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E d o n M o n t p E l i E r p i o n E E r W E s t U n i t y Fay E t t E s t ry k E r W a U s E o n
(USPS 168-440) - Volume 5 Edition 36

YOUR LOCAL WEEKLY HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

Blue Star/Gold Star Banner


Four County Career Center
Event Held At Wauseon VFW Evacuated Due To Bomb Threat

PHOTO BY FORREST R. CHURCH, STAFF

QUICK RESPONSE ... October 2 turned into an eventful day at Four County Career
Center when bomb threat was discovered.
By: Forrest R. Church, Publisher
THE VILLAGE REPORTER

PHOTO BY TAMMY ALLISON, STAFF

PROUD RECIPIENTS ... Brenda Stickley Lippert and son Kristian Lippert II of
Wauseon are presented with their Blue Star Banner with 4 stars to represent 4
family members serving. Additional photos on page 22.
By: Tammy Allison
THE VILLAGE REPORTER

On Thursday, October 2nd, 2014 students and faculty at the Four County Career
Center of rural Archbold / Ridgeville Corners were evacuated due to a bomb threat.
The threat was made via a letter found by
a student on campus in an undisclosed location. Authorities are not releasing the location of where the letter was found at this
time due to the ongoing investigation. The
letter was handed over by the student who
found it to a supervisor who handed the letter off to Superintendent Tim Meister, who
then contacted the Henry County Sheriff's
Department.
Nearly 1,200 students and staff were
evacuated to neighboring Northwest State
Community College per the school's evacuation protocol for such matters via the
school's announcement system. Parents of
Four County Career Center students and
staff received a phone alert via the school's
alert system notifying what was occurring.
According to Superintendent Meister the
evacuation occurred at 12:54 p.m. and by
12:57 p.m. "there was not a soul in the
building", only taking three minutes to clear
the large campus.
Superintendent Tim Meister stated in an
interview with "The Village Reporter" after
the building was successfully cleared, "Our
staff did a tremendous job, they got the kids
to a safe place quickly, they (staff) monitored them the entire time, and it is good for
our parents to know their kids are in great
hands."
In an interview with one of the few students who remained on campus after the
threat had been cleared (name being omitted due to being a minor), "We were notified
by the school's overhead announcement,

we were not notified why we were leaving,


just that we had to leave. We were sent all
the way to Northwest State Community College and sat in the grass until our normal
dismissal time, around two hours later".
When asked if everything was calm among
students, she stated "not exactly, I feel it
would have been calmer if they told us why
we were being evacuated. Nobody would tell
the students why we were being evacuated."
In an interview with Henry County Sheriff Michael D. Bodenbender, Bodenbender
confirmed that after the sweep conducted
by law enforcement and fire was complete
that staff were requested to return to their
rooms to see if there was anything suspicious in their rooms, as those sweeping the
building were obviously not familiar with
the set up and items normally associated
with each classroom. Assistance was also
offered by the FBI but declined as local authorities had matters in hand, according to
Sheriff Bodenbender.
When asked "if the school had surveillance video in place", Superintendant of
schools Mr. Tim Meister confirmed that the
school has cameras which will be used as
part of the investigation. "It is safe to say we
will use every resource we have available to
assist the investigation".
Four County Career Center provides experienced based education to prepare students for college, secondary education and
a range of specific careers. The school has
students from twenty two "base schools"
from Fulton, Williams, Defiance and Henry Counties including Edon, Montpelier,
North Central, Hilltop, Stryker, Fayette and
Wauseon within The Village Reporter's coverage areas.

does. This event demonstrates that


Americans care about Americans. One
Blue Star Banner mother expressed
Years ago a star in the window
gratitude of receiving a banner to hang
symbolized a silent reminder of a loved
in her window so she can retire the
one actively serving the country. The
banner presently hanging in her window
Blue Star Banner program, started in
that hung during World War 2 for her
World War 1, hung the star proudly
grandfather and great-uncle. Banners
in the windows of homes where a
can hold up to five stars to represent up
serviceman on active duty resided.
to five family members serving.
This popular practice faded during the
In addition to the Blue Star
Vietnam War but Sherryann Franks of
Banners, every year, Sherryann Franks,
Archbold is striving to bring awareness
coordinator of the event, selects a Gold
of our military personnel back to the
Star mother to honor and present a
community through both the Blue Star
Gold Star Banner. The Gold Star Banner
and the Gold Star banners.
honors a loved one who was killed while
On the recent cold, breezy Sunday
serving. This year the fallen solider
afternoon of October 5, 2014, the 7th
memorialized was Staff Sgt. Sonny C.
Annual Blue Star/Gold Star Banner
Zimmerman, formerly of Waynesfield,
Event, organized by Franks, was held at
Ohio, who was killed in action July 16,
the Wauseon VFW. The sunny yet chilly
2013 in Afghanistan. As the ceremony
weather didnt deter eighteen Blue Star
Forrest R. Church may be reached at
was emotionally raw for his mother
publisher@thevillagereporter.com
families and one Gold Star mother from
Michelle Zimmerman, three former Gold
attending. As everyone gathered outside,
Star families who attended the days event
the patriotic tone of the afternoon
surrounded her in order to offer love and
was set by the bagpipe music of John
support. In an emotional presentation,
Galbraith followed by a police escort of
the Honor Guard presented her with
the West Unity American Legion Riders.
an oil painting of her son, painted and
Everyone then gathered inside to
donated by local artist Nora Sallows.
honor this years banner recipients. The
Every Blue Star Banner family and the
parents and other representative loved
Gold Star Banner mother were presented
ones of the Blue Star Banner service
with prayer shawls knitted by Marty
personnel were escorted in by the Honor
Ross and friends. The prayer shawls are
Guard. The American Legion Riders
prayed over as they are being made and
presented the banners to each family as
provide families with something tangible
David Kleck of WNDH Radio Napoleon
they can hold onto in those difficult
read the biographies of each serviceman
moments of missing their loved one
and servicewoman represented by the
serving the country.
stars.
A symbol of love and peace, two white
Perry Marvin, Director of the area
doves were released at the close of the
American Legion Riders, expressed,
events to honor the life of Staff Sgt.
When one goes to war, the whole family
Sonny C. Zimmerman. A
luncheon was provided
for all in attendance. For
PHOTO BY T.J. HUG, STAFF
those unable to attend, the SHOWING SUPPORT ... Community Health Professionals Volunteer and Event Coordays events were recorded dinator Becky Kimble and Hospice Ambassador Kim Peebles, right, each lean on the
for viewing on INTV.
CHP sign.
Franks has witnessed
positive response to the
For the first time ever, the Community
By: T.J. Hug
event. As emotional and
Health Professionals (CHP) of Williams
THE VILLAGE REPORTER
raw as this is, I know I am
County will host a dinner and charity
Even angels need help sometimes.
doing the right thing. The
auction in order to raise funds for its
In this particular instance, they
healing starts.
Hospice Program, acquired by the CHP
will be looking to a lighthouse for that
in May of 2013. Representing the lives
Tammy may be reached at
assistance, with hopes that it will guide
publisher@thevillagereporter.com
Your Hometown News Source
CONTINUED TO PAGE 22
generous souls in their direction.

Hospice To Host Beacon


Of Hope Dinner & Auction

"The Village Reporter"

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T H E

V I L L A G E

R E P O R T E R

Area Obituaries & Death Notices


Doyle C. Miller (1943 - 2014)

Lawrence Christy (1947 - 2014)

Larry G. Johnston (1954 - 2014)

Doyle C. Miller, age


70, of Edon, Ohio, died at
2:35 A.M. on Saturday,
September 27, 2014, in
his home, surrounded by
family, after an extended
illness. Mr. Miller attended
North Central High School
and was employed by Fifty
Plus Five in West Unity,
Ohio, for fifteen years
until the plant closed,
Krill Trucking at Nettle
Lake and then retired
from Robinair Corporation
in Montpelier, Ohio, with fifteen years of service. He
enjoyed being outdoors and cutting wood in his woods.
Doyle C. Miller was born on November 28, 1943,
in Williams County, Ohio, the son of William K. and
Myrtle E. (Daring) Miller. He married Kathryn I. Yoh on
September 30, 1962, in Bryan, Ohio, and she survives.
Survivors also include one daughter, Deborah (Larry)
Meyers, of Edon, Ohio; one grandson, Todd (Deanne
Tibbits) Meyers; three great-grandchildren, Shelby
Meyers, Benjamin Paul Allen and Camber Meyers;
two brothers, Kenneth (Martha) Miller, of Montpelier
and Wilbur Miller, of Melbern, Ohio; and two sisters,
Valeria Sis Brown, of Melbern, and Yvonne (Kenneth)
Beck, of Montpelier. He was preceded in death by his
parents, three brothers, Wayne, Dwight and Elmer
Miller; and one sister, Evelyn Bish.
In lieu of flowers, memorials are requested to the
family for expenses.
To sign the online register or to send condolences,
please visit www.krillfuneralservice.com

Lawrence (Larry) R.
Christy, age 67, of rural
Stryker, passed away
Wednesday
morning,
Oct. 1, 2014 at Regency
Hospital in Sylvania. For
40 years he had been the
Sports Director for WMTR
Radio in Northwest Ohio.
Larry was born in
Wauseon, Ohio on July
31, 1947, the son of Mike
and Barbara (Lawrence)
Christy. On December
17, 1977 he married
Becky Praet, and she survives. He was a member
of the Archbold United Methodist Church and a
member of the Ohio Sportscasters Association. He
was a 1965 graduate of Archbold High School, and
received his Bachelors of Science in Business from
The Ohio State University.
Surviving are his wife, Becky; son, Ryan Christy
of Bowling Green, Ohio; daughter, Tracy (Ron)
Garber of Liberty Center, Ohio; three grandchildren,
Zane, Morgan and Blake Garber; and two sisters,
Carol (Joe) Jaggers of Camden, Michigan and Patty
Christy of Archbold. He was preceded in death by
both parents, and brother, Tom.
Interment will be in the Archbold Cemetery. The
family requests that memorial contributions be
given to the Zane, Morgan and Blake Garber College
Fund. Online condolences may be offered to the
family at www.grisierfh.com. Grisier Funeral Home
in Archbold has been entrusted with arrangements.

Larry G. Johnston,
age 60, of Wauseon,
passed away Tuesday,
September 30, 2014, at
his home, surrounded by
his family. Larry worked
for General Motors for
38 years. He was also a
basketball official and
softball umpire for the
OHSAA and a member of
UAW Local 14. He had a
passion for athletics, as
he coached softball, gave
pitching lessons, and actively followed the Defiance
College Yellow Jackets and the University of Toledo
Rockets.
Larry was born in Jackson, Michigan, on June 17,
1954, the son of Virgil and Barbara (Myers) Johnston,
Jr. On June 19, 1976 he married Debbie McCaskey,
and she survives. Larry attended North Clinton
Mennonite Church in Wauseon.
Besides his wife Debbie, surviving are daughters,
Jennifer (Charlie) Bryan of Philadelphia, PA, and
Justine Johnston of Wauseon; grandson, Cooper
Bryan; brothers, Norm (Angie) Johnston of Surfside,
SC and Jim (Diane) Johnston of Macomb, MI; brothers
and sister-in-laws, Dan and Kym McCaskey of Adrian,
MI, Chuck and Deanne Stock of St. Charles, MO,
Doug and Amy McCaskey of Sylvania, OH, mother
and father-in-law, Charles and Grace McCaskey of
Morenci, MI, aunt, Betty Ayers of Adrian, MI, as well as
many nieces, nephews and friends. He was preceded in
death by both of his parents.
Larry was a devoted husband, loving father and
grandfather and loyal friend, but to all a HERO for his
hard fought, courageous battle with brain cancer. His
focus always remained on his family and his undying
faith.
The family requests that memorial contributions
be given to the NWOAL Line Drives for Larry Athletic
Scholarship Fund. Online condolences may be offered
to the family at www.grisierfh.com.

Leone R. Meeks (1926 - 2014)


Leone R. Meeks, age
88, of Swanton, passed
away peacefully at her
home Thursday, October
2, 2014, surrounded by
her loving family. She was
born January 15, 1926 to
the late Claude Young and
Dora (Mominee) Young.
Leone
attended
Clay
High School in Toledo.
She married the late
Clarence E. Red Meeks
on January 9, 1946 in

Angola, IN.
Leone was a homemaker throughout her years. She
enjoyed gardening, caring for the yard and various
outdoor landscaping projects. She is survived by her
children; Connie (Wayne) Donaghue, Carol (Ron) Echler,
Cheryl (Frank) Chapa, Cindy Meeks, Danny (Tammy)
Meeks, 12 Grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren,
brother, Irving Young and sister, Florence Jones. She
was preceded in death by her parents; husband of
67 years, Red; brothers, Raymond, Arthur, Claude,
Harry and Harold Young; and sisters, Dorothy Oppe,
Elsie Cousino and Hazel Gillmore.
Those wishing a show of sympathy are asked to
consider contributions to the family, with a choice
of charity to be decided at a later date. Please visit
www.barnesfuneralchapel.com to send condolences to
Leones family.

Larry A Mercer
Larry A Mercer, 75, of Montpelier, passed
away Saturday afternoon, October 4th in his
home. He was the husband of the former Mary B.
Rademacher. As Larry requested there will be no
services held. Condolences may be made online at
thethompsonfuneralhome.com

Dorothy Mae Cook (1916 - 2014)


Dorothy Mae Cook,
98, of Montpelier passed
away Thursday, October
2, 2014 at the Defiance
Inpatient
Hospice
in
Defiance, Ohio. She was
born March 05, 1916 in
Harbor Springs, Michigan
to Frank A. and Clara M.
(Funk) Rosemeier. She
was a Montpelier resident
most of her life.
Dorothy
worked
for
Spangler
Candy
Company in Bryan as a machine operator for 23
years, retiring in 1981. She was a member of the
Liberty Bible Church in Pittsford, Michigan. Dorothy
was a loving mother, grandmother, and great
grandmother.
Dorothy is survived by two sons: Chet (Delores)
Cook of West Unity and Jerry (Deborah) Cook of Ruby,
South Carolina; seven daughters: Barbara (John)
Tidmore of Arab, Alabama, Mary (Mark) Sanders
of Edon, Ohio, Virginia (Mike) Cary of Highland,
Michigan, Clara Jo (Roger) Hagemeyer of Casa Grande,
Arizona, Shirley Cook of Watsontown, Pennsylvania,
Rebecca Frechette of Lenoir City, Tennessee and
Ruth Ann Owens of Bryan; one daughter-in-law:
Phyllis Cook of Bryan, one-half sister: Betty Pugsley
of Florida; twenty-five grandchildren; thirty-one
great grandchildren and numerous great-great
grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her
parents, one son: Garold Cook in May of 2003 and
one brother: Louis Rosemeier.
Preferred donations are to the Liberty Bible
Church, Pittsford, Michigan. Condolences may be
made online at thethompsonfuneralhome.com.

Reporter

www.thevillagereporter.com

YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE FOR THE COMMUNITIES OF


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& SURROUNDING AREAS IN WILLIAMS & FULTON COUNTY, OHIO

NORTHWEST OHIO COVERAGE AREAS

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2 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

KEEPING READERS NOTIFIED OF LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT, FIRE, COURT & CRIME STOPPER ACTIVITIES

WILLIAMS & FULTON COUNTY AREA LOCAL POLICE, EMS &FIRE REPORTS

EDON P.D.
No reports received at time of
press.
STRYKER P.D.
(Sept 26) Assault
(Sept 26) Traffic Citation - Speed
(Sept 27) Found Property
(Sept 27) Theft
(Sept 27) Information Report
(Sept 28) Disabled Vehicle
(Sept 29) Traffic Warning - Speed
(Sept 29) Traffic Warning - Speed
(Sept 30) Traffic Warning - Stop
Sign
(Sept 30) Traffic Citation - Speed
(Sept 30) Forgery
(Oct 1) Juvenile Problem
(Oct 1) Theft
(Oct 1) Traffic Warning - Left Of
Center
(Oct 2) Traffic Warning - Speed
(Oct 2) Traffic Warning - Speed
(Oct 3) Traffic Warning - Speed
(Oct 3) Traffic Warning - Speed
PIONEER P.D.
No reports received at time of
press.
WEST UNITY P.D.
(Sept 22) Assist Fire Dept
(Sept 22) Domestic Violence
(Sept 22) 911 Hang Up
(Sept 23) Driving Complaint/
Left of Center (Warning)
(Sept 23) Speed/Warning
(Sept 23) Telephone Harassment
(Sept 24) Truck Off Route/
Warning
(Sept 24) Traffic Crash/Private
Property
(Sept 24)Juvenile Complaint
(Sept 24) Unruly Juvenile
(Sept 24) Expired Plates/Warning
(Sept 25) Traffic Complaint
(Sept 25) Child Abuse
(Sept 25) Child Abuse
(Sept 25) Disorderly Conduct/
Bench Warrant
(Sept 26) Fraud
(Sept 26) Theft
(Sept 26) Traffic Complaint
(Sept 26) Agency Assist
(Sept 27) Speed/No Operators
License (Citation)
(Sept 27) No Tail Lights (Warning)
(Sept 27) Debris in Roadway
(Sept 27) Soliciting Without
Permit
(Sept 27) Suspicious Person
(Sept 27) Loud Music
(Sept 27) Speed/Warning
(Sept 28) Left of Center/Warning
(Sept 28) Dog at Large
(Sept 28) Medical Emergency
MONTPELIER P.D.
Elyse R. Wilson, age 30, Montpelier, OH, was arrested on September 28 for assault.
Robert J. Moats, age 28,
Montpelier, OH, was arrested
on October 3 for assault. He was
taken to CCNO.
FAYETTE P.D.
No reports received at time of
press.

tigate Complaint
(Sept 28) 1462 N Shoop Ave,
Disabled Vehicle
(Sept 28) 414 Cedar St, Animal
Call
(Sept 28) 414 Cedar St, Animal
Call
(Sept 28) 712 Lawrence Ace Unit
2, Threats/Harassment
(Sept 28) 1445 N Shoop Ave,
Threatening Waitress
(Sept 28) 840 W Elm St Unit
702, Investigate Complaint
(Sept 29) 1495 N Shoop Ave,
Alarm Drop
(Sept 29) 840 W Elm St Apt 702,
Investigate Complaint
(Sept 29) 826 N Shoop Ave,
Alarm Drop
(Sept 29) 555 W Linfoot St, Accident (Property Damage)
(Sept 29) 650 E Linfoot St, Narcotics
(Sept 29) 839 Lawrence, Alarm
Drop
(Sept 29) 116 Arrowhead Trail,
Divets in Sidewalk
(Sept 29) 615 Ottokee St, Open
Door
(Sept 29) 1120 N Shoop Ave Unit
41, Investigate Complaint
(Sept 29) 728 Fairway Dr Unit 1,
Suicidal Threats
(Sept 29) 13115 Deer Run Dr,
Fire/Alarm
(Sept 30) 200-B Fulton St, Suspicious Activity
(Sept 30) 840 W Elm St Unit
902, Domestic Trouble
(Sept 30) 840 W Elm St Unit
908, Vandalism
(Sept 30) 940 E Leggett St, 911
Open Line
(Sept 30) 104 W Chestnut Ct,
Threats/Harassment
(Sept 30) Wabash St, Found
Bike
(Sept 30) 311 S Shoop Ave,
Barking Dog
(Oct 1) 450 Marshall St, 911
Hang Up Contact In Person
(Oct 1) 209 E Walnut St,
Threats/Harassment
(Oct 1) 117 E ELm St, Larceny
(Oct 1) 485 E Airport Hwy,
Counterfeit Bill
(Oct 2) 550 W Linfoot St, Suspicious Vehicle
(Oct 2) OttokeeSt @ Wabash,
Disabled Vehicle
(Oct 2) Wabash St, Disabled Vehicle
(Oct 2) 704 Fairway Dr Unit 102,
Fraud
WILLIAMS COUNTY
CRIMINAL
Cavin E. Mcconnell, Public Indecency. Fine $250, Costs $119.
No future violations within next
2 years, no contact with victim.
Cavin E. Mcconnell, Public Indecency. Fine $250, Costs $45.
No future violations within next
2 years, no contact with victim.
Donald L. Shull, Pass Bad
Check. Fine $100, costs $84. No
future violations within 2 years.
Restitution $44.44 to prosecutor.
Angel Resler, Pass Bad Check.
Fine $100, costs $84. No future
violations within next 5 years.
Restitution of $150 to prosecutor. No checking account for 5
years.
Rebecca Fenstermaker, Dog
at Large. Fine $96, costs $79.
Julie R. Simmons, Drug Paraphernalia. Fine $150, costs $79.
Teresa M. Taylor, Theft. Fine
$250, costs $84. No future violations within next 2 years, no
contact with victim Wal-Mart.
Judy A. Wagner, Theft. Fine
$250, costs $90. No future violations within 2 years. Restitution of $29.86 to Prosecutor.
Elyse R. Wilson, Assault. Fine
$250, costs $210. 50 hours
community service. No future
violations within 2 years. Restitution to prosecutor. No violent
or threatening contact with victim.
Amber Cavazos, Pass Bad
Check. Fine $250, costs $84. No
future violations within 5 years.
Restitution $46.59 to prosecutor. No checking account for 5
years.
Christopher M. Aufdencamp,
Unlicensed Driver. Fine $300,
costs $102.
Matthew W. Weber Jr, Disorderly Conduct. Fine $250,
costs $99. No violations within
2 years.
Antonio Gonzales Jr, Violate
Pro Ord. Fine $300, costs $125.
Jail 180. No future violations
within 5 years.
Antonio Gonzales Jr. Violate
TPO. Fine $500, costs $119.
Jail 180. No future violations
within 5 years.

WAUSEON POLICE
(Sept 25) 137 N Brunell St, Animal Call
(Sept 25) 810 N Shoop Ave, Larceny
(Sept 25) 864 N Fulton St, Suspicious Vehicle
(Sept 25) 1170 N Shoop Ave, Illegal Dumping
(Sept 26) 738 Fairway Dr, Accident (Property Damage)
(Sept 26) 725 S Shoop Ave, 911
Hang Up Contact In Person
(Sept 26) 1066 N Ottokee St,
Stolen Car
(Sept 26) 230 Clinton St, Investigate Complaint
(Sept 26) 318 E Chestnut St,
Threats/Harassment
(Sept 26) 380 Virginia Dr, Alarm
Drop
(Sept 26) Enterprise Ave @ W
Linfoot St, Disabled Vehicle
(Sept 27) 712 Lawrence Ave Unit
2, Civil Matter
(Sept 27) 708 S Harvest Ln,
Open Door on Vehicle
(Sept 27) 485 E Airport Hwy,
Hit-Skip
WILLIAMS COUNTY TRAFFIC
(Sept 27) 147 N Franklin St, AnRuby A. Guillen, 71/55 Speed.
imal call
Fine $46, costs $79.
(Sept 28) 230 Clinton St, InvesAndrew M. Brossia, 67/55

Speed. Fine $46, costs $82.50.


James W. Heisler, 70/55
Speed. Fine $46, costs $82.50.
Bonnie S. Wilks, Impr Start/
Back. Fine $50, costs $85.
Laura J. Lewallen, 69/55
Speed. Fine $46, costs $79.
David R. Wagner, 71/55
Speed. Fine $71.00, costs
$82.50.
Kylie S. Reckner, 68/55
Speed. Fine $46, costs $79.
Stacey J. Nungester, 75/55
Speed. Fine $46, costs $79.
Keith A. Spruce, 85/70 Speed.
Fine $46, costs $82.50.
Carl W. Yarger, 65/55 Speed.
Fine $46, costs $79.
Chelsea M. Jenkins, 90/70
Speed. Fine $46, costs $82.50.
Mauricio G. Gomez, 83/70
Speed. Fine $46, costs $79.
Joshua A. Dixon, 86/70
Speed. Fine $46, $87.50.
Jesus S. Sandoval, 83/70
Speed. FIne $46, costs $82.50.
Amanda Mercer, 65/55 Speed.
Fine $46, costs $79.
Michael F. Paffrath, 86/70
Speed. Fine $46, costs $82.50.
Barbara J. Shifley, 81/70
Speed. Fine $46, costs $79.
Limor P. Makoul, 82/70
Speed. Fine $46, costs $79.
FULTON COUNTY
TRAFFIC & CRIMINAL
Aaron C. Huffman, Delta, No
brake lights. Costs $64.
Aaron C. Huffman, Delta,
D.U.S. Costs $64.
Aaron C. Huffman, Delta, OVI.
Fine $525, costs $88.
Amanda K. Collis, Reading MI,
No Valid Operator License. Fine
$200, costs $88.
Bret D. Campbell, Wauseon,
OVI. Fine $575, costs $88.
180 suspension, 180 days jail,
$500 fine, no violations until
2/7/2017. Not to consume or
possess drugs or alcohol for one
year.
Bret D. Campbell, Wauseon,
66/55 Speed. Fine $25, costs
$64.
Bret D. Campbell, Wauseon,
Headlights. Fine $25, costs $64.
Otis D. Plassman, Wauseon,
Phys Control. Fine $500, costs
$88. CC Sanctions: 180 days
jail, $500 fine, no violations for
2 years. 30 hrs community service.
Robert W. Chase, Archbold,
60/55 Speed. Fine $37, costs
$88.
Chelsea G. Rothfuss, West
Unity, OVI. Fine $500, costs
$88. C/C sanctions: 180 days
and $575 fine. No violations for
2 years. DIP and 30 hours community service. ALS vacated.
Chelsea G. Rothfuss, West
Unity, Fail to Control. Costs $64.
Billy R. Boyd, Wauseon, OVI.
Fine $500, costs $88. C/C
sanctions: 180 days jail and
$575 fine. No violations within
2 years. DIP and 30 hours community service. ALS vacated.
Billy R. Boyd, Wauseon, Fail
to Control. Costs $64.
Clayton P. Cameron, Wauseon,
Special Vehicle. Fine $150,
costs $88.
Jessie A. Rodriguez, Fayette,
D.U.S. Costs $88.
Kori C. Degner, Toledo, 80/65
Speed. Fine $150, costs $88.
Kenneth R. Locke Jr, Wauseon,
Improper Backing. Fine $102,
costs $88.
Imogene
M.
Buehrer,
Wauseon, Fail to Control. Fine
$102, costs $88.
Orlando Santiago, Archbold,
69/55 Speed. Fine $37, costs
$88.
Gregory D. Kinsman, Pioneer,
69/55 Speed. Fine $37, costs
$88.
Thomas E. Powers, Belleville,
MI, 84/70 Speed. Fine $37,
costs $88.
Laurie L. Stone, Wentzville
MO, 84/70 Speed. Fine $37,
costs $88.
Leonel A. Campos, Chicago IL,
94/70 Speed. Fine $100, Costs
$88.
Michael E. Moran, Rock Island IL, 80/70 Speed. Fine $37,
costs $88.
Cierra R. Hewes, Maumee OH,
85/70 Speed. Fine $77, costs
$88.
Derrick M. Walker, Cheboygan MI, 84/70 Speed. Fine $37,
costs $88.
Sara N Bailey, Whitestown, IN,
87/70 Speed. Fine $47, Costs
$88.
Brad Woods, Des Plaines, IL,
90/70 Speed. Fine $100, costs
$88.
Edward M. Kochalski, Port
Clinton OH, 81/70 Speed. Fine
$37, costs $88.
Michael S. Hornacek, Lake
Zurich, IL, 82/70 Speed. Fine

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

$37, costs $88.


Crystal Harris, Wheaton IL,
90/70 Speed. Fine $100, costs
$88.
Basthi E. Reyes, Archbold,
Improper Backing. Fine $102,
costs $88.
Kenneth P. Service, Bethel
Park PA, 81/70 Speed. Fine $37,
costs $88.
Michael L. Ahrens, Davenport, IA, 83/70 Speed. Fine $37,
costs $88.
Brennan P. Crane, Homer
Glen IL, 86/70 Speed. Fine $47,
costs $88.
Eric F. Long, Chicago IL,
83/70 Speed. Fine $37, costs
$88.
Chidozie C. Dike, Brookhaven
PA, 103/70 Speed. Fine $150,
costs $88.
Roberta M. Eisenberg, Flushing NY, 88/70 Speed. Fine $47,
costs $88.
FULTON COUNTY
SHERIFFS OFFICE
Sheriff Roy E. Miller announces that the Fulton County Sheriffs Office conducted a
High Visibility Blitz, designated
Homecoming Blitz. This Blitz
was worked in conjunction
with the Evergreen High School
Homecoming Football Game and
Dance. The Blitz started on September 26, 2014 and ended on
September 27, 2014. Deputies
who worked this Blitz made 37
traffic stops and issued 2 citations. The two citations were issued for speed violations. Deputies also issued 39 warnings to
motorists. The High Visibility
Blitz is paid from a grant that
the Sheriffs Office has received
from the Ohio Department of
Public Safety. Sheriff Miller and
his deputies are dedicated to
protecting the citizens of Fulton
County and the motorists who
travel its highways. This grant
allows for extra patrol to enforce
traffic laws that will increase
safety of motorists on the roadway in areas that are prone to
a higher number of serious and
fatal crashes.
Sheriff Roy E. Miller announces that the Fulton County Sheriffs Office is conducting a High
Visibility Traffic Blitz, designated as Homecoming Blitz which
started on October 3, 2014 and
will end on October 26, 2014.
The Sheriffs Office will be working this Blitz in correspondence
with the Wauseon, Archbold,
and Delta High School Homecoming Football Games and
Dances. Deputies will be working various hours and locations
near Wauseon, Archbold, and
Delta High Schools during this
Blitz. The Sheriffs Office will be
primarily looking for impaired
driving violations. Sheriff Miller
and his deputies are dedicated
to protecting the citizens of Fulton County and the motorists
who travel its highways. This
Blitz is being funded from a
grant that was awarded to the
Fulton County Sheriffs Office
from the Ohio Department of
Public Safety. The grant pays
for extra patrol to enforce traffic
laws that will increase the safety of motorists on roadways in
areas that are prone to a higher number of serious and fatal
crashes.
FULTON COUNTY
COMMON PLEAS
Several individuals were sentenced recently in the Fulton
County Common Pleas Court
according to county prosecutor
Scott A. Haselman.
Amanda Bowser, age 33, of
Delta, OH, previously pled guilty
to Grand Theft and Forgery. Between December 14, 2012 and
June 26, 2013, while employed
by Deardorf Property Management as an on-site manager for
apartment complexes in Delta
and Archbold, she stole cash.
On January 20, 2013, she forged
a deposit receipt form and/or a
resident certification for one of
the tenants. Judge James E.
Barber sentenced Ms. Bowser
to 2 years of community control
and ordered her to pay prosecution costs and attorney fees,
make restitution of $241.00 to
a victim, have no contact with
Deardorf
Property
Management employees or properties,
seek and maintain employment,
make restitution of $5,100 to
Travelers Insurance Company,
and serve 5 days in CCNO, with
credit for 2 days served, within
60 days. Failure to comply could
result in Ms. Bowser spending
10 months in prison.
Christian Lantz, 42, Fayette,

OH, along with his wife, Tonya


Lantz, 48, each previously pled
guilty to Grand Theft. Between
May 1, 2009 and April 31, 2012,
they received benefits from the
Fulton
County
Department
of Job and Family Services to
which they were not entitled.
Judge Barber sentenced Mr.
Lantz to 5 years of community control and ordered him to
pay prosecution costs, obtain
his GED, seek and maintain
employment, make restitution
jointly and severally with Tonya
in the amount of $15,092.00,
and serve 6 days in CCNO, with
credit for 6 days served. Judge
Barber sentenced Mrs. Lantz
to 5 years community control
and ordered her to make restitution jointly and severally
with Christian for $15,092.00,
seek and maintain employment,
and serve 5 days in CCNO with
credit for 5 days served. Failure
to comply could result in both
of them serving 10 months in
prison.
Shawn Laver, 23, of Liberty
Center, OH, previously plead
guilty to Theft. On February
7, 2014, he stole a credit card
from a Delta man. Judge Barber sentenced Mr. Laver to 2
years of community control and
ordered him to have no contact with the victim, pay prosecution costs and attorney fees,
pay a $250.00 fine, stay out of
bars/taverns, not possess alcohol and/or drugs, abide by an
11:00 PM to 6:00 AM curfew,
successfully complete drug/alcohol treatment, forfeit his 2008
Crysler Sebring, and spend 4
days in CCNO with credit for 4
days served. Failure to comply
could result in Mr. Laver serving
7 months in prison.
Samuel Sorrell, 27, previously
pled guilty to Aggravated Trafficking in Drugs. According to
Fulton County Prosecutor Scott
Haselman, on or about January
22, 2014, Mr. Sorrell sold or offered to sell a drug in the vicinity of a juvenile. Judge James E.
Barber sentenced Mr. Sorrell to
serve 24 months in prison. The
Court ordered that Mr. Sorrell
pay prosecution costs, courtappointed counsel fees, and any
other fees. The Court also suspended his drivers license for
six months.
Andrew W. Parks, age 25, previously pled guilty to Trafficking
in Heroin and Possession of Heroin. According to Fulton County
Prosecutor Scott A. Haselman,
on or about March 15, 2014 and
April 22, 2014, Mr. Parks sold
and/or possessed heroin. Judge
James E. Barber sentenced
Mr. Parks to two years of community control. He ordered Mr.
Parks to pay prosecution costs
and counsel fees; pay restitution of $150 to the MAN Unit;
pay a fine of $250; not consume
or possess alcoholic beverages
or illegal drugs; not enter bars
or taverns; successfully complete the SEARCH Program at
a corrections center in Bowling
Green; seek and maintain employment; and abide by a 10:00
PM to 6:00 AM curfew. His drivers license was suspended for
six months. Failure to abide by
these conditions could result in
Mr. Parks serving 20 months in
prison.

FULTON COUNTY
CRIME STOPPERS
The Fulton County Crime
Stopper Program would like
your help in solving the following crimes:
Authorities are investigating
a break-in at 25126 County
Road F, Archbold. On Septmber 27, 2014, the homeowner reported that power tools
were taken from a pole buildings on the property. Missing
is a Hasavarna weed eater, a
Hasqavarna chain saw and 2
chains, a chain for a pull saw,
and some oil. Total value of
stolen items is $568.
If you have any information
concerning these crimes that
could lead to the arrest and
incarceration of the person(s)
involved, please contact the
Fulton County Crime Stopper Hotline. Anyone with information about these or any
other felony will be eligible
for a reward of up to $1,000
cash. Call is confidential and
anonymous. The number to
call day or night is 1-800255-1122, toll free.

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 3

MORE GENERAL AREA NEWS

MORE POLICE NEWS

Make Special Memories At


Sauder Village Fall Family Fun Night

Police Warn Of Counterfeit


Money Usage In Wauseon

Archbold, OH On October 17 and


18 families from throughout the region
are invited to gather at Sauder Village to
celebrate fall by taking an evening train
ride, decorating pumpkins and cookies,
making a fall-themed craft, and much
more! Reservations are now being taken
for the fifth annual Fall Family Fun
Night - a memorable way to celebrate
fall at Sauder Village
There is something magical about
being in the Historic Village after hours,
shared Kim Krieger, Media Relations.
This
evening
program
provides
families with a special opportunity to
create special memories while enjoying
traditional fall activities at Sauder
Village.
The evening program includes a train
ride on the Erie Express and a hay ride
in the tractor driven trolley. At Natives
& Newcomers guests will learn about
Native American life and make a cordage
bracelet. Throughout the evening guests
can also make a fall-themed craft to
take home, enjoy pumpkin and cookie

decorating, and warm-up with hot


cocoa.
Pre-registration and pre-payment are
required for this special fall program that
will be held from 6:00-9:00 p.m. each
evening. The program cost is $12.00 for
adults, $7.00 for students ages 4-16 and
children 3 and under are free. Special
rates are available for members, lodging
guests and groups of 14 or more.
For more information or to register
for the Fall Family Fun Night Program
visithttp://www.saudervillage.org/
Creativity/Events/Fall_Family_Fun_
Nights.asp or call 800.590.9755.
There are many other activities
planned at Historic Sauder Village
through the end of October. Some of
the special fall events include Fall on
the Farm and Scout Day October 11,
Community Health Day/Fulton County
Community Appreciation Day October
18 and Woodcarvers Show & Sale
October 25 and 26.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

Medicare Open Enrollment Opportunities


Offered Through Fulton County Senior Center
The Fulton County Senior Center
is offering many opportunities for
assistance to seniors who are enrolling
in or are already enrolled in Medicare
throughout October and November
2014. The Medicare Open Enrollment
period opens on October 15th and ends
December 7th, 2014.
It is very important for seniors to
take part in Open Enrollment to make
sure that their plans are working the
best for them, states Cheryl Witt, Fulton
County Senior Center Assistant Director.
Last year I was able to help seniors save
an average of $551 per person on their
Medicare Open Enrollment dollars. Witt
notes that the Fulton County Senior
Center, Wauseon site, will be holding
a Medicare Check-Up Day in October
as well as many other opportunities for
one-on-one appointments throughout
the county during the open enrollment
period.
What can be done during Open
Enrollment?
-Change from Original Medicare to a
Medicare Advantage Plan and visa versa
-Switch from one Medicare Advantage
Plan to another Medicare Advantage Plan
-Switch from a Medicare Advantage
Plan that does not offer drug coverage
to a Medicare Advantage Plan that offers
drug coverage and visa versa

-Join a Medicare Prescription Drug


Plan
-Switch
from
one
Medicare
Prescription Drug Plan to another
Medicare Prescription Drug Plan
-Drop your Medicare prescription
drug coverage completely
All changes made will take effect on
January 1, 2015.

The Wauseon Police


Department is warning
businesses and residents
that counterfeit $20 bills
are circulating through
Wauseon. On October 1,
the Police Department
took
a
report
of
counterfeit money being
used at the Wauseon WalMart. The suspect made
a significant purchase
using
the
counterfeit
money. The Wauseon
Police
Department
is
asking businesses and
residents to be a little
more vigilant with their
transactions and look
over the change they
are receiving back. If
you do come across any
currency that appears to
be counterfeit, report it
immediately to the store.
If you wait, you will be out
whatever is counterfeit.
Some of the items to
check are the security
features in the currency.
Some of those features
are magnetic strip, feel/
texture of the currency and
quality of print. Attached
is a link to the U.S. Secret
Service for identification
of
Counterfeit
money.
http://www.

secretservice.gov/money_
detect.shtml
Shown in the picture
is the suspect that used
counterfeit money. The
suspect
was
driving
a
small
red/maroon
hatchback
vehicle.

Anyone with the name


of the suspect or his
identity, please contact
the
Wauseon
Police
Department at 419-3353821.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

Fulton County Crime Stopper


Trustees Award Delta Couple For
Information Leading To Indictment
The Trustees of the Fulton County
Crime Stopper program have authorized
a reward of $250 to be paid to a Delta
couple for information they provided
regarding an attempted burglary. They
were able to give authorities a description
of a suspicious vehicle and driver. That
information led to an indictment being
filed against Seth Bowser of Delta for

Attempted Burglary. Mr. Bowser is


currently serving a 16-month prison
sentence. The Trustees commend this
family for their brave actions and are
pleased to recognize them for their
efforts. Community involvement does
make a difference in the fight against
crime.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

Ohio State Highway


Patrol Investigating Two
Vehicle Crash On US 6

The
following
Mobile
Office
appointments are available free of
charge:
October 17 at Swanton Site (10-2)
October 21 Wauseon Senior Center (10-2)
October 23 at Wyse Commons (9-3)
October 28 at Evergreen Library (10-2)
November 6 at Swanton Library (10-6)
(Edgerton) The Defiance Post
November 13 at Fayette Site (10-2)
of
the Ohio State Highway Patrol is
November 18 at Delta Site (10-2)
investigating
a two vehicle crash, which
November 20 at Wyse Commons (9-3)
November 25 at Evergreen Library (10-2) occurred US 6 near milepost 7 in Center
Township. A 1996 Dodge Ram pickup,
To make an appointment, contact driven by Joel Birky, age 23, of 10157
Cheryl Witt at 419-337-9299. The above CR 17-75 West Unity, Ohio had been
information is also available on the westbound on US 6, when the driver
Fulton County Senior Centers Website at attempted to pass a semi. Mr. Birky
www.fultoncountyoh.com/seniorcenter
failed to see an eastbound 2004 Pontiac
To receive notifications and updates Grand Am, driven by Alexis Gors, age
regarding upcoming Senior Center 21, of 870 Summit Street Defiance,
events via email or text, please visit www. Ohio. Both drivers attempted to avoid
fultoncountyoh.com and click the Notify the crash by going off of the south side
Me tab located on the home page.
of the roadway but struck head-on.
INFORMATION PROVIDED
A front seat occupant, Cody L.

4 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

Rochester, of 870 Summit Street


Defiance, Ohio, along with both
drivers were transported to the Bryan
Community
Hospital.
Seat
belts
appeared to not have been in use at the
time of the crash. Both vehicles received
heavy front end damage and were towed
from the scene. The crash remains
under investigation.
The Post units were assisted at the
scene by the Bryan Fire Department,
Williams County Sheriffs Department,
Edgerton
Police
Department
and
Williams County EMS.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

Fire Prevention Week


October 5 - 11, 2014

Discover The Ways To Fireproof A Home Stay Safe With Supplemental Heating
A house fire can engulf and destroy a
home in a matter of minutes. Even with the
fast-acting response of firefighters, a home
that has caught fire may be irreparably
damaged by flames, soot, and water. Fire
is no laughing matter and it behooves homeowners to take precautions to fireproof
their homes as much as possible.
The Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention state that although death and
injuries caused by residential fires have declined gradually during the past several decades, fire-related deaths continue to pose
a significant health hazard. In 2010, it is
estimated that someone died in a fire every
169 minutes in the United States alone. A
person was injured by fire every 30 minutes, according to the National Fire Protection Association, Fire Analysis and Research Division. The Canadian Association
of Fire Chiefs estimates an average of 375
people die every year from fires in Canada,
mostly from smoke inhalation.
Most fires are largely preventable. The
following are a few fireproofing measures
for safety-conscious homeowners.
Install smoke detectors and check
the batteries regularly. Smoke inhalation
causes many fire-related deaths. A smoke
detector should be installed outside of
every bedroom and on every level of the
house. Dont install a smoke detector near
a window, door or forced-air register, where
drafts could interfere with the detectors
operation. Be sure to routinely check that
every smoke detector is working properly.
Have a fire extinguisher in an easily
accessible location. Ideally, there should
be a fire extinguisher in every room of the
home, but at the least keep one wherever
fire is used regularly, such as a kitchen or
by a fireplace. Ensure the fire extinguisher
is charged and that you understand how to
operate it.
Remove combustible materials from
around the house. Do not allow old clothing, rags, newspapers, or cardboard boxes
to accumulate around the house. Discard
newspapers and magazines as quickly as
possible and be careful to avoid storing
anything too close to heaters, furnaces or
electrical equipment.
Adhere to the recommended wattage in
lamps and lighting fixtures. Do not exceed
the recommended bulb wattage for lights
around the house. There may be overheating or shorting that can lead to fire.
Look for fireproof interior decor items.

PROVIDE A WARNING ... Smoke inhalation


causes many fire-related deaths. Properly
installed smoke detectors can give time to
get out of a house.
Nowadays, carpeting and furniture can be
coated with fireproof chemicals. The added
investment may be worth it in the long run.
Do not leave candles unattended.
Many people like the look and aroma that
candles provide. Candles also provide emergency illumination in the event of a power
outage. Candles can be easily knocked
over and start a fire. In fact, candles are
one of the top causes of house fires. Never
leave a candle unattended, even for a short
amount of time. And certainly never go to
sleep without extinguishing a candle.
Keep the chimney clean. Inspect the
chimney flue regularly and have it cleaned
to prevent an abundance of residual burnt
material from accumulating. This creosote
can catch fire itself.
Use a fire-resistant roofing material. A
roof should be made from metal, clay or asphalt tiles. Trim any overhanging branches
or vegetation to reduce the amount of combustible material nearby.
Have a fire-safe wall behind wood
heaters. A brick wall or another fireproof
material should be used on any walls that
house a wood- or gas-burning appliance for
added safety.
Verify electrical safety. Extension
cords and power strips should be kept to
a minimum, and the outlets should not
be overloaded. Replace fuses properly and
dont be afraid to call a certified electrician
to verify you are correctly set up.
By making a few tweaks in and around
the house, a homeowner can decrease the
likelihood of a fire.

Celebrate With Safety Around Your Tree This Season


Christmas trees are a
beloved staple of the holiday season. But as beautiful and inspiring as
Christmas trees can be, its
important that men, women and children exercise
caution around trees so no
accidents occur. The following are some Christmas
tree safety tips courtesy of
the National Fire Protection
Association.
Choose the right tree.
The tree you choose can
go a long way toward ensuring the tree will make
it through the season accident-free. Artificial trees
should be identified on their
labels as fire retardant. A

freshly cut tree should have


fresh, green needles that do
not fall off when the tree is
touched.
Do not place the tree
near a heat source.
Keep the tree clear
of exits. A Christmas tree
should never be placed in a
spot that bars an exit.
Add water to the tree
stand every day. A dry tree
is a significant safety risk.
Inspect lights before
decorating the tree. All
Christmas lights should be
inspected before they are
hung on the tree. Replace
any loose or burned out
bulbs, and inspect cords
to make sure they are not

worn down or frayed.


Use appropriate lights.
Many lights are exclusive to
indoor or outdoor use, so be
sure to use the appropriate
lights for your indoor tree.
Turn lights off before
going to bed. The lights on
the tree should always be
turned off before going to
bed or leaving your home to
prevent fire.
Properly discard the
tree. Trees that have dried
out pose a considerable fire
risk, so its best to discard
a tree when it starts to drop
needles. Do not place a discarded tree in the garage
or lean it up against your
home.

Civilian Fire Facts ... Did you know?


According to the National Fire Protection Association, 92 percent of all civilian
structure fire deaths in 2011, the most recent year for which statistics are available,
resulted from home structure fires. Not
surprisingly, kitchens are the leading area
of origin for home structure fires. Fortytwo percent of such fires, which peak dur-

ing the dinner hours between 5 p.m. and


8 p.m., began in the kitchen. And while
smoke alarms may not prevent fires, they
can prevent deaths stemming from home
structure fires. Three out of five reported
home deaths resulted from fires in homes
with no smoke alarms or homes with
smoke alarms that were not in operation.

When the weather begins to grow cold, individuals turn to supplemental


forms of heat for a variety
of reasons. The rising cost
of home ownership as well
as escalating fuel prices often set people on a search
for the least expensive and
most efficient ways to keep
comfortable during the cold
weather season. Space heaters, wood-burning stoves,
and fireplaces are among
the more common and popular supplemental heating
sources.
The same heating sources that can be cost-effective
and safe when used correctly can become hazardous
when safety guidelines are
not followed. The National
Fire Prevention Association
states that in 2010 heating
equipment was involved in
an estimated 57,100 reported home structure fires in
the United States alone, resulting in 490 deaths, 1,540
injuries and $1.1 billion
in direct property damage.
These fires accounted for 16
percent of all reported home
fires.
In an effort to prevent
property damage or loss of
life, homeowners should
follow the safety guidelines
that come with a supplemental heating device. Also,
simple steps can prevent fire
and injury.
Test smoke alarms
monthly to ensure they are
in proper working order.
Should a malfunction of a
heating appliance occur or
a fire start, a smoke alarm
could be your first indicator
of a problem.
Keep anything that can
burn at least 3 feet away
from any heating equipment, including a furnace,
a wood stove, portable space
heaters, or a fireplace.
Consider the use of a
gate or another obstruction to keep children and
pets several feet away from
a space heater or another
appliance that can easily be
knocked over.
Never use fuel-burning
appliances without proper
room venting to the outdoors
to prevent carbon monoxide
poisoning.
Only use the fuel recommended by the product
manufacturer.
When making a fire in a
stove or fireplace, never use
flammable liquids to start or
accelerate the fire.
A wood-, pellet- or
coal-burning stove should
be burned very hot at least
twice a day for about 30
minutes to reduce the creosote buildup in the chimney
or flue.
Chimneys should be
professionally cleaned at the
beginning of each use season.
Do not use an oven to
heat the home while it is in
the on position.
Electric space heaters
should be kept away from
walls, curtains and furniture.
All supplemental heat-

SUPPLEMENT HEAT SAFELY ... Wood-burning stoves are


just one method of supplemental heating that should be
used in a safe manner.
ing sources should be
turned off or extinguished
before leaving the house or
going to bed.
Carbon monoxide detectors should be installed
in every level of the home.
Install the detectors close to
all bedrooms. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless
gas that cannot be detected
easily. It quickly robs the
body of oxygen and can be
fatal when present in high
amounts.
Any stationery space
heating equipment or HVAC
system should be installed
by professionals and inspected so that it adheres
with local building codes.
This is to ensure your safety
as a homeowner.
Use safety screens in
front of fireplaces.
Make sure the damper
is open every time you light
a fire.
Do not move a heater
while it is hot or fill it with
fuel at this time.
Cinders and ashes
should be cleaned routinely
from stoves and fireplaces
and stored away from the
home in a heat-safe container until cool.
Never position an electric heater next to a water
source.
Extension cords should
not be used unless absolutely necessary. The cords
should be heavy duty and
meet the draw of the unit.
Children should not be
allowed to touch or play near
any heating appliances. Do
not leave children or pets
unattended in a room with
a fire or space heater going.
Before investing in a
heating unit, homeowners should consider adding
more insulation to homes
or caulking drafty windows
and doors as a method to
warming a home.
Whether out of necessity or just to provide an
added measure of warmth
to a home, many people use
supplemental heating appliances frequently during the
winter. Emphasizing safety
when using such devices
can prevent many of the
fire hazards associated with
these devices.

419-428-3161
Industrial, Commercial
& Residential

Insurance Services

Wauseon
419-335-9507
Archbold
419-445-6846

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Contact Mark Tingley
419-272-2245

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 5

Fire Prevention Week


October 5 - 11, 2014

Keep Safe - Establish A Home Fire Safety Plan

PLAN ... Keeping family members safe from fire involves establishing
a fire safety plan.

People rely on fire and smoke detectors to help keep them safe in
their homes. Though fire and smoke alarms are effective, a firm fire
safety plan that will keep everyone calm should a fire occur could
make the difference between life and death.
The U.S. Fire Administration says that more than 3,500
Americans die each year in fires, while roughly 18,300 more men,
women, and children are injured each year. Cooking accounts for

the greatest percentage of residential fires, followed by arson. Dryer


vent fires are also a big concern. FEMA says that smoke, rather than
the fires flames, is responsible for 75 percent of all deaths by fire.
In addition to physical injury and material damage, fires can
cause a host of problems. Psychological distress, monetary damages
and loss of pets may come with fires. Loss of irreplaceable personal
items is also a concern. Although fires can be devastating, theyre
also highly preventable, and smoke alarms and a home fire safety
plan are two precautionary measures everyone should take.
Creating an evacuation plan doesnt have to be complicated.
Such a plan can be established in a few minutes and then reinforced
through practice every so often to keep everyone fresh on what to do.
Begin by assessing the layout of the home. Figure out the two
best exits from the home.
If your home doesnt have two doors, invest in a fire ladder so
that one of the windows can be a point of exit.
Know how to gain access to the exits, including the best path
to take to avoid injury. Its a good idea to consider a few different
scenarios. A kitchen adjacent to the upstairs staircase may become
engulfed in flames and make exit by way of staircase impossible. Just
because you have doors to the outside doesnt mean theyll present
the best type of exit.
Sketch out the layout of the home and the escape plan. Smoke
can make it difficult to know up from down. Be sure everyone can
reach the exits even if vision is obstructed. Try it with your eyes
closed.
Check fire alarms routinely, and change batteries at least every
year.
Make sure windows can be easily opened if they are an exit
point.
Make note of who will be helping children or the elderly out
of the home.
Establish a place where the family will meet outdoors. This

area should be far enough away


from the home so that everyone
will be safe from smoke, flames
and falling debris. Fires may
ignite fuel explosions, so be sure
the meeting spot is a good deal
away.
Children should be
instructed to run to the meeting
spot immediately without
waiting behind for anyone to
catch up. No one should reenter
the home after arriving at the
meeting spot.
Do a few practice runs so KNOWLEDGE ... Knowing
that everyone will be accustomed how to properly use a fire
extinguisher can stop a small fire
to getting out quickly.
from becoming large and out of
While in most cases it is
control.
better to escape and let the fire
department extinguish a fire,
in the event of a small fire,
occupants may be able to stanch it with a personal fire extinguisher.
Follow the acronym PASS to properly put out the fire.
PULL the pin in the extinguisher.
AIM the nozzle or hose at the base of the flames.
SQUEEZE the trigger.
SWEEP the foam across the fire base; do not just aim in one
place.
Fire safety is very important. In conjunction with smoke alarms,
a fire safety plan can help everyone get out alive.

Simple Steps For Candle Safety


Candles are one of the easiest and most effective ways
to add aroma and ambiance to a home. While many people would like to use scented candles in their homes, they
may be weary of the fire risk. However, candle-related
fires appear to be on the decline.
It is estimated that candles are used in seven out of
10 American households and that people spend around
$2 billion annually on candles, according to the National
Candle Association. Candles can be used for aromatherapy or to make a room feel more cozy. People who are
anticipating a weather event that may knock out electrical
power also rely on candles as an alternative light source.
Although using candles can lead to fires, the NCA reports that candle-related fires have dropped to their lowest level in roughly 10 years. Data shows candle fires
dropped by nearly 50 percent between 2001 and 2010.
Thats thanks in part to the industrys safety standards
and consumer education efforts.
According to a Home Candles Fires report issued by
the National Fire Protection Association, there were approximately 9,600 accidental candle fires in 2010, the latest year for which figures are available, compared to a
peak of 18,900 in 2001. The statistics are based on data

reported by the federal governments National Fire Incidence Reporting System and NFPAs survey.
While candle fires tend to peak during the holiday season, when candles are an integral part of holiday decorating, candles are widely burned throughout the year,
including during outdoor gatherings in the summertime.
To reduce the risk of fire when using candles, consider
these guidelines.
Trim the wick to 1/4 inch each time before burning. .
Use a candle holder specifically designed for candle
use. It should be sturdy and heat-resistant.
Avoid drafts, vents or air currents that can cause
rapid or uneven burning and excessive dripping.
Never leave a burning candle unattended.
Do not burn candles by or on anything that might
catch fire.
Keep candles out of the reach of children and pets.
Follow the manufacturers recommendations.
Dont touch or move a burning candle.
Always keep a candle within sight.
Extinguish all candles before bed or if you feel sleepy.
When used safely, candles make a welcome addition
to a home.

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6 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

Stryker, Ohio

419-682-3311
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

Bombers Steakhouse Hosts Benefit For Wolfe


By: T.J. Hug
THE VILLAGE REPORTER
Given the nature of Edon and the people who live there, it should come as no
surprise that they would rally around him.
After all, Lee Wolfe is one of their own.
Wolfe, a Bomber native, worked at the
Menards Distribution Center in Holiday
City when it happened. A board fell from a
machine and fractured his skull in several
places, giving him severe head trauma. As
bad as his injuries were, they could have
been much, much worse.
He was very lucky, claimed Lee's father, Chad Ordway.
Indeed, the board could have done
much more damage to his skull, and very
easily might have lead to his death. Instead, he's not only alive, but recovering
as well. There will come a time when he
can actually go back to working.
That is amongst Wolfe's largest obstacles at the moment, actually - his inability to work. Edon residents have rallied
around him since the incident, with local
establishments such as the town's branch
of Slattery's Gas Station taking up collections for him.
Edon villagers took that assistance a

step further on September 27, as a benefit


was held for Wolfe at the Bombers Saloon
and Steakhouse. People gathered at the
eatery to show their support both morally
and financially.
Those in attendance were treated to
pulled pork, cheesy potatoes, macaroni
salad, and baked beans, served buffetstyle in the back of the Steakhouse. A silent auction was also held, as well as a
50/50 drawing, a cornhole tournament,
and a blind draw with proceeds going to
Wolfe.
DJ Jeff Clark provided music for the
day, though there was plenty of live entertainment as well. The Back Up Band and
The Double Cross'd Band both rocked the ROCK THE HOUSE ... The Back Up Band rocks out on the stage of the Bombers Saloon
stage of the Saloon. A karoke contest was and Steakhouse.
also held.
Patrons around the Steakhouse wore
special shirts sold during the event. The
shirts refer to Wolfe as The Hard Headed
One.
Given what had happened to Wolfe,
and why a benefit was needed in the first
place, the phrase seemed oddly appropriate.

Edon Couple Celebrate 60th


Wedding Anniversary

T.J. Hug may be reached at


publisher@thevillagereporter.com.

PHOTOS BY T.J. HUG, STAFF

PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED

JUST LIKE OLD TIMES ... Enjoying their time at the bar, Edon patrons talk amongst
DIAMOND WEDDING ANNIVERSARY ... LeRoy and Marilyn (Kinnison) Held are
themselves while attending the Lee Wolfe Benefit.

having their 60th Wedding Anniversary. The couple were married on October 9,
1954 at the St. Joseph Catholic Church in Blakeslee. Their adult children, Lucinda
(Allen) Faulhaber, Edon; Deborah (Marc) Grisier, Toledo; Sandra (Paul) Reese,
Raleigh, NC; Robert Held, Carmel, IN and their children hosted a catered Chipotle
meal honoring the couple at their home on an earlier date. They are greatly blessed
with 10 grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

WHAT WE READ YEARS AGO - THE EDON COMMERCIAL

1986 Edon Student Librarians


COME ON IN ... Edon residents pile into the Bombers Saloon and Steakhouse to support the Lee Wolfe Benefit. Special Mr. Lees Crew shirts were sold as part of the fund
raising campaign.

Tired of being treated


like just another
account number?
Get the personalized
attention you deserve.

STUDENT LIBRARIANS ... Kneeling: Brian Siebenaler and Nan Moulder. Second
Row: Todd Kissinger, Donna Parrott, Tracy Henderickson, Dawn Burlew,
Melinda Oyer, Alice Williams. Third Row: Advisor Mrs. Culbertson, Chris Boling,
Teddie Gambler, Bill Lovejoy, Dustin Favourite. Missing: Yvonne Mocherman.

EDON COMMERCIAL
70 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1944
Jacob Walz bought the residence property owned by Mrs. Lottie Zulch Holdridge. It was sold by
action on Saturday.
Miss Florence Eyester is clerking in the Gladding Store.
60 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1954

24 Hour ATM

Call, come in or
go online, and get
to know us today!

www.edonstatebank.com
419-272-2521 Serving the community 419-272-2792
since 1893
Edon
Blakeslee
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Luke, Mr.


and Mrs. Kinzer, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Rockey, Mr. and Mrs. Orville
Rockey, and Mr. and Mrs. Dale Harroff, Jr. met for Mrs. Richard Lukes
birthday.
Edons Treblearies, sponsored
by the Edon Lions Club, will go to
New York today to participate in a
national barbershop contest. Sweet
Adeline, Inc. Lion Charles Huard is
furnishing transportation for the
girls.
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Lautzenhiser
entertained with a birthday party
Sunday for the pleasure of their
daughter Karen. Ten guests were
present and a fine potluck dinner
as served to the group.

50 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1964
The fifth grade and their teacher, Eleanor Lesnet, went on a field
trip Monday. They were guided
around Lake LaSuAnn by Mrs. Loretta Kohl and room mothers, Pat
Slagel and Glenna Robison and
bus driver Dewayne Fox.
Names of members of the newly
organized Student Council at Edon
High School were announced recently. The Student Council was
organized this fall and members
were selected by the faculty.
40 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1974
Miss Emily Foster is the new
band director at the Bryan High
School. Miss Foster makes all her
own shows. Each show has a drill,
dance and feature number which
gives a variety.
The Edon Church of Chris would
like to proclaim this Sunday, October 27 as Jerry Borton Day. The
purpose of this special say is to
raise funds for buying a wheelchair
that will fit in the Borton van.

ADDITIONAL EDON NEWS ON PAGE 8

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 7

North Central Book Club Members


Look To Grow Club Numbers

REFLECTIONS FROM PIONEERS PAST

1969 North Central Honor Society

HONOR SOCIETY ... Seated: Marshall Landis, Secretary - Treasurer; Mrs.


Oxender, Advisor; Shelby Pierce, President; Nancy Heller, Vice-President;
Jackie Miller. Standing: Diane Martin, Elaine Smith, Rod Hersha, Butch
Bell, Lorraine Houk, Wanda Douglas.

MORE EDON AREA NEWS


PHOTO BY T.J. HUG, STAFF

BOOK CLUB ... Pictured from left to right: Front Row, Seated Austin Echler. Back
Row Allyson Hutchison, Brooke Bryan, and Mrs. Carolyn Hopper.
By T.J. Hug
THE VILLAGE REPORTER

and High School English Department


have joined forces to achieve their
goal. Mary Boots, Tana Kappen, Kelli
I'll be at every meeting.
Hills, and Carolyn Hopper, all English
So says Allyson Hutchison, a member
Teachers at North Central, will all take
of the North Central Book Club.
part in the group.
The group met for the second time
The Book Club met last month,
ever on Friday, with three students
deciding on Divergent as their first book
in attendance. Discussing the book
to discuss. At the conclusion of the
Divergent, the group aimed to capitalize
meeting, members selected The Maze as
on the success of big budget Hollywood
their next book.
movies based on books to inspire
According to Mrs. Hopper, the goal is
students to read.
for word of mouth to spread information
In an effort to jump start the club, the
about the club to the students of North
four teachers comprising the Junior High
Central.
We're
hoping
the
Williams County Historical Society
students will start talking,
and word will get out
about us.
With three enthusiastic
October 11 10 AM - 4 PM
members
already
on
at the museum 611 East Main Street, Montpelier
board, the students of
(adjacent to the fairgrounds) 419-485-8200
North Central are sure to
Join us for a day filled with fun! Enjoy the craft show, bake sale,
hear all about the North
Central Book Club.
chili contest, butter churning and basket weaving demonstrations,

Fall Fest

childrens crafts, horse-drawn wagon rides, magic show,


bounce castle. AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!

Adult Admission $1
Kids 12 and under FREE

T.J. Hug can be reached at


publisher@thevillagereporter.com

Meet Author Victor A. Baird


At The Edon Branch Library
Meet author Victor A. Baird on
Tuesday, October 21st at 6:00 pm at
the Edon Branch Library. Mr. Baird
will be promoting his historical book
Railroading on the Wabash Fourth
District.
Built as the Wabash Railroads
Chicago Extension and an integral
part of the shortest railroad between
Detroit and Chicago, the Fourth
District through Northwest Ohio
and Northern Indiana has a colorful
history. It was the first Wabash
District dieselized (1950) and home
of the last mixed train in Indiana
(1962). In addition to an illustrated,
researched history, dating back to
1891, Railroading on the Wabash
Fourth District tells the story in the
words of railroaders that worked
the line and folks that remember
it. This book includes hundreds of
photographs, maps, illustrations,
diagrams, timetables, track charts,

and so much more. As a bonus, the


postscript chapter provides an update on what happened to the railroad
after the 1964 Wabash lease to Norfolk
& Western.
Victor A. Baird will be speaking
on the history of the Wabash Fourth
District, as well as signing and
selling copies of his book, which
contains information on Edon and
the Williams County area. This is
the perfect program for history buffs
and railroad enthusiasts. If you are
unable to attend the book signing
you can purchase Railroading on the
Wabash Fourth Districtonline at www.
erstwhilepublications.com.
The Edon Branch Library is located
at 105 S. Michigan Street. For more
information, please contact library
manager Cyndi Jewell at 419-2722839.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

THE VILLAGE REPORTER

WEEKLY COMMUNITY CALENDAR


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OCTOBER 10TH - OCTOBER 16TH, 2014


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10TH

MONDAY, OCTOBER 13TH

Montpelier Chamber of Com- Montpelier Village Council Meetmerce Meeting 8:00 AM


ing 6:00 PM
Pioneer Village Council Meeting
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11TH
7:00 PM
West Unity Fall Fest (See page 13 Wauseon Board of Education
for a detailed listing of events.)
Meeting 5:30 PM
Archbold Fall Fest (See page 20
for a detailed listing of events.)
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14TH
Williams County Historical Soci- Montpelier School Board Meeting
ety Fall Fest 10:00AM - 4:00 PM 5:00 PM
Fayette Schools Family Fun Day Edon Board of Public Affairs 6:30
9:00 AM - 8:30 PM
PM
Edgerton Fall Fest
Chloe Merrilat and Williams WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15TH
County Cancer Assistance Benefit No Events Submitted By Press Time
Square Dance 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Edon Fire Hall
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16TH
Edon School Board Special Public Fayette Public Meeting Concerning
Meeting 10:00 AM
Chickens
Wauseon Crossroads Evangelical Rainbow of Wellness - Veterans
Church Habitat Home Run 9:00 Memorial Building 8:45 AM
AM
Holiday City Village Council
Meeting 7:00 PM
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12TH
Fayette Chamber of Commerce
No Events Submitted By Press Time Meeting 7:00 PM

COMMUNITY CALENDAR THOUGHT - "A community that doesn't communicate with its
Hometown Newspaper is a community left unaware." Submit your community calendar request to publisher@thevillagereporter.com. A 501(C)(3) non-profit organization may post their
event for free, with encouragement to support your hometown paper with an additional advertisement. For-profit Organizations must place an advertisement and their event will then
be posted here free of charge.

8 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

Our Family Serving


Your Family
www.eaglefuneralhomes.com
Fayette, OH

SUBMIT YOUR
COMMUNITY
EVENT BY
EMAILING
US AT:
FAXING
(877) 778-9425

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

Johnny Appleseed Makes A Visit To Montpeliers Scott & Hasty Host


Montpelier Elementary Classrooms Celebrity Dinner In West Unity
By: T.J. Hug
THE VILLAGE REPORTER

PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED

SPECIAL GUEST ... Several grade levels at Montpelier Elementary have been
learning about Johnny Appleseed with his birthday being on September 26th.
Teachers thought it seemed smart to invite him (portrayed by Elementary Principal
Lance Thorp) in to discuss what his life was like and the role he played in planting
so many apple trees across many parts of the United States. Johnny visited
classrooms, read a story to the students, gave everyone an apple, and told his many
stories! Kids loved their time with Johnny and learned so much.

Montpeliers Helping Hands


Food Pantry Sees Growing Need

PHOTOS BY CHELSIE FIRESTONE, STAFF

Special Waitress Teresa Hillis was


challenged to sing Im a Little Teapot,
with motions included, by her table.
And she accepted. Such was the environment of the Celebrity Dinner put on
by Jade Scott and Elayna Hasty.
Patrons gathered at Millers Country
Kitchen in West Unity to partake in the
fun of the event, roughly fifty in number.
They were treated to a festive evening
powered by the vibrantly youthful personalities of Scott and Hasty.
Scott, the reigning Junior Miss Montpelier, has been working with the Tennessee H.U.G.S. organization to collect
shoes for those in need throughout the
world. Going into the evening, she had
474 pairs of flip flops in her possession,
nearly halfway toward her goal of 1,000.
With several guests arriving at Millers
with footwear to donate, its quite likely
Scott has crossed the 500 pair mark already.
For Hasty, her hope was to raise
money for G.A.B. Girls, an anti-bullying organization which the young girl
founded. After moving to Montpelier
from Toledo in first grade, she found
herself the victim of hazing from a group
of girls. But it was the bullying suffered
by a friend, so intense that said friend is
now home schooled, that led Hasty, the
current Junior Miss Williams County, to
form G.A.B. Girls.
The simple fact that both girls have
gone so far out of their way to find a way
to help people, and completely on their
own accord, demonstrates why it is that
they were drawn together. That so many
showed up in support of their respective
causes demonstrates just how impressive these young ladies truly are.
Serving those in attendance were five
special waitresses for the evening. Hillis was joined by Shelley Duran, Jody
Smith, Miss Edgerton Hannah Herman,
and Teen Miss Williams County Morgan Mitchell in bringing the people their

VOLUNTEERS ... Helping Hands Food Pantry volunteers Otis King and Mary Weirich
showcase the sign that invited local residents to aid the pantry by donating non-perishable food items or by making monetary donations to help the pantry keep shelves
stocked.

SERVICE FASTER THAN A LOCOMOTIVE


... Special Waitress Shelly Duran dresses
up as Supergirl as part of the fun of the
Dinner. Serving patrons as a super hero
likely brings with it the expectation of expedited service.
COLLECTING ... Helping Hands Food Pantry Director Paula Peffley sets outside the
Montpelier Fire Station during the pantrys recent food drive. Peffleys goal of collecting
1,000 pounds of food for the pantry were not quite realized but she expresses sincere
gratitude to all who reached out to help the pantry help those in need.

By: Chelsie Firestone


THE VILLAGE REPORTER
Paula Peffley, Director of the Helping
Hands Food Pantry in Montpelier, says
that she is appreciative of all of the
donations received by the pantry at their
recent food drive but points out that
the Pantry is still very much in need of
monetary and perishable food donations
to help assist those in need.
Helping Hands, located at 309 W.
Washington Street in Montpelier, is
a fully self-sufficient pantry staffed
solely by volunteers who take no salary
in return for their service. Monetary
donations received and funds generated
through fundraising events pay for
overhead expenses such as utilities and
building upkeep as well as to help keep
food stocked on the pantrys shelves.
While the recent food drive brought in
$122 in cash donations and 755 pounds
of food, that food isnt likely to last long
as the pantry has seen the number of
families they assist grow as much as
40% over the last few months. Currently
the pantry is serving approximately 140
families each month and each of those
families averages between 50 and 75
pounds of food over a month meaning
the pantry needs as much as 10,000
pounds of food each month to continue
to assist those in need.
Cash donations are always accepted
and allow the pantry to both pay

overhead as well as purchase food at the


Toledo Food Bank, where the pantry can
purchase bulk food items at 18 cents
per pound. However, Peffley also points
out that the food bank is also sometimes
lacking in certain items. Of particular
need at the pantry are non-perishable
food items such as dry and canned
goods. Meat and toilet paper are also in
high demand and difficult for the pantry
to keep in stock without help from the
community.
The pantry is also asking that
Williams County residents consider
partnering with them by pledging $10
each month. Its a small amount that
has the potential to go a long way. As
Peffley explains, if 200 people from
Williams County would make that
pledge, the pantry would have enough
funds to keep the food shelves stocked,
to cover all of their expenses including
building maintenance, and to support
their Hands That Teach program,
which provides valuable education in
life skills to those in need.
With the holiday season coming
quickly upon us, the pantry expects
to see the need for assistance to grow.
Anyone who would like to help can stop
by the pantry on Tuesday or Thursday
between 11:00 AM and 1:00 PM or
Thursday evenings between 5:30 PM
and 7:30 PM.
Chelsie can be reached at
chelsie@thevillagereporter.com

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

drinks and food, as well as honoring an


occasional request from their respective
tables.
Overall, the evening was fun, festive,
and meaningful, a unique combination,
not unlike the combination of hosts who
put the dinner together.
T.J. Hug can be reached at
publisher@thevillagereporter.com.

PHOTOS BY T.J. HUG, STAFF

QUEENS UNITED ... Junior Miss Williams


County Elayna Hasty, right, and Junior
Miss Montpelier Jade Scott, right, join
forces to host the Celebrity Dinner.

SHORT AND STOUT ... Challenged by her


table, Teresa Hillis performs Im a Little
Tea Pot, complete with motions, at the
Celebrity Dinner in West Unity.

MAY I HAVE YOUR ATTENTION PLEASE


... Jamie Geren, mother to Jade Scott,
makes an announcement to those in attendance at the Celebrity Dinner. Scott
came up with the dinner idea after seeing
Geren host one for a work related event.

G.A.B. Girls Hosts


The Princess Within Me Event

PHOTO BY TIMOTHY KAYS, STAFF

A BIG DAY FOR THE G.A.B. GIRLS October 4 was a busy day for the Girls
Against Bullying Girls program. Beginning at 10:00, a meeting was held at Cookies
On Demand in Downtown Montpelier in preparation for the later event at the same
venue. Elayna Hasty, the founder of G.A.B. Girls hosted an event entitled The Princess Within Me. The Princess Within Me was geared towards girls aged five through
eight years old, which taught young girls about beauty from within, and that all
girls are their own unique princess. Games and story time followed later, based
upon the book The Super Duper Princess Heroes: How It All Started by Sanjay
Nambiar. Later that evening, a celebrity dinner fundraiser for G.A.B. Girls and Tennessee H.U.G.S. was held at Millers Country Kitchen in West Unity, full coverage
of which can be found in this edition of the Village Reporter. Pictured above at the
earlier meeting is Ms. Hasty, along with Kaiya Sechler.

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 9

MORE MONTPELIER AREA NEWS

Montpeliers Sidney Houk Crowned At Homecoming


By: T.J. Hug
THE VILLAGE REPORTER

With Jake Dewire and Jared Shoup


on either arm, Sidney Houk stood at
midfield as the announcer told the
crowd about her high school career and
future plans.
He also mentioned the possibility of
her becoming Homecoming Queen.
Now, before hes anointed a fortune
teller, it should be noted that the announcer said the same of the other
two Senior Attendants for Montpeliers
Homecoming, Christy Duchene and Breanna Stein. Yet it did end up being Houk
who was proclaimed Queen at the conclusion of the Homecoming Ceremony.
Of course, all of the attendants had
a turn taking center field. First in line

was Freshman Attendant Joy Scholma,


accompanied by her escort Jaden VanTong and Remington Beck. Sophomore
Attendant Alyssa Stoy was escorted
by Nick Buehrer and C.J. Roth. Zech
Thompson and Dylan Snyder walked
with Hope Scholma, Junior Attendant,
as she made her way to midfield. Of
the Senior Attendants, Christy Duchene
was accompanied by Jared Lyons and
Jared Sargent, Breanna Stein by Cody
Caudill and Hunter McKelvey, and Houk
by Dewire and Shoup.
All the while, friends and family
awaited each attendant as they made
their way toward the Montpelier sideline. With cameras and phones in hand,
they captured memories of the momentous ceremony as the sun shined down

on the Homecoming royalty from behind. ter her coronation, Queen Houk and
Upon her announcement as Home- her court were introduced to the home
coming Queen, Houk was crowned by crowd.
last years Queen Jessy Duchene, who
T.J. Hug can be reached at
happens to be the sister of Christy. Afpublisher@thevillagereporter.com

A QUEEN AND HER COURT ... The 2014 Montpelier Homecoming Court, from left to
right: Freshman Attendant Joy Scholma, Sophomore Attendant Alyssa Stoy, Junior
Attendant Hope Scholma, Queen Sidney Houk, Senior Attendant Breanna Stein, and
Senior Attendant Christy Duchene.

PHOTOS BY T.J. HUG, STAFF

WATCHING A CORONATION ... From left to right: Zech Thompson, Junior Attendant
Hope Scholma, and Dylan Snyder look on as the coronation of Queen Sidney Houk is
taking place.

PASSING OF THE CROWN ... 2013 Montpelier Homecoming Queen Jessy Duchene prepares to crown Sidney Houk as the 2014 Homecoming Queen at the conclusion of the
Homecoming ceremony prior to the game against Delta.

INTO THE FUTURE ... From left to right: Freshmen Remington Beck, Attendant Joy
Scholma, and Jaden VanTong stare at the coronation ceremony, perhaps looking four
years into their own futures.

ALL SMILES ... Senior Attendant Christy Duchene jokes with her escorts, Jared Sargent
(59) and Jared Lyons (24), during the proceedings of the Homecoming Ceremony.

HAPPY ESCORTS ... C.J. Roth (76) and Nick Buehrer (72) are all smiles as they pose
for a picture with Sophomore Attendant Alyssa Stoy, whom they are escorting for the
Homecoming Ceremony.
SAY CHEESE! ... From left to right: Cody Caudill, Senior Attendant Breanna Stein, and
Hunter McKelvey stare right into the camera as they pose for a picture at the Homecoming Ceremony.

ORDER YOUR COPY OF THESE FULL COLOR PHOTOS AT


WWW.THEVILLAGEREPORTER.COM
.FR

REFLECTIONS OF THE PAST


1928 Montpelier High School Orchestra

HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA ... Sitting: Estelleen Shearer, Martha Freed,


Ruth Fisher, Gladys Flickinger, Pauline Kintigh, Beatrice Tedhams, Lucille
Mower, Audrey Tedhams, Laurice Drake. Stanging: Henry Walter, Howard
Bechtol, Lee VanFossen, Willard Bordner, Michael Ringenberg, Carl Legant, Paul Messner, Robert Augustine, Robert Boyer, Gerald Waterstone,
Robert Lett, Leonard Drake.

10 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

MORE MONTPELIER AREA NEWS

MORE GENERAL AREA NEWS

Montpelier Elementary Holds Williams County Ballot Issues For


Little Loco Leaders Assembly November 4 Election Released
By: Chelsie Firestone
THE VILLAGE REPORTER

PHOTOS PROVIDED

KINDER KLUB AND KINDERGARTEN ... Front Row (left to right): Maggie Jacob,
Alex Fedderke, and Rose Budd. Back Row (left to right): Wesley Brown, Zara Fry,
Rozzlynn Kolbe, and Wesley Barron.

FIRST GRADE ... Front Row (left to right)Jaxon Zigler, Jason Lincoln, and Angela
Stantz. Back Row (left to right)Mallory Hornung, Gabby Jones, and Luke Friend.

SECOND GRADE ... Front Row (left to right)Lilly Ayers, Peyton Boothman, Lainey
Brigle, and Aleigha Hillard. Back Row (left to right)Alec Walz, Greyson Saneholtz,
Isabella Scott, Reece Gooding, and Jarett Malone.

In addition to addition to being asked


to vote between several candidates
running for state offices, Williams
County voters will be asked to vote on
several local issues and renewals of
levies. Those issues and levies, listed by
locality include:
Countywide Issue 4 Proposed
Tax Levy (Renewal) - A renewal of a
tax for the benefit of Williams County
for the purpose of providing operating
revenue to the Williams County General
Health District at a rate not exceeding
1 mill for each one dollar of valuation,
which amounts to $0.10 for each one
hundred dollars of valuation, for five
years, commencing in 2015, first due in
calendar year 2016.
Countywide Issue 5 Proposed
Tax Levy (Renewal) - A renewal of a tax
for the benefit of the Williams County
Public Library for the purpose of current
expenses at a rate not exceeding 1
mill for each one dollar of valuation,
which amounts to $0.10 for each one
hundred dollars of valuation, for five
years, commencing in 2014, first due in
calendar year 2015.
Countywide Issue 6 Proposed
Tax Levy (Renewal) - A renewal of a tax
for the benefit of Williams County for
the purpose of providing and maintain
senior citizens services and facilities at
a rate not exceeding 1 mill for each one
dollar of valuation, which amounts to
$0.10 for each one hundred dollars of
valuation, for five years, commencing in
2015, first due in calendar year 2016.
Bridgewater Township
Issue
11 Proposed Tax Levy (Renewal)
- A renewal of a tax for the benefit of
Bridgewater Township for the purpose
of fire protection at a rate not exceeding
0.7 mill for each one dollar of valuation,
which amounts to $0.07 for each one
hundred dollars of valuation, for five
years, commencing in 2015, first due in
calendar year 2016.
Edgerton Village Issue 7 Proposed
Municipal Income Tax - Shall the
Ordinance providing for a three-quarter
percent (3/4%) levy on income for a
continuing period beginning January 1,
2015, for defraying operating expenses
and for capital improvements, including,
without limitation, sewer and street
projects, parks, playgrounds, public
buildings, and equipment necessary
for the Police, Fire, Street, Traffic and
Safety Departments be passed?
Edon Northwest Local School District
Issue 1 Proposed Tax Levy (Renewal)
- A renewal of a tax for the benefit of
Edon Northwest Local School District
for the purpose of general permanent
improvements at a rate not exceeding
3 mills for each one dollar of valuation,
which amounts to $0.30 for each one
hundred dollars of valuation, for five
years, commencing in 2015, first due in
calendar year 2016.
Jefferson Township
Issue 12 Proposed Tax
Levy (Renewal) - A renewal
of a tax for the benefit
of Jefferson Township
for the purpose of fire
protection at a rate not
exceeding 1 mill for each
one dollar of valuation,
which amounts to $0.10
for each one hundred
dollars of valuation, for
five years, commencing in
2015, first due in calendar

year 2016.
Maple Gove Union Cemetery District
Issue 2 Proposed Tax Levy (Renewal)
- A renewal of a tax for the benefit of
Williams County for the purpose of
providing operating revenue to the
Williams County General Health District
at a rate not exceeding 1 mill for each
one dollar of valuation, which amounts
to $0.10 for each one hundred dollars of
valuation, for five years, commencing in
2015, first due in calendar year 2016.
Springfield
Township

Issue
13 Proposed Tax Levy (Renewal)
- A renewal of a tax for the benefit of
Springfield Township for the purpose of
fire protection at a rate not exceeding 2
mills for each one dollar of valuation,
which amounts to $0.20, for each one
hundred dollars of valuation, for five
years, commencing in 2015, first due in
calendar year 2016.
Springfield Township Park District
Issue 3 Proposed Tax Levy (Renewal)
- A renewal of a tax for the benefit of
Springfield Township Park District for
the purpose of defraying the expenses
of the Township Park District and
purchasing, appropriating, operating,
maintaining and improving lands for
park and recreational purposesat a rate
not exceeding 1 mill for each one dollar
of valuation, which amounts to $0.10 for
each one hundred dollars of valuation,
for five years, commencing in 2015, first
due in calendar year 2016.
West Unity Issue 8 Special
Election By Petition Local Liquor Option
for Particular Location - Shall the sale of
wine and mixed beverages be permitted
for sale on Sunday between the hours of
eleven a.m. and midnight by SaneholtzMcKarns Inc., dba Unity Main Stop, an
applicant for a D-6 liquor permit, who
is engaged in the business of operating
a neighborhood convenience store at
204 East Jackson St., West Unity, Ohio
43570, in this precinct?
West Unity Issue 9 Special
Election By Petition Local Liquor Option
for Particular Location Shall the sale
of beer, wine and mixed beverages be
permitted by Saneholtz-McKarns Inc.
dba Unity Mini Mart, an applicant for
D-1, D-2, C-1 and C-2 liquor permits,
who is engaged in the business of
operating a neighborhood convenience
storeat 205 West Jackson St., West
Unity, Ohio 43570, in this precinct?
West Unity Issue 10 Special
Election By Petition Local Liquor Option
for Particular Location - Shall the sale of
wine and mixed beverages be permitted
for sale on Sunday between the hours
of ten a.m. and midnight by SaneholtzMcKarns Inc. dba Unity Mini Mart, an
applicant for a D-6 liquor permit, who
is engaged in the business of operating
a neighborhood convenience store at
205 West Jackson St., West Unity, Ohio
43570, in this precinct?
Chelsie can be reached at
chelsie@thevillagereporter.com

Montpelier Office - 310 Lincoln Ave.


Every Thursday
2nd Thursday

10:30 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 - 4:30 pm

10:30 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 - 6:30 pm

Bryan Office - 1399 E. High St.


Every Tuesday
1:00 - 4:30 pm

CALL FOR APPOINTMENT

OPEN HOUSE
October 6th - 17th
Bring your entire family in to enjoy
all the Y has to offer

Join during this time and we will waive your


enrollment fee ($60 savings)
Exciting new member values this fall more value in your membership than ever

BUCKET FILLERS ... Front Row (left to right)Maggie Jacobs, Aiden Roland,
Carsen Nixon, Darius Ross, Jaxon Stahler, and Alexa Stuck. Back Row (left to
right)Wesley Barron, Gabby Jones, Luke Friend, Dreyden Endicott, and Sabrina
Wiyrick.
Montpeliers elementary school held
its monthly Little Loco Leaders assembly
for September on September 29th, 2014.
The word of the month was Teamwork
and specific students were recognized
by their teachers for showing acts of
Teamwork throughout the month.
Students were taught by our guidance
counselor, Miss. Anderson, that together
everyone accomplishes more with
organization, respect, and kindness! In

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

addition, many students showed acts of


Teamwork throughout the month and
were given the opportunity to drop their
name in a bucket as a bucket filler to
have a chance to be drawn out randomly
at the assembly as well. These students
were given awards that were donated
to the school by local businesses (Cool
Beans and McDonalds).
INFORMATION PROVIDED

Statewide Reciprocity beginning Oct. 1st - Our Williams


County Family YMCA members now can enjoy full access to
over 50 YMCAs throughout the state of Ohio
Reduced member pricing for classes like Group Cycling,
Boot Camp, Pilates, water arobics and more
Expanded FREE childwatch Monday through Friday
mornings at 8 am - 11 am and Monday through Thursday
evenings 4:30 pm - 7:30 pm
You already belong. Now join us, at YOUR Williams County Family YMCA!

Williams County
Family YMCA

One Faber Drive, Bryan


419-636-6185
THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 11

West Unity Legion Post 669


Hilltop High School Announces
September Students Of The Month
Holds Annual Ceremony For
Disposal Of Unserviceable Flags

PHOTO PROVIDED

STUDENTS OF THE MONTH ... Front Row Left to Right: Justin Athy, Josh Hodge,
Nash Kuney, Johnnie Roth, Felicity Jackson, Shelby Kuney, Kaylista Underwood,
Rylee McCain, and Ben Routhier. Back Row Left to Right: Brayden Gorsuch, Alex
Lopez, Brianna Bell, Kennadi McCain, Jenna Kempf, Baylee Schmitt, Sydni Rivera,
Teryn Ganster, Malorie Heer, Brian Gallup.

WHAT WE READ YEARS AGO

PREPARATION WORK ... Legion member Willard Miller separates the usable from the
unserviceable flags prior to the ceremonies.

1996 Hilltop Yearbook Staff

PROPER DISPOSAL ... Legion member Steve Marvin commits an unserviceable flag to
the flames.

YEARBOOK STAFF ... Front Row (L to R): Sherry Ashbaugh, Joy Mercer, Lasey
Barber. Middle: Bobbie Deck, Lindsey Harrington, Yolie Serrano, J.R. Jones,
Todd Kerr. Back: Emily Stine, Ami Dawson, Marjie Yeupell, Chip Flory, Mike
Hand, Toby Moyer. Missing: John Grine, Becky Grant.

PHOTOS BY TIMOTHY KAYS, STAFF

By: Timothy Kays


THE VILLAGE REPORTER
True journalism holds at its core the
forbiddance of offering ones opinion
as fact. With that being said, I would
ask the kind reader to indulge me in a
moment of pure opinion, one for which
you are free to objectwe live in the
greatest country on earth.
Whether or not you would agree with
that sentiment, it is a non sequitur point
for others, especially those who, at one
time or another, have worn the uniform
of the American armed forces. They are
the ones who went into harm's way to
defend this country and the freedoms it
offers. One of those freedoms is found
in the First Amendmentthe freedom of
expression.
Some have taken this freedom
to the extreme, and engaged in acts
that desecrate the flag of our country.
While armed services members fought
to preserve the freedoms of America,
others would burn the very flag that
these same armed services members
served under. Still though, there comes
a time when a flag becomes too worn,
faded or damaged to be flown with
the distinction in which it deserves. It
is then, and ONLY then in which it is
deemed proper to retire a flag by means
of disposal by burning.
On the evening of October 1, members
of the American Legion Post 669 in
West Unity conducted a flag disposal
ceremony behind their building on
East Jackson Street. Flags which were
turned over to Post 669 for disposal were
brought forth in a military ceremony. The
Ceremony for Disposal of Unserviceable
Flags is outlined in Resolution No. 440,
passed by the 19th National Convention
of The American Legion in New York in
September of 1937. The ceremony has
been an integral part of American Legion
ritual since that date.
The
Sergeant-at-Arms
opened
the ceremony by addressing the
Post Commander that there were
unserviceable flags to be retired. The
Sergeant-at-Arms then presented the
flags to the Second Vice Commander
and the First Vice Commander for their
inspection and approval. Gaining both,
the Sergeant-at-Arms returned to the
Post Commander and reported that the
Second Vice Commander and the First
Vice Commander had confirmed the
original findings.
The Commander then read from
prepared text, Comrades, we have
presented here these Flags of our

Country which have been inspected and


condemned as unserviceable. They have
reached their present state in a proper
service of tribute, memory, and love. A
flag may be a flimsy bit of printed gauze,
or a beautiful banner of finest silk. Its
intrinsic value may be trifling or great;
but its real value is beyond price, for
it is a precious symbol of all that we
and our comrades have worked for and
lived for, and died for a free nation of
free men, true to the faith of the past,
devoted to the ideals and practice of
Justice, Freedom and Democracy."
Continuing, the Commander said,
Let these faded Flags of our Country
be retired and destroyed with respectful
and honorable rites and their places be
taken by bright new flags of the same
size and kind, and let no grave of our
soldier or sailor dead be unhonored and
unmarked. Sergeant-at-Arms, assemble
the Color Guard, escort the detail
bearing the flags and destroy these flags
by burning. The members shall stand at
attention.
After a prayer by the Chaplain, the
Color Guard advanced toward the firepit, carrying with gentle respect and
dignity the faded and frayed banners of
Red, White and Blue, the same banners
of which saw many American service
members go forth to foreign conflicts in
service of their country, never to return
home. As those who are remembered for
their service and sacrifice to America are
done so with well deserved high dignity,
so the members of the American Legion
have done with the banners for which
they fought.
It was an act seemly so to do, and
done with the dignity and decorum that
the Flag of America deserves from those
who partake of Her freedoms.
Timothy Kays can be reached at
tim@thevillagereporter.com

WEST UNITY REPORTER


130 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1884
Alfred L. Beatty goes to Irvington,
Mich., to remain during the winter.
Last Friday, Grandfather D.M.
Burns was 74 years old his children
gave him a surprise party.
The M.E Conference returned Rev.
J.L. Scott to this place.
120 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1894
Rev. H.J. Keister and family and
Rev. John Poucher are attending the
M.E. Church Conference in Lima.
Rev. I.W. Lowman is the new U.B.
Minister.
The fair at Montpelier was a success. Attendance Thursday was among
the largest in the history of the fair
and everything but the balloon ascension passed off satisfactory.
110 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1904
H.F. Quilliams, mail carrier route
No. 1, has finished his first months
work.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Barber, a son, on September 18.
J.T. Long and wife are the proud
parents of a son born September 14.
J.O. Finch has purchased the J.T.
Cook property formerly owned and occupied by the late Dr. F.O. Hart.
100 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1914
The new million dollar sugar factory just completed at Paulding will be
opened with imposing ceremonies Oct.
1. Among the prominent men to be
present to participated are Gov. Harman, Hon. Warren G. Harding, Republican Candidate for Governor, Senator
Theodore E. Burton, and Congress-

12 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

man T.T. Ansberry.


George Geesey returned to his college work at Defiance. Miss Clara
Smith, Fredrick and Robert Salter,
and Clifford Tyke have again taken up
their work at Ohio State.
Ohio Conference of the M.E.
Church.
90 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1924
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Caulkins, September 13, a daughter.
Allen Rupp, Leland Stoner and Edson Thomas are attending Ohio Wesleyan while Boyd and Frank Bly are at
Ohio State.
80 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1934
Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Ferris are moving this week into the property they
recently purchased of Mr. and Mrs.
J.B. Shaffer.
A daughter was born to Mr. and
Mrs. Guy Allen on September 23.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Laurel C.
Persing of Toledo, a son.
70 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1944
Maryann Paquin commenced her
work Monday as a Freshman at the
University of Toledo.
Dr. Charles Young, 57, of Paw Paw,
Mich., was killed when his auto was
struck by a fast moving train. Young
was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs.
Jacob Young.
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Smith and
daughter along with Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Knapp and son returned from
a trip Yellowstone National Park in
Wyoming and Glacier National Park in
Montana and British Columbia, Canada.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

2014
fALL fESTIVAL
October 11, 2014

Downtown West Unity, Ohio

6 am to 10 am Brady Twp. Firemans Breakfast


9 am - 3 pm West Unity Silent Auction

at the Firehouse - Free Will Donation


at the American Legion Hall

Food
s
e
m
a
G
Fun!

9 am Hilltop Halloween Co-Ed Softball Tournament

Memorial Park - Contact Shari 567-712-9191

Noon to 2 pm Relay for Life Chili Cook Off


Downtown - Call Barb for an entry 419-924-2969

10 am - 2 pm C & B Tigers Craft Show


Living Hope Methodist Church - Deb 419-924-5709

Just Add Kidz


Inflatables

100 Block of North Main

Clowns
Face Painting
Cotton Candy
Caramel Corn
Pumpkins
Mums for Sale

Have fun at the West Unity Fall Fest!

201 B. East Jackson St., West Unity, Ohio


419-924-9077

Have a Blast at the


West Unity Fall Festival!

Kamco Industries
United with the Community
1001 E. Jackson St., West Unity, Ohio (419) 924-5511

50/50 Raffle
at the Legion Hall
Chamber Sponsored
Proceeds for Relay
for Life

Annual
Pack-A-Pick Up
Food Drive for the local
food pantry

West Unity Chamber


Pie Throwing Contest
Ladies
Auxullary Bake
Sale
Sons of the American
Legion

Back by popular
demand!!!

Alan Grant

Call with any questions to the Chamber Office


@ 419-924-2952 or Call Alan Bennett,
Chamber President @ 419-551-0950

Dont Miss the Fun


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THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 13

WHAT WE READ YEARS AGO

1979 Stryker Gymnastics

GYMNASTICS ... Front Row: Sherrie Cramer, Stacey Brooks, Carole Bailey, Laurie
Barnum, Robbin Allison, Advisor Mrs. Julie Bunch. Back Row: Sandy Roth, Toni
Smith, Kathy Hildebrandt, Debbie Sullican, Michele Hitt.
STRYKER ADVANCE
110 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1904
Trustees of Pulaski Township have
made the first appointment for ditch
supervisor, N. Vinayre being the appointee.
Schoolmates of Elva Allison surprised her for her 14th birthday.
The laying of concrete for the pavement began Friday with 20 men on the
job.
The Bryan Democrat was sold last
week for $10,000 to a company in which
R.L. Starr is the principal stockholder.

Miss Helen Hudkins became the


bride of Mr. Gaylord Meyer on October
11.
70 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1944
Thomas Rataiczak, 58, died at his
home on October 6.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gates, a
daughter.
60 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1954
Cpl. Garnet O. Stamm is stationed in
the Philippines where he has been assigned to duty as a radio mechanic.
Avis Buehrer and Harold Bernath
were married on September 16.
Over 200 people boarded the special
New York Central train here Saturday to
help at the opening of the Toledo Union
Station. O.J. Collins, the Blades oldest
correspondent, was singly honored, as
was John Leavy, Strykers oldest native
born resident and former NYC agent.

100 YEARS AGO


OCTOBER 1914
On September 27 Walter L. Stubbs
of Stryker and Matie L. Cranor of Daleville, Ind., were married.
Julian Juillard and son have purchased the Sam Snow farm of 108 acres
for $12,000.
Mrs. Beach sold her south side property to George Willetts, who works in
Annettes Barber Shop. Mr. Willetts is
moving here this week.

50 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1964
Rev. Raymond Peters. Pastor of the
First Lutheran Church, has been reassigned to St. Paul Ev. Lutheran Church
in Paulding.
Larry Werder was pictured alongside
his fellow members of the University of
Michigan marching band.
Donna J. Burch became Mrs. Harold
J. Lloyd on September 24.
In the coming election Springfield
Township will vote for a park board
who will govern a proposed park for our
town and township.

90 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1924
James O. Rising died on October 2.
Rose Mallory and Charles Chappius
were married October 2.
Daniel Tressler was killed instantly
when an apple tree fell on him.
80 YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 1934
Vaughn E. Bolles and Miss Alma
Kennedy were married on October 8.

MORE GENERAL AREA NEWS

Snake Finds Its Way Into The


Engine Of Williams County Van

PHOTO PROVIDED

GOTCHA! ... Jason Fulton holds the Python he removed from Corey Kurths van,
still standing next to the vehicle itself.

By T.J. Hug
THE VILLAGE REPORTER
Checking the vehicle of ones own
spouse can lead to a plethora of surprises.
After all, it always seems to be the
one who isnt behind the wheel who is
the better driver in a relationship, always willing to offer free advice on how
to operate the vehicle. So who knows
just how they drive or what they get into
when one is not around to chaperone.
Of course, for Corey Kurth, what he
found in the engine of his wifes van had
nothing to do how or where she was
driving.
It seems most likely the Python
slipped into the engine from an opening under the barn floor where it was
parked. In any case, the three foot long

snake was making itself comfortable


within the confines of the engine when
Kurth was showing his friend, Jason
Fulton, the interior of his wifes vehicle.
He was just kickin back in there,
Kurth recalled, like it was where he belonged.
The pair were used to finding animals
in engines, so they had some idea of
what to do, though the experience was
unique.
Ive pulled a lot of animals out of engines, said Kurth, but never a snake.
It was actually Fulton who removed
the reptile from the inner workings of
the van. The two men treated the animal
as though it were deadly, even though it
showed no signs of hostility.
It was docile, really mellow. Kurth
remembered.
Placing the snake in a cat food bag,
Kurth called the sherrifs office. After
several attempts, he finally got through,
where his dilemma was met with laughter. Afterward, the office told Kurth there
was nothing they could do. Kurth ended
up giving the Python to Alfonso Pena, a
neighbor, who is currently keeping it as
a pet.
As for how long the Python had been
on the property, its difficult to say. The
recent cold spell would likely have driven it to a warmer area had it been there
a while. Yet, there was a troubling trend
that indicates it may well have camped
out in the barn for a bit.
A few of our barn cats are missing.
proclaimed Kurth. We wonder if he was
feeding.
Hopefully the Python will have a
healthier, not to mention less disturbing, diet in its new home.
T.J. Hug can be reached at
publisher@thevillagereporter.com.

Four County Career Center Selects


Student Council For 2014-2015

PHOTO AND INFORMATION PROVIDED

STUDENT COUNCIL ... Four County Career Center has selected seniors to the
2014-2015 Student Council. Student Council sponsors the school-wide blood
drives, Christmas For Kids fund raiser, the Spring dance, and the paper recycling
program at the Career Center. Students from Hilltop & Stryker include (LEFT TO
RIGHT) Samantha Burdine, Law Enforcement & Security Tactics (Hilltop); Naomi
Diaz, Interior Design (Stryker); and James Perry, Law Enforcement & Security
Tactics (Stryker). Student Council Advisor is Angela Ballard, Vocational Special
Education Coordinator.

MORE MONTPELIER AREA NEWS

Montpelier Parks Department Readies


For A Busy Fall & Holiday Season
The Montpelier Parks
Department
convened
for their regular session
meeting on the evening of
October 1.
The Board approved the
Financial Statement from
September 30, 2014. Actual revenues reported totaled $529,555.87, which
includes a $200,000 note
for basketball & tennis
court reconstruction. Actual expenses came to
$260,386.80, leaving a
balance of $269,169.07.
Park Supervisor Don
Brown noted that the
sidewalk at Storrer Park is
done, and that the monument at the Main Street
Park had been installed.
Official
groundbreaking
for the Storrer Park Shelter House is scheduled
for October 8 at 6 p.m.
The basketball and tennis court asphalt work
is scheduled to begin the
week of October 13. He
has worked at leveling
the trenches around the
courts, keeping the soccer
fields painted, and due to
some late summer rains,
he has also been mowing and weed-eating a lot.
It takes him 24 hours to
mow everything at the
park, and he hopes to be
able to spray dandelions
this fall. Mr. Brown noted that yellow jackets are
everywhere, even though
he has been keeping the
trash cans emptied. He
also noted that the tree
stumps at the park had
been ground, and that the
Street Department will fill
the holes with dirt. The
Street Department also
painted lines on the Pony
League parking lot.
Concrete pads are being poured for under
some of the bleachers and
greenhouse to help with
maintenance. Since the
bleachers will probably
be moved closer to the
field when the backstop is
brought in closer, the concrete pad under the Division II softball bleachers
will not be installed until
after new fence is installed
around the Division II
field, probably in the next
year or so. The Board
didnt want to spend money to have a pad installed
this year, only to have it
out of position when the
DII backstop is moved.
Amongst the items in
the report of Village Recreation Director Sandy
Gordon was the mention
that the soccer season
ends on October 6. She

14 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

also noted that 24 kids,


including several who
had not played soccer,
had signed a petition to
increase the age level for
soccer at the park. The
petition was reviewed by
the Board, with no action
taken at the time. Noted
that the last time the park
had done a survey. Ms.
Gordon asked the Board
to consider conducting a
park survey in 2015, as
the last survey about park
use was conducted back
in 2006. The proposed
2015 survey would also
include some questions
about pool use. She gave
the Board some examples
of pool surveys from other towns for them to look
over and discuss again in
the coming months.
Mr. Brown and Ms
Gordon both noted that
Christmas
decorations
will be going up in October. Unfortunately, the
Santa for the top of the
waterslide quit working
last year and may not be
able to be repaired again.
The decoration has been
around for a while, and
is simply wearing out, as
is the Christmas train for
the south end of the park.
They said that they would
do what they could, but
thought the Board should

If we
meet by
accident
Dont Forget

Hit A
Deer, Win
A Turkey

know that something may


have to be done or need to
be changed this year with
the decorations.
The Board heard a report of upcoming activities in the works, some of
which have yet to be finalized. Amongst those on
the confirmed schedule
are a childrens Halloween
movie at the Library from
10 until 11:30 am for kids
up to age 12. Costumes
are encouraged, and free
treats will be provided.
A quilted pot holder
craft class will be held at
the Library on November 22. The cost will be
$10.00, and registration
information is available at
419-485-3496.
A Christmas for Critters event benefitting the
Williams County Humane
Society will be held at
Storrer Park on December
1 from 8 am until 2 pm.
Details on the benefit and
the prize drawings can be
obtained from Ms. Kelly
Deck at 419-630-8947.
Finally, a wreath/table
decoration workshop will
be held on December 2.
The cost will be $10.00,
and further information
can be obtained by calling
419-485-3496.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

You
should
call

We have 50 courtesy Cars

at no cost to you when we repair you vehicle

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

FA
Fayette Bank Closure Fayette FFA Hard At Work
& Grocery Store Update
At its monthly meeting, Fayette
Chamber Members discussed the rumor
that had emerged earlier in the day that
Fayettes two branches of the Huntington
Bank were among other Huntington
area banks slated for closure by the end
of the year. Huntington Bank came to
Fayette in July of 2007.
That discussion was followed by
updates on the status of initiatives
by local civic leaders and Chamber
members in their drive to facilitate the
attraction of new ownership for the
communitys recently shuttered Fayette
Super Market. During that review,
Chamber officers noted the leading
role that anonymous private citizens
and the Fayette Area Foundation have
played in saving the facility for reuse as
a locally owned and operated grocery
outlet. Those efforts will be chronicled
in upcoming meetings and public
announcements.
Not lost on Chamber leaders and
members is evidence that Fayettes
Industrial Sector has quietly and
successfully weathered the Great
Recession in a fashion that celebrated
the collaborative efforts of our private
sector. Over the past six years, Fayette
has established a positive trend by
filling vacant buildings, welcoming new
industries, and successfully increasing

the employment base.


The increased activity at Fayette
Business Park as well as robust growth
in other industrial operations in the
local manufacturing sector has placed
additional stress on Fayettes streets
and roads. At a time when positive
economic indicators were scarce, local
performance offered stability and
cautious growth. Currently private
sector leaders are assessing needs and
developing potential sustainable plans
to address these issues.
Members were also reminded that:
Halloween will be celebrated on
Friday, October 31st from 6 to 7:30.
PHOTOS PROVIDED
The Fall Fest and last years Main
Street Ramble is taking a planned STUDYING SOIL ... Taylor West and Paige Keefer: Judging for various rural soil
judging characteristics.
hiatus for 2014.
A locally authored Community
Development Plan will soon be available
for member review.
Fayettes booth at the Fulton County
Fair was another artistic and marketing
success.
The performance of 2013 Storefront
Initiative exceeded expectations.
Structural reorganization updates
will be presented at the November
annual meeting of the organization.
The next meeting is slated for
Thursday, October 16th at 7:00 p.m. at
the Fayette Opera House.

REFLECTIONS FROM FAYETTES PAST

1970 FAYETTE CROSS COUNTRY

RURAL SOIL JUDGES ... Front Row: Taylor West, Jennaya Hibbard, Paige Blad,
Dylan Keefer. Back row: Cole Stuckey, Casen Burkholder, Garett Reinking, Andrew
Lichtenwald.

CROSS COUNTRY ... Row 1: K. Snider, G. Strayer. Row 2: T. Schrock, R.


Wade, Mr. Dryfuse, R. Roth, M. Williams, K. Paison.

Fayette Library Announces


Exciting October Events

URBAN SOIL JUDGES ... Kegan Carnicom, Isaiah Garett, Dylan Stannard, Leah
The Fayette Library is hosting a will follow this schedule: Grades K-1 Bussing, Joel Smith, Wade Burkholder, Kaela Seiler.
special program Look Up to the Stars! come on Tuesdays, and grades 2-5 come
on Friday, October 17 from 7:00-8:30 on Thursdays after school from 3:00
The Fayette FFA has been busy were given the task of judging soil on
p.m. In case of rain, the event will be to 3:45 p.m. The October schedule of already this year. Fifty eight students characteristics to determine if soil
held at the Fayette Opera House. Kevin events are as follows: Oct. 7 & 9Play recently participated in the Rural and would be good for buildings, basement,
Manning will be giving an educational Outside, Oct. 14 & 16Movie, Oct. 21 Urban soil judging contest on September roads, septic tanks, etc. The seventh
and entertaining exploration of the & 23Craft, Oct. 28Halloween Bingo, 19th, hosted by the Fulton County and eighth graders also had the chance
universe, the stars and other celestial and Oct. 30Halloween Jeopardy.
Soil and Water office. Through this in participating this year. Great job!
wonders, as well as a refreshingly
For the younger children, story time contest eight students were selected to
This year the Fayette FFA officers
large perspective gained by looking is held for children ages 2 to 5 not yet participate in the District land judging assisted the county in the Annual 3rd
up to the stars. Following a power in Kindergarten. Children ages 2 and 3 contest. The seventh and eighth graders Grade Ag Fest. The officer team set up
point presentation, you will have the are required to have an adult stay with also had the chance in participating a station where students learned about
opportunity to view the amazing rings them for the entire session. Story Time this year. Rural members consisting various animals that included: a cow,
of Saturn, craters of the moon and meets every Monday from 6:30 p.m. to of Taylor West, Dylan Keefer, Andrew horse, guinea pig, duck, chickens,
other jewels of the night sky through a 7:00 p.m. Each session includes a story Lichtenwald,
Casen
Burkholder, puppy and kittens. The officer taught
powerful telescope weather permitting. and craft. On October 27, come dressed Jennaya Hibbard, Paige Blad, Cole the students about animal care, safety
You will also be given the chance to talk for a Halloween party.
Stuckey, and Garett Reinking. These and general facts about the species.
with Kevin after the program to ask him
The monthly book discussion club students were evaluating soil based on
Next up for the Fayette FFA will be
any questions you may have. You can will be held on Thursday, October 21 at characteristics to see if the land would district Dairy cattle, dairy products and
also bring in your own telescope. Kevin 7 pm. The book that will be discussed be suitable for agricultural purposes. Fruit Sales. Look for an FFA member
founded Look Up to the Stars with a is The Book Thief by Markus Zusak set The seven Urban members who moved after October 17th, 2014 to purchase
mission to generate interest and foster during World War 2 in Nazi Germany.
onto districts were Leah Bussing, Joel fresh Florida citrus, beef jerky, nuts and
scientific literacy in the general public
Special event: On Monday, October Smith, Kaela Seiler, Isaiah Garret, BBQ sauce.
nationwide through the delivery of awe- 13 @ 6:00 p.m. Tanya Fleischmann will Wade Burkholder, Keegan Carnicom,
INFORMATION PROVIDED
inspiring, educational and entertaining be here to instruct a class on how to Dylan
Stannard.
These
students
programs. Kevin is an International make jewelry. You will have your choice
award-winning astronomer and former of making a bracelet or a watch. Tanya
consultant to NASA.
will have all the supplies needed to make
The After-School Program for October the jewelry. Watches are $27.00, and
bracelets are $17.00. Call
the Library, or stop in at
the adult circulation desk
to sign up for this class.
Fayette High School will be hosting the Fayette Family Fun Festival on Saturday
Teen Read Week will
October 11, 2014 from 9 AM to 8:30 PM. There are events going on all day,
Immunizations by be Oct. 12-18. The library including a 6 on 6 volleyball tournament, a cornhole tournament beginning at
Appointment Only will have a prize drawing 2 PM, inflatables from 10 AM - 4 PM, games, crafters, silent auction, and bake
for any teen that comes in
sale. At 12:00 PM there will be a live auction. From 4-6 PM there will be a Hog
Appointments Available
and checks out an item.
Every Friday 8:30 am - 12:00 Noon Welcome the fall with a Roast. At 6:30 PM there will be a free family movie on a large projector screen. To
donate auction items or for questions regarding crafters or vendors, contact Becky
1st & 3rd Thursday 2-6 pm
visit to your local Fayette
Coopshaw at 567-454-7172 or email b.coopshaw@donsautogroup.com. To register
library!
for the volleyball or cornhole tournaments, contact Paula Bird at 419-583-7439.

Family Fun Festival Coming


To Fayette High School

INFORMATION PROVIDED

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

INFORMATION PROVIDED

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 15

MORE FAYETTE AREA NEWS

Fayette High School Announces Class Officers & Student Council

JUNIOR COUNCIL MEMBERS ... Baiylee Ruger, Taylor Griffiths, Garett Reinking,
Adriana Hylander, and Hayley Burkholder.
PHOTOS BY T.J. HUG, STAFF

SENIOR OFFICERS ... Paige Keefer (Sec), Miranda Minzey (Tresurer), and Dylan
Stannard (Pres), Missing Michael Brubaker (VP).

FRESHMEN COUNCIL MEMBERS ... Asia Laguio, Jordan Simon, Hunter Griffiths,
Grant Reinking, and Caitlin McIntosh.

JUNIOR OFFICERS ... Emilie Keiser (VP), Casen Burkholder (Pres), Alexis Fruchey
(Sec), and Garett Reinking (Tres).

SOPHOMORE OFFICERS ... Haley Perdue (Pres), Ethein Malchow (Sec), Cole
Stuckey (Tres) and Gavin Leichty (VP).

STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS ... Leah Bussing (Sec), Taylor Griffiths (Tres),
Adriana Hylander (VP) and Dylan Stannard (Pres).

MORE GENERAL AREA NEWS

Fulton County Ballot Issues For


November 4 Election Released
By: Chelsie Firestone
THE VILLAGE REPORTER
In addition to addition to being asked
to vote between several candidates
running for state offices, Fulton County
voters will be asked to vote on local
issues and renewals of levies. Those
FRESHMEN OFFICERS ... Max Baker (Pres), Aubrey Lemley (Sec), Alyssa issues and levies, listed by locality
Lichtenwald (Tres), and Jaryd White (VP).
include:
Archbold 1 Precinct Issue 1 Special Election By Petition - Shall the
sale of beer, wine and mixed beverages
be permitted for sale on Sunday between
the hours of eleven a.m. and midnight
by Shri Ganesh Enterprises Inc., dba
Archbold Sunoco, an applicant for a
D-6 liquor permit, who is engaged in
the business of operating a convenience
store at 1500 S. Defiance Street,
Archbold, OH 43502 in this precinct?
Chesterfield Township Issue 2
Proposed Tax Levy (Renewal) A renewal
of a tax for the benefit of Chesterfield
SOPHOMORE COUNCIL MEMBERS ... Jennaya Hibbard, Ethein Malchow, Gavin Township for the purpose of providing
and
maintaining
fire
apparatus,
Liechty, Mason Maginn, and Paige Aschemeier.
appliances, buildings, or sites therefor,
or sources of water supply and
materials therefor, or the establishment
and maintenance of lines of fire alarm
telegraph, or the payment of firefighting
companies or permanent, part-time,
or volunteer firefighting, emergency
medical service, administrative, or
communications personnel to operate
the same, including the payment of
any employer contributions required
for such personnel to operate the
same, including the payment of any
employer contributions required for
such personnel under section 145.48
or 742.34 of the Revised Code, or the
purchase of ambulance, paramedic,
or other emergency medical services
operated by a fire department or
SENIOR COUNCIL MEMBERS ... Kamrin Hunter, Presley Pennington, Justice firefighting company at a rate not
Reyes, Wade Burkholder, Leah Bussing, and Dylan Stannard.
exceeding 1 mill for each one dollar of
valuation, which amounts to $0.10 for
each one hundred dollars of valuation,
ORDER YOUR COPY OF THESE FULL COLOR PHOTOS AT
for 5 years, commencing in 2015, first
WWW.THEVILLAGEREPORTER.COM
due in calendar year 2016.

16 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

Chesterfield Township Issue 3


Proposed Tax Levy (Renewal) A
renewal of a tax for the benefit of
Chesterfield Township for the purpose
of general construction, reconstruction,
resurfacing and repair of roads at a rate
not exceeding 2 mills for each one dollar
of valuation, which amounts to $0.20 for
each one hundred dollars of valuation,
for 5 years, commencing in 2015, first
due in calendar year 2016.
Dover Township Issue 4 Proposed
Tax Levy (Renewal) A renewal of a tax
for the benefit of Dover Township for the
purpose of fire, rescue and ambulance
protection services at a rate not
exceeding 1 mill for each one dollar of
valuation, which amounts to $0.10 for
each one hundred dollars of valuation,
for 5 years, commencing in 2014, first
due in calendar year 2015.
York Township Issue 5 Proposed
Tax Levy (Renewal) - A renewal of a tax
for the benefit of York Township for the
purpose of providing and maintaining fire
apparatus, appliances, buildings, or sites
therefor, or sources of water supply and
materials therefor, or the establishment
and maintenance of lines of fire alarm
telegraph, or the payment of firefighting
companies or permanent, part-time,
or volunteer firefighting, emergency
medical service, administrative, or
communications personnel to operate
the same, including the payment of any
employer contributions required for
such personnel under section 145.48
or 742.34 of the Revised Code, or the
purchase of ambulance equipment, or
the provision of ambulance, paramedic,
or other emergency medical services
operated by a fire department or
firefighting company at a rate not
exceeding 0.5 mill for each one dollar of
valuation, which amounts to $0.05 for
each one hundred dollars of valuation,
for 5 years, commencing in 2014, first
due in calendar year 2015.
Chelsie can be reached at
chelsie@thevillagereporter.com

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

Wauseons Own Bill Bray: Sometimes, Even A Hero Needs A Helping Hand

THE BRAY FAMILY ... Bill, Mary Jo, Emily and Jacob.

By: Timothy Kays


THE VILLAGE REPORTER
If you are a resident of Wauseon,
chances are good that you know Bill
Bray. If your children attend any of the
Wauseon Schools, you no doubt have
seen Bill Bray snapping pictures at some
event. This Fremont transplant has done
more to promote the youth of Wauseon
in his time here than many natives have
in their entire lifetime. You show me a
Wauseon kid, ANY kid, and Ill show you
a champion, an advocate, and a friend in
Bill, just as it used to be with his father.
Unlike your run-of-the-mill members of
the media, the articles come second
the kids always come first in the eyes of
Bill Bray.
Back in 1990, the organist of the
Clyde Christian Church introduced Bill
to the Pastor of the church, and in 1991
Bill and Mary Jo became husband and
wife. Bill was working at the Adrian Daily Telegram while Mary Jo continued her
pastoral duties with the church, but after her father passed away she became
concerned for her mother who was living
alone in Wauseon. In 1998 Bill and Mary
Jo relocated to Wauseon, a new home
for Bill, but familiar digs for Mary Jo, a
Tribe Town native and a member of the
Wauseon Class of 1983.
In June of 2003, Bill went all-in for
the community he now called home, beginning the publishing of the Wauseon
Youth Connection. Dedicated entirely to
the kids of the Wauseon School District,
the Bill Bray publication came about for
two specific reasons. I was working in
Adrian, while my son (Jacob) was in elementary school, Bill explained. It was
a point where I was working 70 to 80
hours a week, and he called me two or
three times to ask if I was going to be
home for his third grade concert. I said,
Im sorry son. My daughter (Emily) and
son would be asleep when I left, and
would be asleep when I got home. I had
five years of it, then I said I just cant do
this. They were growing up, and I needed
to be around for them. I thought about
what I could do. I thought that the local
paper wasnt doing an adequate job of
covering youth eventssports, or anything youth related, so I thought that I
would start my own paper.
Printed by his former employers in
Adrian, the weekly issued Wauseon
Youth Connection was born, and immediately took off. This paper was a oneof-a-kind, focusing exclusively on the
all kids, Kindergarten to seniors, in the
Wauseon Schools. Economics unfortunately, put a premature end to the publication, but not to Bills youth advocacy.
Like every other publication, I was having trouble with advertising toward the
end of its life, he said. I couldnt afford
it anymore, so in 2009, I went online.
That lasted for about a year or a year
and a half, and I just ended it and was
looking for something else. I cant remember who, but somebody mentioned
Forrest (Church), so I contacted him and
talked with him. I said that moving to
Wauseon might be a good idea; you can
certainly beat the local paper thats here
now. With that, The Wauseon Reporter
was born. Bill came onboard as well, but
did he want to continue to focus on the
kids? His answer was plain and simple
Absolutely!
It was about the same time that the
Wauseon Youth Connection was up and
running on all cylinders that life was
beginning to take a turn for Bill. In
2004, the hospital was having a diabetes screening, and I went out and took
that. They called me back and said that I
might want to get some blood work done;
it didnt look right to them. So, I went
to my family doctor, got the blood work
done, and my kidney numbers were elevated. From there, until 2009, it just
progressively worsened. I finally ended
up at UTMC, where they performed a
transplant in 2009. My kidneys hadnt
completely failed, but they were func-

tioning at only about ten percent.


With the new kidney in place, things
were supposed to be looking up for Bill,
but his original kidneys were failing for
a reason that was missed by the doctors. There was an underlying condition
called multiple myeloma; its a cancer of
the blood, Bill explained. Multiple myeloma is to kidney tissue as a termite is
to wood. It just eats up kidney tissue.
It killed my kidneys, so I had the transplant. Within a week of the transplant,
the new kidney started to fail. They didnt
know that I had multiple myeloma going
into the transplant. They did a biopsy of
the transplanted kidney, and it was covered with multiple myeloma. With Gods
help, they were able to reverse it, and
the kidney transplant gave me five years,
but this past June, it too died. Bill now
requires dialysis treatments three times
a week. Add to this a colon rupture during 2013 which requires a colostomy bag
for the rest of his life, and that would
be enough to push even the most stout
hearted over the edge.
I dont dwell on it, Bill says. You
live every day like its your last. The
dialysis process is, in a word, boring.
Not for Bill, thoughhe works on game
stats and other articles about the kids.
If I didnt have the kids, what would I do
there? Sleep? Even multiple myelomainduced total kidney failure has to take
a back seat to Bills kids. This trait of inner strength is a genetic gold mine that
he inherited from his father.
My dad was a coach for about 38
years, Bill said. He had the respect of
every kid. He taught English. He was
back in the day when the teachers
took kids and slammed them up against
the lockers or slapped them across the
mouthhe was back in that era. The
two kids that grew up with him through
the years, the two kids that he gave detention to more than any others, they
were almost the first two in the funeral
home when he died. Doesnt that say it
all? Youve got to respect the kids. Youre
not going to get respect from them unless you respect them back.
That mutual respect was not something that was relegated to the microcosm of the local levels. Bill talked about
one of his favorite students to watch
over the past few years, 2013 Division III
Baseball Player of the Year and Wauseon
Class of 2013 Co-Valedictorian, Ty
Suntken. Bill marveled at his dedication
to his athletic skills, and noted that his
scholastic skills received equal dedication. Theres a lot more like Ty out at
that school, Bill said. Ive only seen
what he had inside in one other athlete.
It goes back a long time to Rob Lytle, the
All-American at Michigan (and later the
Denver Broncos). My dad coached him
in high school, and his work ethic was
second to none. Every night, all summer
long when he came home from Michigan, he and dad would go out. Theyd
run the hill; theyd run the track. Dad
worked him out every night. Going into
his junior year, Bo (former Michigan
Coach Schembechler) wanted to switch
him over to fullback. Gordon Bell was
there, and he was a great tailback. Rob
said, What do you think, Coach Bray?
Dad said, Go for it. Who is going to beat
you out at either position? He did, and
he and Gordon were the first two kids
to gain over 1,000 yards in a season up
there.
Rob was a great friend. I miss himI
miss him a lot. He was like a brother to
me, Bill continued about the late Wolverine ground pounder. He went from
Michigan to Denver. He won the AFC
Championship Game, called us that
night, and said, Coach Bray, Ive got
three tickets to the Super Bowl if you
can get yourself there. We went to the
Super Bowl, and were included in all the
family events, the pregame meal, being
taken by the bus right up to the front
door of the Superdome, and the postgame meal with the team. Unbelievable!
My dad contracted pancreatic cancer

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

in January of 1991, and in January of


93, he died. That night, Rob was there
that whole night with us. Dad started
coaching him during his sophomore
year, and they were inseparable. It was
almost like a father-son relationship,
and he was there the night dad died
he stayed there the entire time. The respect that Coach Bray gave to his kids
came back to him over the remainder of
his life, and continued after his walk on
earth was over. His life was a testament
to the words of Solomon in Ecclesiastes
11:1Cast your bread upon the waters,
for after many days you will get it back.
How does all of this tie into the story
of who is Bill Bray? Continuing, he said,
Those are the kids that would come
over to our house. Dad would give them
pep talks; tell them to not leave college
without that piece of paper saying that
youre a graduate. Every one of them,
before theyd leave, hed give them a fifty
dollar bill and say, Just do your best. Be
the best that you can be. Thats where
I learned it from. Thats where I learned
to love the kids. Everything I do comes
from himI learned everything from him
when it comes to the kids.
The Wauseon Christian Church,
where Mary Jo was an Associate Pastor,
was forced to let her go in a budgetary
decision. With the family now without
insurance and the extra income that she
brought in, the Bray household finances
have been strained. However, an appreciative community is rising up to help
Bill with his medical expenses. On September 18, an account at gofundme was
opened entitled, Friends of Bill Bray.

The site at http://www.gofundme.com/


eoq1rs, allows for online donations to be
made for the benefit of the Fremont kid
who has taken the kids of Wauseon to
heart. There will also be a benefit scheduled for the end of October at the church
that was put together by some of Mary
Jos cousins, and friends of the family.
Throughout all of the trials, what has
held Bill together? My family, he said,
adding, The communitythe communitys been great to us. Life keeps me goingI love life. My faith plays huge into
this. Without God, where would any of
us be? I love my Lord; Im not ashamed
to say that. Hes brought me through
so much. Prayer was endless for me
through the transplant, through the colon rupture, and now through dialysis. I
feel those prayers, every day.
To the aforementioned list, there was
one more thing that Bill added to the
things that have held him together; The
relationship that I have with a lot of the
kids over at the school. Once again, despite the physical pain and the emotional strains associated with his condition,
his thoughts go straight back to the kids
of the Wauseon Schools, and now that
he has been named the Official Publicist of the NWOAL, hes got more kids
than ever for which to play the advocate.
Faith, family and the kidsthats what
keeps Bill Bray running.
Like fatherlike son. As it was then,
so it is now, and as long as Bill can tap
a keyboard or hold a camera, so it shall
always be.
Timothy Kays can be reached at
tim@thevillagereporter.com

Wauseon Library Will


Close For Columbus Day
In honor of Columbus Day, the Wauseon Public Library will be closed on Monday,
October 13 with the library reopening on Tuesday, October 14 at its regular time
of 10:00 a.m.

Fulton County Seniors


Celebrate October Birthdays

PHOTO PROVIDED

BIRTHDAY CELEBRATIONS ... Those celebrating October birthdays at the Fulton


County Senior Center, Wauseon, Ohio, are: (standing, from left to right): Tim
Lemons, Carl Knipp. Seated, Ron Crossgrove.

REFLECTIONS OF THE PAST


1964 Wauseon Art Guild

ART GUILD ... Row 1: L. Neuenschwander, D. Drum, A. Warncke, J. Leatherman, B.


VonSeggern. Row 2: D. Smith, C. Sluder, K. Crew, B. Baker, C. Germann, D. Richer.
Row 3: R. Demaline, E. Costello, C. Moll, J. Barber, D. Zumfelde, T. Barber.

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 17

MORE WAUSEON AREA NEWS

Wauseon High School Celebrates Homecoming With Queen Sariah Yackee

PHOTOS BY BILL BRAY, STAFF

Senior Attendant Sally Frank with her parents.

Queen Sariah Yackee with her parents.

Junior Attendant Kallie Strauss with her parents.

Sophomore Attendant Alex Rosonowski with her parents.

Dinner

Freshman Attendant Amanda Baker with her parents.

Fulton County Health Center presents


an informative evening designed to
understand the growing roles of Nurse
Practitioners and Physician Assistants

with the
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s
y
h
P
Tuesday, Oct. 21
5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Fulton County Health Center


Ground Floor, Beck Meeting Room

Cost: Program including meal is free

Queen Sariah Yackee

ORDER YOUR COPY OF THESE FULL


COLOR PHOTOS AT
WWW.THEVILLAGEREPORTER.COM

Fulton County Health Center is offering this special event, designed to be both informative and
relaxing, as you learn about the role of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in the
local medical office setting. Join our panel of Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants as
they discuss current healthcare trends and answer you questions about their role in providing
healthcare to area residents.
Preregistration is required. Doors will open at 5:00 p.m. An evening meal will be provided at
5:30 p.m., followed by the program beginning at 6:00 p.m.

Pre-registration is required by October 14th.


Space is limited. To register, call 419-330-2735.

FULTON COUNTY
HEALTH CENTER

Completing the circle of care

725 S. Shoop Avenue Wauseon, Ohio 43567

18 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

MORE GENERAL AREA NEWS

Fulton County Senior Center


Shares October Happenings

The Fulton County Senior offers


a variety of events for Fulton County
seniors. On Wednesday, October 15,
you are invited to the Wauseon site for a
free concert with the Joe LaConey Band.
The 25 member band plays a variety of
tunes from four decades. Concert starts
at 10:30 in the morning. Call by October
13 to make lunch reservations.
Upcoming event: Hunt for bargains
on this day trip on Thursday, November
6 to the thrift store, Goodwill. We will
leave the Wauseon site at 9:00 am and
return by 4:00 pm. Our travel will take
us to two Goodwill stores. Bring money
for lunch. Reservations required for
transportation purposes. Please sign up
at 419-337-9299 by October 23. Cost for
this trip is $5.00. Please pay in advance.
Medicare Check-Up Day will take
place at the Fulton County Senior
Center, Wauseon site, on Tuesday
October 21, 2014 from 10:00 a.m. to
2:00 p.m. Please make plans to attend
and learn valuable information from
OSHIIP Representatives. The morning
session (10am - noon) will provide
important information on Medicare
Part D (Prescription Drug Plans) and
Medicare changes for 2015. Lunch
break will be from Noon-1:00 pm.
Lunch reservations must be made by
4:00 p.m. on Friday October 17th, if you
are planning to eat lunch at the Senior
Center. The cost for lunch is $1.50 for
Fulton County residents and $3.50 for
out of county residents. The afternoon
session (1-2 pm) will give Fulton County
Seniors the opportunity to receive

personalized drug plan comparisons.


Those wanting drug plan comparisons
are asked to bring their Medicare card
and a current list of all medications and
dosages (your pharmacist can supply a
printed list of your medications). Seniors
requesting comparisons will be served
on a first-come, first served basis. If
you have any questions, please contact
Cheryl Witt at 419-337-9299. We look
forward to seeing you at this important
event! A FREE service brought to you
by the Ohio Senior Health Insurance
Information Program (OSHIIP).
Have some questions? This is your
opportunity to meet with Cheryl Witt,
Information & Referral Specialist. Get
help with Medicares Open Enrollment,
understanding
insurance
bills,
completing applications, and more.
Meet Cheryl at Wyse Commons Library
on the Fairlawn campus, Archbold on
Thursday, October 23; offered at no cost
to seniors, in partnership with Wyse
Commons. Or meet Cheryl at Evergreen
Community Library on October 28 from
10 a.m. to noon or Swanton Public
Library on November 6 from 10a6p. For any of these dates, make an
appointment in advance with Cheryl by
calling 419-337-9299.
Each site, Wauseon, Delta, Swanton,
Archbold, and Fayette offer a variety of
programming such as music, exercise,
community speakers, bingo, and
shopping. Call the Wauseon site for
more information at 419-337-9299.

Congressman Bob Latta Stops By


Northwest State Community College

PHOTO PROVIDED

LAB TOUR ... (L to R): John Barlage, engineering faculty, shows a student project
to Tom Stuckey, NSCC president, and Congressman Latta.

During a recent trip to northwest


Ohio, Congressman Bob Latta visited
Northwest State Community College
to see how NSCC is incorporating
the lean principals of reducing waste
and increasing efficiency. A team of
NSCC employees recently completed
an organization and safety project,
known as 5S in lean terminology, in
the campus machining lab. During his
visit, Congressman Latta toured the
lab and saw the finished project. The
reorganized space will benefit students
by providing better access to equipment
INFORMATION PROVIDED and showcasing how lean practices are
used in manufacturing to create a more
efficient and safer work environment.
Projects like this are eligible for grant

funds through Ohios Local Government


Efficiency
Program.
Through
the
program, public sector employees
including city, state, county, township
and public school entities, can receive
free training on lean practices. The goal
of the training is to help these employees
eliminate waste in their processes, save
money and provide better service. Local
agencies that complete the training
are then eligible to apply for up to
$100,000 in grant funding to carry
out lean projects. Northwest State is
an authorized training provider for
the program. For more information,
contact Jim Drewes at 419.438.3660 or
jdrewes@NorthwestState.edu

Celebrate Fall On The Farm & Scout


Day October 11 At Sauder Village Department Of Labor Awards Nearly $2.5
Million Grant To Northwest State College

Archbold, OH From
shelling corn, making corn
husk dolls and decorating
pumpkins to pressing
cider, digging potatoes
and making butter, Fall
on the Farm promises
to be a wonderful day to
create special memories
at Sauder Village. On
Saturday, October 11,
a full day of engaging
activities will allow guests
to experience what life
was like on an Ohio farm
many years ago! October
11 is also Scout Day with
free admission for Boy
and Girl Scouts visiting
Sauder Village for this
special event.
The Farm Day events
at Sauder Village allow guests to
experience how life in rural Ohio
changes with the seasons. Fall on the
Farm will include activities such as
rolling out pie crusts, picking and
decorating pumpkins, pressing apples
into cider and making rope. Children
can help separate pumpkin seeds for
roasting, pack apples, grate soap, and
watch soap making demonstrations.
Students from the Tinora German Club
will help children with a traditional
German craft and game. Other popular
activities include participating in an

old-time spell down in the District 16


School, making butter, shelling beans,
and playing old-fashioned games.
Fall on the Farm is a fun day for
parents, grandparents and children to
create special memories together while
experiencing life in Ohio more than
150 year ago, shared Kim Krieger, PR/
Media Relations. As guests get involved
with traditional fall activities they will
gain a better understanding of how our
ancestors lived while having a lot of fun
at the same time!
In addition to the many handson activities, guests will also enjoy
watching
fall-themed
d e m o n s t r a t i o n s
throughout the Village
Save Money,
including
making
Make Memories pumpkin
leather,
pumpkin
soup
and
& Have Fun
pumpkin cakes wrapped
at Camp Sack-In in corn husks. There will
also be blacksmithing
demonstrations at Natives
Just Minutes From
and Newcomers, apple
The Ohio State Line!
drying
demonstrations
and soap being made over
an open fire in the 1910
Homestead area. Again
this year a Harvest Home
Service will be held in
the Village Church. This
special fall service will
be held at 11:30, 12:30
and 1:30 to celebrate the
bounty of the harvest.
As part of this funfilled day, Sauder Village
is also recognizing the
accomplishments of Boy
Scouts and Girl Scouts.
To honor local Scouts,
Northeast Indianas Best Kept Secret
For Family Camping In A Rustic Setting! Girl and Boy Scouts will
receive free admission on
Saturday, October 11.
Swimming Beach Convenience Store
(Scout must be in uniform
Dump Station Fishing Hiking Forest Areas
or present their Scout
Pull Thru Sites Available Tent Sites
card).
Other upcoming events
Playground Outdoor Games Family Activities
at Sauder Village include
24 hr Courtesy Patrol 50 Amp Available
Community Health Day
Family Park Rural Setting Pets Welcome
October 18, Fulton County
Community Appreciation
8740 E 40 S Angola, IN 46703-9804
Day on October 18,
Phone: (260)665-5166
Fall Family Fun Night
October 17 and 18 (preFax: (260)624-3326
registration required), and
E-Mail: campsackin@hotmail.com
Woodcarvers Show & Sale
October 25 and 26.

www.campingfriend.com

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

INFORMATION PROVIDED

ARCHBOLD,
OHIO
The
U.S.
Department
of
Labor
recently
awarded Trade Adjustment Assistance
Community College and Career Training
grants to sixty-six community colleges
across the nation. Five of those grantees
are in Ohio, with Northwest State
Community College receiving just under
$2.5 million. NSCC will use the funding
to enhance curriculum in several of its
advanced manufacturing programs.
The grant will take four years to
implement and evaluate, but students
will start to see some changes within the
next year. Best practices will be shared
with the Department of Labor and could
be put into practice statewide and even
nationwide.
One of the key grant activities is the
expansion of prior learning assessments,
which are a way to recognize the skills
and knowledge that students already
have. Many of the students in these
programs enter college with experience
in manufacturing and prior learning
assessments help us assign college
credit for that experience. That means
students can complete programs in less
time and get to work faster, said Tom
Wylie, associate vice president of special
projects at NSCC.
Technology upgrades, namely a
computer farm, will lead the way for

other curriculum improvements. The


computer farm will house applications
and software that students can access
from nearly any device.
Programs like industrial automation
maintenance,
programmable
logic
controllers and robotics use specialized
software that students can only access
from campus computer labs. The
computer farm will make that technology
accessible to students anywhere,
anytime, said Wylie. Improved access
means more than convenience. It means
students can work at their own pace.
Once theyve mastered a skill, they can
move on and spend more time on skills
they need to develop.
The computer farm will also house
simulations students can use to practice
their skills. Studies show that training
through simulation leads to stronger
workplace performance, said Wylie.
Local employers will help us design the
simulations using actual scenarios from
the workplace, including everything from
standard operations to troubleshooting
an equipment breakdown. We want
students to encounter these situations
for the first time during their coursework,
where instructors can provide guidance
and feedback, not on the shop floor with
dollars and production at stake.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

Fulton County Senior Center To


Host Medicare Check-Up Day
(WAUSEON, OH) Medicare Check-Up supply a printed list of your medications).
Day 2014 The 2014 Medicare CheckSeniors requesting comparisons will
Up Day will take place at the Fulton be served on a first-come, first served
County Senior Center, Wauseon Site, basis. If you have any questions,
on Tuesday October 21, 2014 from please contact Cheryl Witt at 419-33710:00 am to 2:00pm. This community 9299. For those unable to attend this
event will provide accurate, unbiased program, they may call the OSHIIP
information about Medicare and the Hotline number at 1-800-686-1578,
Medicare Part D prescription drug which will direct the caller to a live
benefit.
person in Columbus.
This event is a free educational
The above information is also listed on
service provided by the Ohio Department the website, www.fultoncountyoh.com/
of Insurance and its Ohio Senior seniorcenter. To receive notifications
Health Insurance Information Program and updates regarding upcoming Senior
(OSHIIP). The morning session (10a-12p) Center events via email or text, please
will provide important information on visit www.fultoncountyoh.com and click
Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug the Notify Me tab located on the home
Plans) and Medicare changes for 2014. page.
There will be a lunch break from NoonINFORMATION PROVIDED
1:00p.m. Lunch reservations must be
made by 4:00pm on Friday
October 17th for those
planning to eat lunch at
the Senior Center. The
suggested donation for
lunch is $1.50 for Fulton
Sofas Recliners Bedroom
County Residents and
Dining Room & More!
$3.50 for out of county
Residents. The afternoon
session (1p-2p) will give
Fulton County Seniors
the opportunity to receive
personalized drug plan
comparisons.
Those
wanting
comparisons
are
asked
to
bring
their
Medicare
card
and a current list of all
medications and dosages
(your Pharmacist can

Made in the USA


Furniture Sale

Its All On Sale NOW!

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 19

Archbold

Carp Fall Fest

Featuring the Community Chili Cook-Off

9:00 am - 3:00 pm Downtown Archbold

Saturday, October 11, 2014


8:45
8:50
9:00








StrongArm Entertainmment DJ (all day)


AHS Marching Band: Star Spangled Banner
Kids Little Fish Fun Run

(Free run for kids!)


Pancakes: Boy Scout Troup #63

Food & Vendor Booths Open


1st Annual Car Show

Xtreme Automotive Detailing

Slate Art Exhibit


Fun Fo
r
The Wh
ole
Family

Featuring area artist

KidZone Opens

Black Swamp Arts Council


& Party Expressions

8:15
5k Run/Walk for the Lights
9:50
Zumba Demo


by fusion Health & Fitness
10:00 Chili Cook-Off Tasting Begins


Sponsored by CIG Financial

Pumpkin Carving
11:00 Tractor Pedal Pull


(Facilitated by Archbold Fire Department)

Sponsored: Investment Planning Associates


Lions Club Auction
1:00 Lip Sync Contest / Dance with Todd
8:00 - 11:00 PM Joe N Shoey

FALL FESTIVAL FRENZY


Storewide Savings!
Saturday, October 11 8:00 - 3:00

Eliza Henry

A.R.S. RefuSe SeRvice,

inc

200 Taylor Parkway


Archbold, Ohio 43502
Your LOCAL Company

210 North Defiance Street, Archbold, Ohio 43502


419-446-0000 www.elizahenry.com

We are a family owned and operated company


that has been your neighbor for over 40 years!
MUNICIPAL
RESIDENTIAL

Grisier
ss Funeral
Homes
Grisier
s Funeral
Homes
Grisier
Funeral
Homes

Main St. Main St.


Stryker
St. St. W. Curtis
St. St.
S. Fulton
Stryker
W. Curtis
S. St.
Fulton
St. St.
Main
Stryker
St. W. Stryker
Curtis
St. S.Wauseon
Fulton
St.
Delta
Archbold
Delta
Archbold
Stryker
Wauseon
Delta
Archbold
Stryker
Wauseon
419-822-3121
419-445-3551
419-682-2341
419-335-6031
419-445-3551 419-682-2341 419-335-6031 419-822-3121

419-445-3551 419-682-2341 419-335-6031 419-822-3121

Come
enjoy
all the
Come
enjoy
all the
Enjoy
THe
Come
enjoy
all
the
Stryker
Summer
Fest
Stryker Summer Fest
Fall
Festival
Stryker
Summer
Fest
Activities!!!
Activities!!!

INDUSTRIAL
ROLL-OFF SERVICE
COMMERCIAL WASTE-HANDLING RECYCLING

Temporary cans available for household clean-ups.

(800) 823-6715

7HUU\DQG/RQQLH6KRUW

Activities!!!

Archbold 419-445-6846
6+257$*(1&<
Insurance, Real Estate & Auctions

Wauseon 419-335-9507

Archbold 419-445-6846
$UFKEROGDQG:DXVHRQ
419-335-9507
Visit us atWauseon
www.shortagency.com

Visit us at www.shortagency.com

Country
Store

Meat
Processing

Located out on the farm south of Archbold


V-354 Rd. 24, Archbold, OH

419-445-6366

Check us out on the web at www.brookviewfarmmeats.com


22251 ST. RT. 2
ARCHBOLD, OH 43502
419-445-1552

Mon - Fri 9 am - 4 pm
Sat 9 am - 12 pm

(419) 445-9300

Fax (419) 445-9328

15% OFF

we pay for 1/2 the cost of


seed.
We also provide free planting!

G
KINING
N
I
THPLANT A?
OF
ALF
F
L
A
Screened Sawdust for
Animal Bedding
419-445-5206

800 West Barre Road


PO Box 10
Archbold, OH 43502
800.446.2520

No Credit? Bad Credit?


Call Us Today!

Were here to help you find your next vehicle


with easy, convenient payments
We offer
Huge Inventory Low Down Payments

October 10 & 11

Not valid with other offers

We have seed available and

W
E

WWW.SHALOMWORKS.ORG

Anthony Grime, Marketing Rep.


Deborah Grime, DBA
202 N. Defiance St.
Archbold, OH 43502

A UY ST
LF AN
A DING
LF GR
A EEN
!

108 W. HIGH ST.


BRYAN, OH 43506
419.636.1713

Uniforms - Shoes - Accessories


Career Wear

Must present coupon at time of write-up. Not valid on previous visits


or with other offers. See dealer for details. Expires 10-15-14 VR

Come Visit
Downtown
Archbold!

Must present coupon at time of write-up. Not valid on previous visits


or with other offers. See dealer for details. Expires 10-15-14 VR

Must present coupon at time of write-up. Not valid on previous


visits or with other offers. See dealer for details.
VR

See dealer for details.

VR

www.superior-auto.com
335 N. MAIN ST., BRYAN, OH 4 1 9 - 6 3 3 - 0 7 5 0
20 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

Personal One-On-One
Open Enrollment Service

KAY PAXSON
An Independent Broker You Can Trust

With over 25 years of experience and with a commitment to customer service


first, Kay Paxson offers honesty, around the clock availability, and a trusted
resource for changing insurance and Medicare needs.
Serving each customer on an individual basis, Kay strives to be both a partner
and guide to every customer all the way through the process of choosing the
plans that fit the customers needs. Kay focuses on making sure each customer
is informed on all of their options and happy with the choices they make.
New this year is office manager, Laura Hoffman. Laura is here to give you the
same level of knowledgeable service customers have come to expect.
A One-Stop shopping experience, Kay Paxson Insurance
2014 OPEN
offers you exceptional customer service. Both Laura
ENROLLMENT
Hoffman and Kay Paxson are available to help you with all
your Medicare, Health and Life Insurance options:
IS OCTOBER 15

Medicare Advantage
THROUGH

Paramount Elite
DECEMBER 7

Humana

Anthem

Gateway
CALL FOR

HealthSpan
OTHER CONVENIENT

Medicare Supplements
LOCATIONS

All Major Companies
DURING OPEN

Prescription Drug Plans
ENROLLMENT

All Major Companies
Locally born and raised and serving the local community, Kay Paxson is always
there to answer any questions and to take the confusion and guesswork out of
choosing healthcare plans. Both Kay and Laura are knowledgeable with new
health care laws, and in all of the changes coming in Medicare Advantage. They
are committed to helping their customers understand all of the options available.
Fully licensed in Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, and Florida.

KAY PAXSON INSURANCE


222 Depot St., Wauseon, OH
419-335-0827 Toll Free: 866-203-2155
KAY PAXSON
419-403-0110
kaypaxson@msn.com
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

LAURA HOFFMAN
419-403-0061
lhoff62@hotmail.com

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 21

MORE GENERAL AREA NEWS

Hands Of Grace Faith In Action Serves Elderly


& Disabled Residents In Fulton County
As the holiday season approaches,
we kindly ask that you please remember
Hand of Grace Faith in Action, a
local ministry serving the elderly and
disabled in Fulton County for over 15
years. Since out establishment in 1997,
we have donated over 100,000 hours
and $2 million of volunteer services
including:
Adult Day Center Services for the
transitional care of those adjusting from
chronic, physical, or cognitive illnesses,
Community Services such as respite
care, TLC calls and visits, minor home
repairs and year work, shopping, and
light housework,
Transportation Services to and
from non-emergency medical and other
necessary appointments, including
the use of a licensed Handicapped
Accessible Vehicle (HAV).
Simply stated, out mission is to
keep the elderly and disabled in out
community in their own homes, with
their loved ones, for as long as is safely
possible.
Our work has a powerful impact not
only on the people we serve, but also on
the larger community as a whole. Worth
noting, we are predominately reliant on

charitable donations in order to provide


our services. That is why we ask you
to remember Hands of Grace Faith in
Action with a charitable gift in support
of our important work during the holiday
season. Any amount you can share will
be greatly appreciated and put to good
use right here in Fulton County.
Also, weve simplified the donation
procedure, allowing supporters to
donate directly online or by mail. Visit
us at http://www.handsofgrace.org/ to
make a gift using a credit card (including
monthly installments), or send a check.
All donations are tax deductible.
Hands of Grace Faith in Action is a
private non-profit (501c3) organization,
funded through our partner agency
United Way, as well as caring Fulton
County businesses and residents such
as yourself. As a private entity, we are
able to fill the gaps where other agencies
cannot help. Please be assured that we
do not provide any duplicate services
that are offered by any other agencies.
On behalf of the many hundreds of
care-receivers and care-givers in Fulton
County, thank you in advance for your
generous donation and/or continued
support.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

CONTINUED FROM THE FRONT PAGE

Blue Star/Gold Star Banner...

The American Red Cross


Encourages Donors To Make
Blood Donation A Lifelong Habit
The American Red Cross reminds
eligible donors that its never too late
or too early to make blood donation a
lifelong habit.
Many blood donors report making
their first blood donation while in high
school. High school and college students
account for about 20 percent of all blood
donations to the Red Cross. Individuals
can begin donating at 17 years old,
or 16 in some states, and continue to
donate as long as they meet eligibility
requirements.
Blood donations often decline during
the winter holidays when school is not in
session. The Red Cross is offering 16 to
24-year-old students currently enrolled
in school a way to help overcome this
seasonal decline and have a chance
to win a college scholarship. Students
who sponsor a successful blood drive
between Dec. 15, 2014, and Jan. 15,
2015, through the Leaders Save Lives
program will be entered to win a college
scholarship and will receive a gift
card. More information is available at
redcrossblood.org/leaderssavelives.
Donors are needed year-round,
particularly those with types O negative,
A negative and B negative blood. Those
who attempt to donate in October will be
entered to win a $5,000 Visa gift card,
courtesy of Suburban Propane.
To make an appointment to donate
blood, eligible donors are encouraged
to download the new Red Cross Blood

Donor App from app stores or text


BLOODAPP to 90999 to receive a
download link, visit redcrossblood.org
or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-7332767).
Upcoming blood donation opportunities
in Williams County:
Friday, Oct. 17 from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.,
The Enrichment Center, 11246 State
Rt 15 in Montpelier.
Thursday, Oct. 30 from 7:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m., Bryan High School, 150 S
Portland in Bryan.
Friday, Oct. 31 from 11 a.m. - 5
p.m., Hilltop High School, 1401 West
Jackson Street in West Unity
How to donate blood:
Simply download the American
Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit
redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED
CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to make an
appointment or for more information.
All blood types are needed to ensure
a reliable supply for patients. A blood
donor card or drivers license or two
other forms of identification are required
at check-in. Individuals who are 17
years of age (16 with parental consent in
some states), weigh at least 110 pounds
and are in generally good health may
be eligible to donate blood. High school
students and other donors 18 years
of age and younger also have to meet
certain height and weight requirements.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

CONTINUED FROM THE FRONT PAGE

Hospice To Host Beacon ...

PHOTOS BY TAMMY ALLISON, STAFF

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT ... John Galbraith opened the days events with
bagpipe music.

A GRAND OLD FLAG ... West Unity American Legion Riders opened the events with
a patriotic ride.

SELFLESS SERVICE ... Parents Darcy and Jeremy Simon of Wauseon with son Pvt.
Josh Simon-US Army attend the days events.

Fall Story Times Resume In October


At The Wauseon Public Library
Celebrate the harvest season with
your preschoolers at the Wauseon
Public Librarys Fall Story Times on
Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m., running
through November 18. The story times
are free and are open to children three
and over.
Join Childrens Librarian Rachel
Dominique for fall stories, songs,
activities, and crafts, invited Library
Director Amy Murphy. Not only will

they have a good time, but they will also


be working on early literacy skills to
help them get ready for school.
Among Octobers themes are apples,
leaves and acorns, pumpkins, and
Halloween.
For more information or to register
for the Fall Story Times, please e-mail
the Wauseon Public Librarys Childrens
Department at amy.murphy@oplin.org
or call 419-335-6626.

Wauseon Public Library


Board Meeting On October 14
The Wauseon Public Librarys Board of Trustees will hold a board meeting on
Tuesday, October 14 at 6:00 p.m. in the librarys second floor meeting room. The
public is always welcome.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

of those who've come under hospice


care and the hope the service brings
to their families, the Beacon of Hope
lighthouse was chosen as the symbol
for the organization's fund raiser.
Speaking at the event will be three
separate families, who've had loved
ones go through hospice care in the
last year, appropriately known as
the Hospice Ambassadors for 2014.
Those loved ones left behind by Derald
Steinke, Gail Gordon, and Dt. Thomas
Olnhausen will speak at the Beacon
of Hope Dinner, each with their own
unique take on their hospice experience.
As they had seen hospice at work
through family and friends, Mary
Steinke and Ann Kidston were familiar
with the program when it came time to
enroll their father, Derald Steinke. With
a call to, and, later, a visit from Krista,
a hospice nurse with whom they were
familiar, the family made the decision
to allow Derald to start receiving care.
And they were glad they did.
Hospice has been a blessing for us,
the family expressed in an open letter,
and we are so thankful for the care
and comfort they provide.
Their angel, as Steinke and
Kidston refer to Krista, even made
a special trip to be with the family at
Derald's passing. Even after his death,
she continued to help those loved ones
left behind fill their needs.
And Hospice has continued to be
a source of care comfort for us to this
day.
Gail Gordon had but a single request
upon receiving his diagnosis of stage
four esophageal cancer.
Please don't put me in the hospital
or nursing home.
This was a difficult wish to honor, but
Gordon's family did just that, thanks to
the CHP Hospice. In the those trying
times that were the later stages of his
life, when he was still kickin', just not
very high, Hospice was there. And not
just for him, either.
It became clear that CHP was
not only there to care for Gail, Dave
Gordon, family to Gail, realized, but
also to help the rest of the family
through this difficult time.
Gail left this world on May 15 of this
year, but he made several friends at the
CHP before doing so, according to Dave.
The family of Dr. Thomas Olnhausen
is in a unique position when compared
to the other two families serving as
Hospice Ambassadors. Dr. Olnhausen's
children now have a mother who is
under Hospice care for gallstones that
are not able to be removed due to their
close proximity to major blood vessels.
For Kim Peeble, it was a surprise that
Hospice would take on a case that
didn't involve cancer.
I didn't realize Hospice cared for
patients who don't have cancer.
It was Pancreatic Cancer that
claimed Peebles father on May 11
of this year. Prior to his diagnosis,
Olnhausen had only been sick once in
his entire life according to Peebles, so
the family was stunned by the news.
On one of several trips to the Bryan
Hospital, after receiving the news that
his body had started to reject blood

22 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

transfusions, Olnhausen and family


met with Mary Ellen, a Hospice Nurse
with the CHP. She informed them
of the benefits of Hospice care, and
Olnhausen decided to sign up for the
program.
For two months Olnhausen was
under Hospice care, even partnering
up with an Arizona branch so he could
see his cousin, Sandy Olnhausen, with
whom he was quite close.
Spending his last seven and a
half days at the In Patient Hospice in
Defiance, Olnhausen died with all four
of his children by his side.
Struggling with the loss of her father,
while attempting to take care of her
mother, Peebles, a fifth grade teacher at
Bryan Local Schools, was overwhelmed
at the monumental task. It was words
from her late father that guided her
back to Hospice.
And I heard his voice telling me to
call Mary Ellen. Peebles recalled.
This was his advice shortly before he
passed, but Peebles declined, believing
Hospice to be only for cancer victims.
She made the call this time, however.
Mary Ellen returned that call well
after her regular hours, determined to
find out what was wrong. The result
of that call was Peebles' mother being
enrolled in the program, allowing the
teacher to continue her work until her
retirement at the end of this school
year.
Why would Mary Ellen go above and
beyond her work duties for Peebles?
When they lose a patient, it's
like they lose a family member.
Becky Kimble, Volunteer and Event
Coordinator for the CHP, proclaimed.
Peebles simply refers to the Hospice
Nurses as Our Angels here on Earth.
On hand to emcee the event will be
Mix 98.1 FM radio personality Rick
Small. Showtime DJ Jamie Shaffer will
provide music for the evening, while
hospice nurses themselves will serve as
hostesses.
Governing both the live and silent
auctions will be The Carlin and
Company Realty and Auctioneers.
Amongst the items to be auctioned
are an Ohio State University (OSU)
Football autographed by Buckeye Head
Coach Urban Meyer, tickets to OSU
and Indiana Football games, Big Ten
Championship game tickets, an African
Queen Suite at the Sandusky Kalahari
Water Park, a children's bike provided
by Colbart's Bicycle Shop in Edon, and
a Sauder's Heritage Inn Package in
addition to many others.
For those who wish to help, and
perhaps partaking in a bit of fun while
doing so, the Beacon of Hope Dinner
will take place on October 23 at 5:30
P.M. in the Bryan Eagles building, with
dinner being served at 6:15 P.M. Entry
into the event will cost $20 per person,
or a bargain package of eight people
for $150. Interested parties should
call Kimble at 419-633-7590 for more
information or to obtain tickets.
Even angels need assistance from
time to time, especially the ones living
here on Earth.
T.J. Hug can be reached at
publisher@thevillagereporter.com

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

The Village Reporter


The Village Reporter

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BUSINESSES IN WILLIAMS & FULTON COUNTIES


SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BUSINESSES IN WILLIAMS & FULTON COUNTIES
ATTORNEY

AUTO

AUTO

419-237-2661
866-99LAWPRO
www.molitierno.com

Your Full Service


Truck & Tractor Store
1201 Wohlert St., Angola, IN 46703

260-665-5396 800-654-4715
www.angoladavesdiesel.com

1422 Whitaker Way


Montpelier, OH 43543
Phone (419) 485-3242
Fax # (419) 485-9612

Little Lights

Brown Drain
Cleaning

MIDNIGHT
FANTASY

14226 US HWY. 20-A


Montpelier, OH

419-485-5029
FINANCE

419-212-4356

Email: Vaughn@entenmansflooring.net

FREE ESTIMATES & FULLY INSURED


entenmansflooringandmore.com

EVENTS

YOUR TRI-STATE RIDE

419-737-1324

Years of Experience
WEDDINGS
PARTIES
PROMS
EVENTS

Emergency
Service
Available

RIDE IN STYLE!
CUSTOM TRANSPORATION

Sink/Tub
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Mark Brown

419-212-4756

419-737-1324
419-408-0929

midnightfantasypartytour@gmail.com

Find us on Facebook

14226 US HWY 20-A MONTPELIER, OH


419-485-5029

Financial Advisor
.

126 East Maple Street


Bryan, OH 43506
419-636-5644
www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC

FUNERAL HOME

Little Lights Daycare and Preschool is a ministry of the River


of Life Worship Center. Located at 14226 US Hwy 20-A in Montpelier, Ohio, they can be reached at 419-485-5029 or riveroflife@
williams-net.com.
The center is open from 6 am 6 pm Monday through Friday and has 9 caregivers. Due to their unique location, they
currently have North Central, Mill-Creek and Montpelier schools
that pick up and drop off at the center. They are also set up for
children enrolled in Head Start as well.
They take pride in what they do and are very honored that
parents would choose to bring their children to our center and
care for them. They work very hard to get the children ready for
kindergarten while also addressing the ODE Standards.
They have many outings for the children who come to the center, including our
summer school-age program. In the summer, they take the school-agers to the pool,
parks & recreation program in town, local nursing homes, tour a local farm, supermarket, pizza shop, and also plan an all day outing to Sauders Village. We would
encourage those who would be thinking about needing care, to give us a call so we
can show you around and what we have to offer.
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Energy USA, LLC

3268 St. Rt. 191, Stryker, OH 43557


heartlandenergyusa@live.com

419.682.1111
Scotts Cell 419.553.0248
Daves Cell 419.789.0082

HEATING
DRAIN CLEANING
COOLING ELECTRICAL
PLUMBING
DUCT CLEANING

Owners: Bob & Beth Tejkl


www.heartlandenergyusa.net

HOME HEALTH

Ruby Carpenter RN,

24 Hour Service

Greeting Cards 25

Wed thru Sun 12 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

HEATING

Heartland

13805 St. Rt. 107


Montpelier, OH 43543
260-494-4859

419.485.4046
Montpelier

FARMING / FEED

LITTLE LIGHTS DAYCARE & PRESCHOOL

Richard C Wright

construction

Vaughn Entenman

FEATURED BUSINESS OF THE WEEK

Have
401(k)
questions?
Lets talk.

nixon

PARTY TOURS

Residential, Commercial,
Industrial
Reasonable Rates

State Licensed
Christian Based Curriculum
Daycare / Preschool

CONSTRUCTION

338 E. Hull St., Edgerton, Ohio 43517

millerbodyshop@hotmail.com

ENTERTAINMENT

6 weeks to
12 years old

Custom Tile Work


Flooring & Showers
Hardwood, Laminate & Carpet
Roofing, Siding & Windows
Doors & Decks
Whole Room Remodels
Electrical/Plumbing

Kenny Prince Kenny Nester


AUTO, TRUCK & BUS REPAIR

DRAIN CLEANING

Monday - Friday
6:00 am - 6:00 pm

Custom Flooring and


Complete Home Renovations

Expert Collision And


Frame Repair

DAYCARE/PRESCHOOL

Daycare & Preschool

Entenmans Flooring
& More, INC.

Body Shop

Thomas Molitierno
& Diane Molitierno,
Attorneys
Serving both Ohio
& Michigan clients

104 E. Main St. Fayette, Ohio

CONSTRUCTION

Miller

THOMAS S.
MOLITIERNO

Bankruptcy
Personal Injury
Criminal Wills
Probate Real Estate

AUTO

1-800-455-KERN
1-419-822-3888

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

Administrator

Allcaring Home
Health Services
322 Clinton St. Suite 201
Defiance, OH 43512

Phone 419-782-8200
Fax 419-782-8266
Phone Toll Free 1-877-782-8250
E-Mail: allcaring@embarqmail.com

INSURANCE

FLOORING

Carpet

Mart

7300 State Route 108,


Wauseon, OH

Just South Of The Fairgrounds

419.335.0993

www.freefloorz.com
Lowest Prices
Period.
GARAGE DOORS

Mr. Breezysolutions
Screening S

We Specialize in Sales,
Installation & Repair of:
Garage Doors & Openers
Lifestyle Garage Screens
Window Screens
Custom Screen Frames
Porch & Patio Screening
Entry Doors, Patio Doors
Storm Doors & Windows We Offer Full

Layaway Plans

John Slattman
Owner,

Bryan, Ohio

419-553-7503

slattman3377@roadrunner.com
www.mrbreezyscreeningsolutions.com
facebook.com/mrbreezys

INSURANCE

Free Information
on Annuities
Call
866-660-9228
If you are not satisfied with
your returns on CD's
call this number to receive free
information.
Courtesy of Robert Chrismer,
Registered Representative
of Sigma Financial Corporation
Member FINRA/SIPC

111 Chase Street


Stryker, Ohio 43557

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 23

MORE GENERAL AREA NEWS

Ohio Hunters Gear Up For Exciting Deer Season

Ohios deer archery season is open, and with the


first firearm season just around the corner, the Ohio
Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division
of Wildlife reminds hunters of several regulation
adjustments for the 2014-2015 white-tailed deer
hunting season. Hunters are reminded to review the
2014-2105 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations
before heading afield. Regulations are available at
wildohio.gov and where hunting and fishing licenses
are sold.
Ohios 2014-2015 deer seasons include:
Archery: Sept. 27-Feb. 1, 2015.
Antlerless muzzleloader: Oct. 11-12.
Youth gun: Nov. 22-23.
Gun: Dec. 1-7.
Muzzleloader: Jan. 2-5, 2015.
Antlerless permits are no longer valid in some
counties during the 2014-2015 deer season. See the
attached bag limit map or county list to confirm if
antlerless permits are valid in the county you plan
to hunt this season. Antlerless permits are no longer
valid in the following counties: Belmont, Carroll,
Coshocton, Defiance, Fairfield, Fulton, Gallia, Geauga,
Greene, Guernsey, Hardin, Harrison, Hocking,
Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Knox, Lawrence, Meigs,
Miami, Monroe, Morrow, Muskingum, Noble, Perry,
Richland, Van Wert, Washington, and Williams
counties. Hunters who check a deer in these counties
need to use an either-sex permit.
Antlerless permits are valid in the remaining
counties through Nov. 30, 2014, the Sunday before the
deer-gun season. Only one antlerless permit may be
used per county, regardless of the bag limit. Antlerless
permits are also valid for use during Ohio Division of

Wildlife authorized controlled hunts.


New this year, specific straight-walled cartridge rifles
are legal for use during the deer-gun and youth deergun seasons. These specific straight-walled cartridge
rifles are legal for deer hunting: .357 Magnum, .357
Maximum, .38 Special, .375 Super Magnum, .375
Winchester, .38-55, .41 Long Colt, .41 Magnum, .44
Special, .44 Magnum, .444 Marlin, .45 ACP, .45 Colt,
.45 Long Colt, .45 Winchester Magnum, .45 Smith &
Wesson, .454 Casull, .460 Smith & Wesson, .45-70,
.45-90, .45-110, .475 Linebaugh, .50-70, .50-90, .50100, .50-110 and .500 Smith & Wesson.
Also a change for the 2014-15 season, shotguns and
straight-walled cartridge rifles may have no more than
three shells in the magazine and chamber combined
while deer hunting.
For the first time, historical records of Ohios
top-scoring deer can be searched online through
a partnership effort between the ODNR Division of
Wildlife and the Buckeye Big Buck Club. A complete
database of top deer scores, complete with rankings,
hunters name, county of the kill and more, is available
atwildohio.gov. Ohio ranks No. 7 nationally for the
number of trophy deer as compiled by the Boone and
Crockett Club through 2011.
For the second season, hunters can check their
harvest on their mobile device at ohiogamecheck.com.
A valid email address and phone number are required
to use the service, and hunters still need to make their
own temporary tag.
Deer hunting hours are 30 minutes before sunrise
to 30 minutes past sunset for all deer seasons. This
includes gun and muzzleloader seasons.
It is legal to bowhunt during the antlerless deer
muzzleloader hunting season, Oct. 11-12, but no

antlered deer may be killed regardless of hunting


implement during these two days.
Hunters can harvest one buck during the 20142015 deer hunting season.
A review of the 2013-14 Ohio deer seasons is
available online.
INFORMATION PROVIDED

Animal House Rescue

Puccini & Maggie


Puccini and Maggie are 6-7 yr old Yorkies looking for
a forever home together. Both are spayed and current
on their vaccinations as well as flea and heartworm
preventative. The adoption fee is $250 for these girls.
They love to snuggle and are good with other dogs,
cats and are housebroken. They are afraid of children.
For more information on these or other pets available,
please visit www.ahrescue.org or email animalhouserescu@aol.com

SHOP @ HOME .... SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESS


LAWN

B&G
Outdoor Power
Equipment LTD
Full line of service & parts
Gravely - Ariens - Echo
Dolmar - Snapper

09629 US 127
West Unity, Ohio

419-924-5210
REALTOR

MEATS

NEWS

PETS

THE VILLAGE REPORTER

Weve Been in
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DEFIANCE, OH 43512

419-782-7831
HOURS
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SATURDAY
7am-12noon

Hours: M-F 9:00 - 7:00


Sat. 9:00 - 5:00 / Sun. 1:00 - 5:00

FEATURED BUSINESS OF THE WEEK

TRI-COUNTY REPAIR

Kevin Gray
Real Estate Broker

Cell: 419-553-9563
Office: 419-636-5500

kgray@wilsonauctionltd.net
825 N. Main St. Bryan, OH 43506
WilsonAuctionLtd.com
www.bryanohiohomes.com

RETAIL

A Fresh Cut Florist Mennonite Pantry


Fashion Finesse Boutique Pennycrest Gifts
Tastefully Done Gourmet Foods
Personalized Laser Engraving Kameleon Jewelry

At the Shops at Pennycrest,


we work TOGETHER to
offer you MORE choices to
BETTER serve you.
Mention SUMMER SALE
and RECEIVE 20% OFF
your entire purchase

(good through 8-31-2014 - exclusions apply)

Summer Hours: M-F 9-5 Sat 9-1


220 N. Defiance St. Archbold, Ohio
419-446-9473

STAFFING

50+ IMMEDIATE
POSITIONS AVAILABLE!
Pro Resources Staffing is hiring for
several companies in the
Steuben and Dekalb county areas.

POSITIONS INCLUDE:
General Labor Forklift Operators
Welders Liquid Industrial Painters
Part Time Sorting Work 12 Hour Shifts
Please call or stop in to one of our offices today!

652 N. Grandstaff Dr. Auburn, IN 46706

260-927-1030

300 W Maumee Street Angola, IN 46703

260-624-2225

REALTOR

CORNER OF ST. RT. 127 & 20 FAYETTE, OH


419-237-2546 1-800-872-3220

Tri-State
Trucking
opened in 1978 and
recently changed the
name to Tri-County Repair. The business is
owned by Dewey Kunkle
and is located at 21751
St. Rt. 20 in Fayette.
Dewey and wife, Ivy,
are lifelong residents in
Fayette and have been
active in the community
through various groups and organizations along with strong support to Fayette
athletics through their children.
The staff of three full-time employees is here to provide you with the best service possible.
They service trucks and trailers, as well as, complete federal inspections for
them. They make all kinds of hydraulic hoses & fittings, sell Lucas Product and
1/8 thru 1/2 plastic bedliners. Road services is also available.
Tri-County Repair is open Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. till 4:00 p.m. and
Saturday 7:00 a.m. till Noon.
STORAGE

TIRES

TRAINING

WATER

Northwestern Ohio
Driver Training
School, Inc.

Unity Water
Conditioning

ATV Tires
@ eBay Prices

m.e.Miller tire
17386 State Highway 2
Wauseon OH 43567
419-335-7010
www.millertire.com

Competitive prices, Local


Owners & Instructors.

LOCATIONS IN:
Bryan: 419-636-9092
Stryker: 419-682-4741
Wauseon: 419-337-6580

RETAIL

E
H

liza
enry

210 North Defiance Street


Archbold, Ohio 43502
419-446-0000
www.elizahenry.com

Clothing & Accessories, Books,


Toys, Games, Gifts, and More!

Wed/Thur/Fri 9-5:30
Sat 9-2:00
Terry & Donna King, Owners
donna@elizahenry.com

Shop online at
www.elizahenry.com!

STAFFING

Peoplelink
Staffing Solutions
Village of Edgerton
324 N. Michigan Street
Edgerton OH 43517

Applications
accepted 1-4 pm on
Wednesdays
Call 260-927-1842
For questions

You may also


apply online at
www.peoplelinkstaffing.com
and select
AUBURN branch
E.O.E.

WELDING

Serving Northwest Ohio

115 S. Liberty St.


West Unity, OH 43570
Cell: (419) 553-0298
unitywater@frontier.com
www.kinetico.com
Peg Baltosser
Water Problems? I can help you.
Call me for an appointment.

800-886-5585

www.nwdriverstrainingsch.com

24 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

Saluting Survivors
Encouraging Awareness
Remembering Loved Ones

For more information about breast cancer prevention,


early detection and support for a cure, please visit
the National Breast Cancer Foundation online at
www.nationalbreastcancer.org.

During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we stand together in our support for a
cure and our support for the women who are faced with the disease. By encouraging breast
cancer research and raising awareness of the importance of early detection, we can all help
save lives.
It is estimated that nearly 200,000 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year,
and that more than 40,000 of these women will die. Breast cancer is a threat to women of all
ages, races and walks of life. Even men are at risk for breast cancer, with approximately 1,700
men diagnosed each year. These numbers remind us why it is so important to know the signs,
symptoms and risk factors of breast cancer. Early detection of breast cancer is the best
weapon against the disease, which means breast self-exams should be performed regularly,
with clinical breast exams every one to three years. By the age of 40, women should begin
getting mammograms every one to two years. In addition, healthy lifestyle habits like physical
activity, not smoking, minimizing alcohol intake and consuming plenty of fresh fruits and
vegetables can help women reduce their risk factors.

Recognizing The Signs Of Breast Cancer May Save Your Life

Stryker, Ohio

419-682-3311

As with many types of


cancer, breast cancer is
most successfully treated
when it is detected early.
Over the previous quarter
century, death rates for
breast cancer have been
on the decline, a positive
development that Breastcancer.org, a nonprofit
organization dedicated to
providing reliable, complete and up-to-date information about breast
cancer, suggests is a byproduct of the heightened
awareness of breast cancer
over the last 25 years and
the increasing emphasis
placed on breast cancer
screening.
Understanding
the
symptoms of breast cancer
also can help women battle
and defeat this potentially

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

deadly disease. While the


presence of any of the following symptoms does not
necessarily mean breast
cancer is present, the appearance of the following
should be enough to inspire women and even men
to visit their physicians for
thorough
examinations
and screenings.
Changes in the feeling
of the breast or nipple: A
change in how the breast or
nipple feels could be indicative of a larger problem.
If the nipple is especially
tender and this persists for
an extended period of time,
exercise caution and discuss this change with your
physician. Similarly, if a
lump or thickening develops on or near the breast
or underarms, speak with
your physician.
Changes in appearance of the breast: A lump
or thickening in the breast
may affect the appearance
of the breast. Another visible symptom of breast
cancer is a change in the

skin texture or an enlargement of pores in the skin


of the breast, which may
appear similar to dimpling,
not unlike an orange peel.
Swelling or shrinking of
the breast, especially when
such symptoms appear on
just one breast, may also
indicate breast cancer.
In addition, some women
with breast cancer notice
a sudden asymmetry with
their breasts despite their
breasts previously being
symmetrical, and such a
development should immediately be brought to
the attention of a physician.
Changes in the appearance of the nipple: A
nipple that appears different also may be a sign of
breast cancer. Some women with breast cancer have
noticed a nipple turned
slightly inward or inverted
prior to their breast cancer
diagnosis. Skin of the nipple, as well as that of the
breast and areola, which
is the dark circle of skin

around the nipple, may


also become red, scaly or
swollen when breast cancer is present.
Clear or bloody discharge from the nipple:
Women who are breastfeeding often notice a milky
discharge from their nipple
after breastfeeding. Such
discharges are normal.
However, when a woman
who is not breastfeeding
notices the presence of a
clear or bloody discharge
from her nipple, such a
development should be
brought to the attention of
a physician.
Any of the aforementioned signs and symptoms may be a sign of infection or the presence of a
cyst, both of which are less
severe than the presence
of breast cancer. But the
success rates of treating
cancers that are detected
early is such that any potential symptom of breast
cancer warrants an immediate discussion with a
physician.

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 25

Menopause Treatment & Breast Cancer Risk

Does Breast Size Affect Cancer Risk?

KNOW YOUR RISKS ... Hormone replacement therapy can elevate breast cancer risk and
may not be an appropriate menopause treatment for all women.

Upon reaching a certain age, women


go through the natural process of menopause. This change typically occurs when
a woman reaches her late 40s or early 50s.
The transition to menopause happens
over several years and results in fluctuations of hormone levels in a womans
body. During this transition, many women experience a variety of symptoms, from
mood changes to hot flashes to vaginal
dryness. These symptoms can be so severe they impact daily activities and can
impede quality of life. Hormone replacement therapy, or HRT, may be prescribed
to alleviate the side effects of perimenopause and menopause. However, HRT is
not without risks, including an increased
chance of developing breast cancer.
According to The Mayo Clinic, HRT,
which includes medications containing female hormones to replace the ones
the body no longer makes naturally after
menopause, used to be a standard treatment for women with severe symptoms. In
the largest clinical trial to date, a combination estrogen-progestin pill was found
to increase the risk of certain serious
conditions, including blood clots, heart
disease, stroke, and breast cancer. This
type of therapy also may make a womans
breasts appear more dense on mammograms, making breast cancer more difficult to detect. When undergone for more
than a few years, HRT has been confirmed
by multiple studies to increase the risk for
breast cancer.
Women concerned about HRT and cancer risk, especially those with a significant
family history of breast cancer, generally
want to avoid the use of hormone therapies. But what is a person who is experiencing many side effects of menopause
that can be so easily remedied by hormone therapy to do? Research into HRT
alternatives has discovered a host of natural treatments that can provide relief.
Soy: Soy offers some promising results,
especially with regard to relieving hot
flashes. Soy is very high in phytoestrogens, or plant estrogens. Red clover and
flaxseed are other sources of plant estrogens. Phytoestrogens are less potent than
pharmaceutical estrogen, and scientists

believe they do not contribute to breast


cancer in the way natural or pharmaceutical estrogen may.
Black cohosh: Black cohosh is a member of the buttercup family and is a perennial plant native to North America. Preparations of black cohosh are made from
the roots and underground stems. Black
cohosh has long been used by natives of
North America to treat malaise, gynecological disorders, rheumatism and other
conditions. Black cohosh is now sold as
an herbal remedy to alleviate hot flashes
and excessive sweating in menopausal
women. The National Institutes of Health
awarded more than $7 million to the University of Illinois to study the efficacy of
black cohosh and other herbs in treating
certain symptoms of menopause.
Dong quai: This herb is in the celery
family and native to Asia. In Chinese
medicine, dong quai has been considered
a female ginseng because of its way of
balancing the female hormonal system.
As such, dong quai has long been used
to relieve the symptoms of premenstrual
syndrome and menopause. According to
the University of Maryland Medical Center, researchers are unsure if dong quai
acts like estrogen or blocks estrogen in
the body, as studies have produced mixed
results.
Lifestyle changes: Women may need
to dress more lightly, use a water atomizer to spray their bodies to cool down and
keep their bedrooms cold to alleviate hot
flashes.
Vaginal estrogen: If vaginal dryness
and pain during intercourse are the primary symptoms, vaginal estrogen rings
or suppositories may be necessary. These
provide estrogen directly to the affected
area while only allowing very low levels
to enter the bloodstream. In turn, vaginal
estrogen may not increase breast cancer
risk in the same way as other hormone
therapies.
Hormone replacement therapy can alleviate menopausal symptoms, but also
it can elevate breast cancer risk. Other
options are available, and women can
speak with their doctors about alternatives to HRT.

Various factors may increase a womans


risk of developing breast cancer. But the
size of a womans breasts may not help doctors determine the gravity of that risk.
Researchers have uncovered connections between some genes that determine a
womans breast size and those involved with
breast cancer, but those discoveries are not
enough to determine a definitive link.
Scientists at commercial DNA testing
service 23andMe in California have found
a correlation between the genes that determine whether a woman will wear a B cup or
a D cup bra and the genes associated with
breast cancer risk. Data from more than
16,000 female customers who had their genetic makeup examined was analyzed, particularly single nucleotide polymorphisms,
or SNPs. SNPs are variations in DNA that
may or may not have impact on predisposition to certain traits or illnesses. The researchers identified seven SNPs as significantly associated with breast size, three of
which had previously been linked to breast

Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy


Apart from certain skin
cancers, breast cancer is
the most common form of
cancer among women, particularly American women.
It does not segregate based
on race and ethnicity or
even gender, as men can be
diagnosed with breast cancer as well.
Depending on the location of the cancer, its
pervasiveness and the patients family history, various breast cancer treatments are available. A
combination of radiation
and chemotherapy may be
necessary, but surgery may
ultimately be the best option. Cancer removal surgery involves the surgical
removal of breast tissue.
Sometimes the nipple and
the skin can be spared,
but other times the entire
breast and even the lymph
nodes under the arm must
be removed. Many women
who undergo mastectomy
procedures choose to have
some sort of post-surgery
breast reconstruction.
Breast
reconstruction
employs plastic surgery to
restore a breast to nearnormal shape and ap-

20/20
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Store

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Processing

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cancer risk.
Doctors say that it is unlikely breast size
alone will dictate propensity for breast cancer. Others have argued the DNA study was
preliminary and possibly flawed because it
failed to account for complete information,
such as breast density, participants weight
or alcohol consumption -- all factors that
can contribute to breast cancer risk.
Excess body weight, which can contribute to larger breast size, may be a more
likely culprit in the correlation between cup
size and cancer. The American Cancer Society says that as many as 20 percent of all
cancer-related deaths were impacted by excess body weight.
There is not a large enough body of
evidence to link large breast size to an increased risk of breast cancer. Its true that
larger breasts have more breast cells susceptible to mutation, but many surmise that
genetics and lifestyle factors are more likely
than breast size to elevate a womans breast
cancer risk.

pearance following a mastectomy. A few different


procedures may be needed
to reconstruct the breast,
and surgery on the other
breast may be done to improve symmetry. According to Cancer Treatment
Centers of America, many





women are eligible to begin reconstruction at the


time of mastectomy, which
can reduce the number of
surgical procedures women
must endure and can eliminate time spent without a
breast.

Dimension
Hardwood
Veneers, Inc.
509 WOODVILLE STREET - EDON

ROTARY VENEER MILL

Buying Standing Timber & Cut Logs. All


Species Including Hard Maple, Soft Maple,
Beech & Oak
Contact Mark Tingley
419-272-2245

Custom Molded
Plastics, LTD

Ronald E. Ernsberger

BOKERMAN
YACKEE KOESTERS
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PRESIDENT

Two Locations Same Great Service

14620 Selwyn Drive - Holiday City, Ohio


419-485-2020
Cell: 419-770-2020

WAUSEON - 419-335-4060

rernsberger@2020cmp.com

126 E. Chestnut St.

NAPOLEON - 419-599-5540
1223 N. Scott St.

800 West Barre Road


PO Box 10
Archbold, OH 43502
800.446.2520

nixon construction

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108 W. High St.


Bryan, Oh
4196361713

22251 St. Rt. 2


Archbold, OH 43502
419-445-1552

www.shalomworks.org

26 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

The Village Reporter

CHURCH & SPIRITUAL NEWS

Devotional Thought / Fellowship of Christian Athletes


BY: REX STUMP - CONSISTENCY

In 1977 in the second


game of a doubleheader
in Boston, Detroit Tigers
rookies Lou Whitaker and
Alan Trammell made their
first appearance together.
These two future all-stars
went on to hold down the
second base and shortstop
jobs in Detroit for a record
of nineteen years. Many
remember Baltimore Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken, Jr. playing in 2,632 consecutive games from April 30, 1982 to Sept. 19, 1998. He
played 16 years and didnt miss a game! Just recently
NBA referee Dick Bavetta retired after a 39-year career
in which he never missed an assignment. Dick Bavetta
officiated a record of 2,635 consecutive regular-season
games after starting his NBA career on Dec. 2, 1975. Its
recorded that he also worked 270 playoff games, including 27 in the NBA Finals.
Those kinds of records are unbelievable! Why is that?
For some of us, consistency, longevity, faithfulness, and
commitment are foreign terms. It seems today that our
culture is not very committed to work, relationships, or
our faith.
Psalm 102:25-27, Long ago you laid the foundation
of the earth and made the heavens with your hands.

They will perish, but you remain forever; they will wear
out like old clothing. You will change them like a garment and discard them. But you are always the same;
you will live forever.
The writer of this Psalm proclaims that all things in
this world will pass away and change, but God remains
the same. Things wear out, you toss them. Clothes,
tires, food you name it, when they reach their expiration date or wear out, you get rid of them. Sometimes
certain things just lose their appeal so you change them.
But not God.
God doesnt change. He is faithful and committed.
He was there from the very beginning of time laying out
the foundation of the earth. All things will pass away
says the writer, but God will always remain the same!
Gods consistency, faithfulness, and commitment is a
blessing and an encouragement to us.
These attributes, these truths about God allow us to
trust Him. He wont walk out on us. He wont be a no
show. He is here.and today, maybe you need to be
reminded that you are not alone or abandoned. Maybe
today you need to be encouraged that when everything
else around you is rapidly changing and you are not sure
who to trust you can place your trust in an unchanging
God! He is consistent, He is faithfulHe lives forever!
For more reading, check out; Lamentations 3:23;
Psalm 117:2; and Hebrews 13:5

MORE GENERAL AREA NEWS

Williams County Soil & Water Conservation Announces


Northwest Ohio Field Windbreak Program

Purpose
The purpose of the Northwest Ohio Field Windbreak
Program is to plant field windbreaks that provide
protection against soil loss due to wind erosion and
wind damage to crops.
The windbreaks may also provide food and cover
for wildlife.
Plantings where the purpose is the protection of
home sites or farmsteads, landscaping, or ornamental
use are not eligible for this program.
The cost for the 2015 Northwest Ohio Windbreak
Program is $0.35 per row foot.
Qualifications
Landowners or tenants who actively farm
agricultural land can qualify for the program.
The program is for field windbreaks only.
Farmstead and feedlot windbreaks do not qualify.
The field on which the windbreak is planted must
be at least 10 acres in size.
The windbreak can be from one to six rows wide
but must be at least 1,000 feet long.
When designing a windbreak near property
boundaries, it is important to ensure that the
windbreak is laid out on the correct landowners
property.
Property line windbreaks will not be planted.
Windbreaks must be located a minimum of 5 to 15
feet from property lines.
Windbreaks must be planted outside of power line
right-of-ways and other utility easements.
Services Provided
The Northwest Ohio Windbreak Program is a full
service program. Assistance available to the landowner
includes an on-site inspection, windbreak design and

Upcoming Concert
Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014 - 7:00pm
Archbold High School Auditorium
600 W. Lafayette St Archbold, Ohio

John Schmid

of Common Ground Ministries, Berlin OH


performing a selection of gospel,
country & folk style music
With Opening Group

The Messengers Quartet

Wendell Beck, Randy Kauffman, LaMar


Yoder, Roger Rupp & Jimmy Stewart
No admission fee, but a freewill offering will be taken to benefit
Common Ground Ministries, John Schmids singing ministry
focusing on inmates within the Ohio Corrections System.

help in completing the application.


In the spring, a pre-emergent herbicide is applied
and the seedlings planted.
In the fall, the planting is inspected and a second
herbicide application is made.
Replacement seedlings are provided the following
spring to the landowner to replant dead seedlings.
Landowner Responsibilities
The landowner may need to perform initial site
preparation. This could include clearing brush from
the area to be planted or plowing a strip for planting.
The landowner is responsible for maintaining
the windbreak. This includes some weed control and
replanting seedlings that die.
Specific information on site preparation and
maintenance will be provided.
Cost-share & Rental Payments
Contact your local Farm Service Agency or the
Williams Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD).
Application Procedure
The application deadline for windbreaks to be
planted in the spring 2015 is December 5, 2014.
A Northwest Ohio Windbreak program order
form must be used. Contact your local SWCD office
or the ODNR district office in Findlay to apply for a
windbreak.
A district technician or the private lands biologist
will meet with you to determine eligibility and help
develop a planting plan that insures a successful
windbreak.
Planting is done in early spring by the ODNR
Division of Forestry, so it is best to contact them in the
summer of fall and plan ahead for next years spring
planting season.
Payment Procedure
The landowner agrees to pay the amount indicated
to the Ohio Division of Forestry upon completion of
the windbreak planting.
Payments can be made by check only.
Landowner will be invoiced after the windbreak is
planted. Payment in full is
due within 30 days upon
receipt of the invoice.

Winning The Battle


For A Generation
THE PRAYERS OF A BROKEN-HEARTED CHILD
For those of us in ministry who have comforted a
family over the tragic loss of a parent, mother, father,
child, or for those who are going through such as
loss, what can you say to help, to bring hope? The
illustration below that I read in preachingthisweek.
com carries a great biblical truth; that when the face
of God is turned toward us, there is peace, read on
Pastor James Moore of Houston, Texas, tells
a story about a young man whose wife had died,
leaving him with a small son. Back home from the
cemetery, they went to bed early because there was
nothing else he could bear to do.
As he lay there in the darkness, grief-stricken and
heartbroken, the little boy broke the stillness from
his little bed with a disturbing question, Daddy,
where is Mommy?
The father got up and brought the little boy to
bed with him, but the child was still disturbed and
restless, occasionally asking questions such as,
Why isnt she here? and, When is she coming
back?
Finally the little boy said, Daddy, if your face is
toward me, I think I can go to sleep now. In a little
while, he was quiet.
The father lay there in the darkness, and then in
childlike faith, prayed this prayer: O God, I dont
see how I can survive this. The future looks so
miserable, but if Your face is toward me, somehow I
think I can make it.
Thats what the Messiah came to teach us: that
Gods face is always toward us. Nothing ever will be
able to separate you from His love. Now, thats real
security.
The Apostle Paul put it this wayRomans 8:3839 (NIV), For I am convinced that neither death nor
life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present
nor the future, nor any powers, 39 neither height
nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be
able to separate us from the love of God that is in
Christ Jesus our Lord.
Rick Jones, was former Executive Director of
Defiance Area Youth for Christ and serves
as a pastor of an area local church.

T
O
HMUSIC
L
O
O
C

TOPICS

FUN KIDS LOVE CASUALATMOSPHERE

PERRYSBURG
WEST TOLEDO
WHITEHOUSE

SOUTH TOLEDO
FINDLAY
iCAMPUS

SATURDAYS

SUNDAYS

5:15 7 9 10:45 12:30


PM

PM

AM

AM

PM

If you cant join us in person, watch live online at CedarCreek.tv

BRITSCH, INC
ROLLIN BRITSCH
Vice-President
247 N. Brunell St.
P.O. Box 391
Wauseon, Ohio 43567
(419) 335-8871
1-800-466-1628
Cell: (419) 466-3577
Email: rol_britsch@britschinc.com

Hallett, Hallett
& Nagel
Attorneys At Law
TIMOTHY W. HALLETT
ERIC K. NAGEL

132 S. Fulton Street


Wauseon, OH
419-335-5011

Please
contact
the
Williams SWCD at 419636-9395 Ext 3 for more
information.
Northwest
Ohio Windbreak Program
website
at:
http://
forestry.ohiodnr.gov/
landownerassistance
INFORMATION PROVIDED

CHURCH DIRECTORY LISTING & SPIRITUAL NEWS SPONSORED IN PART BY:

Farmers
Edge

BUCKEYE

Fountain City
Christian School

Veterinary Hospital

Providing
Academic Excellence,
Christian Dedication,
Community Involvement,
International Commitment,
Spiritual Formation

03422 SR 49 North, Edgerton


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C -Store
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For information call


419-636-2333

419-298-2385

1432 Whitaker Way, Montpelier


419-485-5668

River of Life
Worship Center
Pastor Homer Miller
14226 US Hwy 20-A Montpelier 419-485-5029

Sunday: Praise & Worship - 9:30 a.m.


Wednesday Evening - 7:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE - 27

MORE GENERAL AREA NEWS

North Western Electric Co-op Members See


Why New EPA Regulations Wont Help

PHOTO BY T.J. HUG, STAFF

LETS HAVE A LOOK ... Members of the North Western Electric Cooperative pose for a picture before entering the Cardinal Plant
located in Brillant, Ohio. There, the members saw the new and innovative ways in which coal is made safer for the environment.

By: T.J. Hug


THE VILLAGE REPORTER
People have until October 16 to let
their voices be heard.
Thats the last day of the comment
period in regards to new regulations
announced by the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) on June 2 of
this year. The Action.Coop movement
would like for those unhappy with
the new policy, known as the Clean
Power Plan, to take advantage of this

opportunity to express their opinions


on the matter. Theyve wasted little time
doing so themselves.
Implementing the rule would be
costly to the American Economy, a flier
put out by the movement maintains,
while providing little, if any, benefit to
the global climate.
The main issue that has them up in
arms is the reliance upon natural gas,
as well as the reduction in coal usage,
to generate electricity. According to

Action Coop, this will increase costs


to businesses, potentially leading to
job loss, create a $40 increase to the
average Ohio Co-op member, and even
substantially raise the cost of electricity
to everyday Ohioans.
Another part of their argument is that
these changes wont make a significant
impact on the environment anyway.
According to the EPAs own research,
the rule will reduce carbon dioxide
emissions by less than one percent, yet

will cost at least somewhere in the range


of $4.2 to $8.8 billion to enact.
Action.Coop also points out that
Ohio co-ops, after investing over $1
billion possess one of the cleanest coal
burning units in the world. The fact that
coal also has a proven track record of
price stability, something that cant be
said of natural gas, is also mentioned by
Action.Coop.
Even Global Science Report has made
the claim that the Clean Power Plan, by
the year 2100, would only reduce the
rise in global temperatures by less than
two one-hundredths of a degree.
Members of the Bryan North
Western Electric Cooperative saw one
of the efficient new burners first hand
when they toured the Cardinal Plant in
Brillant, Ohio. Learning all about the
Low nitrogen oxide burners and how they
reduce emissions by sixty percent. They
also saw how Electrostatic precipators
removed ninety-nine percent of all fly
ash particles, typically produced by coal
combustion. They even saw how the
Cardinal Station used an automated
system to continuously monitor stack
gas emissions, ensuring the stations
compliance with clean air requirements
already dictated by the EPA.
Indeed, the trip showed North
Western members exactly why the Clean
Power Plan and its movement away
from coal usage seems a bit extreme
and likely unnecessary.
Its safe to say theyll probably be
speaking up before October 16.
T.J. Hug may be reached at
publisher@thevillagereporter.com

THE VILLAGE REPORTER


SERVING WILLIAMS & FULTON COUNTIES AND BEYOND
FULTON
WILLIAMS

GET YOUR AD SEEN IN THE VILLAGE REPORTER! YOUR AD WILL BE VIEWED BY


THOUSANDS OF SUBSCRIBERS AND READERS IN WILLIAMS & FULTON COUNTIES, AS
WELL AS VIEWED ONLINE ON OUR WEBSITE! TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD 24 HOURS
A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK, VISIT US ONLINE AT WWW.THEVILLAGEREPORTER.COM. YOU
MAY ALSO CALL OUR MAIN OFFICE AT (419) 485-4851. PLEASE NOTE THAT CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENT (PREPAID ONLY) IS DUE THE FRIDAY BEFORE PUBLICATION AT 5PM.

$8 FOR 1-20 WORDS, $10 FOR 20-40 WORDS; +$2 FOR EACH 20-WORD BLOCK

Wanted

Help Wanted

WANTED TO BUY - Junk cars & trucks, dead or alive, top


dollar $ paid. 419-708-1615, 419-335-1358.

LPN HOME CARE

Storage
STORAGE - West Unity Storage Units for Rent. Month To
Month Rates - Call 419/924-5007. 10x20 $49 10x10 $38

For Sale
FOR SALE - 1997 Chevy Astro Van. Runs great. 200,000+
miles. Third row seats. $1,300 OBO. Similar van pictured.
Montpelier, Ohio.

PRN, 2nd & 3rd shift in Fulton County.

Community Health Professionals


230 Westfield Dr., Archbold
419-445-5128
www.ComHealthPro.org

HELP WANTED - KITCHEN AIDE - The Fulton County Board


of Commissioners is accepting applications for the position
of a full-time Kitchen Aide. This person will report to the
Fulton County Senior Center in Wauseon daily to perform
routine kitchen duties, maintain proper food service sanitation standards, and operate kitchen machinery. Certification, training or experience in food safety is desired. Monday
through Friday, 6:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.. The starting wage
will be $8.00 per hour. Applications will be received through
October 15, 2014. All interested candidates should send applications to the Fulton County Senior Center or visit www.
fultoncountyoh.com for more information. EEO Employer

To Place Your Classified Call 419-485-4851!

FOR SALE - Do you love history? Do you love FAYETTE?


1916 Fayette Tattler (Yearbook), good condition. $20.
419-630-4305.

Services
Cfs Chrismer
F i n a n c i a l

S e r v i c e s

Life Insurance Payroll Quarterly Reports


W2 Preparation Tax Returns

Bob Chrismer
111 Chase St. Stryker, OH

419-682-1231

rchrismer@sigmarep.com
Securities offered through Sigma Financial Corporation - Member FINRA/SIPC

Call For a FREE Quote!

Help Wanted

HELP WANTED - West Unity Subway is looking for friendly


faces to join our team. Day, evening, weekend and assistant
manager position available. Stop in for application for apply
online at subway.com.

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28 - THE VILLAGE REPORTER - YOUR HOMETOWN NEWS SOURCE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, 2014

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