o n t think it was
part o f a lesson.
Laura said it was
very interesting be
cause he brought along a lot o f slides.

148
EXERCISE

Puzzle
There are six types o f weather hidden in the grid below.
Can yo u fin d them?

S T
U Y
N L
S A
H P
I
NT
E D

O
O
I
D
R
E
S
E

R M B Y H E
U M U D A L
L L Y I N
R I Z Z L E
A M T H Y W
I NN L A
N O W H U N
R W E T O N
153

147

: , -

.
:
?
: , . ,
,
.
presentation [.prezsn'teijbn]
experience [iks'pisrians]
missionary ['mijhsri]
geography [c^i'ografi]
religion [']
to be part of sth
lesson [lesn]
slide [slaid]

; ,

-.

.
?
S

N
S

I
N

I
D
R

S
D

Y
L

L
R

I
N
R

L
I

Y
Z

N
W

Y
D

I
L
Y

storm
drizzle

snow

sunshine ,

hail

rain

L
N

N
N

154

149
An Inheritance
Jill got a letter from a solicitor, informing her that she
inherited a plot o f land from an uncle who had died
recently. Jill and Sean have
been saving for years with
a building society, and al
though they were sorry
that the uncle had died,
they were delighted at the
prospect o f eventually
being able to build their
own house.

An American Author
Truman Capote (1924 -1984) was born in New Or
leans. His work includes the so-called faction (fiction
and fact) novel In Cold Blood (1966) in which he
recreated the brutal multiple murder o f a family in
Kansas by two ex-convicts, tracing the lives of the
murderers to the moment o f their execution, but also
books like the light-hearted story of Holly Golightly.
A famous New York jewellers plays a role in the title
of this book.
What is the name o f this book?

155

149

, ,
,
.
, ,
,
.
inheritance [in'heritsns]
solicitor [soTisits]
plot [plot]
to save [seiv]
building society
['bildirj ss'sateti]
delighted [di'laitid]
prospect ['prospekt]

,
()
,


, ;

150

(1924-1984) .

(1966),
,
,
, .
-
. ?

Breakfast at Tiffany's (1958)


156

151
Plans for a House
Sean:

Jill:

Sean:

N ow that we have the p lo t o f land, what type


o f house are we going to p u t on it? A prefabri
cated house or one
designed by an ar
chitect?
I d o n t know, both
have their advan
tages and disadvan
tages.
We can have a look
around the neigh
bourhood a n d see
which we prefer.

152
Brochures
Sean wrote to several companies which had adver
tised in a magazine he had bought, on prefabricated
houses. They all sent
brochures describing in
detail how their houses
were, in many ways, su
perior to those from the
competition. After brows
ing through them, Sean
was still not sure what
kind of house he and Jill
should build.

157

151

:

, ,
?
?
: , .
:
,
.
prefabricated [pri:'faebrikeitid]
architect ['a:kitekt]
to design [di'zain]
advantage [od'va:ntid3]
disadvantage [ldis9d'va:ntid3]
neighbourhood [neibohud]
to prefer [prffe:]

152

,
, , .
,
, ,
. , ,
.
brochure []
several f'sevral]
to advertise ['aedvataiz]
magazine [.maego'zkn]
to describe [di'skraib]
in detail [in 'dkteil]
superior [sju'piorb]
competition [.kompi'ti/sn]
to browse through [brauz]

; ()

, ,

158

153
A Skyscraper
One of the most spectacular skyscrapers in New York
was completed in 1984 between 5th Avenue and
56th Street. The 202 m building with its 68 floors was
designed by Der Scutt. The atrium is especially attrac
tive with walls and floors covered in marble especially
imported from Italy, and a 60 m artificial waterfall
running down the back wall. The skyscraper bears the
name o f its owner, an ex-billionaire whose name
made a lot of headlines.
What is his name?

At the Architects Office


Jill and Sean have made an appointment with an
architect to talk about the prospects of him designing
a house for them. They
discuss what kind of house
Jill and Sean would like.
He agrees to make them
a preliminary drawing and
asks them to come back at
the beginning of next
week to see if his sketch
complies with their ideas.

159

153

-
1984 . 5- 56- . 202-
68 .
,
, ,
60- ,
. , -, .
?
Donald Trump (Trump Tower)

10
.

154

,
. ,
.

, ,
.
appointment [a'pointmsnt]
to agree [':]
preliminary [pri'liminsri]
drawing ['dro:ir)]
sketch [sketj]
to comply with [kam'plai]

()

160

Visiting a Showroom
The Browns have decided to buy a new fitted kitchen,
but they are not quite sure which style to choose.
They drive out to an in
dustrial estate where a
new show room for fitted
kitchens has opened the
week before. They have
seen an advert in the
paper saying that new
customers get a free
microwave cooker with
every order over 1000.

156

A Queen

She was the daughter o f James V o f Scotland and


lived from 1542 to 1587. She married Francis II of
France in 1558, Lord Damley in 1565 and Bothwell in
1567. She was imprisoned by Queen Elizabeth I o f
England and finally beheaded on a charge o f con
spiracy against the queens life. She figures in several
novels and plays and is the subject o f a tragedy by
Schiller.
What is the name o f this queen ?

6 - 5

161

155

,
, .
,
. ,
,
1000 .
show -room ['Jourum]
to decide [di'said]
style [stail]
industrial estate
[in'dAStrial is'teit]
advert ['asdvait]
cu stom er ['kAstama]
microwave ['maikrouweiv]
o rd er l'o:dd]

156

V 1542 1587 .
II 1558 .,
1565 . 1567 .
I

.
.
?
Mary Queen o f Scots (Maria Stuart)
, ;

162

157
New Loud Speakers
Eric:
Loma:

Eric:

I saw an excellent pair o f speakers in the hi-fi


shop today.
You dont seri
ously want to buy
new speakers, do
you ?
Why not? We
could sell the old
ones, they are
still okay and
would probably
fetch a good price.

158
A Classical Concert
Loma and Eric are at a classical concert. The London
Symphony Orchestra are playing various works by
Beethoven and Brahms.
In the interlude Loma
and Eric make their way
to the foyer where they
meet some friends. They
discuss the event over a
glass o f sherry. Eventually
the bell goes, and they all
return to their seats in
the concert-hall.

163

157

:
:
:

.

, ?
? ,
, , .

excellent ['eksdbnt]
pair []
loud speaker ['laud ,spi:ks]
hi-fi shop ['hai'fai Jbp]
seriously ['siariasli]
to fetch a good price
[fetJl [prais]

,

,

158

.

.
, .
. ,
.
classical ['klaesikal]
concert ['konsdt]
symphony orchestra
['simfani 'o:kistr9]
interlude ['intdlurd]
foyer ['foiei]
event [i'vent]
seat [si:t]

;
, .:
;

164

159
Baking a Cake
Jill:
Sean:

Jill:

I havent baked a cake in ages. I think I ll


m ake one tomorrow.
Its so long ago that
y o u ll probably
have to buy all
the ingredients
new. The sell-by date
will long be past.
Thats all right,
I ll m ake a shop
ping list and you
can go and get the
things.

------------------------

EXERCISE ----------------------

Rhymes
Each word in the left-hand column below rhymes with
one word in the right-hand column. Can you say which
rhymes with which ?

bury
fiery
glory
hairy
marry
lorry
weary
worry

cheery
diary
ferry
carry
hurry
sorry
story
vary
165

159

: .
.
:
, , ,
. ,
.
: , ,
.
in ages ['eid3iz]
to bake [beik]
cake [keik]
probably [']
ingredient [in'grkdjant]
sell-by date ['sel bai deit]
shopping list ['Jbpir) list]


,
;
,


, ?
bury ()
fiery ()
glory ()
hairy ()
marry ()
lorry ()
weary ()
worry ()

.
ferry ()
diary ()
story ()
vary ()
carry (, )
sorry ()
cheery ()
hurry ()

----------------------- --------------------- , ,
?
Yuppies = Young Urban Professionals
Dinks = Double Income No Kids
Woopies = Well-Off Older People

166

161
An Irish Author
The author and playwright we are looking for was
born near Dublin in 1906. He taught in Dublin before
moving to Paris where he met James Joyce in 1928.
His trilogy Molloy, M alone Dies and The Unnamable
were all originally written in French as was his
famous play Waiting fo r Godot. W ith the performance
o f this play he became widely known as a playwright
o f the absurd theatre. He was awarded the Nobel
Prize in 1969.
What is this authors name?

Do it yourself
Sean is considering doing some o f the inside work in
their new house to save some money. He and Jill
have always put up the
wallpaper, so that w ill be
no problem, and he can
also lay carpets. He had
considered putting in the
doors as well, but when
he found out how little
could be saved there,
he decided to have this
work done by a firm.

167

161

, , 1906 .
. , ,
1928 . . ,

-,
.
. 1969 .
. ?
Samuel Beckett (19061989)


,
, .
, ,
. ,
, , ,
.
to consider [kan'sida]
inside [in'said]
wallpaper ['woil.peipa]
to lay [lei]
carpet ['ka:pit]
to decide [di'said]
to have sth done
firm [fo:m]

, ,

-.

168

163
A Part of Manhattan
This part of Manhattan has the same name as a
district in London. It is bordered by Canal St. to the
south, Broadway to the east and Houston St. to the
north. Until about twenty years ago, this district was
just a collection of warehouses and small factories.
Today it is full o f artists and galleries, jazz and rock
cafes, and exclusive shops.
What is this district in Manhattan called?

164
Valentines Day
Laura was really excited because she had received her
first Valentines card. Jill, her mother, thought it a bit
unusual that her ten year
old daughter had been
sent a card from an
anonymous admirer
but thinking back to her
own school-days, she
remembered that she
had also received cards
at that age.

169

163

,
. -, -
, - -.

. , - . ?
SoHo = South o f Houston St.
( -)
, Houston
: ['haustan].

164
.
,
. , ,
,
, , ,
, .
. (14 )
( ) -
.
excited [ik'saitid]
to receive [ri'si:v]
unusual [An'ju:3U3l]
anonymous [s'nonimss]
admirer [sd'maiara]
to remember [ri'membs]

170

165
A Hit-and-Run Offence
Sean had left his car parked in a multi-storey car park
while he went shopping. When he returned, he found
that someone had dam
aged the front wing o f the
car. The person had left
without leaving his name
or address. Sean was very
angry and reported the
damage to the car park
attendant.

166

A Dish
Sean was complaining that they dont eat enough fish.
Jill found a recipe which her mother often used: 500 g
of smoked haddock is boiled and then mixed with
rice which has been cooked with butter, curry powder
and cayenne pepper. Hard-boiled eggs which have
been passed through a sieve are then added to this
mixture.
What is the name o f this dish which originated in India?

171

165

,
. , , -
. ,
.
.
hit-and-run offence
[,hit and ' o'fens]
multi-storey [, stoiri]
car park ['ka: pa:k]
to damage ['daemid3]
wing [wip]
to report [ri'po:t]
attendant [o'tendont]

166

, .
, : 500
, ,
, .
, .
?

kedgeree [.':]

172

167
Raking Leaves
John:
Loma:

John:
Lorna:

Isuppose I might as well rake the leaves to


gether today. Dad will ask
me to do it anyway. ^
Thats a good
idea. Put them
all on the com
post heap.
Wheres the rake
then?
Im sure its
beside all the
other tools
in the shed.

168

An English Novelist

This writer was born in Nottinghamshire in 1885.


His father was a miner, but his mother was determin
ed to keep her son out of the mines and encouraged
him to study. His first major novel Sons and Lovers
from 1913 is an autobiographical account o f his early
years. His last and perhaps best known book is Lady
Chatterleys Lover. It caused a lot o f furore as did his
other writings because o f his frankness about sex.
He died in Vence in March 1930.
What is the name o f this author?

173

167

:
:
:
:

, .
.
. .
?
, ,
.

leaf, pi leaves [li:f| [li:vz]


to rake [reik]
I might as w ell...
compost heap ['kompost hi:p]
tool [tu:l]

(), . . ,

;
/


1885 .
,
.
(1913)
. , , . ,
,
. 1930 .
?
D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence

174

169
In the Library
John is at the local library, choosing some books. He
has difficulty finding a certain book on architecture
he has read about in a
magazine. The librarian
looks through his files
and tells John in which
section he should look.
Finally John finds the
book he has been search
ing for and another
similar book which he
takes as well.

At the Police Station


Sean:

I d like to report that my car has been dam


aged and that the other driver drove off
without leaving
his name and
address.
Policeman: Unfortunately
that type o f thing
happens all the
time. I ll write a
report, but we
have very little
chance o f finding
the culprit.

175

169

.
,
.
, .
, , ,
.
library [laibrori]
difficulty ['difikolti]
certain ['so:tn]
architecture ['cr.kitektjo]
magazine [.maego'zim]
librarian [lai'breorion]
file [fail]
section ['sekjon]

170

:


, ,
.
: , .
,
.
police station [po'li:s 'steijon]
to drive off [draiv of]
to leave [li:v]
unfortunately [An'f^tjnitli]
report [ri'po:t]
culprit ['kAlprit]

,
,
;

176

171
An Estimate
Jill:
Sean:
Jill:

Sean:

The architect has sent an estimate for the


building costs of our house.
Can we afford to
build?
It will actually cost
less than we had
reckoned with.
I think we should go
ahead.
Okay, we can sign
our souls away to
the mortgage bank
for the next 25 years.

172

A Famous New York Building


Before the Empire State Building was completed in
1931, another building which had been completed a
year earlier was the highest building in New York.
This skyscraper in the Art Deco style is almost 319 m
high and is named after the car manufacturer who
had it built. The stainless steel tower which gives the
building its characteristic appearance can be seen
from most positions in New York.

When is the name o f this building?


177

171

:
.
:
?
: ,
. , .
:
,
25 .
estimate ['estimeit]
to afford [a'fo.d]
to reckon with [ ]
to go ahead with sth [a'hed]
to sign away [sain]
mortgage ['mo:gid3]



,
-.
(),

172
-
-- 1931 .
- ,
. -
319 ,
. ,
, . ?

Chrysler Building - -, ,
.
: -, 425

178

173
Flying Kites
In October the wind is usually strong enough for
children to fly their kites. Eric and Loma go for a walk
and see many children
with their kites. Some of
them are just made of
sticks and held together
with a plastic rubbish bag
stretched across them.
Other children have
spent their pocket-money
on colourful kites in all
shapes and sizes.

174
An English Playwright

He was bom in 1929 and made his name with Look


Back in Anger (1956). The first volume o f his auto
biography A Better Class o f Person tells o f his
childhood in suburbia, his brief spell as a journalist
and his years as an actor during which he began to
write plays. His outbursts of anger against contem
porary society caused him to be called an Angry
Young Man along with others such as Kingsley Amis
and Allan Sillitoe.
Who is this playwright?

179

173

,
.
.

.
.
to fly a kite [flai] [kait]
to go for a walk [gou] [wo:k]
rubbish bag [rAbifbaeg]
to spend [spend]
pocket-money ['pokit.imni]
shape [feip]

174

1929 .
(1956).
,

, .

,
, .
?
John Osborne (192994)

180

175
In a Boutique
Sue:
Assistant:

Sue:

Could I try these trousers on, please?


Of course. In the
comer over there
is a cubicle. If
they dont fit,
just tell me, and
Ill get the
same model in
a size bigger.
Oh, I m sure
theyllfit.
I always wear
this size.

176

At the Doctors
Laura had been complain
ing about having a sore
throat all weekend. Her
mother decided to take her to
the doctor since her tonsils
looked very swollen. The
doctor said that it would
be best if Laura had her
tonsils removed as she has
trouble with her throat at
least twice every year.

181

175

:
, ?
: . - .
, ,
.
:
, , .
.
to try on [trai]
trousers (pi) ['trauzaz]
assistant [s'sistant]
comer [':]
cubicle ['kju.bikl]
model [modi]
size [saiz]

176

.
,
. ,
,
.
to complain [ksm'plein]
sore throat [so: Grout]
to decide [di'said]
tonsil [tonsl]
swollen [swouten]
to remove [ri'mu.v]
twice [twais]

182

177
EXERCISE

A Puzzle
1. You sleep under it.
2. You hear with it.
3. It sweetens coffee.
4. Youve got five on
each hand.
5. You read b y
light.
6. You cross a river on it.
7. You record music
with it.
1 down: Something you
need when travelling.

178
Microwave Cooking
Sue:

Pete:

Sue:

Im glad they supplied a recipe book with the


microwave cooker. I think I need some time to
get used to cook
ing in such a
short time.
I read somewhere
that the cooking
times are related
to the weight of
the food.
Yes, thats right,
but its not quite
as simple as that.
183

177

1. , ()
2. , ()
3. , ()
4. , ()
5. ... ()
6. , ()
7. , ( )
1 : , ()

S
F I
R I

N
L
D

G
G

L
R

N
R
R

R D R

178

:
:
:

,
. , ,
.
- ,
.
, , .

to supply [sa'plai]
to get used to sth [ju:st]
to relate to sth [ri'leit]
weight [weit]
quite [kwait]
simple [simpl]

,
-.
,

184

179
Sunday Dinner
When Sean makes roastbeef on Sundays it is always
accompanied by potatoes and gravy. But to soak up
the gravy he also makes something else. He takes 2
eggs, 1/2 tsp. salt, 100 g flour, 1 /4 1 milk and puts these
ingredients in the mixer for 40 seconds. He then heats
fat in a dish in the oven and, when it is very hot,
pours the mixture over it and returns it to the oven
for ca. 30 minutes until it is crispy brown.
What is this fam ous dish called?

180
In Hospital
Jill takes Laura to the hospital and fills in the long
registration form. Eventually a nurse comes and tells
her that she should take
Laura to the ear, nose and
throat ward where another
nurse will show Laura to
her room. They go up in
the lift and eventually find
the ward they are looking
for after wandering around
in a maze o f corridors.

185

179

,
.
, - . 2 , 1/ 2
, 100 , 4 40
.
, ,

30 ,
. ?
Yorkshire pudding

180


.
, -,
.

.
to fill in [fill]
registration form
[.rec^is'treijon fo:m]
eventually [i'ventjuoli]
nurse [no:s]
ward [wo:d]
maze [meiz]
corridor ['korido:]

186

181
A Street in New York
One street in New York is synonymous for the com
plete financial district in which it is situated. The
street received its name from a wall which used to
run along here. It was built to protect the Dutch
Nieuw Amsterdam from the English and the Indians.
In 1700 the wall was knocked down and a street built
in its place. Today there are many banks and solici
tors offices situated here.
What is the nam e o f this street?

182
A Visit in Hospital
Sean and Jill visit Laura in hospital and are told by
the doctor that they can take Laura home the follow
ing day. When Laura hears
this she is very pleased.
She tells her parents that
she cant sleep at night
because the girl in the next
bed keeps talking in her
sleep, and she has read all
the books which she
brought with her anyway.

187

181
-
-
, .
, - .
,
. 1700 . ,
.
. ?
Wall Street

-
- - -
, (
, 40 60). - -
.. ,
(New York Stock Exchange - - ).

182

, ,
. ,
. ,
,
, ,
.
visit [Vizit]
following ['folouirj]
pleased [pli:zd]
to keep doing sth [ki:p]
anyway ['eniwei]

,
-.
, ,

188

183
A Pedestrian Precinct
Sean:

I t s much nicer shopping here now that the street


has been turned into a pedestrian precinct.
Jill:
The only trouble is
carrying everything
back to the car.
Sean: You've always got
m e to carry any
thing heavy.
Jill:
B ut y o u re always
the first one to
complain about
carrying shopping
bags.

184

A Mexican Restaurant
While walking through the pedestrian precinct, Jill
and Sean discovered a Mexican restaurant they
had never seen before.
There is a special lowpriced lunchtime menu
with lots o f interesting
things like tacos with
guacamole and chili con
came. Since they have
never eaten Mexican
food before, they decide
to go in and give it a try.

189

183

:

, ,
.
: .
:
.
:
.
pedestrian precinct
[pi'destrbn 'prr.sipkt]
trouble []
to carry ['kaeri]
heavy [ hevi]
to complain [kom'plein]
shopping bag ['Jbpir) baeg]


, ,

184

,
, .


.
, .
Mexican ['meksikon]
to discover [dis'kAvo]
menu [menju:]
taco ['taekou]
guacamole [.gwcuko'mouli]
to give sth a try

(
)
( )
,

190

185
The Abbey Theatre
The Abbey Theatre was originally opened in 1904.
Soon it became a focus of the Irish revival and be
came home to the Irish National Theatre Society.
After the First World War the theatres finances be
came perilous, and in 1925 it received a grant from the
new Eire government, becoming the first state-sub
sidized theatre in the English speaking world. In 1951
the Abbey Theatre burnt down, but a new theatre
bearing the same name was built and opened in 1966.
In which Irish city is this theatre situated?

186
On the Bus
As Lauras school is quite far away from where she
lives, she has to go to school by bus every day. Quite
often the bus is full and
she has to stand for the
whole journey. This is
sometimes awkward for
her, as she has to carry
her schoolbag and occa
sionally, when she plays
hockey at school, she
has her hockey stick
with her, too.

191

185

1904 .

.
, 1925 .
,

. 1951 . , 1966 .
, .
?

Dublin

186

,
.
, .
, , ,
, .

quite [kwait]
to go by bus
often ['o:fn]
whole [houl]
journey ['d39:ni]
occasionally [']
hockey stick ['hoki stik]

192

A Street in Manhattan
In Manhattan it is easy for a tourist to find his way
around. The streets run from east to west and the
avenues run from south to north. The Fifth Avenue
divides Manhattan into the East Side and the West
Side. There is only one significant exception: New
Yorks longest street runs diagonally from the Battery
in the south to the city boundary in the north.
What is its nam e?

A Birthday Party
Lyn:
Jill:

Lyn:

I m really pleased to see all o f yo u here, but


I m also a bit angry with Paul.
How can yo u be
angry with him
fo r organizing a
surprise party fo r
you?
I f I d known be
fore, I would have
h a d my hair done
a n d perhaps
bought som e new
clothes.

7 - 5

193

187

.
, .
- -.
: -
.
?
Broadway

-- , 80-
XX . 30
- .

188

,
.
: ,
?
:
, ,
, - .
pleased [pli:zd]
angry ['aerjgri]
to organize [':1]
to have ones hair done
clothes [kloudz]

194

189
Gardening
With spring approaching
Sean realizes that he will
have to tidy up the garden
It is not one of his favour
ite tasks and he has been
putting it off as long as he
could. But since he has a
day off work today, he
plans to spend the whole
day in the garden, cutting
grass and pulling out
weeds.

190
Playing Golf
Jill:
Sean:

Jill:

When I was clearing out a cupboard, 1 discov


ered your g o lf clubs. You havent used them
in ages.
T h a ts true. I al
ways plan to play
a round at the
weekends but
never seem to
m anage it.
Perhaps we can
play together
again som e time.
I t s good exercise.

195

i___

189

,
. ,
, .
, ,
.
gardening ['gcudnip]
spring [sprig]
to approach [a'proutj]
to tidy up ['taidi]
favourite ['feivorit]
task [ta:sk]
weed [wi:d]

,
,

190

:

,
.
.
:
.
, , , .
: , -
. .
to clear out [klis]
cupboard [']
golf club ['golf kLvb]
in ages ['eid3iz]
true [tru:]
to manage [']
exercise ['eksasaiz]

(),



,
,
,

196

191
A Lost Credit Card
Sean chose a new pair of trousers in a shop. When he
took out his wallet to pay with his credit card, the card
was not there. This was
rather embarrassing, as
he did not have enough
cash to pay for the trou
sers and had also left his
cheque book at home.
The shop assistant, how
ever, agreed to keep
the trousers until the
next day.

192

An Irish Playwright
This Irish playwright was born in Dublin in 1923.
He was arrested in 1939 for his involvement with the
IRA. His period in Borstal following this is described
in his work Borstal Boy (1958). Probably his bestknown works are The Hostage (1958), a tragi
comedy about an English soldier kidnapped and held
hostage in a brothel, and The Quare Fellow (1959)
which is set in an Irish prison on the eve of a hanging
What is the name o f this playwright?

197

191

.
, ,
. ,
, ,
.
.
to choose [tju:z]
pair []
trousers ['trauzsz]
wallet fwolit]
embarrassing [im'baerasip]
cash [ksej]

192

1923 . 1939 .
(
).
(1958). ,
(1958),
,
, (1959),
.
?

Brendan Behan (19231964)


198

193
A Skateboard
Laura:
Jill:

Sean:
Jill:

Can I have a skateboard, please?


I f y o u have enough money in yo u r savingsbook yo u can buy
one. How m uch do
they cost?
D o n t be ridicu
lous, Laura, y o u ll
break y o u r leg.
I bet y o u had
roller-skates when
yo u were that age
a n d d id n t break
yo u r leg, did you?

194

Going Shopping
After a lot o f persuasion from both Jill and Laura,
Sean agrees that Laura can have her skateboard. He
even takes her to a depart
ment store in the city centre
where they are supposed to
have a large selection.
While Laura is looking at
the skateboards, Seans
attention is drawn to the
many items o f clothing
that have to be worn for
all the different sports.

199

193

:
, ?
: ,
. ?
:
, , .
: , ,
, , ?
enough [i'nAf]
savings-book ['seivipz buk]
ridiculous [ri'dikjutes]
to break [breik]
roller-skates ['route skeits]
age [eid3]

194


, .
, , ,
. ,
,

.
persuasion [p3'swei39n]
to agree [a'gri:]
department store
[di:'pa:tm3nt sto:]
to suppose [ss'pouz]
selection [si'lekjbn]
attention [s'tenjbn]
item [aitam]

200

A Welsh Poet

He was born in Swansea in 1914 and began to write


while still at school. His first volume o f verse appear
ed in 1934. His romantic rhetorical style won a large
following and the publication o f Deaths and Entran
ces in 1946 sold extremely well. Portrait o f the Artist
as a Young Dog from 1940 is a collection o f autobio
graphical short stories. Shortly before his death in
1953 he took part in a reading o f his most famous
single work, Tinder Milk Wood.
What is the name o f this Welsh poet?

Bad Weather
Sean and Jill had planned to drive down to the sea,
but when they got out o f bed, it was a dull and rainy
day and they decided that
it would be a waste o f time
to go anywhere. The fore
cast promised showers all
day with heavier periods
of rain in-between. The
children were disappoint
ed, but Sean promised
that they would play
Trivial Pursuit instead.

195

1914 . .
1934 .
,
1946 . .
* 1940 .
.
1953 .

. ?
Dylan Thomas

196

,
, , ,
- .
.
, ,
.
dull [dAl]

rainy ['reini]
forecast ['fo:ka:st]
to decide [di'said]
waste of time [weist] |taim]
shower ['Jauo]
disappointed [.diso'pointid]

* . Portrait o f the Artist


as a Young M an ( ).

202

197
A British Nurse
The founder of the modem nursing profession lived
from 1820 to 1910. She was known as the Lady o f the
Lamp during the Crimean War, because she used
to tend injured soldiers while carrying a lamp in her
hand. She brought about many reforms in army
hospitals.
What is the name o f this nurse?

198
Listening to the Radio
Jill:

Sean:

I quite like listening


to the new local
radio station. It
has many reports
on events here in
our neighbourhood.
I havent tuned it
into the car radio
yet, but when I m
driving, I prefer
just listening to
music anyway.

203

197

1820
1910 .
,
, .
.
?
Florence Nightingale

,
,
.

.


:
.
.
:
,
, .
to listen [Tisn]
local ['loukol]
radio station
[.reidiou 'steijon]
report [ri'pD:t]
event [i'vent]
to tune in [tju:n]

;
()

204

199
---------------------- EXERCISE ------------------Pronunciation
Here are nine pairs o f words which end with the same
letters but which do not rhyme. Can you say them the
correct way?
1. pork
2. don
3. ass
4. fury
5. cost
6. monkey
7. ponder
8. finger
9. belong

work
won
pass
bury
post
donkey
wonder
singer
among

200
An Evening with Friends
Jill:

Sean:

Dont be late tonight. Remember that Saman


tha and George are coming round for a drink.
They said that they
would come quite
early because they
didnt want to stay
late. Samantha
has a tennis match
tomorrow.
Theyve never been
the same since they
started playing
tennis.
205

199

,
, . ?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

pork [:] ()
don [don] (. )
ass [aes] ()
fury ['fjusri] ()
cost [kostj ()
monkey [Wi^ki] ()
ponder ['ponds] ()

work [ws:k] ()
won [wAn] ()
pass [pa:s] ()
bury ['beri] ()
post [poust] ()
donkey [dorjki] ()
wonder [wAndo] (,
)
singer ['sips] ()
among [')] (,
)

8. finger ['fipgo] ()
9. belong [bi'brj] ()

200

. ,
.
, ,
.
.
,
.

late [leit |
tonight [ts'nait]
to remember [ri'membs]
quite [kwait]
early ['s:li]
same [seim]

206

Halloween Lanterns
Halloween is on October 31st, and children in Britain
often make themselves lanterns from marrows or
turnips. The inside is
scooped out with a spoon,
leaving a thick skin all
around. Then eyes, nose
and mouth are cut into
one side to make a face.
When a candle is placed
inside, it shines through
the holes and gives an
eery appearance in the dark.

202
Fancy-Dress Party
Loma:
Eric:
Loma:

Eric:

We are invited to a Halloween party.


Does that mean I have to dressup again ?
Yes, its a fancydress party, and I
said we both
would come. I m
sure it will be
quite good fun.
/ really wish you
would ask me
before accepting
that kind o f in
vitation.

207

201

- 31 ,
.
, .
, , .
,
.
Halloween [,haelou'i:n]
lantern ['laentan]
marrow ['maerou]
turnip ['ta.nip]
to scoop out [sku:p]
candle ['kaendl]
eery ['iari]
appearance [a'piarans]

202

:
:
:
:

.
, ?
, , , . , .
, ,
.

fancy-dress [.faensi'dres]
to dress up [dres]
good fun [gud fXn]
to accept [ak'sept]
this kind of [kaind]
invitation [.invi'teijan]

208

203
I

In the Pub
O n Friday night, Sean and
Jill o ften go to th e pub at
th e en d o f th e road. T hey
m e e t m an y friends and
have a gam e o f darts or
pool. S ean h as taught
Jill to play darts so well
th a t she o ften beats
him . She is even co n
sidering jo in in g a ladies
team w hich is still look
ing for m em bers.

204
An English Novel
Jan e A u ste n began w riting this novel in 1798 an d sold
it to a p u b lish er w ho p u blished it po sth u m o u sly in
1818. It is probably th e earliest o f h e r com pleted
works. T h e purpose o f th e novel is to ridicule th e
tales o f ro m an ce and terro r w hich w ere popular in
th o se days, such as M rs. R adclifles M ysteries o f
U d o lp h o .

What is this novel called?

209

203


.
. ,
.
, .
darts [da:ts]
pool [pu:l]
to teach [ti:tj]
to beat [bi:t]
to consider [kan'sids]
to join [d3oin]
member ['membs]

{ )

;
,
,

204

1798 .
, ,
1818 . , ,
.
, , . ?
Northanger Abbey

:
( , 1811, , 1813,
-, 1814, , 1815)

210

205

On the Patio
Jill:
Sean:

Jill:

Sean:

Well really have to scrape the m oss fro m


in-between the stones on the patio.
7 quite like it the
way it is. It gives
the patio a quaint
look.
That may be so,
but it becomes
very slippery when
it rains.
B ut who sits out
on the patio when
it rains?

Breakfast
Jill has m ad e scram bled eggs for Sam because it is the
only way h e will eat th e m at all. L aura, o n the o th er
h and, w o n t eat scram bled
eggs an d has to have hers
soft boiled. A nd ju st to
m ake it m o re awkward
Sean likes his hard boiled.
A fter preparing everyone
elses breakfast, Jill ju st
has a cup o f tea an d a
slice o f toast.

211

205

:


.
:
, .
.
: , , ,
.
:
, ?
patio ['paetiou]
to scrape [skreip]
moss [mos]
quaint [kweint]
slippery ['slipQri]

;
,

,
;

-,
.
, -
. ,
. ,
.
scrambled eggs
['scraembld egz]
soft boiled [.soft 'boild]
awkward ['o:kwod]
hard boiled [,ha:d 'boild]
to prepare [pri'peo]
slice [slais]

212

207
A Barbecue
Sean:
Jill:

Could yo u bring me som e more sausages fro m


the kitchen? I d o n t have any left to barbecue.
Our guests m ust
have been hungry.
Weve already
gone through at
least twenty
m arinaded steaks
a n d lamb chops.
Just as well we
bought so many
sausages.

208

A Prize
A ccording to th e will o f a Sw edish chem ist w ho dis
tin g u ish ed h im se lf in th e develo p m en t o f explosives,
certain prizes are aw arded every year for th e m o st
im p o rtan t discoveries in physics, chem istry, eco n o m
ics an d physiology or m edicine respectively. T h e re is
also a prize for th e p erso n w ho m o st p ro m o ted the
fraternity o f n ations an d to th e person w ho shall
have p ro d u ced in th e field o f literature th e m o st o u t
standing w ork o f an idealistic tendency.

What is the name o f the chemist and the prize?

213

?
.
: , , .

. ,
.
to barbecue ['ba:bikju:]
sausage ['sosid3]
at least [at li:st]
to marinade [maeri'neid]
lamb chop [laem t/]
just as well

208

,
,

, , .
,

.
?

Alfred Bernhard Nobel (18331896), Nobel Prize


,

214

209
After a Party
Loma:
Eric:

Loma:

Considering yo u didn't want to go to the party


in the fir st place, yo u seem ed to be having a
good time.
Well, y o u d o n t
expect m e to
sta n d around in
a com er the whole
time, do you?
No, o f course
not. B ut yo u
d id n t have to
sing a song in
fro n t o f everyone.

210

A Series of Books

We are looking for a series o f books which contain


extensive information on all brands of knowledge.
This series was first published from 1768 to 1771 by
a Society o f Gentlemen in Scotland, the editor
being William Smellie. The first issue was a diction
ary of arts and sciences. The second edition in ten
volumes added history and biography. Later the un
dertaking passed to Cambridge University for publi
cation of the 11th edition in 28 volumes in 1910.
What is this series o f books called?

215

209

:
:
:

, ,
, , .
, ,
, ?
, .
.

to consider [ksn'sida]

,

in the first place [fa:st] [pleis] -;
to have a good time [gud taim] ,

to expect [ik'spekt]

com er [:]

in front of [frAnt]

210

,
.
1768 1771 . ,
.
.
.
,
1910 . 28 .
?
Encyclopaedia Britannica

216

211
A Snack
There is a traditional snack served by most pubs in
the south-west of England. It is made from a pastry
filled with chopped turnip or swede, finely diced beef,
onions, diced potatoes, salt and pepper. It is named
after the English county where it originated and was
traditionally the lunch time meal for the miners who
used to work in the tin mines there.
What is this meal called?

212
A Business Trip
Sean has to see a business partner in New York, and
Jill can accompany him. Sean only has to attend
meetings on two or
three days so they will
both have time to do
some sightseeing.
They are both looking
forward to the trip,
especially as most of
the expenses are paid
for by Seans firm.

217

211

-
.
;
; ; ; .
, ,
, ,
.
?

Cornish pasty

212

-,
.
,
.
,
.
to accompany [']
to attend [a'tend]
meeting ['mi:tir)]
sightseeing ['sait.siiip]
expense [ik'spens]


; ,

218

213

EXERCISE

Abbreviations
Can yo u say what these abbreviations stand fo r?

1 A.D.
2 B.C.
3P.S.
4 P.T.O.
5 R.S.V.P.

6 M.P.
7 U.K.
8 U.N.O.
9 M.A.
10 Y.M.C.A.

214

Going by Taxi
Sean and Jill do not do much walking in New York.
They take a cab when they want to go anywhere.
The cab drivers are very
friendly, but their driving
style sometimes frightens
Jill, especially when they
cross five or six lanes,
apparently without look
ing. Both Jill and Sean are
surprised that there are
not more accidents
involving taxis.

219

213

, ?
1 A.D.
2 B.C.
3 P.S.
4 ...
5 R.S.V.P.

=
=
=
=
=

Anno Domini ( , ..)


Before Christ ( ..)
Postscript ()
Please turn over (. )
Repondez, sil vous plait (.), Reply please
( )
6 .P.
= Member of Parliament ( )
7 U.K.
= United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern
Ireland (
)
8 U.N.O. = United Nations Organisation (,
)
9 . .
= Master of Arts ()
10 Y.M.C.A.= Young Mens Christian Association (,
)

214

-.
- , .
, ,
,
. , ,
, , .
cab [kaeb]

driving style ['draivirj stail]


to frigthen ['fraitn]
to cross [kros]
lane [lein]
accident ['aeksidont]
to involve [in'volv]

()

;
-.

220

215
An Irish Author
This Irish nationalist, novelist and short story writer
was bom in the Aran islands. His first novel The
Neighbours Wife was published in 1923. It was fol
lowed by several others such as The Informer (1925)
and Famine in 1937. However, he is best known for
his short stories such as Two Lovely Beasts from
1948. His stories often deal with life or death from an
animals point of view, e.g. The Cows Death (1923).
What is this author's name ?

216
Souvenirs
Jill:
Sean:
Jill:
Sean:

Jill:

W hat shall we buy fo r the children?


It should be som ething very American that
they ca n t get at
home.
L ike a m odel o f
the Statue o f
Liberty?
Well, not quite
like that. How
about T-shirts
with New York
printed on them?
How very original.

221

215

,
. , ,
1923 . , ,
(1925) (1937).

(1948).
, , (1923).
?

Liam O'Flaherty (1897-1984)


O

216

: ?
:
- ,
.
: ?
, .
:
-?
: .
souvenir ['survsnis]
model [modi]
Statue of Liberty
['stsetju: of 'liboti]
quite [kwait]
to print [print]
original [o'rid3onl]

222

217
Buying Shoes
Jill:
Sean:
Jill:
Sean:

I ll have to buy Sam new shoes again.


He goes through shoes like other people go
through handker
chiefs.
I ts ju st his age.
His feet seem to
grow every week.
I seem to remem
ber my mother al
ways complaining
about the holes in
my shoes when I
was S a m s age.

218

A Soup
Jill was looking through some old cook books and
found a recipe for a soup which she has only had
from tins before. As it is easily prepared she decides
to make it for dinner. She buys a chicken which is
placed in a pot with 1 kg leek cut into 2 - 3 cm long
pieces and covered with 2 1/2 1 beef stock. After 2
hours, ten prunes are added to the broth which is
cooked for another hour. This soup has a rather
Scottish sounding name.
What is it called?

223

217

: .
:
, -
.
: . , ,
.
:
, , ,
,
.
handkerchief ['haerjkatJIf]
age [eid3]
to grow [grou]
to complain [kam'plein]
hole [houl]

218


, .
, .
, 2 1/ 2
1 -,
2 -3 . 2
, . . ?
cock-a-leekie soup
- ( -)

224

219
In a Kitchen Studio
Sean and Jill have been looking through advertising
brochures from various kitchen manufacturers. A t
last they think they have
found something which
suits them as regards
design and price. They
make an appointment
with a salesman to come
out and measure the
kitchen so that they can
have a detailed offer.

220
At the Swimming-Pool
Sean:
Jill:
Sean:

Jill:

I think I ll take the children swimming today.


Its so hot I ll come along with you.
Okay. Shall we go
to that big outdoor
pool on the out
skirts of town, the
one with the big
slide?
Yes, that would be
nice. While you re
entertaining the
children, Ill swim
in the wavepool.

8 - 5

225

219


. , -
.
, ,
.
advertising ['aedvotaizir)]

manufacturer [.maenju'fasktfore]
to suit [sju:t]

appointment [o'pointmont]
()
to measure [']

detailed [di:teild]
,

220

:
, .
: , .
:
.
, , ?
: , .
, .

(, )
,

swimming-pool ['swimip pu:l]


outdoor ['autdo:]
outskirts ['autska:ts]
slide [slaid]
to entertain [.ent^'tein]
wave [weiv]
i

-------------------------------------------

---------

226

221
---------------------------EXERCISE ----- -----------------

On Holiday
case - chair - cos - deck - es - glass - mg - ming - see sight - suit - sun - sun - swim - tan - tour - tume
1. You put your clothes in it when you go on
holiday:____________________________________
2. A piece of clothing which you wear in the
water:______________________________________
3. You use them to shade your eyes:______________
4. After youve been sitting in the sun you have
a n ice______________________________________
5. To visit places of interest you can do a __________
6. To relax at the pool you can sit in a ____________

A Puncture
Sean and Jill plan to cycle into the country and have a
picnic, but when Sean gets his bike out o f the garage,
he finds that it has a punc
ture. He hasnt repaired a
d ?
puncture in years and it
takes him over an hour.
He is in a bad mood be
cause he cut his finger
while putting the tyre back
on again, but that soon
goes away when they are
on the road.

f= > .

227

'

221


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

, :
, :
, :
, ...
, ...
, ...
1. suitcase/
2. swimming costume/
3. sunglasses/
4. sun tan/
5. sightseeing tour/
6. deck chair/

222


,
, , .
,
. , ,
, .
puncture ['pApktJb]
to cycle f'saikl]
to repair [']
m ood [m u:d]
to cut [kAt]
tyre ['tais]

228

223
An English Castle
Queen Anne had a castle built for the Duke of Marl
borough north of Oxford, after his troops had won a
battle at Blindheim in 1704. This castle, which was
built between 1705 and 1722, was modelled on the
Castle of Versailles. The park surrounding the castle
is the work o f Capability Brown, the greatest English
landscape gardener o f the 18th century.
What is the castle called?

224
A Visit
Sean:
Jill:

What time are your parents coming today?


I have to pick them up at the station at one
o clock.
Sean: I must admit I ll be
glad when their visit
is over. Your mother
is sometimes a bit
overpowering.
Jill:
She always has
been. Just dont get
into any arguments
with her as you did
last time.

229

223


,
1704 . ,
1705 1722 .,
. , ,
,
XVIII . ?

Blenheim Palace

224

:
?
: .
:
, , .
.
: . ,
.
visit [Vizit]
to pick up [pik ]
to admit [ad'mit]
overpowering [ouvs'pauarir)]
argument ['mqjumant]

, ,

,
,

230

225
An English Composer
This English composer bom in 1857 was by far the
most important figure in English music between the
death of Handel and World War I. His music has an
unmistakable English quality o f inspiration. The two
works which first made him popular were the socalled Enigma Variations (1899) and The Dream o f
Gerontius (1900). He had great success with L a n d o f
Hope a n d Glory - the words were written by A. C.
Benson - and Pomp and Circumstance.
What is his name ?

226
Window-Shopping
Jill and her friend Sue are window-shopping on High
Street. They dont intend buying anything unless they
find a bargain. Suddenly
they find a shop which has
a notice in the window,
saying Sale - All goods
reduced by 50 %. This is
too good an opportunity
to miss, but to their dis
appointment all the
best items have al
ready been sold.

231

225

, 1857 ., , ,
.
.
, , -
(1899)
(1900).
. .
?
Sir Edward William Elgar (18571934)

226

-.
, -
.
, : - 50%.
, ,
, .
window-shopping
['windou Jbpip]
to intend [in'tend]
bargain [:]
notice ['noutis]
sale [seil]
to reduce [ri'djuis]
opportunity [.opa'tju.niti]
item f'aitam]



,
, -.

,
, ,

232

227
A Printing Press
This private printing press was founded in 1890 by
William Morris at Hammersmith and was named
after the village near Oxford where he had lived since
1871. Between 1891 and 1898 the press issued more
than 50 titles, including several of Morriss own
works. Morris himself designed most of the type,
borders, ornaments and title pages. The presss
greatest book is the 1896 edition o f Chaucers works
with illustrations by Bume-Jones.
What is the name o f this printing press?

228
A Computer Virus
Sean:
Jill:
Sean:

We had a virus in our computer system in the


office, today.
Was it serious?
We had to call in
two programmers
from the firm who
installed the sys
tem. They were
there the whole
day, but now
everything seems
to be working
properly again.

233

227

1890 .

, 1871 . 1891 1898 .
50 ,
.
, , .
1896 .
-.
?
Kelmscott Press
-

228

:


.
: ?
:

, .
, , ,
.
virus ['vaioros]
office ['ofis]
serious [siorios]
to call in [ko:l]
programmer ['prougrsemo]
to install [in'sto:l]
properly [']

234

229
At the Fishmongers
Jill:
I d like fo u r pieces o f cod please.
Fishmonger: We have som e lovely plaice on offer today.
Jill:
I m sure its
very nice plaice,
but the recipe
calls fo r cod.
Fishmonger: The customer
is always right.
Four pieces
o f cod com
ing up.

230

A Sculptor
This American bom sculptor settled in England in
1905 and became a British citizen in 1907. He studied
in Paris and developed a life-long interest in ancient
and primitive sculpture. His first major commission,
18 figures for the British Medical Association in
London, aroused abuse because it was alleged to be
obscene. The enormous bronze group o f St Michael
and the Devil (1958) and Rima, a memorial to W. H.
Hudson, in Hyde Park are two o f his most famous
later works.
What is this sculptors name?

235

229

:
.
: ,

: , ,
.
: .
.
fishmonger ['|)]
piece [pi:s]
cod [kod]
plaice [pleis]
on offer [on 'ofo]
recipe f'resipi]
customer ['kAStomo]

( )

230

, ,
1905 . 1907 .

, .
, 18
, ,
. .
(1958) , .. .
?
Sir Jacob Epstein (18801959)

236

231
A Headache
This morning Jill woke up with a splitting headache.
She took a couple o f aspirins to try and relieve the
pain, but they didnt do
much good. She felt like
going back to bed, but
unfortunately she had to
go to work. Instead of
going by bus, she walked
to get some fresh air, and
by the time she arrived at
her workplace, the pain
was almost gone.

232
Holiday Preparations
Jill:
Sean:
Jill:
Sean:
Jill:

I ts time we started getting all our things to


gether fo r the holiday.
What type o f
things?
Passports, suntan
lotion and so on.
I hope my pass
p o rt is still valid.
I f it isn t, y o u ll
ju s t have to stay
at home.

237

231

.
, ,
. , ,
,
, ,
, , .

headache ['hedeik]
splitting ['splitip]
to relieve [ri'li:v]
unfortunately [An'fo:tjhitli]
instead of [in'sted]


,
,

232

: .
:
?
: , .
:
, .
: , .

preparation [.preps'reijbn]
passport ['pa:spo:t]
suntan lotion
['sAntaen ,1]
valid [Vcelid|
to stay [stei]

238

233
EXERCISE

Pronunciation
In English there are seven different ways in which the
letters -ough are pronounced at the end o f the word.
Here are twelve words ending in -ough.
Can you say how each is pronounced?

1 borough
2 bough
3 cough

4 dough
5 hiccough
6 plough

7 rough
8 thorough
9 though

10 through
11 tough
12 trough

234
Checking in
Airport staff: Is this all the luggage you wish to check in,
Sir?
Yes, w ell take the other two bags as hand
luggage.
Airport staff: M ay I see your
passports,
please?
Sean:
Youve got
them in your
handbag,
havent you,
Jill?
Jill:
I hope so.

Sean:

239

233

-ough. , ?
1 []
2 [bau]
3 [kof]

4 [dou]
5 [']
6 [plau]

= ,

=
bough
=
cough
=
dough
hiccough =
=
plough

borough

10 [0ru:]
11 [tAf]
12 [trof]

7 [
8 [0]
9 []
rough

thorough
though
through
tough
trough

=
=
=
=
=

234

_
: , '
:
,
.
: , ?
:
, , ?
:
.
to check in [tjek]
staff [sta:f]
luggage ['Lvgid3]
bag [baeg]
on board [bo:d]
handbag ['haendbaeg]

( )
,

240

235

A Dessert
A delicious dessert for people with a sweet tooth can
be made as follows: place pieces of sponge cake into a
bowl and soak with 1 /8 1 sherry. Top with tinned or
fresh fruit and cover with 1 /2 1vanilla custard. To top
it off, add whipped cream and sprinkle with chopped
almonds.
What is this pudding called?

236
In the Hotel
When Sean and Jill and the children arrive at their
holiday destination, they take a taxi to the hotel.
Once they arrive there, a
porter comes to the door
to carry in their suitcases.
The lobby o f the hotel is
very impressive. In the
middle is a pool with an
artificial waterfall. They
are all very pleased with
their first impressions
of the hotel.

241

235


:
8 .
2 .

. ?
sherry trifle
-
, ,
.

236

,
, .
, ,
. .
.
.
destination [.desti'neijbn]
porter [':]
impressive [im'presiv]
artificial [,a:ti'fijbl]
waterfall ['wo:t9fD:l]
impression [im'prejbn]


( )

242

237
An American Recipe
This American recipe comes from a collection pub
lished in 1854. Mix 4 oz. of unsalted butter with
4 oz. o f castor sugar. Add 1 egg and a little brandy.
Gradually mix in 6 oz. of flour. Roll out on a surface
well sprinkled with flour and castor sugar to 1/4 inch
thickness. Cut into rings and bake at 190 for 8 to 10
minutes. When cool, sprinkle with icing sugar.

What is this recipe called?

238
Map-Reading
Jill:
Sean
Jill:

Sean:

Shall I read the m ap while yo u drive or would


you rather let m e drive?
We can take turns,
i f yo u like.
I ts ju s t as well we
bought a map there arent many
road signs here.
I d o n t think w ell
get lost, there
arent even m any
roads.

243

237

, 1854 .
4 4 .
1 . 6
. ,
, 4 .
190 810 .
, .
?
rich jumbles

(ounce, oz) . 28 ,
(inch, in) 2,5 .

238

:

, ,
?
:
, .
: , , -
.
:
, ,
.
to read a map [ri:d] [msep]
while [wail]
rather [':]
to take turns [teik 'tarns]
road sign ['roud sain]
to get lost [lost]



,
,

,

244

239
A Cosmopolitan
This playwright, actor, director, set and costume de
signer was bom in London in 1921. He is o f Russian
and French descent. He is a tireless worker for
UNICEF and received the Order o f the Smile in 1974
for his dedication to the international assistance to
children. His first play, H ouse o f Regrets , was pro
duced in 1942. This was followed by a long list of suc
cesses such as R o m a n o ff and Juliet (1956).
Whats the name o f this versatile artist?

240
In the Restaurant
Jill:

It m ust have been too much sun fo r the children


today. They w ouldnt usually want to
stay in the room
while we go to a
restaurant.
Sean: I t s quite nice being
able to eat lobster
without having to
give all the best bits
to Sam.
Jill:
True. I wonder who
our children got their
expensive tastes from .

245

239

, , ,
1921 .
.
1974 .
. , ,
, 1942 .
- , (1956).
?
Peter Ustinov (1921 2004)

240

: , , .
,
.
:
,
.
: . ,
?
usually ['ju^uali]
to stay [stei]
lobster f'bbsta]
bit [bit]
to wonder ['wAnds]
expensive [ik'spensiv]
taste [teist]

;
,

246

241
Hiring a Car
Sean arranges to hire a car for a few days so that they
can explore the area where they are staying. When
the car is delivered to
the hotel, the man from
the car hire firm shows
Sean where all the
switches for lights etc.
are. Sean tells him not to
bother as it is exactly the
same type of car which
he has at home.

242
EXERCISE

A Crossword Puzzle
1. You can grill it.
,i
2. You invite them
i _r _]
_
to a party.
3. You light it.
3
"
4. Another word
-----for grill.__________________ ___
5. Beer, wine, lemon
ade etc. are...
1 down is a cut of meat.

247

241

,
,
. ,
,
.. ,
, .
to hire ['haid]
to arrange [']
to explore [ik'spb:]
to deliver [di'liva]
switch [switj]
to bother []
exactly [ig'zaektli]


;
,
,

242

1. , ()
2. , ()
3. , ()
4. , ()
5. , , .. ... ()
1 .
S A U S A G E
G U E S T S
FI RE
BA

R B E C U E

D R I N K S

248

243
The Gunpowder Plot
Guy Fawkes was the leading figure in a plot to blow
up the Houses o f Parliament on November 5th, 1605,
while King, Lords and
Commoners were assem
bled there. As the Houses
o f Parliament still stand
almost four hundred
years later, it is obvious
that the plan did not suc
ceed. The conspirators
were arrested on Novem
ber 4th, and Guy Fawkes
was hanged for treason.

244
Guy Fawkes Day
John:

Sarah:

I quite like standing around the bonfire, look


ing into the flames. The only trouble is that
too many fireworks
are let off.
Youre right. Just
think how many
children are in
jured each year.
Somehow young
children always
seem to get a
hold o f fire
works.

249

243


5 1605 ., ,
.
, , .
4 ,

Gunpowder Plot
[' plot]
to blow up [biou]
Commoner ['komono]
to assemble [o'sembl]
obvious ['obvios]
to succeed [sok'si:d]
conspirator [kon'spiroto]
treason ['tri:zn]



()
,

()

244
*
:
:

.
, .
. ,
. , -
.

*
,
, .
bonfire ['bonfais]
flame [fleim]
trouble []
firework ['fabw9:k]
to injure ['ind33]
to get a hold of sth [hould]

-.; ,
-.

250

245
A Book

It is the title o f Geoffrey Chaucers most celebrated


work which was probably written around 1387 and
extends to 17,000 lines o f poetry and prose. It is the
story o f a pilgrimage. The General Prologue tells of
a meeting o f 29 pilgrims in an inn, who are supposed
to tell a story each. Since only 23 pilgrims tell a tale,
the work is incomplete. The various stories are for ex
ample told by the Knight, the Cook and Chaucer
himself, who narrates two tales.
What is the title o f this book ?

246
Victoria and Albert
John:
Sarah:

John:

/ was reading about Queen Victoria the other


day. Isnt it incredible that she reignedfor over
sixty years?
Her husband
Albert came from
Germany, didnt
he? From Coburg
I believe.
Thats right.
The Victoria and
Albert Museum
is named after
them.

251

245


, 1387 .
17000 .
.
29 ,
. 23
, .
, , ,
, .
?
Canterbury Tales

246
*
:
:
:

.
, ?
, ?
, .
.
.

* (18191901) 1837 1901 .

the other day [] [dei]


incredible [in'kredsbl]
to reign [rein]
to believe [bi'li:v]
to name sth after sb. [neim]


,
,
;
-. -.

252

247
A Shakespearian Play

This play was probably first performed at the Globe


Theatre in 1606. It is based on one o f the generals of
Duncan, king of Scotland. While returning from a
campaign, this general encounters three strange
witches who prophesy that he shall become king.
Spurred on by his wife, he murders Duncan and as
sumes the crown. His castle is attacked by Duncans
son Malcolm who kills him and becomes king of
Scotland himself.
W hat is the nam e o f this general?

248
St. Andrews University
In spring, Sarah will attend St. Andrews University in
Fife. She was very lucky to get a place there, as this
famous university is much
in demand. St. Andrews
was one o f the first univer
sities founded in Britain
and has a strong tradition.
There is also an ancient
cathedral in the town
and, of course, the home
of golfing: the St. Andrews
Golf Club.

253

247

1606 .
.
, . ,
,
, .
, .
, ,
. ?
Macbeth

248
-
-*
. , ,
. ,
, . ,
, , :
- -.
to attend university
[o'tend] [ju:niVo:siti]
Fife [faif]
lucky [*Lvki]
to be in demand [di'mamd]
to found [faund]
tradition [tro'dijon]
ancient ['einjbnt]
cathedral [ko'9i:drol]

,

,

* .

254

249
The Automobile Association
In Britain, the Automobile Association is always on
hand to help motorists whose cars break down while
travelling. The A.A. driv- ,- y v - \
ers can be recognized by (*

their yellow vans and motorcycles. The organiza


tion operates much in the
same way as the AD AC
in Germany and has
agreements with this club
so that German tourists
can call for help as well.

259

A Church in London

This famous church in London is named after the


part o f London in which it stands. It has been recon
structed several times from a church originally built
by Edward the Confessor in the 10th century.
This well-known building has been the scene o f the
coronation o f British monarchs for centuries. It is also
the burial place o f many kings, statesmen, poets etc.

W hat is the nam e o f this church ?

255

249

(..)
,
. ..
. , ADAC
, ,
.
to be on hand [haend]
motorist ['moutsrist]
to recognize frekagnaiz]
motorcycle ['moute.saikl]
to operate [']
agreement [ ' : ]

250


, .
X ,
.
.
, , ..
?
Westminster Abbey

256

251
The Single Market in Europe
A lot o f people in Britain think that the single market in
Europe will make life easier for them. House-owners
especially hope to benefit
from it. Since interest rates
in Britain are sky-rocketting
and mortgage rates are 15 %
and more, they hope to be
able to borrow money from
banks on the Continent at
cheaper rates.

252
A Book Title
Charles Dickens was bom in Portsmouth in 1812.
When he was still quite young, his father was impris
oned for debt. Memories o f this period are reflected
in the early chapters of David Copperfield. Later in his
life he achieved great popularity with his books, many
of which first appeared in serial form in monthly peri
odicals. He died in 1870, leaving his last novel unfin
ished.
W hat is the nam e o f this novel?

9 - 5

257

251

,
.
.
,
15% , ,
, .
single market [,sir)gl 'ma:kit]
to benefit from ['benifit]
interest rate ['intrist reit]
to sky-rocket ['skairokit]
mortgage ['moigid^]
continent ['kontinsnt]


-.

;

252

1812 .
, .

.
,

. 1870 .,
. ?

The Mystery o f Edwin Drood

258

253
Back at the Office
Sean and Jill are both back at work. All the people
in the office who havent been on holiday yet are
envious of their tan.
During the coffee break
Jill has to answer all her
colleagues questions
about their holiday resort
and tells them how nice
everything was. In fact
she asks herself why she
always returns to grey
old England at all.

264
------------------------- EXERCISE

A Puzzle
1. To go on holiday you put
your clothes in a ...
2. The engine of a car.
3. It can fly.
4. Women wear...
5. You make calls from it.
6. You have two ... to stand on.
7. Where you wait for a train.
8. You go u p ... to the first floor.
The bold letters read down the word for something
people need when it rains.
259

253

. ,
,
,
, .
,
.

,

,
, ,

not yet [jet]


envious I'enviss]
tan [tasn]
break [breik]
colleague ['koli:g]
in fact [faekt]
grey [grei]

254

1. ,
... ()
2. .
()
3. , ()
4. , ()
5. , ()
6. ..., .
()
7. , .
()
8. ...
, ()

S U I S
R
I R D

S I R S
L N

L G S
L F R
S I R S

,
().
260

255
A London Building
In London there is a 97 m high clock tower on top
of the Houses of Parliament. The 13.5 tonne bell has
been hanging here since 1858. The old-fashioned
clockwork mechanism has to be wound up three
times a week. The BBC still uses the sound of the
clock striking the hour in several of their news pro
grammes. This famous clock was named after the
politican Sir Benjamin Hall (1802 -1867).
What is it called?

256
Tile-Laying
Sean has been looking for a tiler to put tiles on his
bathroom walls. Everywhere he goes he hears the
same story - they all have
too much work at the moment and could perhaps
start in eight to ten weeks
time. Eventually he gets so
fed up hearing this that he
decides to try his hand at
tile-laying himself. After
an hour he realizes that it
is not quite as easy as he
thought it was going to be

261

255

97-
. 13,5 1858 .
. - , ,
.

(18021867). ?
Big Ben
( ) 11
.

256

, .
, , , ,
, .
,
. ,
, .

tiler ['tails]
perhaps [ps'haeps]
eventually [i'ventjusli]
to decide [di'said]
to realize ['rislaiz]
easy [i:zi]

262

257
The Plumber
After Sean has eventually
got all the tiles on his
bathroom wall, he phones
up the plumber to tell
him that he should install
the sink and bath. The
plumber says that he
will be around to do the
work as soon as he can,
but that it will probably
be the week after next
before he has time.

258

A Saint
The ancient centre o f Glasgow has as its core a great
cathedral which is a perfect example of pre-Reformation Gothic architecture. Behind this is the Necropo
lis, the burial ground of Victorian merchants. Across
the square is Provands Lordship, built in 1471, the
oldest house in the city. This has been restored as a
museum and is open daily. The above mentioned
cathedral is named after the patron saint of Glasgow.
What is his name?

263

257


, ,
. ,
, , , ,
.
plumber ['1]
eventually [iVentjuali]
to install [in'sto.l]
sink [sirjk]
bath [ba:0]
the week after next

()

258

,

. ,
. ,
, 1471 .
, .

. ?
St. Mungo
.

264

259
Hanging Wallpaper
Jill:
Sean:

Jill:

I always enjoy putting up wallpaper.


Well, weve had enough practice over the years
so it should look
quite professional
when its all fin
ished.
All the same I ll
be quite glad when
everything is ready
and we can move
into the house.

260

In the Bookshop
Jill is enjoying one of her
favourite pastimes - brows
ing through books in a
bookshop. She usually ends
up buying two or three
books every time she goes
into a shop, but her main
pleasure is just looking
around the shelves to see
if she can find a book she
doesnt know yet.

265

259

: .
:
, ,

.
: ,
.
wallpaper ['wod.peips]
to enjoy [in'd3oi]
practice ['praektis]
professional [prs'fejnl]
quite [kwait]
glad [glaed]

,
;

; ,

260


.
,
, ,
- ,
, .
bookshop ['bukjbp]
favourite [feivarit]
pastime ['pa:staim]
to browse [brauz]
main [mein]
pleasure [1]
shelf Lfelf]

,

, ;

266

261
A Range of Hills
The old cathedral city o f Gloucester on the river
Severn was founded by the Romans. This city can
still be recognized by the narrow streets and the
remnants o f the city wall. The cathedral was built in
the perpendicular style. Tourists to the area are rec
ommended to take a walk along the Via Sacra which
takes in many interesting historical sites. A range of
hills gives its name to this area o f Britain.

What are they called?

262
A Trip to the Zoo
Jill has taken a day off work to take the children to
the zoo as the school holidays are almost over.
The last time Sam was in the
zoo, he was still in a pram
and fell asleep after half
an hour. This time he is
much more interested in
the animals and has to
be stopped from climb
ing over the wall to join
the elephants.
**

267

- -Mh

261
1]

.
.
. , ,
Via Sacra ( ),
,
.
. ?
The Cotswolds

262

, ,
.
,
.
, ,
.
almost ['oilmoust]
pram [praem]
to fall asleep
interested ['intristidj
to climb [klaim]
to join [d3oin]
elephant felifent]

,
,

268

263
Harvest
Eric:
Loma:

Eric:

It says in the newspaper that the farm ers had


a record harvest this year.
I suppose it also
m eans that a lot
o f fo o d will be
destroyed again
because o f over
nvh
production.
I ts not really the
fa rm e rs fa u lt.
The politicians
encourage it by
paying these grants.

264

A National Park in America

This national park covers an area o f about 3,458


square miles, mostly in the state o f Wyoming. Since
1872 it has been reserved for public use. The park is
named after the river which rises there. This river is a
tributary o f the Missouri. Another interesting thing to
be seen in this favourite tourist area is Old Faithful,
a geyser which erupts regularly at intervals o f a little
over an hour.

What is the name o f this park?

269

263

:
:
:

,
.
, ,
- .
.
, .

record ['reko:d]
to destroy [dis'troi]
over-production
[.ouvapra'dAkfenl
fault [fo:lt]
politician [.poli'tijsn]
to encourage [in'kArid3]
grant [gra:nt]

,
,

264

3458
, . 1872 .
.
, .
.
, ,
.
?
Yellowstone National Park

270

265
A Pub Meal
Eric does not have too much time to spare this lunch
time. He goes into a pub near his office where they
have a good selection of
warm and cold snacks.
He looks at the menu and
orders a portion o f steak
and kidney pudding and
a half pint o f beer. The
door opens and in comes
a colleague from work.
Eric calls him over and
invites him for a drink.

266
An Irish Author

This novelist was bom in 1882 in Dublin. He was so


dissatisfied with the bigotry o f Irish Catholicism as he
saw it that he went to Paris in 1902. There he lived in
poverty and wrote verse. His first published work was
Chamber Music followed by Dubliners in 1914.
Other works include his play Exiles, A Portrait of
the Artist as a Young Man and Ulysses which is no
doubt his most famous novel and was received as a
work o f genius.
What is the name o f this novelist?

271

265

.
,
.
. ,
.
.
pub meal [ mi:l]
to spare [spea]
selection [si'lekjbn]
menu ['menju:]
steak and kidney pudding
[steik] ['kidni] [pudig]


( )
,

266

1882 .
( )
, 1902 . .
.
, 1914 .
.
, ,
, ,
.
?
James Joyce (1882 1941)

272

267
At the Jewellers
Loma:

I have this old pearl necklace from my grand


mother. It is a bit old-fashioned. Do you think
it could somehow
be altered?
Jeweller: Certainly. How
would you like
it? Perhaps it
should be a bit
shorter, and the
clasp at the back
would have to be
changed.

268

Ordering the Turkey


The Millers always order a large turkey for Christmas.
For the last few years they have ordered it from a
farm where the turkeys
are free-range. They are
against factory farming
and were glad that they
had found a farmer who
does not keep his turkeys
and hens in cages so that
they can also buy their
eggs from there.

273

267

:

.
. ,
- ?
: . ? ,
,
.
pearl [:1]
necklace ['neklis]
old-fashioned
[.ould'faejbnd]
to alter [o:\td]
certainly ['s3:tnli]
clasp [kla:sp]

268


. ,
.
, , ,
,
.

turkey ['taiki]
free-range [,fri:'reind3]
factory farming
[ ,fa:mir)]
hen[hen]
cage [keid3]

,

,

274

269
Tickets for an Opera
Eric:
Loma:
Eric:

Do you like Gilbert and Sullivan?


Yes. Why do you ask?
I have been given
two tickets for
one of their com
ic operas. I dont
know whether
to go or give the
tickets away.
Loma: Its ages since
I ve seen some
thing by Gilbert
and Sullivan. Of
course we must go.

270

A Document

We are looking for the name o f the Great Charter of


the liberties granted by King John under pressure
from his barons at Runnymede in 1215. The chief
provisions o f the charter stated that no freeman
should be imprisoned or banished except by the law
o f the land. Another part o f it stated that taxes should
not be exacted without the consent of the Common
Council o f the realm. This charter is in fact the basis
of the British constitution.
What is the name o f this document?

275

269

:
:
:
:

*?
. ?
.
, .
,
. , .

* . . ,
. . .
opera [']
comic ['komik]
whether ['weda]
to give away [giv a'wei]
its ages ['eid3iz]
of course [ka:s]

(,.)

270

,

1215 . ,

, .

.
. ?
Magna Carta

276

111

An Office Party
In Erics office there is always a party before Christ
mas. The boss gives all his employees a small present
and orders a buffet and
some wine. It is always a
happy occasion as every
one is in the Christmas
spirit. The office closes
between Christmas and
New Year, and every
body is looking forward
to the holidays.

272
A Drink

It is the so-called Scottish national drink. Known in


Gaelic as uisge beatha, the water of life, it is one
of Scotlands biggest export articles. Many other
countries have tried to emulate this drink, but with no
great success. It is said that the secret o f the drink lies
in the Scottish water. This could be true as the water
has to pass through turf moors on its way down from
the mountains to the distilleries where this drink is
made.

What is the name o f this drink?

277

271


.
. ,
.
,
.
office [bfis]
employee [.empbi'i:]
buffet fbufei]
occasion [']
spirit ['spirit]
to close [klouz]

,
,
,
,
()

272

.
uisge beatha ,
,
.
, . ,
. , ,

, .
?
Whisky

278

273
Gullivers Travels
Jonathan Swifts Gullivers Travels was published in
1726. The book tells of Lemuel Gulliver, a surgeon on
a merchant ship. In the first part of the book he is
shipwrecked on the island of Lilliput where all the
inhabitants are just six inches high. In the second part
he is accidentally left ashore in a country where the
people are as tall as steeples.
What is this second country called?

274
Homework
Sam has been given his
first homework at school.
He has to paint a picture of
his family. When Jill sees
herself on his picture she
has to laugh. This offends
Sam who thought that his
painting was quite lifelike.
Jill tells him that it really
does look like her apart
from the green hair.

279

273


1726 . ,
.
,
.
, , .
?
Brobdingnag


,
.

274

.
.
, .
, , . ,
,
.
homework ['houmwaik]
to paint [peint]
picture I'piktja]
to offend [s'fend]
painting ['peintir)]
lifelike ['laiflaik]

,
)

280

275
In the Post-Office
Jill had been to the post-office before she and Sean
moved house to ask them to forward the mail.
Unfortunately something
seems to have gone
wrong, as the people in
their old house keep
getting mail addressed
to Jill or Sean. Jill goes
back to the post office
to complain and is told
that the matter will be
sorted out immediately.

276
A Bill
Sean:
Jill:
Sean:

Jill:

Would you look at the am ount o f this bill fro m the


removal firm .
^
I thought yo u had
4 * -? /
arranged a price with
\ {
them before we moved.
I did. B ut look at all
the additional charges
fo r things like taking
down and putting up
light-fittings.
Youll have to query it.
They cant ju s t charge
w hat they like.

281

275

,
, . ,
, ,
, .
, , ,
.
to forward ['fD:w9d]
mail [meil]
to go wrong [rop]
to address [a'dres]
to complain [kam'plein]
to sort out [so:t]

276

,
.
: , ,
.
:
.
,
.
: .
, .
bill [bil]
amount [a'maunt]
to arrange [']
charge [tfa:d3]
light-fitting ['lait .fitip]
to query ['kwiari]

,
; { )

,

282

Ill
Buying Lamps
Jill and Sean still have to find a few lamps for their
new house. They have a catalogue with photographs
of lots o f nice modem
lamps. They choose one
or two that they would like
and then turn to the back
o f the catalogue to have a
look at the prices. After
adding eveiything up, they
close the catalogue and
decide to go to the local
DIY market instead.

278

An Area in Yorkshire
Just a short journey from the industrial centres of
Huddersfield, Bradford and Leeds brings you into a
magnificent landscape o f moors and rolling hills.
Ilkley Moor in the northern part of West Yorkshire is
the subject o f a song sung in the local dialect. Most
people who do not live here cannot understand the
words o f the song. This area is also known by another
name because of three famous author sisters who
lived in Haworth.

What is the surname o f these sisters?

283

Ill


.
. ,
,
, . ,

.
lamp [laemp]
to choose [tju:z]
to add up [aed]
to close [klouz]
to decide [di'said]
local [loukal]
DIY = do it yourself

,
{)

278


, -
, . -

. , ,
.
, -, . ?
Bronte'

-. ,
XIX .
.
284

279
A D og
Jill:
Sean:

Jill:
Sean:

Look at that lovely


big dog there.
It doesn't seem to
have an owner.
I dont like big
dogs that are not
on a lead.
Its got big
friendly
eyes though.
And big sharp
unfriendly teeth.

280
A Buffet
Eventually Jill and Sean get round to organizing a
moving-in party. They decide to have a catering firm
supply a buffet. They have
someone from the firm
along to their house to
advise them on the best
kind of food to order.
They could have a chef
standing behind the
table serving the guests,
but they think that is
overdoing it a bit.

285

279

:
:
, .
, .
: .
:
.
lovely [lAvli]
owner []
lead [li:d]
friendly ['frendli]
sharp [fa:p]

,
,

280

-
.
. -
,
. -,
, ,
, .
buffet ['bufei]
eventually [i'ventjusli]
to organize ['o:g3naiz]
to cater ['keits]
to supply [sa'plai]
to advise [ad'vaiz]
chef [fef]

( )
,
,
-

286

281
The Theatre Royal
The Theatre Royal in London is located on a street
which is named after a family who had a large house
there in Tudor times. The building was converted
into a theatre during the reign o f James I. It was
rebuilt by T. Killigrew and again by Sir Christopher
Wren in 1674. In the 19th century it was the great
house for Christmas Pantomime. After the Second
World War many successful American musicals were
staged there including Oklahoma (1947) and South
Pacific (1951).
What is the name o f the street?

282

------------------------ EXERCISE

----------------------

Participles
Example: The sandwiches were delicious. They had
been made by Jill. - The sandwiches (having been)
made by Jill were delicious.
1. People will come. They ask strange questions.
2 .1 think I hear Laura. Laura is coming home.
3. There are one or two weeds. They grow here.
4. He had done his work. He went home.
5. Mr. Smith had written a book. He wanted it to be
printed.
287

shpauuckuu
5 4
5 -
,

, ,
, ,
, ,

.
,
(
) ,
.


,
.

O Z O N .ru
1015188356

ISBN978-5-271-46128-
9785271461286

9785271 461286

1015X88356