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PORTLAND AND SW WASHINGTON’S ONLY MAGAZINE FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER

SW WASHINGTON’S ONLY MAGAZINE FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER FALL 2014 ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY BUILDING SOCIAL SKILLS
SW WASHINGTON’S ONLY MAGAZINE FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER FALL 2014 ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY BUILDING SOCIAL SKILLS
SW WASHINGTON’S ONLY MAGAZINE FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER FALL 2014 ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY BUILDING SOCIAL SKILLS
SW WASHINGTON’S ONLY MAGAZINE FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER FALL 2014 ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY BUILDING SOCIAL SKILLS
SW WASHINGTON’S ONLY MAGAZINE FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER FALL 2014 ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY BUILDING SOCIAL SKILLS
FALL 2014
FALL
2014

ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY

BUILDING SOCIAL SKILLS THROUGH NATURE SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY INCOME (SSDI) DIGITAL EDUCATION INCLUSIVE CHILD CARE QIGONG SENSORY TRAINING INSTITUTE

Special Needs Planning Every parent of a special needs child asks themselves “What will happen

Special Needs Planning

Special Needs Planning Every parent of a special needs child asks themselves “What will happen to
Special Needs Planning Every parent of a special needs child asks themselves “What will happen to
Special Needs Planning Every parent of a special needs child asks themselves “What will happen to
Special Needs Planning Every parent of a special needs child asks themselves “What will happen to
Special Needs Planning Every parent of a special needs child asks themselves “What will happen to

Every parent of a special needs child asks themselves

Every parent of a special needs child asks themselves “What will happen to my child when
Every parent of a special needs child asks themselves “What will happen to my child when

“What will happen to my child when we’re gone?”

We can help you find the answers

Special Needs Trusts Guardianships and Conservatorships Sorting Out SSI & Medicaid Asset Protection Plans Wills Living Trusts Financial
Guardianships and Conservatorships Special Needs Trusts Sorting Out SSI & Medicaid Asset Protection Plans Wills Living Trusts Financial Powers
Sorting Out SSI & Medicaid Special Needs Trusts Guardianships and Conservatorships Asset Protection Plans Wills Living Trusts Financial Powers of
Asset Protection Plans Trusts Guardianships and Conservatorships Sorting Out SSI & Medicaid Wills Living Trusts Financial Powers of Attorney
Wills Living Trusts Financial Powers of AttorneySpecial Needs Trusts Guardianships and Conservatorships Sorting Out SSI & Medicaid Asset Protection Plans

Plans Wills Living Trusts Financial Powers of Attorney To order a free copy of our Legal/Financial
Plans Wills Living Trusts Financial Powers of Attorney To order a free copy of our Legal/Financial
Plans Wills Living Trusts Financial Powers of Attorney To order a free copy of our Legal/Financial
Plans Wills Living Trusts Financial Powers of Attorney To order a free copy of our Legal/Financial
Plans Wills Living Trusts Financial Powers of Attorney To order a free copy of our Legal/Financial

To order a free copy of our Legal/Financial Planning Guide, call (503) 245-0894 or visit our website at naylaw.com

call (503) 245-0894 or visit our website at naylaw.com Planning for your family tree 6500 SW
call (503) 245-0894 or visit our website at naylaw.com Planning for your family tree 6500 SW

Planning for your family tree

our website at naylaw.com Planning for your family tree 6500 SW Macadam Ave., Suite 300 |
our website at naylaw.com Planning for your family tree 6500 SW Macadam Ave., Suite 300 |

6500 SW Macadam Ave., Suite 300 | Portland, OR 97239-3565 Ph: 503.245.0894 | Fax: 503.245.1562 | www.naylaw.com

Ph: 503.245.0894 | Fax: 503.245.1562 | www.naylaw.com Helping families withspecial needs kids provide security and

Helping families withspecial needs kids provide security and quality of life since 1984

| www.naylaw.com Helping families withspecial needs kids provide security and quality of life since 1984 Member:

Member:

| www.naylaw.com Helping families withspecial needs kids provide security and quality of life since 1984 Member:

contents

contents Inclusive child care FEATURED SECTIONS Lifespan 8 Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) Navigating the hurdles

Inclusive child care

FEATURED SECTIONS

Lifespan

8
8

Social Security Disability Income (SSDI)

Navigating the hurdles of applying for SSDI with an autism diagnosis.

Recreation

12
12

Building social skills through nature

Getting outdoors presents the perfect opportunity for practicing social skills.

14
14

Using boffer to build relationships

Autism advocate Jonathan Chase leads simulated handheld combat using padded mock weapons.

Education

17
17

Bullying 101

Forging strong skills and strategies to combat bullying .

18
18

Digital education

Tapping into digital options for learning.

20
20

Inclusive child care

Finding the right fit for a special needs child.

Health & Wellness

FALL 2014

24
24

Dressing to accommodate sensory sensitivities

Breaking down Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) and ways to find accommodating clothing.

25
25

“My Turn”

One story of life with autism.

Therapy

28
28

Animal-assisted therapy

The many benefits of using animals as a therapeutic option.

30
30

Qigong

Finding relief of autism symptoms through touch.

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FROM the PUBLISHER
FROM the PUBLISHER

Road trips. Weekend staycations. Swimming pools. Family movie nights. Summer is winding down and the new school year is in full swing. I dubbed our 2014 summer “White Knuckle Summer,” intent of loosening the grip on the rigid routine and embracing unexpected adventures. Following his lead, my son demonstrated some nice strides in practicing some flexiblity and trying new things.

Last minute playdates? Check. Pack a picnic and head to the river? Check. Stay in pajamas all day and watch movies? Check. Our family relished in the flexible schedule and witnessed some marked growing and bonding—by all of us.

As school doors reopen, many families search for ways to supplement their child’s education. Traditional brick and mortar K-12 schooling isn’t for everyone. Flip to page 18 to read about some options for digital education, from full-time online schooling to supplementing certain areas of need. There are literally hundreds of options to find individualized ways to tailor your child’s education—from the comfort of home.

Individualized? Check. Lots of options? Check.

And as children head back into the classroom and navigate social hierarchies, opportunities for bullying begin to creep up. We review some strategies to empower children to become self-advocates and also create an open dialogue with educators and other families. Occupational therapist Joanna Blanchard reviews tips for setting personal boundaries and preventing children from becoming a target for bullying.

Empowering? Check. Collaborative approach? Check.

So, while we return to the routine, I hope that our “white knuckle” experiment this summer will begin to have some ripple effects. It was a nice trial to see not just what my son is capable of, but our entire family as a unit.

Balance? Check. Progress? Double-check.

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family as a unit. Balance? Check. Progress? Double-check. 4 Courtney Freitag Founder and publisher www.

Courtney Freitag Founder and publisher

Freitag Founder and publisher www. spectrumsmagazine .com FALL 2014 | VOLUME 2, ISSUE 3 SPECTRUMS MAGAZINE

FALL 2014 | VOLUME 2, ISSUE 3

SPECTRUMS MAGAZINE LLC Courtney Freitag, Founder and Publisher

Mailing address:

1722 NW Raleigh Street, Suite 422 Portland, Oregon 97210 Phone: (971) 998-5967 • Fax: (971) 327-6702 www.SpectrumsMagazine.com courtney@spectrumsmagazine.com

Connect with us online!

/SpectrumsMagazinecourtney@spectrumsmagazine.com Connect with us online! @SpectrumsMag SpectrumsMag Editorial Advisory Board:

@SpectrumsMagConnect with us online! /SpectrumsMagazine SpectrumsMag Editorial Advisory Board: Genevieve Athens,

SpectrumsMagConnect with us online! /SpectrumsMagazine @SpectrumsMag Editorial Advisory Board: Genevieve Athens, Michael Brooke,

Editorial Advisory Board:

Genevieve Athens, Michael Brooke, Amy Donaldson, Karen Krejcha and Jody Wright

Spectrums Magazine LLC makes no warranty, guarantee, endorsement or promotion of any service, provider or therapy option listed in this publication or its website (www. spectrumsmagazine.com). This is a free community magazine created as a courtesy to the public. Spectrums Magazine LLC cannot be held liable for any action or decision based upon information found in this publication or the magazine’s website. It is the responsible of individuals to discuss any therapy or treatment option with the care team. Every effort is made to ensure accuracy and verify information, however readers using this information do so at their own risk. No part of this publication maybe reproduced or transmitted without prior written consent from the publisher. ©2014 All rights reserved.

ON OUR COVER

from the publisher. ©2014 All rights reserved. ON OUR COVER Animal-assisted therapy, has long been used

Animal-assisted therapy, has long been used in the autism community to establish independence and create connection. Equine therapy, such as our featured cover photo, uses horses to aid those on the spectrum.

Read more about animal-assisted therapy on page 28.

Open 7 Days a Week 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Speech Therapy Occupational Therapy Play/Social Skills Training

Open 7 Days a Week 9 a.m.-6 p.m.

Speech Therapy

Occupational

Therapy

Play/Social Skills Training

Academic Tutoring

Private OT Gyms

Dedicated Outdoor Therapy Space

Low Sensory Waiting Room Available

Self-Care Teaching Room

Practitioners work as independent businesses

1700 NW 167 th Place, Suite 220 • Beaverton, OR 97006 • (503) 985-9527 www.thecenterforhealthandperformance.com

220 • Beaverton, OR 97006 • (503) 985-9527 www.thecenterforhealthandperformance.com www. spectrumsmagazine .com 5
220 • Beaverton, OR 97006 • (503) 985-9527 www.thecenterforhealthandperformance.com www. spectrumsmagazine .com 5

5

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lifespan

IDEAS AND TOPICS FOR ALL

AGES AND STAGES

IN THIS SECTION

IDEAS AND TOPICS FOR ALL AGES AND STAGES IN THIS SECTION Social Security Disability Income (SSDI)

Social Security Disability Income (SSDI)

www.spectrumsmagazine.com

8

Dental care for families of children with special needs Make a trip to the dentist

Dental care for families of children with special needs

Make a trip to the dentist more smile-worthy.

At Providence Specialty Pediatric Dental Clinic, children and young adults receive excellent dental care in a safe, fun environment. Our dentists and staff welcome patients ages birth to 26 with behavioral, developmental and medical needs, and their siblings too. We’re changing the world of special-needs pediatric dentistry, one smile at a time!

For more information, call 503-215-1056 or visit www.ProvidenceOregon.org/pediatricdental.

Providence Child Center • 830 NE 47th Ave. • Portland, OR 97213

Providence Child Center offers families of children with special needs comprehensive services through Swindells Resource
Providence Child Center offers families of children with special needs comprehensive services through Swindells
Resource Center, Providence Neurodevelopmental Center for Children and the Center for Medically Fragile Children.
www.spectrumsmagazine.com
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LIFESPAN

Social Security Disability Income (SSDI):

Understanding coverage for those with autism

By Melissa Kenney, Esq.

When you (or someone you love) have autism, attending school or working in a neurotypical world can be overwhelming. Attention deficits, sensory and muscle motion problems, and social/communication misunderstandings can prevent one from being able to independently adapt and perform work or school tasks in typical environments. The Social Security Administration (SSA) considers autism a complete disability in children and adults when certain criteria are met.

But how will you know if you should even apply? If you have a young adult who is about to turn 18, you may be scared that he or she might not qualify for disability help even though your young adult does not have the skills to obtain or hold a job. And if you yourself have autism, you might wonder whether it is autism preventing you from succeeding in a job or whether you just need to find that perfect fit instead.

Here is what SSA looks for when evaluating children, young adults and adults on the spectrum. Let’s use Abe, a male with a spectrum disorder, as our example.

Children on the spectrum.

Families eligible to receive Medicaid and/or food stamps often fit SSA’s allowable income limit. Abe’s parents would first need to see if they qualify financially. Then, to decide if Abe is disabled under SSA regulations, SSA needs evidence from a doctor (Ph.D., Psy.D., or M.D.) and medical records with clinical findings and test results.

SSA also looks at detailed statements from family/ friends, caretakers, therapists and teachers. The medical evidence from the doctor, based on teacher or treating therapy reports, parent reports and independent testing. Statements from others must identify that Abe has deficits in reciprocal social interaction (e.g., doesn’t know how to play with others, still engages in parallel play beyond typical age), deficits in communication (e.g., at least 1 ½ to 2 standard deviations below the mean for his age), deficits in age-appropriate imaginative play or concepts as well as restricted activities and interests.

Abe’s doctors must then provide an assessment opinion showing how these deficits cause serious limitations in at least two of the following areas of functioning:

communication/cognitive functioning, social functioning, personal functioning, and/or sustaining concentration, persistence or pace.

Most parents think their child qualifies for disability only

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because she or he is diagnosed with autism or Asperger’s syndrome. This is not the case. Below is an example showing how Abe likely will NOT qualify for disability:

Abe’s parents applied for Abe’s SSI because they lost their home, assets and income due to Abe’s mother’s medical problems when Abe turned 11. As an 11-year-old, Abe’s attention problems in class caused poor grades except in his favorite class (math). Abe was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome when younger, but no longer met DSM-5 criteria for autism. In spite of occasional irritability caused by being around certain lighting or sounds, Abe can talk to others to share ideas and complete schoolwork with reminders to stay on task.

Abe has two friends from special education classes who also share similar interests. Although Abe gets anxious about changes, he doesn’t blow up or hit others when faced with a change in routine. Abe can’t make small talk and appears shy, but all his teachers say he is easygoing and polite in class, even when inattentive. Finally, Abe is fully toilet trained, doesn’t wet the bed and can bathe, feed and dress himself without help, although his parents have to give him reminders.

In the above example, SSI would deny Abe’s disability application because his spectrum disorder doesn’t cause serious problems in his functioning in school, having friends, communicating, or self care. Based on these facts alone, Abe would appear to have moderate problems at best.

Young adults on the spectrum.

SSA determines an adult is disabled if she or he either is severely impaired and meets SSA’s definition of autism impairment, OR if an adult with autism can’t do the work at his/her education level or training or work simple enough to learn within 30 days or less.

When Abe turned 18, different medical and non-medical rules determine if Abe qualifies for SSI disability. His parent’s income does not count; only his income and resources (which can include free room and board if he still lives with his family). Our Abe is intelligent, but needs a lot of supports and reminders to stay on task for a job, remain physically clean and to interact appropriately with others.

(SSA does NOT consider whether Abe could successfully interview to obtain a job, but SSA can look at evidence showing Abe’s lack of social skills prevent him from

Continued on next page

Social Security, continued from page 8

working well with coworkers, supervisors and the public).

SSA needs evidence to decide if Abe’s limitations prevent him from being successful at competitive employment— as opposed to a sheltered work environment where disabilities are accommodated by the employer, and performance is not measured against neurotypical people.

In general, Abe must prove he is too disabled to work with (1) medical records and testing results; (2) school IEPs and functional assessments; (3) his testimony describing his limitations (which should parallel with what he tells his doctors, therapists, or is demonstrated in assessments); and (4) witness descriptions of his problems and limitations in social interactions, self care, persistence and pace on tasks or hobbies.

Because Abe is so young, Abe should be enrolled in vocational rehabilitation, and, very importantly, should obtain a vocational assessment. Abe’s vocational assessment should contain a summary of his medical history, testing results and opinions, summary of his IEP goals that were achieved and not achieved, and what jobs, if any, Abe can perform with his limitation.

If his vocational assessment says Abe can only work part- time because of his limits, or requires sheltered work that permits constant redirection and a reduced work pace below normal, then Abe’s vocational assessment provides strong evidence that Abe is unable to work full-time in competitive employment. If Abe obtained disability, SSA likely would review his case every several years to see if Abe learned enough skills (whether educational or adaptive skills) to be able to work in spite of his disabling condition.

Older adults on the spectrum.

Imagine if Abe’s loving parents owned a small quiet corner market where Abe would help out by running a cash register, stocking shelves and answering phones. The store rarely had more than three to five customers at a time. Abe wasn’t really very good at the job because he needed a lot of reminders, was slow and couldn’t make eye contact with customers, but since everyone knew him, people were patient.

Abe tried living on his own, but was kicked out of his apartment because he never cleaned the place and it attracted vermin. Abe rarely bathed, too, and his brother always brought him clean laundry because Abe never remembered to do it himself. When Abe turned 40, his parents closed the store and retired. Abe tried to find work: with his high school education, some vocational training and experience at his parent’s store, no one hired him. He decided to apply for disability.

Under SSA regulations, the same proof that Abe needed at 18 still applies. In addition, Abe should also get witness statements from third parties that are not his family, such as former customers, neighbors, or family friends

Vocational assessments should indicate limitations, a requirement for sheltered work or a reduced pace as strong evidence for SSDI.

who can describe Abe’s limitations they personally observed. They should be able to describe limitations in concentration, pace and persistence at tasks, social interactions and self-care. If a medical professional or therapist observed these same limitations, they should be fully documented in Abe’s medical, therapy and/or vocational records as well.

Finally, if Abe was over the age of 18 and diagnosed with autism before age 22, he can get additional financial benefits through his retired or deceased parent’s SSDI, as long as he never married.

In our practice, the biggest hurdles for our clients with autism are that they possess exceptional gifts and intelligence, but also possess significant limitations in self-care, ability to work with others and ability to stay on task. Many of our clients succeeded in college only due to a sheltered parental home environment where others made sure basic hygiene standards, class registration and attendance take place.

Because of their parents’ well-intentioned supports, our clients with autism get an education, but are unable to transfer their education to an independent work environment. Most SSI analysts and administrative law judges see only high IQ scores, and conclude that a high IQ shows an ability to work. As such, parents and family need to be sure to provide SSA college attendance records, journals, receipts and other records. These should demonstrate that their adult children receive significant social, self-care and work supports from family and community.

Melissa Kenney, Esq. is a member of KP Law, PC, a social security and veteran’s disability law firm providing representation throughout the Pacific Northwest. In addition to pas work for people with disabilities and involvement in disability rights groups, Melissa is also a proud parent to her neurotypical step-daughter, her spectrum son and her neurotypical daughter.

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recreation

INCLUSIVE WAYS TO HAVE FUN

IN THIS SECTION

recreation INCLUSIVE WAYS TO HAVE FUN IN THIS SECTION Building social skills through nature 12 Boffer:

Building social skills through nature

12

Boffer: weaponry that teaches

14

Spectacular Smiles. Superior Service. As a team, we are committed to providing a unique professional
Spectacular Smiles.
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As a team, we are committed to providing a
unique professional experience in a loving and
caring atmosphere. We tailor all of our
treatments to fit the individual patient, so
when you complete your treatment you have
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www.dischingerteam.com • (503) 635-4439
Therapy for kids with individual differences and sensory needs. “We have been on this road

Therapy for kids with individual differences and sensory needs.

“We have been on this road of autism therapy for eight years now, and after visiting countless clinics both in Oregon and California, it is my sincere and humble opinion that the love and care we received at Sensory Kids is truly unparalleled.” — Searmi, parent and client at Sensory Kids

Family-Centered, Child-Driven, Therapist-Led

Occupational Therapy Speech-Language Therapy Counseling Dance-Movement Therapy Ongoing Parent Support and Parent Counseling Groups

Therapy Ongoing Parent Support and Parent Counseling Groups 1425 N Killingsworth Street, Portland www.sensorykidsot.com

1425 N Killingsworth Street, Portland www.sensorykidsot.com • (503) 575-9402

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RECREATION

Building social skills through

Building social skills through

social skills through Building social skills through By Elizabeth Sautter, M.A. CCC-SLP Outdoor activities foster
social skills through Building social skills through By Elizabeth Sautter, M.A. CCC-SLP Outdoor activities foster
social skills through Building social skills through By Elizabeth Sautter, M.A. CCC-SLP Outdoor activities foster
social skills through Building social skills through By Elizabeth Sautter, M.A. CCC-SLP Outdoor activities foster

By Elizabeth Sautter, M.A. CCC-SLP

Outdoor activities foster opportunities for exploring new things, building imagination and increasing social competence. Getting in touch with nature gives your child a chance for outdoor play and exploration, and also offers teachable moments where you can nurture social and emotional skills. Next time you are outdoors, practice one of these activities with your child:

Nature Walk

Why not build social skills while also getting some exercise? While walking, help your child make observations about the environment. What does it mean about a family if there are toys on their front porch or a doghouse in the yard? After the walk, your child can practice sharing information by telling other family members what’s new in the neighborhood.

Social Spying

While at the park, help your child build “social detective” skills by observing others and trying to determine their relationship to one another (e.g., mom and daughter,

grandma and grandpa, etc.). Help your child understand the clues that show how people are connected, such as their body language and what they say to one another.

“I Spy”

This is an activity you can do in your own backyard or while walking. Begin by making smart guesses about what you and your child are seeing. For example, to describe a ladybug you would say, “I spy something red with black spots.” It will be up to the child to ask questions and determine what you are looking at.

Scavenger Hunt

In your backyard or another outdoor location, place clues around and have the child hunt for them to find the final prize. Start out with a verbal hint such as, “The first clue is under Dad’s favorite lawn chair.” If needed, help the child figure out the meaning of a clue. Being able to search for clues and follow directions supports social competence.

Continued on next page

Getting in touch with nature gives your child a chance for outdoor play and exploration, and also offers teachable moments where you can nurture social and emotional skills.

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Nature, continued from page 14

Find Your Green Thumb

Gardening is a great outdoor activity to enjoy as a family. First, decide where to garden and what your child will plant. Whether you’re growing flowers, herbs, or vegetables, teach your child what is required to make them grow (water, sunshine, care, etc.). Create a schedule so your child will know when to water the seeds or plants. Your child will learn that it takes a lot of responsibility and nurturing to keep something alive, and it takes patience to watch it grow.

Get Artsy

At a park, beach, or in your backyard, create art using natural materials. Sticks, rocks, leaves, acorns, sand and shells are all terrific art supplies. Your child can practice planning and sequencing by imagining the artwork and then gathering the needed materials. Collaborating with a friend or sibling provides a chance to practice cooperation and perspective taking. And, your child can practice flexibility if a creation falls down, blows away, or doesn’t turn out quite as expected.

Not only will practicing social skills outdoors encourage your child to appreciate nature, but it will also increase observation skills that will carry over into other social situations. Remember, whether you are in your own backyard or far from home, there is a teachable moment waiting. Most of the activities described here and many others can be found in my book, Make Social Learning Stick!

Elizabeth Sautter, M.A. CCC-SLP is co-director and co-owner of Communication Works (cwtherapy.com), a private practice in Oakland, Calif., offering speech, language, social and occupational therapy. She is the co-author of the Whole Body Listening Larry (socialthinking.com) books. Her most recent book is Make Social Learning Stick! How to Guide and Nurture Social Competence through Everyday Routines and Activities (aapcpublishing.net).

Follow her on Facebook: /Make-Social-Learning-Stick and on Twitter @ MakeSocialStick.

SHARE PHOTOS OF YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURES ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE!
SHARE PHOTOS OF YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURES ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE!
Twitter @ MakeSocialStick. SHARE PHOTOS OF YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURES ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE! www. spectrumsmagazine .com

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RECREATION

BOFFER: WEAPONRY THAT TEACHES

Group activity teaches leadership and spatial awareness

By Robert Parish

Jonathan Chase is an autism advocate, professional musician, TEDx presenter, board member of the Autism Society of Oregon and mentor to ASD parents and children. Obviously, the 31-year-old Portland resident has a wide range of diverse talents and special interests.

One of his interests, by any standard, is very special.

Several times a year, Jonathan, who was diagnosed with Asperger syndrome when he was 14, organizes playful interactive educational events called “Boffer Workshops.”

That’s not a typo. The word is “Boffer.”

So, what’s a “Boffer Workshop?” Jonathan’s definition:

“Light contact battles with foam armaments designed to challenge individuals ages 10-30+ in a fun, safe collaborative environment.”

In other words, live-action, non-life-threatening role- playing.

Boffer armaments are handmade replicas of medieval swords, shields and hammers—think Mel Gibson’s personal hand-held arsenal in the movie Braveheart. Unlike the real thing, boffer weapons do not harm or maim. In fact, when one is struck by a boffer sword, laughter often follows the blow.

“It was a hobby I had as a teenager,” Jonathan recalls. “My best friend John and I would build these things with our friends and have sword fights. When I started working in the autism community with teens and young adults through my mentoring business, I was looking for different activities.”

One day, while meeting with a client, Jonathan decided to bring out one of his old foam swords for inspection and discussion. His client’s interest was strong, and the result was spectacular.

Before long, the teenager who had trouble connecting with people he didn’t know, was running around in a field swinging a sword. “It lit a spark,” Jonathan says.

From there, Jonathan started organizing and running group classes outdoors around Portland in the summertime. The group is actively looking for a donated space to hold workshops indoors during the fall and winter months.

“The weapons are silly. They’re bright colored foam and tape and cloth swords, shields and axes,” Jonathan says.

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“At the most basic level, it’s fun. It’s a physical activity for people who are not physical and athletic. Everybody gets to win, and everybody loses. On a deeper level, I see it as a window I can use it to open up and teach things that are hard to teach without a good context.”

Jonathan notes that his boffer workshops aren’t all fun and games. Boffering teaches receptive language, group strategy, leadership and spatial awareness.

“It’s a fun group activity. But, on a deeper level, I can use it to teach critical skills to the population that needs it the most. In a way, that’s fun.”

For more information, or if you have a indoor space to donate, please contact jonathan@jonathanchase.net.

Robert Parish is an autism activist and filmmaker who lives in Portland. His autism awareness films and books can be found on the web at: www.comebackjack.org. He is regular content contributor to Portland Radio Project, www.prp.fm.

John Rahberger (left) and Jonathan Chase, friends since second grade, hold their handmade weaponry.

[Photo by Robert Parish]

PlaySpace where kids connect T herapeutic social skills groups for developing: Engagement Cooperation Communication

PlaySpace

where kids connect

Therapeutic social skills groups for developing:

Engagement Cooperation Communication Pretend play Friendships

Cooperation Communication Pretend play Friendships All groups at PlaySpace are designed to meet the needs of

All groups at PlaySpace are designed to meet the needs of children ages 3-10 years who are experiencing communication, social, sensory and behavioral challenges.

Groups run year round and can be billed to insurance

Contact us for more information:

Call: 503.224.2820 Email: info@pdxplayspace.com Visit: www.pdxplayspace.com

1727 NE 13th Avenue • Portland, Oregon 97212

Visit: www.pdxplayspace.com 1727 NE 13th Avenue • Portland, Oregon 97212 www. spectrumsmagazine .com 15

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education

KNOWLEDGE TO EMPOWER FAMILIES AND PEOPLE ON THE SPECTRUM

IN THIS SECTION

EMPOWER FAMILIES AND PEOPLE ON THE SPECTRUM IN THIS SECTION   Bullying Digital education Inclusive child
 

Bullying Digital education Inclusive child care

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18

20

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BULLYING 101:

Strategies for self-advocacy and prevention

By Joanna Blanchard, OTR/L

During elementary school, our family was able to partner with school staff to navigate most of the social issues that cropped up. However, middle school and high school

is a totally different story for any child. For those with

difficulty processing social cues in the first place, it can be very challenging.

Our oldest child, now entering seventh-grade, is on the very high end of the autism spectrum, coupled with intense ADHD. In the past, it seemed his lack of awareness about what his peers thought was a blessing. He didn’t worry about it, so neither did I.

Now that he’s more aware of social norms, things that other kids have moved past at this age still cut him deeply and cause anxiety. He often feels blind-sided, despite years of social groups and therapy.

To help educate his peers, I’ve shown a video in his elementary classroom about bullying, talked about autism, drawn tangled neurons to emphasize that a person with autism has a bigger brain. This presentation was always as enlightening for me as it is for the kids—all who had the most amazing insights and questions.

However, older kids tend to be more sophisticated and guarded about what they say in front of each other. This is challenging to approach talking about the subject without sounding “preachy.” I am not sure what to look for or say within an older, savvy group of kids to encourage social inclusion.

“I’m not sure we can prevent bullying,” says Lori Ohama,

a fourth-grade teacher in the Battle Ground School

District and parent of two teens. “But we need to inform our kids of different forms of bullying, how to respond and make sure schools take it seriously.” She recommends parents and educators address each incident individually and promptly to ensure students that adults within the system will not fail them.

Mark Moy, owner and head instructor at Moy Martial Arts and Tai Chi in Vancouver, has several tips to prevent bullying, and suggests scenario training with your child, asking: “What would you do if…”

He also advises parents to have a “permission talk” with kids, giving your kids permission to say no to other people, setting personal boundaries and preventing being an easy target.

Another important prevention technique is to take time to talk to your child about his or her day, which is often a challenge for children with autism. Making sure to communicate with school staff regularly via email, journal, or in-person is important, especially for non- verbal students.

If you are able to volunteer at your child’s school, it allows you to begin putting faces to the names of kids that your child talks about. Getting to know your child’s classmates first-hand enables you to help your child interpret difficult things, including tone of voice and sarcasm, and help you find solutions together.

Some effective mantras our family has practiced over the include, “Fly under the radar like a stealth bomber” or “Lions look for the scared zebra,” which keeping a low profile, even if you want to be part of the action. Loud, silly, over-reactive, or attention-seeking behavior can call attention, attracting bullies.

There are often indicators when your child is being bullied. These can be subtle and especially challenging to see in non-verbal individuals.

Both Ohama and Moy say to look for changes in behavior, such as avoidance or withdrawal from participation in class or at recess.

Moy and stopbullying.gov also list the following red flags:

• Unexplained injuries

• Unexplained damage or loss of personal items, including electronics, clothing, books or jewelry

• Negative self-talk, such as “I’m stupid” or “I feel like killing myself”

• Self-destructive behaviors, such as harming themselves or wanting to run away

• Declining grades, avoidance of friends

• Frequent headaches, stomach aches, or faking illness

• Difficulty sleeping, nightmares

• Loss of appetite, unexplained gain in appetite or binge eating (could be hungry from missing or avoiding lunch)

Responding to actual bullying is stressful for everyone involved. Ohama recommends approaching administration consistently with every single incident.

“Every time that something happens you have to email, call, or do both,” she says. “No matter what, you have to

Continued on page 21

17

EDUCATION

DIGITAL EDUCATION:

An alternative to traditional learning

By Alexis Morley

As many parents of children on the autism spectrum

will attest, traditional school settings may present the challenge of a one-size-fits-all approach to education. Several factors can inhibit the learning experience for

a student with autism: teachers moving too quickly

through material, multiple transitions throughout the day and general overall social requirements.

By being able to learn at an individual pace and adapt to unique learning abilities and style, online students can take extra time to absorb information without the pressure of holding back a whole class. Learning online can provide deeper instruction in specific areas of need, whereas some teachers in a traditional setting are constricted by time and a high student ratio.

Luckily, there are a number of alternate options offering

Alternatively, students who are able to move through

Some families are unable to commit to the time it takes

a

different pace and path to education. Online education

subjects quickly no longer grow bored or distracted

is

one option and can provide either supplemental or full-

waiting for other students to complete a lesson.

time instruction for students with ASD.

Time4Learning is designed to let students separate their

At first glance, the world of online education can be vast and overwhelming. One way to determine which option provides the best support for your child is to consider if you’re looking for the entirety of his or her’s education to be online, or if you’re looking for more supplemental opportunities.

math and English work rates to approach learning each subject at different rates as needed.

for full-time online education. Therefore, using online education as a supplement to what is already being taught during the day might be a better fit.

For those looking to get out of the physical classroom completely, organizations like Connections Academy or Time4Learning offer complete curriculums for parents to use at home.

Connections Academy is a free, online public school where students in grades K-12 study both the basics, as well as electives in areas such as art history or technology. Supplemental field trips and online forums allow students to connect with others in small, contained groups.

Time4Learning, an online paid service specifically geared toward students with autism, also provides pre-K-12 students with the core subjects and electives in economics or health. Both programs allow users to work at their own pace, highlighting a reason that online education is a good fit for students with autism.

18

Autism Expressed is a company that works to add additional information to the current K-12 standard curriculum. While many students on the autism spectrum are well-versed in digital gaming and online videos, Autism Expressed tries to supplement general digital and Internet skills.

Jobs today, and increasingly many of our social interactions, rely an understanding of the nuances of digital literacy. With a curriculum specifically geared towards ‘tween and teens on the spectrum, Autism Expressed hopes to “teach digital skills that can support students as they move through school and onto higher education, jobs and overall independence.”

Just like full-time online schooling, modules are student- driven and self-paced to allow an individualized rate of learning. They start with Internet basics and move through to more advanced skills, like safely interacting

Continued on next page

Digital, continued from page 18

on social media. Students finish with a completed online portfolio showcasing their skills and abilities that they can take to future job interviews or attach to college applications.

This extra instructional time for Internet basics can include online social skills, how to organize an electronic calendar and being able to organize thoughts in a computer program before writing a paper.

The development of apps for use with a smartphone, such as an Android or iPhone ® , along with software, are other ways to boost your child’s educational experience. There are apps that address social communication, such as QuickCues by Fraser, language, like FaceUp Matching and functional skills, like Chore Pad HD.

Other apps are available to aid in reading skills, learning pronouns, increasing vocabulary and identifying emotions. One thing to consider when selecting an app, or really any online education program, is the research and efficacy behind the app. There are plenty of entertainment apps, (AngryBirds, anyone?), however ultimately they don’t expand your student’s academic skills.

Other apps and online programs will weave proven therapy methods, such as Applied Behavior Analysis. A good approach to find the best apps for your child is to speak with a clinician or educator. Often a professional’s suggestion can offer apps that are tailored to a specific skill, or area of weakness, your child is working on. Several organizations will list apps, how they can help a certain area and what the evidence exists to support their use.

Online and computer-based education can be a great fit for students on the spectrum due to their unique attributes. Many programs, apps and software not only allow for students to learn through multiple sensory modalities (pictures, sounds and hands-on activities), but also provide videos that model correct behavior or skills.

Video modeling has been shown to be effective method when working with children on the spectrum. A video model, unlike a teacher in a classroom, can be paused and viewed repeatedly until a child is able to master the skill. Many programs target a connected skill in addition to addressing the main purpose of a lesson. For example, while learning how to send an e-mail, a student might also work on appropriate ways to address a friend online, or the etiquette behind sending a note to a professional colleague.

Gaining multiple skills from one lesson helps children integrate what they’ve learned into daily life better than learning in isolation. Kids can make connections they might not otherwise get if solely focused on learning one specific skill.

Alexis Morley is a second year speech-language pathology Masters student at Pacific University. In the past she’s worked in Portland State University’s Autism & Child Language Disorders Lab as well as served as a volunteer with Autism Society of Oregon. She has previously written content for Seattle Magazine and InsideJobs.com.

ADDITIONAL

RESOURCES

Time 4 Learning Special needs online education modules for K-12 students.

homeschooling_special_needs.shtml (888) 771-0914

Washington Virtual Academy Individualized online education for K-12 students. Company based in Tacoma, Wash.

(866) 548-9444

Connections Academy Free online public K-12 school www.connectionsacademy.com/home.aspx (800) 382-6010

Autism Expressed Digital skills for adolescents with autism www.autismexpressed.com

Adirondack Learning Academy Online customized K-12 education www.adirondacklearningacademy.com (800) 374-1007

Teach Town Educational products for children with autism. www.web.teachtown.com (800) 283-0165

19

INCLUSIVE CHILD CARE: Accommodating the needs of all children EDUCATION
INCLUSIVE CHILD CARE:
Accommodating the needs
of all children
EDUCATION

20

By Courtney Freitag

Finding the right person to provide respite or child care

is a common challenge for any family. However, children

that require special care or medical requirements add an extra layer of complexity.

As school doors open and students are welcomed back into the classroom, families juggle schedules that often require care for children with autism. The level of care can vary from dressing, grooming and feeding care to accommodating sensory needs, toileting and assistance with homework. However, having options and choices for a welcoming, safe environment is a critical step for children to be appreciated in a diverse setting.

There are also many benefits to early childhood and school-age children in an inclusive setting—for both the child and the caregiver.

“Inclusive child care is important because it makes child care about caring for children, not separating someone because they may be labeled as ‘different,’” says Sheila Baer, owner of Baerly Big Child Care in Tigard. “It starts with teaching tolerance for one another.”

Children with autism will require an individualized approach to their needs, being aware of how to incorporate social skills, behavioral goals and different

strategies than their neurotypical peers. Whether it is in

a group setting or a one-on-one caregiver, a reliable and

qualified provider is like an extension of your family.

Inclusive child care simply means children with and without special needs are cared for together. Addressing the specific needs of your child, and setting up parameters for proper support, is a step toward inclusivity so children on the spectrum are given a chance to meet their potential. When inclusive child care options are available, families don’t have to face potentially losing a job or be forced to be the primary caregiver for a special needs child.

First, decide what type of child care setting and option

is the best fit and what works best for your family

dynamic. There are a few varying types and each one has its own benefits depending on the needs of the child:

In-home: A daycare professional that serves the family in their home.

Home-based daycare: Small setting generally in a licensed provider’s home.

Inclusive/specialized schools: Quality care by those trained and experienced with children on the spectrum.

Depending on what type of set-up is ideal, creating a plan and outline of information is essential. The Inclusive Child Care Program outlines helpful information that will help a provider serve a child on the spectrum, such as:

• A child’s interests, special likes/dislikes and favorite activities

• A child’s strengths and abilities

• A child’s specific needs and the best way to meet them

• Any fears or concerns

• Best ways to communicate with the family

• How to keep consistency between home and the child care facility (if off-site)

• People that may be helpful to a provider, such as a therapist or specialist that works with the child

ICCP also outlines the many benefits of inclusive child care to children and youth, whether they experience a disability or not:

• Young people are not segregated. The negative effects of labeling and lack of familiarity are decreased.

• Young and school-age children have opportunities to learn from and share experiences with each other This includes positive models for learning, communication and behaviors.

• All children feel a sense of belonging.

• Children of all ages learn to appreciate diversity in others.

• When everyone participates, children have opportunities to be creative, resourceful and cooperative.

Child care providers also benefit to opening their doors or servicing families with children on the spectrum. Gaining knowledge and skills of this population allows educators to bring their knowledge to children requiring a bit of extra care, demonstrating a flexibility and understanding that each child has its own unique needs.

“I’ve always thought of myself as a caretaker,” Baer says. “So accommodating children with autism or any other ‘ability’ comes naturally. I just want children to have a fun and safe environment to be in. A child should never feel excluded for being who they are.”

Visit Spectrums Magazine’s website for a list of questions to ask a child care provider.

Bullying, continued from page 17

fight for your child that has been bullied,” she says, adding that email correspondence works best to keep a record of communication.

It is also important to talk to kids about the difference

between how to react to situations. Moy stresses that self-defense is different than fighting and uses several strategies to teach this.

“Self-defense is when I tried to ignore it or walk away, but the bully continues to physically harm me, and I physically resist,” he explains. “Fighting is when I can walk away, but don’t and lose my temper, entering a physical altercation.”

In his classes, kids repeat drills yelling, “Stop! Leave me alone! Back off!” and practice turning and walking away from imaginary bullies, as well as learning how to break holds, block hits and twist out of grabs.

For children who have difficulty communicating verbally, these phrases can be programmed into an augmentative communication device, or pictures placed on note cards to carry. Make sure your child’s school staff is aware of these options and that they are respected when used.

Both Moy and Ohama expressed the importance of making

a child feel supported when they stick up for themselves.

“If there is a zero-tolerance policy at the school, and the child gets in trouble due to defending themselves, the child needs to know that the parent will still stand by them,” Moy explains.

Ohama adds: “Kung Fu really has helped our child’s confidence and given him tools to deal with bullies. We have it on record if he has to defend himself that I am

100 percent behind him if the school is not going to take action.”

It is also important to remember that kids often don’t report bullying at all. Statistics show that only about one-third of bullying cases are reported, in part because kids don’t want to be judged as weak or be more socially isolated than they already are.

Most children will want to handle the problem on their own, particularly as their approaching adolescence. They do not want to be labeled “tattle tales” and may fear backlash from bullies or peers, according to stopbullying. gov.

Moy explains that when a bully begins bothering a child, teaching these simple points are some of the most effective in avoiding escalation of a problem:

• Ignore them and walk away

• Don’t let the bully poke, push, pinch, punch or grab me

• Use my voice: “Leave me alone”

• Report my problem to an adult that I trust

In addition to teaching the appropriate tools, ensuring open and frequent communication between you, your child and your child’s school is key to helping them to stay safe and feel supported.

Joanna Blanchard is an occupational therapist and the mother of two boys on opposite ends of the autism spectrum. She is the owner of Everybody Stims Occupational Therapy in Vancouver, Wash. She can be reached online at www.everybodystims.com or via email at joanna@ everybodystims.com.

Statistics show that only about one-third of bullying cases are reported, in part because kids don’t want to be judged as weak

or be more socially isolated than

they already are.

21

health & wellness

PROMOTING HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

IN THIS SECTION

wellness PROMOTING HEALTH AND WELL-BEING IN THIS SECTION Sensory sensitivities: helping children find comfort 24

Sensory sensitivities: helping children find comfort

24

“My Turn”

25

22

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23

HEALTH & WELLNESS

SENSORY SENSITIVITIES:

Understanding processing difficulties

24

By Susan Donohoe, OTR/L, SI/SIPT Certified

Many children on the autism spectrum experience sensory processing difficulties or sensory processing disorder (SPD). Sensory processing is the neurological processing and interpretation of sensation within one’s own body and from the environment. In short, it is the brain’s organization and interpretation of the sensory input from everyday use.

This is a complex interrelationship of processes, hence the term sensory integration. “Modulation” is a term you may hear describing the neurological process which an individual’s central nervous system appropriately regulates, and continually adjusts, behavior responses to

external and internal sensory stimuli. If this modulation

is not working well, a person with SPD may seem under

responsive, over responsive (seeking stimuli), both—or may be overwhelmed to sensory stimuli.

When this behavior interferes with an individual’s “occupation” in life (social, emotional, play, school, attention, body mechanics, self-care, etc.), then it is termed a disorder, hence sensory processing/integration disorder. Anyone and everyone have some sensory processing or integration problems from time to time. This is because any kind of sensory stimuli can temporarily disrupt one’s normal functioning.

The three main sensory systems are tactile/touch (influencing motor control and emotional development);

proprioception (sense obtain through one’s own muscles, ligaments, deep pressure to the skin that in turn give

a sense of body position, organization and calibration

of movement); and vestibular (sense of movement and gravity, specifically postural control, muscle tone, coordinated use of both sides of the body, coordinating eye movements, etc). Other sensory systems include olfactory (smell), auditory, visual and gustatory (taste).

Sensory difficulties are individual to each person and some may be mildly affected while others have greater

difficulty functioning in life. Symptoms vary and not all are present, and it is also a marker of neurological dysfunction that an individual may show symptoms one day, or with one activity, and not the next. Therapy for SPD is mainly performed by a trained sensory certified occupational therapist, and includes a safe and challenging level of sensory stimulation.

Activities are performed to encourage movement that focuses the individual on tolerating and integrating sensory input, which is driven by the individual’s

interests and the “occupation” of play. Other therapy focuses on making environmental adaptations (such as

in the home and school).

Dressing for Success!

As mentioned above, making adaptations within the child’s everyday life is also a part of understanding the child. Every child deserves to feel comfortable and confident in his or her clothing. What if that same clothing could offer qualities that address sensory discomfort and therapeutic input?

A child’s image of himself, and how he feels in his

environment, can enhance the social and emotional quality of life when that child feels organized and calm. We all have sensory qualities that make us who we are. However, when these neurological qualities interrupt our participation in life in a negative way, it should be recognized and accommodated.

There are many children with an array of diagnoses that are subject to sensory hyper- or hypo-sensitivities, motor difficulties and social differences, including autism and Asperger’s, ADHD, sensory processing disorders, anxiety and many other developmental disabilities. Why not make their clothing possess some of the very neuroscience qualities that could help enhance their social and emotional well-being?

Continued on next page

Common symptoms of SPD include: clumsiness (tripping, bumping, falling); poor fine motor skills; delayed self-care skills; poor muscle tone; difficulty initiating tasks; poor timing; poor posture; poor hand-eye coordination; learning disabilities; poor handwriting; poor organization skills; becomes easily frustrated; difficulty with social

relations; constantly touching objects; doesn’t like to be groomed; difficulty with clothing seams, socks, waistbands; seeks only soft clothes; likes tight clothing, small spaces, weight of blankets; opposed to being touched, would rather be the one to touch; hates being tickled or cuddled; often touches people or objects too hard; difficulty with eye contact; often smells objects; poor attention skills; picky eater; stuffing food or objects into mouth; difficulty with transitioning; hyper or hyposensitive to noise; hypersensitive to touch; little awareness to pain and temperature; hyposensitive to touch (may not notice when clothes are twisted or on improperly); hypersensitive to light; movement produces

an anxious reaction (swinging, roller coasters); overseeks movement (swinging, spinning,

Continued on next page

rolling); takes excessive risks in movement, extreme activity levels; walking on tiptoes.

Sensory, continued from page 24

As a mother of a child who suffered from sensory processing disorder, and as a long-time sensory pediatric occupational therapist and advocate, I know firsthand it is not easy for our children.

Parents, therapists and educators often express to me the benefits of weighed garments, chew objects, compression garments and a child’s desire for soft materials. However, they frequently state that what is offered to them is too “therapeutic looking,” and therefore, stigmatizing. It’s hard to use many of these garments throughout “normal” life.

Construction of a garment for children who suffer sensory processing difficulties should include specific consideration to address such sensitivities. These can include ease-of-function, tactile sensitivity, relevant design, safety, consistency in design for spatial orientation and proprioceptive input (the unconscious awareness of sensations coming from receptor’s in one’s joints, muscles, tendons and ligaments). These considerations help promote independence as well as organization, alertness and simplicity where quickness of dressing is often expected throughout an individual’s day.

When choosing a weighted vest or blanket, for instance, it is significant to hear the child ask specifically for the “soft one,” the “cool one,” or the “nice one.” It is equally important to give parents beautiful, easy-to-use superior fabrics that are relevant and stylish. It is the right of the individual and their parents to have non-stigmatizing products. Just as important is the idea of play, and accommodating products should express the youthful nature and playfulness inherent in children.

Respect, pleasure, playfulness, comfort and a feeling of security are aspects that can be inherent in children’s clothing. As the design of the child’s apparel and play products are considered, it is important that as many of their personal characteristics are taken into consideration, in addition to the ability for children to take some therapeutic qualities along with them anywhere all day long.

There are so many strategies that help a child with SPD. Considering the aspects of their clothing is just another way a parent can use a non-invasive strategy aimed to let the child know you understand and accept what he or she is feeling!

Susan Donohoe, OTR/L is a pediatric occupational therapist with 33 years experience and certification in Sensory Integration and SIPT testing. Through many years of active practice and working closely with educators, therapists, manufacturers, nursing and experts in design, she founded Kozie Clothes (www. kozieclothes.com) as a way to incorporate neuroscience principles into relevant designed apparel for children with special needs.

MY TURN ONE PERSON’S STORY OF LIFE WITH AUTISM
MY TURN
ONE PERSON’S STORY
OF LIFE WITH AUTISM

By Dana Woodhouse-Nagy

When my son was born on my father’s birthday, I jokingly asked if it guaranteed a place in the will. I would learn quickly that a birthday was not the only thing my son shared with his grandfather. He carries the same blue eyes and the same penchant for routine and mischief.

Dad nicknamed my son “E Man,” bellowing it from his armchair as soon as we entered their house. My son and daughter, unable to pronounce Woody, called him Papa Woo.

Ethan was a chubby, cheerful baby and toddler. He was naturally friendly, and drew people to him by giving what a friend labeled his “movie star” smile. Upon first introductions, my father scooped my son up and walked around, flipping and flopping him in that way that only grandfathers can while Ethan laughed and kicked his little legs in delight.

We celebrated Ethan’s first birthday and my father’s 62 nd together. Given my dad’s love of Tools, the theme was, appropriately, Bob the Builder. Ethan ate his first bite of cake that day, smashing it with his hand and shoving it in with no regard for decorum. “The E Man!” my dad kept exclaiming, laughing at my son while my son laughed back at him.

When Ethan began showing signs of autism, my father announced that he had sensed something was wrong for a while. He shared my disbelief and helplessness in the changes happening to Ethan, watching this beloved boy lose his smile, withdrawing into a world we couldn’t enter.

My husband and I approached the diagnosis with an attitude that we’d be part of the 30 percent recovery rate. It is always a race in the beginning and we were bereft of any village elders to tell us that it was a marathon. My father purchased CDs of sign language instruction so that we could teach Ethan. He and my stepmother came to my home for the initial workshop training with our first Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) consultant.

He listened as I talked and talked about different therapies, diets, medications, trainings and theories. However, at times I complained to my husband that it felt as if my father never trusted me to help my son. I was wrong.

My father always thought me capable of doing something once I made the commitment. He worried that I would never make

peace with my son’s autism. It took many more years for me to learn that lesson.

Continued on page 27

25

therapy

THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS FOR AUTISM

IN THIS SECTION

therapy THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS FOR AUTISM IN THIS SECTION Animal-assisted therapy 28 Qigong 30 26 www.

Animal-assisted therapy

28

Qigong

30

26

My Turn, continued from page 25 I lived in a lonely world for the first

My Turn, continued from page 25

I lived in a lonely world for the first few years after my son’s diagnosis, most of

it by choice. I couldn’t help feeling like

I was somehow walking in a different

reality. I avoided friends and refused to make new ones. I immersed myself in my family and my son’s autism.

My dad would ask me to breakfast, each call coming at 8:30 a.m. because he was a man of strict routine. Many times I would decline, make excuses of chores to be done, when in reality I was sitting on the couch reading books and trying to calm the anxieties that wracked my brain.

Four years ago my father called me to

ask if I would meet him for breakfast. After I refused saying I was busy, he hung up, but called right back and insisted that I needed to join him.

I drove and met my dad at a new

restaurant. That should have been the first clue.

It was there, over coffee and eggs that my dad told me about the cancer in his lungs, about the upcoming lung removal and subsequent chemo. The doctor was confident that it was contained. My dad, a nurse for 40 years, had his doubts.

Life changed that day for all of us. Being the only child near, I was a main support for my stepmother. Together we went through surgery, chemo, petscans, more chemo, sickness and kidney damage, more chemo. The cancer came back, like my dad knew it would. Instead of a cure, my dad fought for more time.

Dad and Ethan still celebrated their birthday together. We kept it simple for both their sakes. So long as there was cake for Ethan and vanilla ice cream for dad, it was all good. They shared

the same approach to food: keep it on schedule, keep it coming, bring the ice cream and keep it simple. If dad liked it, we knew Ethan would. It made dinners together very easy to plan.

I tried to explain to Ethan as simply as I

could what was happening to his Papa Woo. I described to him that the cancer was something bad growing inside him and that he was taking drugs and medicine to try and kill it. I looked up simple stories from other parents and read them to him.

One day my husband and I were getting ready to go to the hospital. I told Ethan we were going to see Papa and would be back later. He walked away, emerging a few minutes later wearing his sandals. He stood patiently by the door, waiting.

I explained to Ethan that he couldn’t

go into the hospital room, that Papa looked different, was thin with tubes and equipment. “See Papa,” he answered while he tried to turn the doorknob.

We got to the hospital. I walked into my father’s room. He was sitting up. My stepmother sat next to him.

“Hi, Dad,” I said, nervously, “Ethan wanted to come see you. He put his shoes on and waited at the door when I said we were leaving to visit you.”

Silence filled the room as my dad stared at me. His eyes, so like my son’s, bore a hole in me. I overshot this one, I thought.

Finally, my dad spoke.

“Yeah, he can come in,” he said in a raspy voice, “but he stays at the door, and only for a minute.”

We walked in and stood at the entrance. Ethan took a skip and stopped suddenly. He stared intently at Papa. He looked at the wires and the tubes and equipment. I held his hand and his belt.

“E man!” my dad called out. His voice crackled. “Say hi,” I encouraged. “Hi,” Ethan said quietly.

When a few minutes passed, it was time to leave and Ethan leaned toward my dad’s bed for a kiss goodbye. It was what he always did when we left. My dad put his hand up and Ethan gave him a gentle high five.

“Bye, E Man,” my father called. “Buh-bye,” Ethan answered.

It was four in the morning when the

phone rang.

“Honey, it’s time,” my stepmother said.

When I arrived in the room my father was sitting up in bed breathing quietly, eyes closed. We sat with him for the next three hours, holding his hand. I promised him that I would look after my stepmother and all our family members. I assured him Ethan would be fine and that he didn’t need to worry about the E Man.

My father died a few minutes later, two days before his 73 rd birthday. My son turned 12. At one point my father had proclaimed that his birthday would be

a nice day to die. I disagreed, reminding

him that it was also his grandson’s birthday. Dad told me curtly that it was “his choice.” I said nothing but before I left I tearfully asked him to reconsider.

We kept Ethan’s birthday simple that

year. I let him make all his own choices. He chose to go through the car wash. He chose a bubble gum dispenser and

a bubble maker. He chose banana cake with whip cream.

It’s hard to know how far Ethan’s grief over the loss of my dad goes. For the first few weeks he insisted on sleeping with the door open. He wept. I stood by his bed and reassured him everything would be there when he woke up:

mama, dada, sissy; his room and his house; his dog and his trampoline. We would have breakfast, I promised. We loved him always.

After a time Ethan’s anxiety eased, and our happy boy returned. I don’t see many shadows in his eyes these days. I know that he misses his Papa. That he loved his Papa Woo. And I hoped that he realizes how much Papa loved his

E Man.

Dana Woodhouse-Nagy is a secret writer who just recently came out. Her loved ones were not surprised and support her life choices. She lives in the Pacific Northwest with her husband, daughter, son, one cockatiel and a very ungrateful dog. Her blog site is:

27

THERAPY

ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY:

Unspoken bonds that speak volumes

By Alexis Morley

When she talks about meeting Dalma for the first time, Doris Dehm smiles and says, “I was so emotional, because you sit there and wait for a new member of your family.”

Dehm isn’t talking about welcoming a new baby to the family, but rather the Goldendoodle service dog she and her husband got for their daughter, Anna, in January 2013. A blonde, bubbly woman with dark-rimmed glasses, Dehm once lived in Lake Oswego and now lives in Australia with her family.

We connect over Skype, where I speak to her in Australia’s morning and Portland’s afternoon. As Dehm talks, Dalma and Anna periodically run into the room, curiously poking their heads in front of the computer’s camera to become part of the conversation. Anna, who is diagnosed with autism, is thin, with dark hair, bangs and a shy smile. Today she’s wearing a lot of pink, which helps to set off Dalma’s curly, white blonde fur.

The two of them appear tethered together by an invisible string. When Anna runs off Dalma follows, watching where the child lands and following if needed. Dehm describes how connected the two of them are, laying together while Anna colors or cuddling while Anna reads. Dalma proves to be more than just a fuzzy friend and provides necessary daily support.

“Anna used to have a lot of fears,” Dehm explains, “for example, butterflies…And now she’s lost that entirely.” Since welcoming Dalma nearly two years ago, Anna’s behavior has improved in other areas as well. Before connecting with Dalma, Anna had meltdowns and would harm herself, and there were also difficulties sleeping and low self-esteem. However, Dehm now sees a marked difference in her daughter.

Along with therapy, “the dog is so effective with helping Anna confront her fears, her meltdowns and her sleep,” Dehm says about Dalma. “The last years have been amazing, we couldn’t imagine the changes [we’ve seen].”

After connecting with other families online, Dehm and her husband decided to get a service animal for Anna through 4 Paws for Ability. The worldwide organization initially required over an hour of video footage of Anna for trainers to get an idea of her behavior, both public and in the home. Trainers then selected a dog that matched Anna’s characteristics, personality as well as the needs of the family.

“We didn’t get to pick the dog at all,” Dehm says. However Anna has allergies and asthma, “so we asked if possible we would like a hypoallergenic dog, and we asked for a

28

bigger one if possible. They said they try to take that in to account but they can’t guarantee if the dog doesn’t match the child’s personality.”

After selecting a dog, training begins. First, 4 Paws for Ability sends its animals to a foster family for six months of socialization before the dog heads to a correctional facility to train with inmates for an additional four to six months. In prison, dogs get basic training, as well as some fun extra skills, such as how to do a high-five and fall over when you shout “Bang!”

Once a dog has been trained the basics, working with the animal on the specific needs of the child are addressed. While the dog is going through this transition, the family also works by completing 12 full days of training at a 4 Paws center. Once the dog becomes part of the family, training continues, but on a much more subtle level.

“I’m still do training, commands, teaching her not to run ahead on a walk, listening when I give her commands, behavioral training (sitting until released at the park), etc,” Dehm says. “It’s easy because the dogs are so well trained. Saying ‘no’ in a strict voice is the only punishment she needs, she knows she has disappointed me.”

Dehm attributes Anna’s behavioral improvements and independence to the fact that her daughter feels dogs are less threatening. “The dog is a much more non-judgmental entity than people were.”

Anna’s improvements are also in part because Dalma is able to take on a unique role in Anna’s life. Before getting Dalma, Anna would push away from her parents during a meltdown, but now Dalma is able to lie on Anna to provide deep pressure and calm her down faster than another person would, her mother says.

Dalma also encourages Anna’s independence and self- confidence by being a friendly, yet calming force. When she thinks about Anna being a teenager and doing things on her own, Dehm says, “I feel more comfortable.”

Before getting Dalma, Dehm and her husband had to take on a role of being “helicopter parents.” Now with the dog, who is trained in tethering though the family no longer uses this method, Anna has a lot more independence “which leads to more freedom, more self-esteem. It’s steps, she knows Dalma’s there and she doesn’t need my hand”.

Many other organizations exists throughout the world to provide trained animals that help provide independence for people with autism.

Continued on next page

Animal, continued from page 28

Autism Service Dogs of America also trains and provides dogs for families with children on the spectrum. Those interested in animal-assisted therapy can contact breeders directly for specifically qualified training dogs for children with autism.

While dogs might be the first that come to mind when thinking of animal-assisted therapy, the options are (literally) much bigger.

Horses are used in both hippotherapy and equine therapy and generally depend on the severity of the disability. Hippotherapy is led by a physical, occupational or speech therapist; trained by the American Hippotherapy Association; horses and patient are matched depending on demeanor and physical attributes; there can be additional staff members that act as a “side walker or spotter” when the patient is on horseback.

Animal relationships with people on the spectrum create strong bonds and can lead to independence.

[Photo by Lori Gregory]

Equine therapy is led by a Therapeutic Riding Instructor who is familiar with riders who have special needs; they hold a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) certification. Riders typically are guided by the instructor to learn how to manage and ride a hose with the goal of instilling as much independence as possible. One main difference is that equine therapy cannot be billed to insurance, while hippotherapy can be covered by insurance.

Forward Stride, an equine and hippotherapy ranch in Beaverton, has several therapeutic adaptive riding programs for children and adults of all abilities. The adaptive program includes classes in basic riding, dressage, drill team, western patterns and jumping.

Other large four-legged animals available for therapy include llamas and alpacas, specifically through Mountain Peaks Therapy based in Vancouver, Wash. Mountain Peaks Therapy began regularly visiting schools, hospitals, senior communities, weddings, camps and rehabilitation facilities in 2007 and recently completed its 900 th visit.

Owner Lori Gregory describes her introduction into owning llamas as a “fluke.” Rojo is Gregory’s first llama, since joined by Smokey and Beni, and originally was purchased as a way to keep the lawn low. One day, while at a fair, children flocked to the 400-pound red hued huggable llama, and someone suggested he become a therapy animal.

With their gentle nature, soft fur and willingness to take multiple sensory-seeking pats, llamas can be ideal animals to interact with children on the spectrum. Mountain Peaks Therapy allows children to gain confidence and trust by feeding the animals by hand, as well as walk them around when allowed. The organization primarily works with groups, but occasionally does individual

therapy sessions with children upon request.

What began as a hobby has now become what Gregory describes as an “obsession.” She says the power of transformations that she’s seen through her work with animals and children on the spectrum. She loves to see how children open up and express happiness around her animals.

The connection between humans and animals is strong and for children on the spectrum, this special bond can provide a unique way to improve on skills and ultimately work toward a more independent life.

“It’s so rewarding to see how people respond in a natural way,” Gregory says. “Parents and therapists in school tell us all the time how it’s hard to get a kid to talk or hug and then our animals show up and they don’t ask anything. The kids just want to hug and talk to them.”

29

THERAPY

QIGONG:

The power of touch

By Courtney Freitag

When her son, Joshua, was four years old, Jamee Homuth began administering an ancient Chinese method known as qigong massage to her son, hoping to alleviate some of his autism symptoms.

Homuth took part in a parent-led qigong massage program offered through a federal grant at Western Oregon University’s Teaching Research Institute.

Homuth says the improvements in Joshua have been profound.

“About a month into treatment, we experienced a huge jump in Joshua’s language ability,” the Washougal mother says. “He became conversational, understanding more and articulating more clearly. His improvement was so pronounced that people who didn’t know that we were doing the massage began to comment on how much his speech had improved in such a short period of time.”

Through a workshops focused on naturopathic options for autism, she was referred to Dr. Louisa Silva, founder of the Qigong Sensory Training Institute (QSTI) and co-author of a dozen studies on qigong that have appeared national reputable peer-reviewed publications.

Silva, a doctor of Western medicine, Chinese medicine and public health, has led a team of trained therapists for 14 years. In 2012, Silva was awarded a three-year grant totaling $842,382 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Part one of her two-part research has allowed Silva and her team to treat 100 children thus far.

30

Photos by Tyra Murray of Grace Portraits

Her passion of helping those with chronic medical problems led Silva to focus on how qigong and a parent- led daily massage program have been shown to effectively reverse sensory sensitivities and behavior improvement.

“When it comes to children with disabilities, I believe the parents are the child’s greatest resources and advocates, and must be empowered and helped to do what they do naturally,” Silva said. “When a close friend of mine had

a child with autism, I started to see how devastating the

diagnosis was, how little help was offered, and I chose to

teach the parents a massage I had learned from Chinese medicine.”

Silva began seeing how qigong helped the children feel better and was compelled to begin research on it. At the time, all information coming out about autism was that it was genetic, she says.

“I knew that the research would have to be very good to

convince people that something like daily massage could help to change the course of autism.”

The basic premise of Silva’s research is that some children with ASD have difficulties with touch, and that, in turn, interferes with development. The research shows that “all children with autism have problems with touch,” Silva says.

Sensitivities can be of varying degree, and include refusal to be touched on the hands and face; difficulty trimming fingernails and haircuts; clothing seams can cause aggravation; problems with food textures in the mouth;

Continued on next page

Qigong, continued from page 30

and many children can have a numbness in response to pain and very high pain thresholds for burns, cuts and bruises.

“Like with autism itself, the cause of the problems with touch is unknown,” Silva continues. “It was only last year that sensory problems were included in the diagnosis of autism, and so the cause of the touch problems has not yet been fully Evaluated. We cannot say for sure that there is no loss or damage to the sense of touch.”

Part one of her research is concluding this fall, with results being published early 2015. Part two of the research focuses on the qigong massage treatment that has been developed and shown to reverse the problems with touch. The team has carried out two randomized controlled trials:

they demonstrate that when parents are trained and supported to give their children a daily qigong massage protocol, the touch problems return to normal, behavior improves and development starts to pick up.

The massage is called Qigong Sensory Therapy, a whole body massage that takes about 15 minutes to give, and is usually given at bedtime. Parents are guided through a three-hour group training in the massage, then practice on each other or on a neurotypical child first.

Families are then given weekly home visits for the first five months where the therapists work with them to perform the massage, and help them to learn to attune the massage to their individual child.

“It may not be easy to do at first, as there are areas of the body which are uncomfortable,” Silva says. “We teach parents not to avoid these areas but to find the techniques which make them comfortable. We have a number of different adaptations of the techniques, and a lot of success with finding our way through the children’s difficulties with touch.”

Homuth attended several hour-long training sessions at QSTI where the 12 steps of qigong massage was explained and broken down. The proper techniques for administering each step were taught, as well as how to modify the massage based on the behavioral responses of the child.

“Before the training sessions with QSTI professionals began, Josh struggled with frequent meltdowns and a lot

Parents are guided through a three-hour group training in the massage, then practice on each other or on a neurotypical child first.

of nervous system dysregulation,” Homuth says. “He had a significant speech delay—both expressive and receptive— anxiety and limited food intake.”

Joshua’s anxiety decreased slightly, and his food aversions began to lessen, allowing him to be more comfortable being exposed to new meals.

Marla Sheffel, a Troutdale mom to three-and-a-half- year-old Theodore, also participated in the parent classes and now massages Theodore five to six times a week. Diagnosed with autism, sensory processing disorder and born with Torticollis, a dystonic condition defined by an abnormal, asymmetrical head or neck position, Theodore began responding positively 45 days into the parent-led massage.

Sheffel also reports improved language, motor skills, mood, dexterity and regulation. The curve from his Torticollis has also improved. Before beginning the massage, Theodore was screamed often, was nearly non-verbal and had to be bounced or swung nearly all hours of the day.

Sheffel learned how to tailor the massage to meet Theodore’s needs and also practices it on her hyposensitive 5-year-old daughter.

“I understand all the intricacies of doing the massage in the right order, and how to realize if Theodore needs more of something or needs to just feel my presence or hand on his chest to know that he is safe and secure,” Sheffel says.

Silva and her staff began a pilot study in 2013 of children ages 6-11, and published results will be available in early 2015. She says that children show signs of “normalizing” within just a few months. At the same time, self-regulation begins to pick up, sleep improves, and tantrums decrease as the normalization of touch on the face and hands and eye contact improves, Silva says.

“Parents are not used to the idea that they can communicate directly with the child’s brain and body through massage,” Silva concludes. “But once they see that they can make a difference in their child, and start to see the first small signs of improvement, they start to understand that they have the power to help their child get better.”

31

THERAPY

THERAPY DIRECTORY of THERAPY OPTIONS www.spectrumsmagazine.com THE PORTLAND/SW WASHINGTON METRO AREA HAS HUNDREDS OF

DIRECTORY of

THERAPY OPTIONS

www.spectrumsmagazine.com
www.spectrumsmagazine.com

THE PORTLAND/SW WASHINGTON METRO AREA HAS HUNDREDS OF EXPERT PROVIDERS, THERAPISTS AND PROFESSIONALS. FIND YOURS TODAY.

Spectrums Magazine began with a vision of creating a comprehensive guide of therapy options and resources—all in one place. Our print directory has the most up-to-date contact information for therapy options, and our website is a hub for the latest news and information on everything from health and wellness, education, tutoring, insurance, employment and more. While we can’t endorse, promote or guarantee the services or outcome of any one provider or type of therapy, this directory was compiled with community input. And we want yours: if you would like to be added to our online directory, please email info@spectrumsmagazine.com.

APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (ABA)

ABA Learning Solutions

15915 SW Stratford Loop B, Tigard

A Hope for Autism

(see ad on page 23)

2900 SW Peaceful Lane, Portland

Autism Behavioral Consulting (see ad on page 15) Two locations:

9901 NE 7 th Avenue, Suite C-116,

Vancouver 129 NE 102 nd Avenue, Suite E, Portland (360) 619-2462 • www.autismabc.org info@autismabc.org

Building Bridges

4724 SW Macadam Avenue, Portland

Center for Health and Performance (see ad on page 5)

1700 NW 167 th Place, Suite 220

Beaverton (503) 985-9527 centerforhealthandperformance.com

Christine Shaw

2816 NE 12 th Avenue, Portland

(206) 406-0060

32

Life Tools Jennifer Knipling, MA, BCBA (503) 853-9408 ABALifeTools@gmail.com

Melissa Gard, Ph.D., BCBA (612) 432-4135

Northwest Young Autism Project

15685 SW 116 th Avenue, King City

Pathways for Potential

10151 SW Barbur Blvd, Suite 108,

Portland (503) 201-7750 pathwaysforpotential.com sue@pathwaysforpotential.com

Play Connections Early Learners

15050 SW Koll Pkwy, Suite C

Portland Autism Center 10300 SW Greenburg Road #240, Portland (503) 206-6285 www.portlandautismcenter.com

Synergy Autism Center 7739 SW Capitol Hwy, #220, Portland (503) 432-8760 www.synergyautismcenter.com synergyautismcenter@gmail.com

Wynne Solutions (See ad on back page) Dr. Maria Wynne (408) 479-4357 www.wynnesolutions.com maria@wynnesolutions.com

ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY

Autism Service Dogs of America autismservicedogsofamerica.org info@autismservicedogsofamerica.org

Canine Companions for Independence (800) 572-2275 • info@cci.org

City Dog Country Dog

5531 SW Macadam Avenue,

Suite 258-210, Portland (503) 740-4886 www.citydogcountrydogtraining.com

Creative Therapy Solutions

5232 N Interstate Avenue, Portland

Dogs for the Deaf (Autism Assistance Dogs)

1-800-990-3647

Flyin’ Changes Ranch 11904 NE 314 th Street Battle Ground, Washington (360) 921-2341 flyinchangesranch@gmail.com

Therapy Gone to the Dogs

5410 SW Macadam Avenue, #270,

Portland (503) 764-9508 www.therapygonetothedogs.org

ART THERAPY

Annette Shore, MA, ATR-BC, NCC

1942 NW Kearney Street, Suite 31,

Continued on next page

Therapy Directory, continued from page 32

Cheri Epstein

2929 SW Multnomah Blvd, #201,

Portland (971) 205-2708 www.nwarttherapy.com

Children’s Healing Art Project (CHAP)

830 NE 47th Avenue, Portland

(503) 215-2233

Providence Neurodevelopmental Center for Children WEST - Providence St. Vincent Medical Center

9155 SW Barnes Road, Portland

Juliana Friedman

4110 SE Hawthorne Blvd, #723

Portland (503) 250-4373 JulianaFriedman@yahoo.com

MoveAbilities

9955 SE Washington Street, Suite 109

1910

SE 11 th Avenue, Portland

(503) 216-2339

Portland

(503) 243-5294 • www.chap.name info@chap.name

(541) 647-8811

BIOFEEDBACK + NEUROFEEDBACK

North Clackamas Parks and

Counseling & Art Therapy

525 1 st Street, Suite 110, Lake Oswego

Advanced Neurofeedback Clinic

Recreation Department (Various inclusive classes)

(503) 635-8122

2301

NW Thurman Street, Suite A

150

Beavercreek Road, Oregon City

Portland

Shelli Vrabel, Recreation Coordinator

Erica Fayrie

(503) 243-7907 • www.nurofeed.com

(503) 742-4371 • www.ncprd.com

2931

NE Broadway, Portland

Erika Johnson

2901 SE Clinton Street, Portland

(503) 236-7884 Erika.k.johnson@gmail.com

Biofeedback & Behavioral Management 9450 SW Barnes Road, #255, Portland (503) 292-0707

Insights to Health

2929 SW Multnomah Blvd, #302

Polaris Dance Theater All Access Dance

1501 SW Taylor Street, Portland

 

Portland

Portland Parks and Recreation

Face in the Mirror Counseling

(503) 501-5001

(Various inclusive classes. Check

599

Weidman Court, Lake Oswego

website.)

(503) 201-0337 • www.fitmc.org

1120

SW 5 th Ave #1302, Portland

Nantz Ruby

In Touch Counseling Services

10175 SW Barbur Blvd, #109b

203

SE Park Plaza Drive

Portland

Sensory Kids

Park Tower II, Suite 105

(503) 245-9999

(see ad on page 11)

Vancouver

1425

N Killingsworth Street, Portland

(360) 334-9959

OT Solutions

(503) 575-9402

5115

SE 38 th Avenue, Portland

AUDIOLOGY

Center for Communication &

Portland Neurofeedback

Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District

Learning Skills

1306

NW Hoyt Street

(Various inclusive classes. Check

371

Sixth Street, Lake Oswego

Portland

website.)

(503) 248-1182

15707 SW Walker Road, Beaverton (503) 645-6433 • www.thprd.org

Albertina Kerr’s Children’s

Developmental Health Services

1675 SW Marlow Avenue, Portland

Patty Ehlers

1010 Washington Street, #280

Vancouver (360) 699-6374 www.pattyehlers-speechtherapy.com

Providence Neurodevelopmental Center for Children EAST - Providence Child Center

DANCE/MOVEMENT THERAPY

Disability Art and Culture Project (503) 238-0723 • dacphome.org disabilityartculture@gmail.com

Happy Mindful People (202) 420-8754 happymindfulpeople@gmail.com

Heart & Soles emilydmurer@gmail.com

Imagination Yoga (971) 645-9606 www.imaginationyoga.com

DEVELOPMENTAL/BEHAVIORAL

PEDIATRICIAN

Albertina Kerr’s Children’s

Developmental Health Services

1675 SW Marlow Avenue, Portland

OHSU CDRC Dr. Peter Biasco

Dr. Gregory Blaschke

707 SW Gaines Avenue, Portland

(503) 346-0644

Continued on next page

33

Therapy Directory, continued from page 33

THERAPY

Dr. Sara Cuthill

Kaiser Permanente

3550 N Interstate Avenue, Portland

(503) 331-6577

Albertina Kerr’s Children’s Developmental Health Services

1675 SW Marlow Avenue, Portland

(503) 228-6479 www.childrenspdx.com

(503) 636-4508 www.portlandpediatric.com

The Children’s Clinic (Two locations)

Children’s Program

9555

SW Barnes Road, Suite 301

Dr. John Liedel

Family Connections Northwest

Portland

Dr. Robin McCoy

2001

H Street, Vancouver

(503) 297-3371

7707 SW Capitol Hwy, Portland

Providence Neurodevelopmental Center for Children EAST - Providence Child Center

830 NE 47 th Avenue, Portland

(503) 215-2233

(360) 993-0866 leahreitzrdi@yahoo.com

Pacific Northwest Pediatric Therapy

4305 SE Milwaukie Avenue, Portland

(503) 232-3955

rosemarywhitepediatricservices.com

19260 SW 65 th Avenue, Suite 340

Tualatin (503) 691-9777 www.childrens-clinic.com

Thomas Koch, M.D.

Doernbecher Children’s Hospital Neurology

745 SW Gaines Road, Portland

 

Sensory Kids

(503) 494-5856

WEST - Providence St. Vincent

(see ad on page 11)

Medical Center

1425

N Killingsworth Street, Portland

doernbecher/programs-services/

9155

SW Barnes Road, Portland

(503) 575-9402

neurology/

(503) 216-2339 Dr. Michele Raddish

IN-HOME SERVICES

Dr. Martine Sacks Dr. Sarojini Budden Dr. Fulgencio Del Castillo www.ProvidenceOregon.org/pncc

FAMILY PHYSICIANS

Children’s Program

Autism Behavioral Consulting (see ad on page 15) (Two locations)

7707 SW Capitol Hwy, Portland

9901

NE 7 th Avenue, Suite C-116,

Evergreen Pediatric Clinic

(503) 452-8002

Vancouver

(Legacy Salmon Creek)

129

NE 102 nd Avenue, Suite E,

2101 NE 139 th Avenue, #370

Vancouver (360) 892-1635 www.evergreenpediatrics.com

Evergreen Pediatric Clinic (PeaceHealth Southwest)

505 NE 87 th Avenue, #120, Vancouver

DIR/FLOOR-TIME

Dr. Jennifer Lyons

The Vancouver Clinic Columbia Tech Center

501 SE 172 nd Avenue, Vancouver

(360) 882-2778

Dr. Mary Lynn O’Brien

Kaiser Division Clinic

7705 SE Division Street, Portland

(503) 777-3311 www.kaiserpermanente.org

Portland (360) 619-2462 • www.autismabc.org info@autismabc.org

Beyond the Clinic

10600 SE McLoughlin Blvd, Suite 202

Milwaukie (503) 496-0385 • beyondtheclinic.com info@beyondtheclinic.com

CDM Long-term Care Services

2409 Broadway Street, Vancouver

(360) 896-9695 • www.cdmltc.org

Autism Behavioral Consulting (see ad on page 15)

Integrative Pediatrics 11790 SW Barnes Road, Bldg. A, #140

Children’s Nursing Specialties

Two locations:

Portland

9900

SW Greenburg Road, #290

9901

NE 7 th Avenue, Suite C-116,

Portland

Vancouver

1-866-968-2401

129 NE 102 nd Avenue, Suite E,

Portland (360) 619-2462 • www.autismabc.org info@autismabc.org

Advanced Pediatric Therapies (see ad on page 23) (Two locations)

8339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy

Portland

4201 NE 66 th Ave, Suite 106

Vancouver (503) 245-5639 • (360) 885-4684 www.pediatric-ot.com sharron@aptot.com

34

The Evergreen Center

516 High Street, Oregon City

(503) 722-4270

Pediatric Associates of the Northwest (Two locations)

2701 NW Vaughn, Suite 360, Portland

(503) 227-0671

and

4103 SW Mercantile Drive

Lake Oswego

Everybody Stims Joanna Blanchard, MOTR/L (360) 608-5143 www.everybodystims.com

Steele Speech Language Therapy

1827 NE 44 th Avenue, Portland

(503) 810-5921 • www.pdxspeech.com

Continued on next page

Therapy Directory, continued from page 34

THERAPYTHERAPY

Tamerlano Speech & Language Services

3945 NE 37 th Avenue, Portland

(503) 481-5426 tamerlanosls@yahoo.com

Karen Joy Campbell

516 SE Morrison Street, Suite 310

Portland Autism Center 10300 SW Greenburg Road, #240 Portland www.portlandautismcenter.com (503) 206-6285

Heather Thompson, M.A. CCC-SLP

Raindance OT

Portland (503) 998-7030

Psychologists Services to You

Rita L Smith

14585 SW 87 th Avenue, Tigard

(in-home treatment)

(In-home therapy)

818 NW 17 th Ave #6, Portland (503) 349-9973 www.psychologicalservicestoyou.com drebittner@comcast.net

(503 805 3851

Katie Statman-Weil, MSW, MS

2929

SW Multnomah Blvd, #105

(503) 564-0131

Portland

(503) 427-8943

MENTAL HEALTH THERAPY

Kathy J. Marshack

Robert Finkelman

(360) 256-0448

1305

NE Fremont Street, Portland

Brooke Psychologists (Two locations)

(503) 258-7971 www.robertfinkelman.com

516

SE Morrison Street, Suite 1010

Portland

Leslie Carter

400 E Evergreen Blvd, Suite 208

Catherine Pivetti

3433 NE Sandy Blvd, Portland

(503) 388-9028 • JoyPivet@aol.com

Collective Perspectives

5201 SW Westgate Drive, Suite 105

Portland (971) 264-7025 • www.cptts.org

Counseling for Moms

5234 NE Farmcrest Street, Hillsboro

(503) 459-2073 www.counselingformoms.com

Creative Connections Counseling Services (503) 309-8671 www.debra-creativeconnections.com

Carol B. Markovics

1880 Willamette Falls Drive, Suite 230

West Linn (503) 305-8505 • dr.carol@mac.com

Edie Dietzen, M.A., M.S., L.M.F.T.

800 A Officer’s Row, Vancouver

(360) 953-0169 www.ediedietzen.com

In Touch Counseling

203 SE Park Plaza Drive, Park Tower

II Suite #105, Vancouver (360) 718-8544

9600 SW Oak Street, Suite 280, Tigard

(503) 807-7413 www.drlesliecarter.com

Life Choices Counseling Center

7000 SW Hampton Street, #204, Tigard

Linda Fishman, Ph.D 720 SW Washington Street, Suite 340, Portland (503) 227-4211 www.lindafishman.com info@lindafishman.com

Mental Health Association of Oregon

620 SW 5 th Avenue, 5 th Floor, Portland

Neurobehavioral Concepts

1609 Willamette Falls Drive

West Linn (503) 803-9361 • www.neurobx.com lonny@neurobox.com

Patrick Ethel-King

9400 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale

Highway, Suite 210, Beaverton (503) 352-0240 • www.nhws.us patrick@nhws.us

Peggy Piers

7739 SW Capitol Hwy, Suite 220

Portland (503) 977-2411 • www.peggypiers.com piers.p@comcast.net

Sundstrom Clinical Services

8440 SE Sunnybrook Blvd, # 120

Western Psychological & Counseling Services (Various locations) (503) 233-5405 • westernpsych.com

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

Advanced Pediatric Therapies (see ad on page 23) (Two locations)

8339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy

Portland

4201 NE 66 th Ave, Suite 106

Vancouver (503) 245-5639 • (360) 885-4684 www.pediatric-ot.com

Assistive Technology NW

2100 NE Broadway #119, Portland

Celebrate the Senses

1509 SW Sunset Blvd. Suite 1K

Portland (503) 810-0275 celebratethesenses.com

Continued on next page

35

Therapy Directory, continued from page 35

THERAPY

Albertina Kerr’s Children’s

Developmental Health Services

OHSU CDRC

707 SW Gaines Street, Portland

Therapy Solutions for Kids

5200 SW Macadam Avenue, #100

1675

SW Marlow Avenue, Portland

(503) 494-8095

Portland

(503) 228-6479

(503) 224-1998

Center for Health and Performance (see ad on page 5)

OT Solutions

Thrive Therapeutics

1700

NW 167 th Place, Suite 220

5115

SE 38 th Avenue, Portland

2135 N Humboldt Street, Portland

Beaverton

(503) 753-6943

(503) 985-9527 centerforhealthandperformance.com

thrivetherapeutics.com thrivetherapeutics@gmail.com

Cooperative Therapies NW

7759 SW Cirrus Dr., Building 26,

Beaverton (503) 433-8085 www.cooperativetherapiesnw.com

Creative Therapy Connections

5232 N Interstate Avenue, Portland

(503) 922-1345 • www.ctcportland.com

Early Choice Pediatric Therapy

106 E 15 th Street, Vancouver

(360) 750-5850 • ecpt4me@gmail.com

Everybody Stims (in-home OT services) (360) 608-5143 www.everybodystims.com

Groundplay Therapy Works

5220 NE Sacramento Street, Portland

Innovative Services Northwest

9414 NE Fourth Plain Road, Vancouver

Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center Pediatric Rehabilitation 19250 SW 65 th Ave, #125, Tualatin (503) 692-1670 www.legacyhealth.org

Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center

2211 NE 139 th Street, Vancouver

(360) 487-1000 www.legacyhealth.org

Neurotherapeutic Pediatric Therapies

Pacific Northwest Pediatric Therapy

4305 SE Milwaukie Avenue, Portland

(503) 232-3955 • pnpt1@comcast.net

Pediatric Sensory Therapy

6635 N Baltimore Avenue, #229, Portland

Pediatric Therapy Services

532 N Main Avenue, Gresham

(503) 666-1333 • www.oregonpts.com

Play 2 Grow 18959 SW 84 th Avenue, Tualatin (503) 563-5280

Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel Pediatric Rehabilitation

2801 N Gantenbein, Suite 2225,

Portland (503) 413-4505 www.legacyhealth.org

Providence Neurodevelopmental Center for Children

EAST - Providence Child Center

830 NE 47 th Avenue, Portland

(503) 215-2233

WEST - Providence St. Vincent Medical Center

9155 SW Barnes Road, Portland

Pacific Northwest Pediatric Therapy

4305 SE Milwaukie Avenue, Portland

(503) 232-3955 • pnpt1@comcast.net

Westside Pediatric Therapy 12525 SW 3 rd Street, Beaverton (503) 641-2767 www.therapykidz.com info@therapykidz.com

RDI ®

Barbara Avila, M.S.

Synergy Autism Center

7739 SW Capitol Hwy, Suite 220

Portland (503) 432-8760 barbara@barbaraavilaconsulting.com

SENSORY INTEGRATION/ PROCESSING

Advanced Pediatric Therapies (see ad on page 23) (Two locations)

8339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy

Portland

4201 NE 66 th Ave, Suite 106

Vancouver (503) 245-5639 • (360) 885-4684 www.pediatric-ot.com sharron@aptot.com

Dr. Chris Chlebowski 923 NE Couch Street, Portland (503) 236-9609 www.drchrischlebowski.com info@drchrischlebowski.com

Early Learning Matters

1400 NE 48 th Avenue, Suite 108

Groundplay Therapy Works

610

High Street, Oregon City

Sensory Kids

5220

NE Sacramento Street, Portland

(503) 657-8903 • nt4kids.org/#/home

(see ad on page 11)

(971) 888-5265

1425

N Killingsworth Street, Portland

New Horizons Wellness Services 9400 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Highway, Suite 210, Beaverton (503) 352-0240 • www.nhws.us

36

Continued on next page

Therapy Directory, continued from page 36

THERAPY

Minaz Chauthani, MS, OTR/L

1748 NW Miller Hill Place, Portland

(503) 758-2728

SOCIAL SKILLS + GUIDED PLAY

pathwaysforpotential.com

 

PlaySpace

Neurotherapeutics Pediatric

A Hope for Autism

(see ad on page 19)

Therapies

(see ad on page 23)

1727

NE 13 th Avenue, Portland

(Four locations)

2900

SW Peaceful Lane, Portland

(503) 224-2820

610

High Street, Oregon City

(503) 516-9085 • ahopeforautism.net

(503) 657-8903

10130 NE Skidmore Street, Portland

(503) 657-8903

Aspiring Youth

Playful Intervention

5293

NE Elam Young Parkway #170

68 SW Miles Street, Portland

7824

SE 13 th Avenue, Portland

Hillsboro

(888) 458-0481

(503) 735-5870

(503) 883-0036

2191

NE 2nd Street, McMinneville

(503) 883-0036

Pediatric Sensory Therapy 6635 N Baltimore Avenue, #229, Portland (503) 477-9527 www.pdxpediatrics.com lisa@pdxpediatrics.com

Pediatric Therapy Services

532 N Main Avenue, Gresham

(503) 666-1333 • www.oregonpts.com

Play 2 Grow Developmental Therapy Services

18959 SW 84 th Avenue, Tualatin

(503) 563-5280

Providence Neurodevelopmental Center for Children

EAST - Providence Child Center

830 NE 47th Avenue, Portland

(503) 215-2233

WEST - Providence St. Vincent Medical Center

9155 SW Barnes Road, Portland

Qigong Sensory Training Institute P.O. Box 92, McMinnville (503) 474-0218 www.qsti.org • info@qsti.org

Sensory Kids

(see ad on page 11)

1425 N Killingsworth Street, Portland

Therapy Solutions for Kids

5200 SW Macadam Avenue, #100

Portland (503) 224-1998 www.therapysolutionsforkids.com

Albertina Kerr’s Children’s Developmental Health Services 1675 SW Marlow Avenue, Portland (503) 228-6479 www.childrenspdx.com

Autism Behavioral Consulting (see ad on page 15)

9901 NE 7 th Avenue, Suite C-116

Vancouver

129 NE 102 nd Avenue, Suite E

Portland (360) 619-2462 • www.autismabc.org info@autismabc.org

Brooke Psychologists, LLC

516 SE Morrison Street, #1010

Building Bridges

4724 SW Macadam Avenue, Portland

Center for Health and Performance (see ad on page 5)

1700 NW 167 th Place, Suite 220

Beaverton

(503) 502-2709

Happy Mindful People (202) 420-8754 happymindfulpeople@gmail.com

New Horizons Wellness Services

9400 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale

Highway, Suite 210, Beaverton (503) 352-0240 • www.nhws.us

Pathways for Potential

10151 SW Barbur Blvd, Suite 108

Portland

(503) 201-7750

Providence Neurodevelopmental Center for Children EAST - Providence Child Center 830 NE 47 th Avenue, Portland (503) 215-2233

WEST - Providence St. Vincent Medical Center

9155 SW Barnes Road, Portland

Small Talk Speech Therapy Angela Arterberry, MS, CCC-SLP (503) 358-8182 MissASpeech@gmail.com

Social Kraft (503) 381-9344 • www.socialkraft.net socialkraft@me.com

SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY

Albertina Kerr’s Children’s

Developmental Health Services

1675 SW Marlow Avenue, Portland

(503) 228-6479 www.childrenspdx.com

All About Speech

8196 SW Hall Blvd, Suite 114

Beaverton (503) 641-2005 • allaboutspeech.net

Assistive Technology NW

2100 NE Broadway #119, Portland

(503) 708-5720 assisstivetechnw.com Kim@AssistiveTechNW.com

Barbara Erskine Speech Therapy (Two locations)

8513 NE Hazel Dell Ave, Suite 201

Vancouver (360) 573-7313 7000 SW Hampton Street, Suite 127

Continued on next page

37

Therapy Directory, continued from page 37

THERAPY

Buckendorf & Associates 10300 SW Greenburg Road, #410 Portland (503) 517-8555 www.buckendorfassociates.com ba.info@buckendorfassociates.com

Center for Communication & Learning Skills

371 6 th Street, Lake Oswego

Center for Health and Performance (see ad on page 5)

1700 NW 167 th Place, #220

Beaverton • (503) 985-9527 centerforhealthandperformance.com

Clackamas Speech

(see ad on page 23)

2305 SE Washington Street, #102

Milwaukie (503) 654-1014 www.clackamasspeech.com

Communicating Together

1727 NE 13 th Avenue, Portland

Cooperative Therapies NW

7759 SW Cirrus Dr., Building 26,

Beaverton (503) 433-8085 www.cooperativetherapiesnw.com

Creative Connections Counseling Services (503) 309-8671 www.debra-creativeconnections.com debra@debra-creativeconnections.com

D’Onofrio & Associates

1827 NE 44 th Avenue, Suite 20

Portland (503) 808-9919 www.donofrioslp.com

Dvortcsak Speech and Language Service

818 SW 3 rd Avenue, #68, Portland

(503) 887-1130 • www.dslsi.com

38

Early Choice Pediatric Therapy

106 E 15 th Street, Vancouver

(360) 750-5850 • ecpt4me@gmail.com

Gresham Speech Therapy

4336 SE Viewpoint Drive, Troutdale

(503) 312-9362 • www.gst-d2l.com/gst

Jo Workinger (503) 422-3337 www.joworkinger.com

Kelli Murdock Eickelberg, SLP

7701 SW Cirrus Drive, Suite 32-D

Beaverton (503) 520-5030 KelliEickelbergSLP@hotmail.com

Legacy Meridian Park Medical

Center Pediatric Rehabilitation

19250 SW 65 th Avenue

Medical Plaza 1, Suite 125, Tigard (503) 692-1670 www.legacyhealth.org

Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center 2211 NE 139 th Street, Vancouver (360) 487-1000 www.legacyhealth.org

New Horizons Wellness Services 10700 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy, Building 3 Suite 618, Beaverton (503) 352-0240 • www.nhws.us

NW Speech Therapy (503) 512-9355 • (360) 747-7144 www.nwspeechtherapy.com info@nwspeechtherapy.com

Play 2 Grow Developmental Therapy Services

18959 SW 84 th Avenue, Tualatin

(503) 563-5280

Providence Neurodevelopmental Center for Children

EAST - Providence Child Center

830 NE 47 th Avenue, Portland

(503) 215-2233

WEST - Providence St. Vincent Medical Center

9155 SW Barnes Road, Portland

Providence Rehabilitation Services

270 NW Burnside Street, Gresham

(503) 215-2233

Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel

2801 N Gantenbein, Suite 2225

Portland (503) 413-4505

Red Bird Speech and Language (503) 583-2314 www.redbirdspeech.com Paige@redbirdspeech.com

Scottish Rite Center Kid Talk

5125 SW Macadam Avenue, #200

Small Talk Speech Therapy (503) 358-8182 MissASpeech@gmail.com

Speech Language Pathology LLC

6035 SW Florida Street, Portland

(971) 255-1961 www.speechtherapypdx.com

Therapy Solutions for Kids

5200 SW Macadam Avenue, #100

VISION THERAPY

NW Eye Care Professionals (Three locations)

15259 SE 82 nd Drive, #101 Clackamas (503) 657-0321

9901 NE 7 th Ave. #C115

Vancouver (360) 546-2046 10970 SW Barnes Road

Beaverton (503) 214-1396 www.doctorbruce.net

Speech-Language Pathologists Occupational Therapy Consultations Speech & Play is dedicated to providing quality

Speech-Language Pathologists Occupational Therapy Consultations

Speech & Play is dedicated to providing quality speech, language and social communication support to children and their families, using a mix of naturalistic play-based and tranditional therapy approaches. We believe children learn best when engaged in fun and motivating interactions!

learn best when engaged in fun and motivating interactions! Social Skills Groups Speech & Language Groups

Social Skills Groups Speech & Language Groups Feeding Groups Individual Treatment Speech-Language Evaluations

Contact us: www.speechandplay.com Email: connect@speechandplay.com Phone: (503) 946-5375

All practitioners work as independent businesses at The Center.

Specializing in children who have autism, delayed language acquisition or language disorders, and sensory processing disorders.

or language disorders, and sensory processing disorders. Extensive experience working with children who have

Extensive experience working with children who have articulation, phonological, and motor speech disorders and children who have difficulties with executive functioning, reading, writing, and spelling.

steele

Speech

Language

therapy

writing, and spelling. s teele Speech Language therapy Erica Steele, MS, CCC-SLP ( 503 ) 810-5921

Erica Steele, MS, CCC-SLP (503) 810-5921 erica@pdxspeech.com

Learn more about us at:

thecenterforhealthandperformance.com NW 167 th and Cornell in Beaverton

NW 167 t h and Cornell in Beaverton Lee Savinar LS Learning (503) 422-3334
NW 167 t h and Cornell in Beaverton Lee Savinar LS Learning (503) 422-3334
NW 167 t h and Cornell in Beaverton Lee Savinar LS Learning (503) 422-3334
NW 167 t h and Cornell in Beaverton Lee Savinar LS Learning (503) 422-3334
NW 167 t h and Cornell in Beaverton Lee Savinar LS Learning (503) 422-3334
NW 167 t h and Cornell in Beaverton Lee Savinar LS Learning (503) 422-3334
Lee Savinar LS Learning (503) 422-3334 LSLearning2@gmail.com Individual and group tutoring for all children through
Lee Savinar
LS Learning
(503) 422-3334
LSLearning2@gmail.com
Individual and group tutoring
for all children through 9th grade.
Specialize in working with
children on the Autism Spectrum
and students with other
learning differences.
Learn more about my work:
Devinsmom.com
Email me at:

Gluten-Free Casein-Free Diet Denise McMerrick, Consultant

“Since 2007, I’ve enjoyed being a consultant to families with loved ones on the autism spectrum. Specializing in the GFCF diet, I’ve been able to help many kids with this effective intervention, often seeing dramatic results.”

effective intervention, often seeing dramatic results.” Consultations@Devinsmom.com www. spectrumsmagazine .com 39

39

Helping Kids Succeed

Improving the daily life of kids and families to reach their maximum potential

“Because of the help we had from Dr. Wynne, we are the happiest we have ever been and so is our son. We have challenges at times, but we know how to handle them and how to handle our own lives in order to help our son.” —Wynne Solutions client

in order to help our son.” —Wynne Solutions client ABA services for all ages Collaborative care
in order to help our son.” —Wynne Solutions client ABA services for all ages Collaborative care

ABA services for all ages

Collaborative care with children, parents, school staff, therapists and more

Parent training and support

In-person and tele-health services

Innovative, cutting-edge technology to teach our future generations

cutting-edge technology to teach our future generations Dr. Maria Wynne (408) 479-4357 maria @ w y

Dr. Maria Wynne (408) 479-4357

to teach our future generations Dr. Maria Wynne (408) 479-4357 maria @ w y nnesolutions.com www.wynnesolutions.com
to teach our future generations Dr. Maria Wynne (408) 479-4357 maria @ w y nnesolutions.com www.wynnesolutions.com
to teach our future generations Dr. Maria Wynne (408) 479-4357 maria @ w y nnesolutions.com www.wynnesolutions.com