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In New Hampshire - Bath, Benton, Bethlehem, Bristol, Campton, Canaan, Dalton, Dorchester, East Haverhill, Easton, Franconia, Glencliff, Groton,
Haverhill, Hebron, Landaff, Lincoln, Lisbon, Littleton, Lyman, Monroe, North Haverhill, North Woodstock, Orford, Piermont, Pike,
Plymouth, Rumney, Sugar Hill, Swiftwater, Thornton, Warren, Waterville Valley, Wentworth, and Woodsville.
In Vermont - Bradford, Corinth, Fairlee, Groton, Newbury, South Ryegate and Wells River
Northcountry News PO Box 10 Warren, NH 03279 603-764-5807
SKIPS
GUN SHOP
Buy Sell Trade
837 Lake St.
Bristol, NH
603-744-3100
www.nhskip.com
New & Used Firearms
Reloading Supplies
Gunsmithing Service
Hunting Supplies
& So Much More!
485 Tenney Mountain Hwy.
Plymouth, NH
603-536-1422
www.harrisfamilyfurniture.com
The area's
first choice, for
furniture and
mattresses.
u La-Z-Boy
u Broyhill
u Simmons
u Best
u Tempur-pedic
u Ashley
Free Local
Delivery
C.M. Whitcher
Transfer Facility
Commercial
Residential
Roll Offs
and
Demolition
1 to 40 Yard
Containers
Available
58 Whitcher Hill Rd.
Warren, NH
603.764.9300
Hunting Season
is here -
get your gear!
Nice large, healthy looking bull moose. - Duane Cross Photo. (www.duanecrosspics.com)
Time For Blaze Orange In NH__________
Right off
I-91, Exit 17, Rte 302
Wells River, VT
802-429-2500
absolutepowersportsvt.com
Hours: M-F 8-5 Sat. 8-2
SUPPORTING ALL THAT IS LOCAL FOR OVER 25 YEARS!
FREE
Dale Clough Photo
SINCE APRIL 1989 g READ THROUGHOUT THE NORTH COUNTRY & BEYOND g OCTOBER 10, 2014
Hunters and other outdoor
enthusiasts are encouraged to
put on a bright orange article of
clothing when they head afield
this fall. Wearing a fluorescent
orange hat, vest or jacket makes
you highly visible, one of sever-
al key safety precautions for
hunters, hikers and others
enjoying the autumn woods.
Several hunting seasons are
already underway in New
Hampshire (see
http://wildnh.com/Hunting/hun
ting_dates_and_seasons.htm).
"Wearing blaze orange has def-
initely been shown to decrease
hunting incidents across the
country," said Josh Mackay,
who coordinates the Hunter
Education Program at the New
Hampshire Fish and Game
Department. "It is important for
outdoors enthusiasts generally,
but especially for hunters,
because the overwhelming
majority of hunting-related
incidents involve members of
hunting parties."
Mackay stressed that, along
with wearing blaze orange, the
top safety rules for hunters are
controlling the muzzle of your
gun at all times and positively
identifying your target -- and
what's beyond -- 100 percent of
the time.
Overall, New Hampshire has an
excellent record for hunter safe-
ty, largely attributable to the
state's effective hunter educa-
tion programs. The average
number of hunting-related inci-
dents per year has gone down
each decade since mandatory
hunter education classes
became required in the 1970s.
The 1960s saw an average of
21.4 incidents per year in New
Hampshire. Fewer incidents
Story continues on page A3
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page A2
URGENT SAVINGS ALERT! URGENT SAVINGS ALERT!
The Savings Continue
DISCOUNT JIMS BARGAIN CENTER
DISCOUNT JIMS BARGAIN CENTER
In The Village Of North Haverhill, NH On Route 10
603-787-6807 OPEN EVERY DAY
We Offer AVast Array Of Quality Items You Will Find At
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Remember - Prices Are Born Here And Raised Elsewhere &
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Friends Dont Let Friends Pay Retail !!! Friends Dont Let Friends Pay Retail !!!
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URGENT SAVINGS ALERT!!!
CHANGE OF SEASONS, CHANGE OF INVENTORY!!
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Citrus II Hand Sanitizer 2 for $1
Bag of 12 Pairs of USA Made Socks Only $3.88
Warm Hats Start At Only .88
Gloves From Just .99
Pain Patches 4 for $1
Chain Saw Files $1.88
NEW SEASONAL ITEMS ARRIVING DAILY!
NICE HOUSE LOT OF FURNISHINGS
ON ITS WAY...
Lots of better buy it when you see it Bargains!
SIMILAR SAVINGS THROUGHOUT THE STORE
WE LOVE YOU MOM. KEEP SMILING!
As Always Thank You For Your Support
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WATER TOWER NEAR WOODSVILLE DEPOT
Page A3 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
Northcountry News
PO Box 10 Warren, NH 03279
Phone & Fax 6037645807
Email: ncnewsnh@gmail.com
Web: www.northcountrynewsnh.com
The NORTHCOUNTRY NEWS is published every other Friday by
Bryan Flagg and is circulated free of charge throughout the towns
and communities listed on the front page.
Publisher & Editor Bryan Flagg
Advertising Bryan Flagg / Pat Wilson
Delivery Fulfillment LeeAnn Roberge
Office/Bookkeeping Suzanne Flagg
This paper assumes no financial responsibility for
typographical errors, however we will reprint a correction notice,
and/or that portion of the ad in which an error occurs.
The Northcountry News is proudly published and printed in New
Hampshire using recycled paper and 100% water based inks!
We are printed by the Concord Monitor, Concord, NH
Joseph Patch Library To Host Rebecca Rule Program_______
Heaths
heathsgreenhouse.com 603-823-8500
Open 9am-Closing Rt. 18, Franconia, NH ~ Just off I-93, below Profile High School
ORGANIC GREENHOUSE NURSERY LANDSCAPING
Organic From The Beginning Since 1972
Fall Mums & Perennials Fall Asters, Cabbage & Kale
Hydrangea Bushes Evergreens Fruit Trees & Bushes
Potted Flowers & Herbs Houseplants Fresh Organic Veggies
Farm Fresh Rainbow Eggs
You Can Now Send Us Your
Classified Ads Online!
Go To www.northcountrynewsnh.com,
Click On The Classified Ad Link
And Go From There! Simple.
Continued from page A1
have occurred each decade
since, with an average of 3.4
incidents per year since 2002.
While most hunting-related
incidents do not involve non-
hunters, it's a good idea for hik-
ers and other outdoor enthusi-
asts getting outdoors in the fall
to think safety as well, by wear-
ing blaze orange, sticking to
established trails, and review-
ing the hikeSafe guidelines at
ht t p: / / www. hi kesaf e. com.
Blaze orange pet accessories
are also available.
For more information on dates
and details of N.H. hunting sea-
sons, visit
Time For Blaze Orange In NH__________
http://www.huntnh.com/Huntin
g/hunting.htm.
Rebecca Rule presents
"Ruled & Seconded: Town
Meeting in New Hampshire"
Saturday, October 18th at 1:00
p.m.
Mark your calendars for
the18th to join New Hampshire
storyteller, author and humorist
Rebecca Rule as she regales us
with stories of the rituals, histo-
ry and traditions of town meet-
ing, including the perennial
characters, the literature, the
humor and the wisdom of this
uniquely New England institu-
tion.
Rebecca has travelled the state
presenting and gathering new
stories from her audiences.
Now, through a grant from the
NH Humanities Council, we
have the opportunity to enjoy
the curiosities of Town Meeting
around the state and perhaps
add our own stories to her
repertoire. We are very excited
to have her join us in October!
Please tell your friends and
neighbors about this upcoming
program. We'll start promptly at
1:00p.m. Parking is on the
street or at the Health Center.
Light refreshments will be
served.
In the meantime, stop in the
library to check out one of
Rebecca's books (We have Live
Free and Eat Pie: a Storyteller's
Guide to New Hampshire and
Moved and Seconded: Town
Meeting in New Hampshire, the
Present, the Past and the
Future.)
For more information, please
call the number below or email
us at jpatchlibrary@yahoo.com.
We look forward to seeing you
on the 18th!
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page A4
Northcountry News Picture Of The Week
Beautiful picture of a local beaver! - Kristen Hatch May
If you have a photo which you think could make it as our pic-
ture of the week, let us know. Email it to
ncnewsnh@gmail.com.
by Dave Berman
Bermans Bits
KENNELL
Alan F. Kennell, DDS, MS
Board Certified Orthodontist
Braces for Children & Adults
Smile with Confidence!
Ask about treatment options available for ALL ages!
Certified Provider
Enjoy The Benefits of a Fabulous & Comfortable Smile!
KennellOrtho.com | 524.7404 Laconia | 536.7404 Plymouth
Jacob - Laconia, NH
HELPFUL HINTS & ANNOUNCEMENTS!
The pantry is located under the ambulance service
and is open Fridays from 1-3 PM.
The Pantry would like to thank all of the local gardeners for donating
their wonderful produce this year. All that come to the pantry really
look forward to this. Hope to see you again next year!
Ad Sponsored by the Northcountry News
Warren Wentworth Food Pantry News
Incessantly scouring the uni-
verse (and my back yard) for
the weird, the wacky, and the
thoughtful so you dont have
to.
The high price of education!
My daughter is off at college
and needed a book on account-
ing, but it was pricey... it costs
$300! A book on accounting
costs $300! Accounting. $300.
Anyone else see a problem with
this? Of course, I have to won-
der if the professor wrote the
book or maybe owns stock in
the company. Would
Accounting for Dummies work
as well ($13.32 at Amazon)?
Just wondering.
On the other hand, I guess the
economy at large must be turn-
ing around! My bank account
just paid me some interest!
Yup! I got a full penny... and its
happened before!! Wowsers!
On the third hand, wretched
excess! Theres The
Hibernator, a breakfast dish
boasting a gargantuan 8,000
calories. The owner of the Bear
Grills cafe in England, said that
only 20 customers have so far
attempted to take on The
Hibernator, which weighs 7
pounds and amounts to nearly
four times the daily recom-
mended caloric intake for an
adult man. No one has yet suc-
ceeded in finishing the dish,
which he requires diners to sign
waivers before attacking. Its
called The Hibernator because
if anyone completes it, theyll
have to sleep for a year. The
breakfast includes four fried
eggs, four strips of bacon, eight
sausages, four hash browns, a
four-egg cheese omelet, four
waffles, four pieces of toast,
four pieces of fried bread, four
pieces of black pudding (made
with pigs blood [Id stop right
there]), two ladles of beans,
tomatoes, mushrooms, French
fries and a 2,000-calorie milk-
shake to wash it all
down. [UPI] Adam?
Love those ads: If you find
you are losing too much weight,
cut back the dosage! or If you
have an erection that lasts four
hours, call a doctor! Does
either one ever really happen?
Speaking of ads, if you use (or
want to use) personalized give-
aways for your business (pens,
magnets, calendars, bag clips,
ice scrapers, etc., etc), please
get in touch with me I
Guarantee I Can Save You
Money! Ask for details.
A New Hampshire man who
tried to sell a 70-pound rhinoc-
eros head online is happy that
charges against him have been
dropped. Ari Goldenberg of
Milton was charged by the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service back
in 2012 with selling an endan-
gered species and falsifying
records. Local media report that
there is no proof he broke any
laws. Goldenberg said the black
rhino head was part of a collec-
tion donated to Philips Exeter
Academy in the 1930s. A
woman bought it from the
school and sold the rhino to him
several years ago. He said he
has the paperwork for it. He put
an ad to sell it on Craigslist. A
buyer willing to pay $35,000
turned out to be an undercover
wildlife agent, who confiscated
the head. [www.azcentral.com]
A rhino head? Whod want one
in the first place?
The Sox are done, the Pats
havent really started playing
yet (I am hoping they get their
act together looking pretty
bad so far), and the Bruins are
doing okay in preseason. I so
enjoy watching them all for the
love of the game.
A 19-year-old mother faces
child abuse charges after
deputies say they found her 5-
month-old baby in the trunk of
her car. The Sun-
Sentinel reported that the baby
was lying on a pair of hedge
clippers, a rusted tire iron and
a gas can. Deputies say
they originally pulled over the
vehicle because of the way
Breona Watkins was driving.
When she stopped the car, the
deputy heard a baby crying in
the trunk. Watkins told deputies
that baby had been sitting in the
lap of the 14-year-old passenger
but she didnt want to get a tick-
et, so the teenager slid the baby
into the trunk. Watkins is in jail
under a $7,000 bail.
A former UPS employee in
Arizona is accused of stealing a
package containing a $160,000
diamond and trading it for $20
worth of weed, ABC-15 reports.
Walter Earl Morrison, 20,
thought that the package he
allegedly swiped while unload-
ing cargo at Sky Harbor Airport
in Phoenix contained cash,
according to a probable cause
statement obtained by The
Smoking Gun. In fact, the pack-
age contained one pricey stone.
Authorities say the half-baked
bandit traded the diamond for
the equivalent of two joints of
marijuana. The diamond was
later recovered and returned to
its intended recipient.
Its October already. Where
does the time go? Someone was
right on when they compared
life to a roll of toilet paper the
closer to the end, the faster it
goes!
On an all-too-serious note,
something I dont fully under-
stand. I have lost at least five
acquaintances/friends recently.
I dont know the stories behind
the stories, but if you are read-
ing this and are having issues
with alcohol and/or other drugs,
ask for help while you can.
Take that first (and hardest) step
change has to come from you.
Please. YOLO!
Recently at work, a man came
in and recognized me as being
responsible for the Bermans
Bits that appeared years ago in
Ski Week. Other than his
remembering me offering some
good stuff, he also recalled
the final word in each column:
Later. So, keeping the memo-
ries alive... Later.
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Monday through Thursday
6am-8pm Friday 6am-9pm
Saturdays 8am-8pm
Sundays 8am-6pm
All Meats Cut The Aldrich Way!
3039 Dartmouth College Hwy.
North Haverhill, NH 03774
(603) 787-6241
Quality Meats - Deli - Grocery
www.aldrichgeneralstore.com
BEST MEATS - LOWEST PRICES!
ITS OUR WAY OF DOING THINGS!
We pride ourselves on giving you
the best meats available at
the lowest price.
We can do this because we have
the staff and the expertise.
A SECRET! Watch for our
spectacular Truckload Meat Sale.
It is coming and you won't
believe the prices!
It's The Aldrich Way!
Page A5 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
Piermont Plant Pantry
Rte. 25 Piermont, NH 603-272-4372
PUMPKINS CORN STALKS
Corn, Egg Plant. Cabbage,
Winter Squash
MUMS, ALL SIZES.
Open 7 days - dawn - dusk
Gift Certificates Fresh Eggs Always
www.piermontplantpantry.com
Pollys Pancake Parlor Planning Major Expansion___________
Dorchester Grange Rummage Sale
Slated________________________________
Dennis, Kathie, and Emily Cote, the third and forth generations to manage the family-run
Polly's Pancake Parlor, are planning a major expansion of the renowned Sugar Hill restau-
rant. See story below...
With an eye to the future,
Pollys Pancake Parlor plans
major expansion.
Sugar Hill landmark to begin
construction on new shop and
restaurant this fall
Its been more than 75 years
since Polly and Sugar Bill
Dexter began serving pancakes,
waffles, and French toast in a
renovated woodshed next to
their home. In the ensuing
decades, Pollys Pancake Parlor
has served countless pancakes
to many thousands of visitors
and expanded the dining par-
lor several times.
This fall the renowned restau-
rant will undergo a major
expansion, allowing more effi-
cient operations and a move to
staying open year-round.
Were serving upwards of
58,000 people a year now,
sometimes more than 500 in a
day, said Kathie Aldrich Cote,
who with her husband Dennis
and daughter Emily runs the
family business started by her
grandparents back in 1938.
Weve really outgrown our
space, and after a decade of
thinking about expanding and
improving Pollys, were mov-
ing ahead with plans this fall.
Those plans include removing
the current building, construct-
ed in the late 1800s as a car-
riage house and later used as a
woodshed, and creating a new,
larger pancake parlor on the
Route 117 site overlooking the
mountains of the Presidential,
Franconia, and Kinsman
ranges. The project will retain
Pollys charming character
while modernizing the restau-
rants facilities.
From its initial conception as a
small tea room to complement
the Dexters maple sugaring
business, Pollys has grown
considerably over the decades.
Beyond the dining room, which
has a seating capacity of 65, the
converted shed and adjacent
buildings also contain the
kitchen, a separate bakery and
shop, and a thriving mail order
business, which ships maple
products, pancake mixes, and
other Pollys-centric items
around the country and beyond.
Pollys stone grinds the flour
used in many of its mixes on
site, and Dennis Cote continues
to make the maple spread and
maple sugar used in the
Pancake Parlor and sold at the
shop.
The extra effort and homey
character of Pollys are what
have made it a favorite break-
fast and lunch stop for both
locals and visitors from afar.
Throughout the summer and
fall, there is often a line of din-
ers eagerly waiting for a spot in
the dining room and a taste of
Pollys famous pancakes or one
of its New England-centric
sandwiches assembled on
homemade bread.
The restaurant has been fea-
tured in Road Food, Every Day
with Rachel Ray, Cooking with
Paula Dean, the Food Network
Magazine, New Hampshire
Magazine, and Yankee maga-
zine. Pollys also won a James
Beard Award in the American
Classics category in 2006.
With a new, modern building,
the Cotes and their staff will be
able to more efficiently operate
the restaurant, bakery, and mail
order endeavors. Pollys will
also be able to remain open
year-round, an impossibility in
the current building.
The Dorchester Grange #280
will hold a Fall Rummage &
Bake Sale in Dorchester, NH on
Saturday, October 11, and
Sunday, October 12, from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Dorchester
Town Hall (located just off of
Route 118 on Town House
Road on the Dorchester
Common).
This sale will offer adult and
children's clothing, books,
White Elephant items, and
many delicious homemade
baked goods. All proceeds will
benefit Dorchester Grange
sponsored community events,
outreach programs, and chil-
dren's holiday parties.
For more information, or to
donate gently used household
items, books or clothes, please
leave a message for Darlene
Oaks at 603-786-9357
Rodent Infestation
Mice, Squirrels, Chipmunks
Can cause serious health problems
We can Help
Act now before winter
White Mountain Wildlife Control
(603) 616-1538
Email: CHHodge@roadrunner.com
NH Licensed: Wildlife Control Operators
Member
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page A6
Orford Sand and Gravel
& Piermont Sand and Gravel
Gravel/Stone/Sand/Topsoil
By Appointment Only
Call for Pricing
Office (603) 353-9700
Owner, Stacey Thomson Cell (603) 359-0202
Email: thomsonlogyard@valley.net
Pittsburgh Farms Forests, Wetlands And Fields Permanently Protected______________________________
For the good of wildlife, work-
ing forests, productive farm-
land, and public access for fish-
ing, hunting and other low-
impact recreation, the Society
for the Protection of N.H.
Forests has purchased conser-
vation easements on two
parcels of land belonging to
Roy and Laurel Amey in
Pittsburgs Indian Stream
Valley.
One easement covers 262 acres
that are part of the Amey fami-
lys Maple Ridge Farm, well
known locally for the Ameys
community involvement and
A Day at the Farm events
during the North Countrys
annual Moose Festival. The
farm straddles Tabor Road and
includes two-thirds of a mile
along Indian Stream, an impor-
tant native eastern brook trout
fishery that is a focus area for
habitat protection and restora-
tion efforts led by Trout
Unlimited, one of many part-
ners in the easement purchases.
The farm also features managed
woodlands punctuated by ver-
nal pools, and lush hay fields
where endangered northern har-
riers (a/k/a marsh hawk) are
known to hunt.
The other easement covers
seven acres of hayland and wet-
lands, and runs about 2,000 feet
along both Indian Stream and
the Connecticut River to their
junction just south of Rt. 3.
Both easements guarantee pub-
lic pedestrian access and per-
manent protection from devel-
opment while retaining the
Ameys ownership of the land.
This project was exceptional
in the way it brought so many
conservation partners together
with far-sighted landowners to
protect this special place where
Indian Stream flows into the
Connecticut River, said Jane
Difley, Forest Society presi-
dent/forester. The Connecticut
River watershed has long been
an important focus area for con-
servation, and these pieces are
spectacular additions to the net-
work of conserved lands in this
region.
Partners who provided funding
to purchase the easements
include the Land and
Community Heritage
Investment Program (LCHIP),
the Open Space Institutes
Transborder Fund, the Russell
Farm and Forest Conservation
Foundation, the Hunt
Foundation, three local chapters
and the statewide N.H. Council
of Trout Unlimited, and private
contributors.
The conservation of this land
adds to the mosaic of protected
lands in the area, including the
171,000-acre Connecticut
Lakes Headwaters tract con-
served by a statewide coalition
in 2003. That easement protects
Indian Stream north of the
Amey land. Other nearby
blocks have been added since
then, including the Forest
Societys Washburn Family
Forest, directly across the
Connecticut from the Amey
easements. Roy Ameys brother
John Amey has also conserved
the farm and forestland his fam-
ily owns south of Maple Ridge
Farm. The conservation of land
The conservation easements protect land and access
along Indian Stream, which is an important habitat for
native eastern brook trout. Forest Society photo
across the border in Canada,
including the 13,000 Mount
Hereford Forest, further
strengthens this regions eco-
logical importance.
Maple Ridge Farm is a key
piece within the larger connect-
ed landscape, said Jennifer
Melville, vice president of
grants and loans with the Open
Space Institute (OSI). The insti-
tutes Transborder Fund sup-
ports projects that help to create
protected corridors across inter-
national boundaries that will
enable wildlife to move across
the landscape, adapt and sur-
vive as the climate changes.
Wildlife species dont care
about boundaries. Preliminary
science and mapping supports
conserving this area for species
such as lynx, bobcat, American
marten, showshoe hare, bear
and moose, in the face of cli-
mate change, Melville said.
The success of this project
hinged on the commitment of
the landowners, Roy and Laurel
Amey, to work with the Forest
Society for a successful conser-
vation outcome. Both Roy and
Laurel grew up in the Indian
Stream Valley and have deep
farming roots there going back
three generations. Their moti-
vation for conserving the land,
though, has more to do with
looking ahead than looking
back. They are the parents of
four children and the grandpar-
ents of six, and they enjoy
opening their farm to kids in the
community to share with them a
connection to and love for the
land.
I decided a long time ago I was
just a steward of this land and I
wanted to take the best care of
the land and buildings I could
for the next generation, Roy
Amey said.
Taking the best care includes
the conservation easements,
which will ensure that the land
stays intact and undeveloped
forever, and will continue to
provide access for fishing,
hunting, walking and other low-
impact recreation to the com-
munity. As you get older you
see whats been destroyed,
developed, changed, Amey
said. I want this place to stay
beautiful.
Founded in 1901, the Society
for the Protection of New
Hampshire Forests is the states
oldest and largest non-profit
land conservation organization.
Supported by 10,000 families
and businesses, the Forest
Societys mission is to perpetu-
ate the states forests by pro-
moting land conservation and
sustainable forestry. The organ-
ization owns 53,000 conserved
acres of land in New Hampshire
and holds conservation ease-
ments on another 130,000
acres.
Northcountry News
Supporting All
Things Local
Since 1989.
Now Celebrating
Over 25 Years
Of Serving The
North Country!
A Huge Thank You
To All Of our
Readers And
Advertisiers For
Making It All
Possible!
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Page A7 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
World Class Ice Dancing Ensemble To Perform At PSU______
The Schilling Beer Company of Littleton, NH celebrated their first anniversary recently, with
a festive Oktoberfest event with the Mad Bavarian Horn Band. North Country Senator Jeff
Woodburn along with Littleton Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Lauren
Anderson presented a state proclamation to Schilling's owners, Jeff Cuzzens and John
Lenzini. (Courtesy Armorfoto)
Gas Diesel Deli Meats Groceries
Beer Lottery Cigarettes & More
We Also Have Hunting & Fishing Licenses And
OHRV Registrations
Route 25 Wentworth, NH 764-5553
We Have 24/7 Fuel Pumps
With A Credit Card
Mon - Thurs. 5am - 8pm Fri 5am - 9pm
Sat 6am - 9pm Sun 6am - 8pm
Dogs Ready to Aid Vets
If you're a veteran with PTSD that hasn't been handled well thus
far, or a veteran with a service-related disability, here's a possible
answer for you: dogs. Specially trained Guide and Service dogs
are available for veterans who are blind or disabled by physical,
traumatic brain injury or PTSD.
Patriot PAWS Service Dogs (patriotpaws.org) trains service
dogs to perform services for disabled veterans with the goal of
increasing the veteran's self-sufficiency. Here's a partial list of
what the dogs are trained to do: get help in emergencies, recog-
nize PTSD episodes, take off shoes and socks, help with laundry
(who knew?). Contact Patriot PAWS at 972-772-3282
office@patriotpaws.org.
America's Vet Dogs (www.vetdogs.org) covers a wide range
when it comes to matching dogs with veterans. Dogs are trained
for vision and hearing assistance, climbing stairs and so much
more for seriously injured veterans. It also provides dogs for
physical and occupational therapy at Walter Reed. Contact 1-866-
838-3647 or info@vetdogs.org.
The Department of Veterans Affairs will take care of most of the
costs of providing eligible veterans with Guide or Service dogs.
See www.va.gov/health/serviceandguidedogs.asp for specifics.
Approved veterans will be referred to Assistance Dogs
International (www.assistancedogsinternational.org) for Service
dogs and to National Association of Guide Dog Users
(www.nagdu.org) for Guide dogs. The VA pay for the cost of a
dog and its training, as well as veterinary care, but not for subse-
quent expenses like food.
If you don't need services but want to help veterans who do, go
online to America's Fund (americasfund.org), an arm of the
Semper Fi organization. This non-profit charity steps in to help
veterans with adaptive transportation, home modifications and
emergency funding. It consistently get A-plus and 4-star ratings
from the big charity watchdogs. If you can, open your wallet and
send them some money.
Freddy Groves regrets that he cannot personally answer reader
questions, but will incorporate them into his column whenever
possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com.
c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
The countrys premier ice danc-
ing company, Ice Theatre of
New York, will be performing
in Plymouth, NH on Sunday,
October 26, 2014 at 3:00 pm.
The event will include a newly
commissioned performance
called ICE: Dance, On Golden
Pond and will feature an
ensemble of top international
and Olympic competitors,
including US Mens champion,
Ryan Bradley. This is the only
performance in Northern New
England this season. Ticket
prices to the event at the
Hanaway Rink at Plymouth
State College range from $18 -
$28.
Art and culture critics have her-
alded the work of the non-profit
skating company. The New
York Times calls Ice Theatre of
New York The best hope for
the future simply because they
recall what skating has the
potential to be: dancing on air.
Olympic television viewers are
familiar with ice dancing as a
sport, but ensemble perform-
ances with a modern dance and
ballet focus bring the art form
to a new level.
This will be a homecoming of
sorts for Artistic Director,
Douglas Webster, who grew up
in the White Mountains.
Webster has gone on to become
a well-known international
skating choreographer.
Bringing Ice Theatre of New
York back to Plymouth is a
highlight for me, says Webster.
Returning to my roots and
sharing with the community my
love of ice dancing as both an
athletic and artistic endeavor is
important to me.
I travel all over the world as a
skating choreographer but
theres no place like my home
state and Im excited to bring a
high quality performance to
New Hampshire. The
Plymouth event features a
newly commissioned work
called "Flight," a quartet creat-
ed by Webster to the music of
"On Golden Pond."
Webster has also been involved
in creating the upcoming out-
door skating rink at Strawbery
Banke Museum in Portsmouth.
He will be the Guest Artistic
Director at Puddle Dock Pond
this winter.
Tickets now on sale at Silver
Center for the Arts Box Office
603-535-2787 or online at
http://www.plymouth.edu/sil-
ver-center/buy-tickets/
www.curtnrod.com
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page A8
A Walk In The Woods With County Forester David Falkenham_______________________________________
White Mountains
DAR To Meet______
By David Falkenham,
UNH Cooperative Extension
Grafton County Forester
It is possible that I could be
considered a tree-hugger,
depending of course on your
perspective of my forest
philosophies. I have spent my
life working and playing in the
forest. As I wander through the
woods I have been known to
stop and stare admiringly up at
the trees. As a forester I have
been and will be responsible for
the cutting of trees for human
use. Am I a tree hugger?
I am just as fascinated with
small trees as I am the large
ones. I am much more interest-
ed in forest diversity than I am
in the size of the trees. A recent
clear-cut that is loaded with a
mixed tangle of plants is rich
ground for plentiful wildlife.
Large trees inspire awe and
daydreaming; thickets of small
trees trigger the instinct to look
for wildlife sign. All trees,
including small trees, need hugs
too.
Forest diversity also means
diversity of uses, whether it is
human use, wildlife use, or
preferably a little of both. This
is where New Hampshire really
shines. Throughout my years as
a forester I have always
admired the spectrum of forest
uses and ownership patterns
that New Hampshire boasts.
These ownership and use pat-
terns are part of a strong New
England land ethic and are part
of the fabric of our rural cul-
ture. Farmers, loggers,
landowners and foresters, along
with a core of support groups,
work very hard to create an
open and forested landscape
that supports many uses, recre-
ation, forestry, farming and pro-
tected wilderness areas. All of
this is fairly equally represented
and accessible throughout the
state. If you need a place to
walk in the woods in New
Hampshire, it is not hard to
find.
Every year I also explore the
Adirondack Mountains of
upstate New York. In this area,
there really are only two colors
of land use and ownership. The
forest preserves of the
Adirondack Park are vast and
logging is not allowed. The
Adirondack Park is an amazing
place and I appreciate the
opportunity to dip my canoe
paddle into some of the finest
wilderness waterways available
in the east. The trees in this for-
est are old and reach to the sky.
However with no logging, there
is little forest diversity and
equally limited wildlife.
Consequently, the only eco-
nomic activity here is second
homes and tourism.
On the other side of the
Adirondack coin are the very
large private landowners. These
landowners have a vested eco-
nomic interest in their land and
they are good at gaining back
their investment either through
developed tourism or heavy
logging. In this area, land is
either heavily logged, devel-
oped, or completely protected.
There isnt much color or eco-
nomic stability in that equation.
There is plenty of logging in
New Hampshire but it is a per-
centage of a large mixture of
land-based uses. New
Hampshire has incredible land-
scape diversity, both public and
private, and that diversity is
part of our culture and a con-
tributor to our economic stabili-
ty. We have great organizations
that support this land-based
way of life and help landowners
make decisions about their land
and I am very proud to be part
of that support as a County
Extension Forester.
I love the Adirondacks, but I
love coming home! Every year
I sense a slight bit of disap-
pointment as the waters cool
and I hang up my canoe for the
season.
But Hunting Season is coming
and the dogs are ready for some
of the finest walks in the woods
of the year back in the land
were grouse, woodcock, and
other forest critters abound.
The White Mountains Chapter,
Daughters of the American
Revolution, will hold their last
meeting of the year on
Saturday, October 11, at 1:00
PM.
The meeting will be held at
Riverglen House, 55 Riverglen
Lane, Littleton. The program
feature will be A
Patriotic Quilt of the 1930s
presented by Nola Forbes who
will display and talk about a
red, white and blue quilt featur-
ing the 48 states at the time and
DC.
We will again be cutting fleece
lap robes for local veterans in
nursing homes; the ones made
at the October 2013 were so
appreciated that we wish to
expand the number of veterans
receiving one.
Bring your favorite sharp scis-
sors and 1 yard piece of Polar
Fleece to cut and fringe. Easy
instructions will be available at
the meeting; there will be a few
extra shears and fleece lengths
available.
The building is handicap acces-
sible. Guests and the public are
welcome and always cordially
invited to DAR meetings, and
refreshments will be served.
Additional information about
the meeting, or membership in
the Daughters of the American
Revolution (DAR) is available;
please contact Chapter Regent
Marsha Stewart at (603) 837-
9513 or Assistant Treasurer
Elaine LaDuke at (603) 444-
5948.
Share your Dreadful picture with us either on our Facebook page at:
Precision Car Care, or email us at precisioncarcare.nh@gmail.com
Precision Car Care 65 Smith St. Woodsville, NH (603) 243-0334
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www.yourbudgetlumber.com
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NORTHCOUNTRY NEWS
NORTHCOUNTRY NEWS
Letters & Opinions Legal Notices Help Wanted Restaurant Guide Letters & Opinions Legal Notices Help Wanted Restaurant Guide
Classifieds Puzzles & Comics Business & Church Director y Events Classifieds Puzzles & Comics Business & Church Director y Events
Section B Section B
Section B 16 Page Pull Out
- Tom Ryan Photo
The Adventures
of Tom & Atticus
Harmans Cheese & Country Store
1400 Route 117 Sugar Hill, NH 03586
www.HarmansCheese.com 823-8000
Open Daily 9:30 am 5:00 pm
Really Aged Cheddar
Maple Syrup, Gourmet Foods,
Unique Gifts
Free Tasting Samples
Lately I've been keeping com-
pany during the late hours of
each night with May Sarton's
"Journal of a Solitude." I've
encountered her poetry for
years and whenever I do I
appreciate her gift, but her jour-
nal is something deeper, more
honest and genuine. The late
New Hampshire poet lived
down in the Monadnock area
and well understood the small
towns that dot our state and the
land and weather we all know
intimately.
Each night, I read an entry. I
portion it out so that I will not
finish the book too quickly.
Each morning, as Atticus and I
walk or hike, her words return
to me while we pass through the
colorful foliage, along earthen
paths, by rivers and ponds, to
ledges with views more breath-
taking than I've ever noticed.
For this certainly has been the
best fall foliage I've seen in
years. And just as the colors
and the light have been lumi-
nous, so are her words. How
fortunate we are to live here,
and how fortunate to have poets
and writers who understand
New Hampshire. As they
reflect this great area and the
natural world that surrounds us,
Nature reflects who we are as
we surrender to her charms.
There is something in Sarton's
journal entries that pierce me.
A stark reality made beautiful.
It's exhibited in the way she
sees the trees and her words
offer lessons to each of us.
Perhaps lessons we already
know, but need a gentle
reminder to see clearly once
again. How appropriate she
starts off in the fall and notes
the changing of the landscape.
Just as we are currently wit-
nessing as we look out the
kitchen window, walk the dog,
or drive to work.
As Atticus continues to age I
am faced with a new reality.
He's twelve now; in the autumn
years of his life. He's not as
quick or strong as he once was.
His hearing is failing - a bit.
His eyes don't see as clearly as
night, nor do they judge depth
as accurately either. But he's
still well, still enjoys getting out
and about. If we are not out
three times a day he stares at me
as I write to remind me we need
to be outside. "Get a move on,"
his stern look says to me.
"Daylight is burning."
As Atticus ages, I find myself
growing up a bit. For when
dogs are young or in the prime
of their lives, we are all chil-
dren in their company. But I am
learning to accept things that
the young may not quite com-
prehend. One of them is know-
ing we won't be returning to
nearly any of the highest peaks
we've done together. Not at his
age. And the next time I return
to Franconia Ridge or the
Bonds or the Presidentials, it
will be without him. Hopefully
it will be years down the road.
But still I have been forced to
accept the change we all must
deal with when those we love
turn elderly and cannot get
around quite as easily as they
once did.
But amidst the loss, there is a
grace to be found. Look no fur-
ther than the trees that blaze
bright red, orange, and yellow
everywhere we look. May
Sarton wrote: "I think of the
trees and how simply they let
go, let fall the riches of a sea-
son, how without grief (it
seems) they can let go and go
deep into their roots for renewal
and sleep." Then she added: "Is
this a key? Keep busy with sur-
vival. Imitate the trees. Learn to
lose in order to recover, and
remember that nothing stays the
same for long, not even pain,
psychic pain. Sit it out. Let it all
pass. Let it go."
It seems that is the lesson we
are learning in Atticus's old age.
To let go of the past. Past
expectations. Past performanc-
es on the trails. We both are
older than we were when we
started hiking ten years ago, but
while I'm middle aged, my
four-legged friend is now
becoming elderly.
Acceptance has come in the
form of appreciating nature
whenever we experience it and
wherever we can. So what if
we don't go as high as we used
to or traverse for as many
miles? In the White Mountains
we are blessed with waterfalls
and valleys, ponds that are
secreted away where the moose
go to play and eat, and rivers
both strong and gentle. The air
is clean, the wildlife abounds,
and we are still free as we wish
to be as we make our way into
the forest each time we enter
one, leaving the car and the rest
of the busy world behind.
Nature calls to us and we still
respond. Our age doesn't mat-
ter. As we grow older we tem-
per our desires and find new
places to embrace and different
ways of getting lost in nature in
order to get lost in ourselves.
Nature teaches us what we need
to learn. We merely have to
take the time to pause and pay
attention. Right now the trees
are reminding me that in the
autumn they are at their most
beautiful. Looking to Atticus
now as I write this, his eyes are
a tad bit cloudier, his muzzle
has a touch of gray in it.
Beyond that though, he shines
as he always has. Only this
morning, in mountain air clean
and cool, he bounced along a
trail that traces the Saco River
like he was a pup again. Young
and free and happy.
The passage of the seasons is
much like the passage of life.
There are lessons to be learned
and gifts to received, no matter
the time of year. No matter the
time of life.
Just a reminder that you can
always follow Tom & Atticus
along each and every day on
their bog at:
tomandatticus.blogspot.com.
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page B2
North Country Dining Guide
North Country Dining Guide
At The Common Warren, NH
603-764-5288
Beer & Wine & Full Liquor Lic. M/C & Visa
Mon., Wed. & Thurs. 6am-2pm Closed Tuesdays
Fri . 6am -8pm Sat. 6am -11pm Sun. 8am -2pm
Tenney Mtn. Highway Plymouth, NH
536-6330 or 536-9869 (yumy)
Open Daily At 11am GEORGESSEAFOOD.COM
All-U-Can-Eat Days!
(While Supplies Last - Served Until 7:30pm)
MONDAY - Shrimp & Cup of Chowder
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WEDNESDAY - Haddock & Cup of Chowder
GREAT LUNCHEON SPECIALS!!
Tuesday is SENIOR CITIZEN DAY 15% Off
(Age 60 or over excludes all you can eat & other specials)
FISH FRY FRYDAY - Golden Fried Haddock
Inc. cup of chowder, salad, potato & veg.
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We Have
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Friday Eves $10.99(Tax & Gratuity not inc.)
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Page B3 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
www.Davis RealtyNHVT.com
davisrealty1958@gmail.com
139 Central Street,
Woodsville, NH 03785
(603) 747-3211
SOUTH RYGATE, VT New Englander home
features 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood
floors, country kitchen, living room, family
room, den, covered patio with barbecue
fireplace and sits nicely above the road with
land and brook frontage across the street.
Detached 2 car garage. Plenty of square
footage. Room for the whole family.
$98,500.
BATH, NH Enjoy the Ammonoosuc River
from this location. Cape with 1400 sq. ft..
Features 3 Bedrooms, 1st floor laundry,
large kitchen, wood flooring, metal roof,
fireplace, front porch and a level back
yard. This property needs renovations,
but will be lovely when completed.
$49,900.
NORTH HAVERHILL, NH Splendid renovation
skills brings this historic unique 3 bedroom
Cape back to a charming home. Formal Dining
Room, Eatin Kitchen, hardwood floors, gas
heat stove and pellet stove. Plumbed for
Master Bedroom Bath, Terraced gardens and
oversize Amish Shed. Convenient to town.
Wonderful setting. Skiing, snowmobiling,
hunting and other activities in the area and
surrounding locations. $147,500.
LISBON, NH Lovely home. Very solidly
constructed. Perfect for any kind of
financing in a nice neighborhood near
school. Features include 4 Bedrooms, 2
baths, Formal Dining Room, Living Room
and eat in Kitchen. Large basement with
woodstove and forced hot water heating
system. Move in condition. $129,000.
HAVERHILL, NH. Summer and winter fun awaits
you. Walk across the street to the lake, wonderful
screened in porch for relaxing and entertaining, 3
bedrooms, living room with double sliders and
fireplace, dining area, loft area for kids to play,
family room in lower level with 2 of the bed
rooms, walkout lower level to a good size deck,
storage shed, septic replaced 2012, very well
maintained home. Enjoy mountain lakes ameni
ties with no association fees. $151,500.
HAVERHILL, NH Situated right on the
Lake. Chalet with plenty of natural light.
Cozy up to the woodstove. Open concept
Living Room/Kitchen, Loft, 3 Bedrooms,
sliders to deck overlooking the lake. Great
place for vacation or year round.
Mountain Lakes offers many amenities
without association fees. $179,000.
by Suzanne Flagg
NORTHCOUNTRY
COOKIN
From Here
To Iraq
And Beyond!
Northcountry
News
Read By
Thousands!
Now Online Too!
northcountrynewsnh.com
WE WELCOMELISTINGS
COMMERCIAL&RESIDENTIAL
Barbara Currier - Broker
Bill Waldrip - Assoc. Broker
Clinton Clay, Assoc. Broker
Joan M.Clay, Sales Assoc.
Kim Gould, Sales Assoc.
603-968-7796
Corner of Rte. 3 & 175 Holderness, NH
Mon-Fri 9-4 Sat 10-3 Sun by apt.
WARREN, NH- This beautiful log
home built in 2009 sits back from
the road on a long private driveway
that protects your privacy. Built to
the owners specifications it is very
detail orientated. This property has
a nice view of the mountains that
could be panoramic with some cut-
ting and trimming. Large front
yard for vehicle parking and room
for guests. Wildlife is abundant in
the area. This could be the home you have been waiting for !! High
School students may go to Plymouth, Orford or Woodsville.
$349,900.
pineshoresllc.com
CAMPTON, NH- Come build
your dream on the nice country lot,
on a dead end street. Located in a
well established neighborhood.
The streets are paved. Close to
snowmobile trails, I-93, shopping,
skiing. This lot is snuggled in at the
base of the White Mountains. Easy
access to the Lakes and Mountains.
Something to do in all the season.
Come enjoy the quite. $39,900
NEWHAMPTON, NH- A 51 acre
parcel of land near the
Ashland/New Hampton town line.
This property has some beautiful
views (with cuttings).It would
make a perfect private estate or a
new sub-division. Sub-division
plans already done with road lay-
outs, etc. Road has to be updated
before sub-division approval. The
property is abutted by the Scribner
State Forest. I93, shopping, boating, skiing, lakes , mountains, and
PSU are close by. An easy walk to Ashland Village. Sub-division
needs the road updated to be accepted by the Town of New
Hampton. This property is close to town but extremely private.
Make it your own country estate or complete the sub-division road
for an investment property. You could also build your home on a
large portion of the land and with sub-division approval sell some
of the lots. The best of both can be yours. Property now in current
use. $179,900
WARREN, NH- Location!
Location! Run your business in
one unit and rent the other to
help with the cost. Or if your
looking for an investment. This
is one of the best location with
visibility on Water Street,
Route 25 and the RV/
Snowmobile Trail. This is a one
level building for easy access
with plenty of parking. Located
in the center of everything going on in the quaint little town
of Warren. $124,900.
Our favorite winter squash is
butternut, so Ithought I would
share different cooking tech-
niques with those who are also
fans of this delicious winter
squash variety.
1. Steam-bake: Cut the squash
in half, lengthwise. Place
squash, cut side down, into a
glass baking dish, and add
cup of water to the baking dish,
cover tightly with foil and bake
at 350 F for one hour. Remove
from oven and let cool slightly
before handling. Flip squash
over and scoop out seeds and
membranes and discard. Then,
scoop out the flesh and mash
with butter, brown sugar, honey
or maple syrup. Serve as a side
dish.
2. Roast: Slice the squash into
thick, half moon slices, or
peel and dice the squash. Toss
squash with olive oil and cinna-
mon and roast at 400 F for 35-
40 minutes.
3. Peel, then boil: Peel squash
and remove seeds and mem-
brane. Dice the flesh and boil
for 15 to 20 minutes in a small
amount of water (but dont
allow all the water to evaporate)
or until soft. Eat as is with but-
ter, or mash with butter, maple
syrup and black pepper.
4. Microwave: Butternut
squash can be cooked whole in
the microwave. Cut several slits
through the peel and into the
flesh to allow steam to escape.
A medium-sized squash will
take about 10 minutes to cook
in the microwave. Remove
carefully as it will be extremely
hot! Let cool before handling!
Cut in half lengthwise, scoop
out and discard seeds and mem-
brane, before scooping out the
flesh.
5. Bake: Cut the squash in half
lengthwise and place flesh side
down on a foil lined baking
sheet. Bake at 400 F for 30 to
40 minutes. The squash will be
soft and tender when it has
cooked through. Some people
choose to leave the seeds in
when baking and scoop them
later and some prefer to cut out
the seeds and membrance
before baking.
Piermont Historical Society News______
Campton Historical Society News______
On Columbus Day, October 13,
from 1 to 3 p.m., the Society is
sponsoring a tour of the historic
Deal Harness shop on Church
Street in Piermont across from
the entrance to the Cedar Grove
Cemetery. A view back in time!
On October 23, at 7 p.m. at the
Old Church Building in
Piermont, local author Michelle
Sherburne will discuss her book
on Abolition and the
Underground Railroad in our
area. Michelle is a Vermont his-
torian and has spent years
researching the Underground
railroad and the Civil War. She
also co-authored A Vermont
Hill Town in the Civil War:
Peachams Story. Sherburnes
latest book by History Press.
St. Albans Raid: Confederate
Attack on Vermont was just
released in September in time
for the 150th anniversary cele-
brations.
Following the presentation,
refreshments will be served.
White Mountain Photography-
Presented by: John Anderson,
Monday, October 20th at 7:00
This is a unique opportunity to
come hear a local expert talk
about his craft and expertise
with a camera. John will talk
about the history of photogra-
phy in the white mountains and
talking about his work as artist
in residence for the White
Mountain National Forest.
John's work is in collections,
both public and private around
the country. He is a member of
the League of New Hampshire
Craftsmen, and shows his work
throughout the state. In addition
to being a master of his craft, he
is also an outstanding member
of the community helping out at
the local elementary school, is
the coordinator of the photogra-
phy department at Plymouth
State University, is on the states
roster of Artist in Education.
Check out his work at:
http://imagczar.zenfolio.com/w
mnf
The presentation will be at the
Old Town Hall in Campton,
which is handicap accessible,
and open to the public. For
information about the Society,
check our web site at
www.camptonhistorical.org
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page B4
- Notices, Letters, Opinions, Help Wanted, & More! -
Letter To The Editor_______________________________________
Letter To The Editor_______________________________________
Letter To The Editor_______________________________________
Letter To The Editor___________________
Letter To The Editor___________________
The Town of Warren, NH
is seeking volunteers
to help in the construction of trails in
the Warren Town Forest on
Sunday, October 12th from 9 am to 4 pm.
Contact Judy at (603) 764-5780 for more
information and to sign up.
NOTICE
POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT
HEALTH OFFICER/DEPUTY HEALTH OFFICER
WARREN, NH
The Town of Warren, NH is seeking qualified
applicants for two municipal positions:
Health Officer and Deputy Health Officer.
This is a volunteer position working with the primary
goal of maintaining and improving the health and
well-being of all Warren residents.
Submit a Letter of Interest to Judy Tautenhan,
Town Administrator, at administrator@warren-nh.com.
Positions will remain open until filled. The Town of
Warren is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
The 2014 Annual Meeting of Ammonoosuc Community Health
Services will be held Wednesday, October 29
th
at 5:30 pm in the
Board Room at ACHS, 25 Mount Eustis Road, Littleton, NH. The
public is welcome to attend.
PUBLIC NOTICE
Ammonoosuc Community Health Services
Your Community Health Partner for Life
Franconia Littleton Warren WhlLeFeld Woodsville
25 Mount Eustis Road, Littleton, NH 03561
603.444.2464 www.ammonoosuc.org
Mr Meyers,
In reference to your last letter,
Sep 12. The baiting issue has
been brought to the Legislature
in the past and its failed and its
futile. In the last session F&G
had gone before JLCAR ( joint
legislative committee on admin-
istrative rules ) and it was
determined that the Executive
director, with the consent of the
commission has, Statutory
Authority for setting bear sea-
sons found in RSA 208:1-a, and
shall adopt rules, pursuant to
RSA 541-A relative to opening
and closing the seasons for tak-
ing bear, fixing the number bear
to be taken and the methods and
manner of taking and reporting
of same.
The Department, under statute
RSA 207:58, Is given guidance
which states " The legislature
finds it is in the best interest of
the state and its citizens to reg-
ulate, protect , restore, and con-
serve the wildlife resources of
the state under a uniform
scheme of management through
the F&G department.
It almost makes it sound like the
Legislative form of government
doesn't want the responsibility
of methods and manners but
know this, If the Gold Dome
were to take on that responsibil-
ity we would be looking at new
House and Senate Bills every
year on season setting, meth-
ods, manners, numbers, ect. It
would be a quagmire. I would
It seems not only autumn has
arrived, but it is also the season
where politicians use our roads
for free advertising with their
ubiquitous signs.
To me it is an egotistical dream
come true for many of them to
see their names plastered up
and down the highways and
byways of America.
Personally, if I see the same
name in a row, over and over, I
make a mental note NOT to vote
for that person, as I find it
extremely irritating. I think
many feel as I do. Perhaps
politicians should do a poll on
Just wanted to let you know I
continue to enjoy your free
Newspaper which I pick up at
Hannaford in Plymouth.
My favorite parts include the
great bird and animal pictures,
the bits of history, and the page
shared by Elizabeth Terp and
Beth Weick. Elizabeth always
has something new to make me
History is indeed repeating
itself
A letter appeared in a recent
edition of a local paper
(History is repeating itself)
in which the writer made a
rather lame attempt to dispar-
age the Koch brothers as being
malefactors of great wealth.
Now, a malefactor is defined as
someone who violates the law
and/or does harm or evil, espe-
cially toward another. The
body of the letter in question
consists largely of quotes from
other writers and the Sugar Hill
resident who penned this smear
provides no evidence or exam-
ples of why he believes this to
be an accurate description of
the Koch Brothers.
I believe that the history repeat-
ing itself is that of, when your
record and positions in regard
to actual issues is not some-
thing it would benefit your
cause to talk about, resorting to
personal attacks and smears
against those who disagree with
you.
I think that we would all do well
to brace ourselves for the
inevitable onslaught of this type
of behavior from Democrats
during the current election
cycle. They will, no doubt, con-
tinue their efforts to demonize
the TEA Party and the Koch
brothers, discourage and pun-
ish hard work/success, increase
the number of people dependent
upon the government and resur-
rect the phony concept of a
Republican war on women.
Russell T. Cumbee
Franconia, NH
just how successful such litter-
ing is.
And please, all of you running
for one thing or another, take
them away after the election
instead of leaving them to be an
eyesore (which they are any-
way) and create environmental
waste that others have to pick
up.
It is no better to me than seeing
McDonald's bags, et al, strewn
around during tourist season.
Marsha Downs
Warren, NH
suggest that If you belong to a
Hunting and Fishing club, and
if that club determines that bait-
ing is unethical ( I agree that it
is the " low road " ) you need to
lobby the Commission at F&G
to end it.
You will find that the
Enforcement dept will not back
you on this for the argument
that baiting is a management
tool. You will find also that Its
the Guides who will fight tooth
and nail on this issue. How else
can you turn a $ so easily ?
Sorry I cant be of more help on
this subject.
Eric T Rottenecker
Bristol, NH
think, even if I don't always
agree. Beth's homesteading
journey gives me insight into a
simpler way of life that so many
of us have come to believe is
impossible to live. She is as
close to Thoreau as one is likely
to get in this day and age.
In addition, going thru your ads
always give me a resource I
either need and may need in the
future.
Thanks for all the work I know
is needed to provide us with this
publication.
Health & Peace,
Betty Ann Trought
Dorchester, NH
Again another anti hunter who if
he doesn't hunt, shouldn't care
about a sport he obviously does-
n't know anything about. I'm not
into football, baseball, basket-
ball, boxing, ultimate fighting or
whatever. If a bunch of guys
want to chase some ball down a
court and kick it into a basket so
be it. If two guys, or in this day
and age girls want to pound
themselves into a coma, so be it.
Until you have participated in
an event, don't put down others
that do it until you have an idea
of what its all about. Why don't
you partisan the government to
rip the teeth and claws out of
coyotes, wolves, cougars, and
bears. It would give the rabbits,
squirrels, deer, and other vege-
tarian animals a more fair
chance of survival if you could.
Heck why not cut off 2 of their
legs so their like man and cant
even catch their food. Its illegal
to hunt at night, per your night
vision gear, and any 10 year old
child born in a family of ethical
hunters, knows that.
Wonder what your excuse is!
Probably born in New York City.
It is the hunters job to take game
by the means of trying to trick or
outsmart his game, if possible.
The best cover scent in the world
sometimes doesn't work. Did
you see the twig that just sent
your arrow two feet over the
deers back. When your musket
doesn't fire because you forgot
to put the primer in and there is
a 400 pound bear that any
hunter would love to take.
Hunting isnt just about killing.
There are things that happen
that leave you with memories
you never forget, good ones if
youre lucky to have bested all
the things that can go wrong,
and memories of what could
have been, when it goes bad.
We are in the animals environ-
ment when we step into the
woods to hunt them. Means of
taking them just help and thats
all. There are no guarantees.
Stepping into a penned in chick-
en coup to kill your chicken for
the freezer may be what youre
talking about in for fair chase.
Tens of thousands of hunting
licenses sold last year. Get a
hold of fish and game and find
out what the percentage was for
hunters that harvested a bear or
deer.
Hopefully Maine doesn't pass
any more ignorant laws against
the hunters. I wish you people
that are so against killing ani-
mals, cared about an unborn
human being as much. That is
cruelty in my eyes, in the worst
form.
Nothing in this letter will change
this persons thinking. But the
person complaining about oth-
ers being unethical is often the
one that should be looking back
at themselves, as in so many
cases of people complaining
against others.
Sincerely,
R.L. Weeks, Danbury, NH
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Page B5 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
North Country Happenings...
Breast Cancer Benefit
for
Warren, NH Resident
Gloria Avery
October 18th
at the
Warren Town Hall
Spaghetti Dinner Buffet
With All The Fixins!
5-7pm Dinner
7-10pm Karaoke
$10 Per Adult $5 Kids 6-12
Under 6 Free
Please Come & Enjoy The Fun
Sing & Dance
All For A wonderful Cause...
Wentworth
Congregational Church
Annual Harvest Supper
Saturday October 25th
5-6:30pm at the Church Vestry
$10 Adults $6 Under 12
Turkey with all the Fixins
Pies, Coffee, Juice, Soda
Warren Masonic Hall - breakfast
from 7-9 on the first Sunday of
each month. Hope to see you
there.
-----------------------------------------
Breakfast - All you can eat, 2nd
Sunday of each month from
7:30-10am at the Masonic Hall,
North Haverhill, NH. $5adult;
$2.50 child.
-----------------------------------------
The Warren/Wentworth Food
Pantry, serving residents in
Warren, Wentworth and Glencliff,
is located behind the Warren
Wentworth Ambulance Service
building and is open every Friday
from 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. For eligibility
information or to make a dona-
tion, stop by or call 764-5265. The
pantry gratefully accepts food or
monetary donations as well as
donations of personal and house-
hold care items.
-----------------------------------------
Haverhill Memorial Post 5245 and
their Ladies Axillary hold their
regular monthly meeting at 7pm
on the third Thursday of each
month at the VFW Post in North
Haverhill. All members are invited
to attend.
-----------------------------------------
For all upcoming events at D
Acres - (D Acres is located at 218
Streeter Woods Road in
Dorchester, NH.) Visit
www.dacres.org.
-----------------------------------------
If you have any talent at all, come
join us on Thursday Evenings,
Open Mic Night, at the
Greenhouse Restaurant in Warren,
NH. Come by to listen or join in!
Junction of Routes 25 & 25-C in
Warren, NH. Support our area
musicians. Come join us!
-----------------------------------------
To find out the on-going happen-
On-Going Events
ings at the Squam Lakes Natural
Science Center in Holderness,
NH. You can call 603-968-7194 or
visit them online at: www.nhna-
ture.org
-----------------------------------------
To find out the on-going happen-
ings at the AMC Pinkham Notch
Center where programs are free &
open to the public: AMC Pinkham
Notch Visitor Center, Route 16,
Pinkham Notch, NH. For more
information contact the AMC at
(603) 466-2727 or www.out-
doors.org.
-----------------------------------------
For ongoing schedule at Silver
Center for the Arts, Plymouth,
NH, call 603-536-ARTS or visit
them on the web at:
www..plymouth.edu/silver
-----------------------------------------
Wentworth Historical Society
meets monthly, 7:00 p.m, every
third Thursday, April - Dec. at
the Historical Society Museum in
Wentworth. Join us for historical
topics and stimulating conversa-
tion.
-----------------------------------------
The Baker's River Grange meets
the 2nd and 4th Friday every
month, 7:30 p.m., Grange Hall,
Rte.25, Rumney. Visitors wel-
comed!
-----------------------------------------
Anxiety Umbrella is a new Peer
Support Group for people with
Anxiety related disorders. These
include: Generalized or Social
Anxiety, Panic (attacks), Obsessive
Compulsive, Phobias & fears.
This group will meet the 1st & 3rd
Thursday of each month at the
Cottage Hospital Occupational
Therapy Waiting area at 6: PM.
For more info. ANXIETYUM-
BRELLA@gmail.com or call
Lurette @ (603)838-5595 or
Robin @ (603) 747-2527. You are
not alone in your struggle!
Saturday, October 11th from
6:30-9am - Pythian Sisters
Breakfast at the Warren, NH
Pythian Hall. $6/ea. Scrambled
eggs, link sausage, toast, home
fries, coffee, juice, sausage and
gravy biscuits.
-----------------------------------------
Corned Beef & Cabbage Supper,
Saturday, October 11th from 5-
7pm at Bath Congregational
Church, Bath, NH. Adults $12;
Children 5-12 is $4; under 5 is free.
-----------------------------------------
Wentworth Historical Society is
holding the October 16, meeting
at Small Fruit Farm Antiques 117
Route 25 Wentworth, N.H. 03282.
Evie and John Michaud specialize
in NE Primitives and will share
many unique items and stories
with us. We will meet in the Red
Barn at 6:00 p.m. instead of the
regular 7:00 p.m. Please call 764-
5256 or 786-9783 for directions or
questions..
-----------------------------------------
OCTOBER 11, 12 & 13, -
Columbus Day Weekend The
Lincoln Fall Craft Festival will be
held October 11 through 13 at the
Village Shops and Town Green
along Main Street, Lincoln NH.
Enjoy glorious mountain foliage
among the over 150 booths or
arts, crafts, food and live music.
Free Admission, rain, snow or
shine. Directions: From Route 93
take Exit 32.
For information call 603-332-2616
Upcoming Events
or visit www.castleberryfairs.com.
-----------------------------------------
Walk to Prevent Suicide - Support
the American Foundation for
Suicide Prevention by participat-
ing in the Out of the Darkness
Community Walk on Saturday,
October 18 at Woodsville High
School , 9 High Street in
Woodsville, NH. Proceeds will
benefit local and national suicide
prevention and awareness pro-
grams. Registration and the walk
with start at Woodsville High
School. Registration time: 9 AM.
To register, donate or to learn
more, please visit www.out-
ofthedarkness.org or call 888-333-
2377.
-----------------------------------------
Wentworth - Congregational
Church Annual Harvest Supper
Saturday, October 25th; 5-
6:30pm at the Church Vestry; $10
Adults $6 Under 12. Turkey with
all the Fixins. Pies, Coffee, Juice,
Soda.
------------------------------------------
North Country Home Health &
Hospice Flu Clinic Schedule -
Haverhill area: Horse Meadow
Senior Center on Friday, October
17th, 10:30-12:30; Opera Block
Apartments on Tuesday, October
21, 10:30 - 12:30. In the Lisbon
area at the Lisbon Shared Ministry
White Church on Wednesday,
October 15th from 10-12.
TOWNOFWARREN
Supervisors of the Checklist
Will Meet
Saturday
October 25, 2014
11:00- 11:30 am at the
Warren Town office Building
for the purpose of
corrections of Checklist
Supervisors
Donna Bagley
Donna Hopkins
Janice Sackett
November 4, 2014
State General Election Day
Warren Town Hall
9 am - 7 pm
NOTICE
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page B6
Northcountry News For The Fun Of It!
YOUR
NORTHCOUNTRY
NEWS
Its What The
Locals Read!
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Page B7 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
Northcountry Puzzle Answers
North Country Classified Ads
10 ITEMS- Call for more details 508-
458-5068 Rumney. 1. Hearthstone
Wood Stove. $800. / 2. Loggy Boyou
Climbing Tree Stand $140. / 3. Hang
on Tree Stand w/ Climbing Sticks.
$65. / 4. Ladder Tree Stand 12ft. $30.
/ 5. safety Harness $25. / 6. ATV Back
Seat & Storage unit $75. / 7. ATV V-
Grip double Gun Rack $30. / 8.
Vintage Carousel Horse on pedestal 5
ft. Tall $675. / 9. 8ft. X 35 ft. Mobile
Home Trailer 1979 clean , no leaks,
only $800. / 1973 Triumph GT6 mk3
British Sports car $5,000. Or BO
*PHOTOS AVAILABLE BY E-MAIL.
(10/10)
---------------------------------------------------
BEAUTIFUL CHERRY DROP-LEAF
TABLE with 2 extra leaves. ($175.00)
call 764-9979.
---------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE - 1/2 hp meat grinder -
$70; stainless steel bowls, $10; cank
meat slicer, $5.00; 12 aluminum boat
& trailer, $600. Call 603-838-6131.
(10/10)
---------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE - Several items! Kirby
Vacuum Cleaner w/shampoo, many
attachmentsAsking $300 OBO;
Electric Lift Chair, blue, only 1 year old,
asking $500, OBO; Sharp Electric
typewriter, BO. Call 603-243-0046.
(10/25)
---------------------------------------------------
UNIQUE T-SHIRTS
Including Mount Moosilauke,
hiking, and more!
Check out our website at
www.mojomoosegear.com.
Some really neat local stuff!
Mojo Moose Gear
White Mountains, NH
---------------------------------------------------
Calling all crafters! Russell Elementary
School in Rumney, NH is planning a
craft fair and chili cook-off October
18th from 8am-4pm. Contact
chiltz@pemibaker.org if you are inter-
ested in being a vendor. (10/10)
SHARI`S BERRIES - Order
Mouthwatering Gifts for any Occasion!
SAVE 20 percent on qualifying orders
over $29! Fresh Dipped Berries start-
ing at $19.99! Visit www.
berries.com/[TRACKING_ITEM2] or
Call 1-800-912-4998 (TFN)
AMERICAN GREETINGS is looking
for Retail Greeting Card
Merchandisers in Lincoln, NH. As a
member of our team, you will ensure
the greeting card department is mer-
FORSALE
GIFTS
CRAFTERS WANTED
HELP WANTED
chandised and maintained to provide
customers the best selection of cards
and product to celebrate lifes events.
Join the American Greetings family
today by applying online at:
WorkatAG.com (Auto Req ID:
12721BR) or call
1.888.323.4192.(10/12)
---------------------------------------------------
PART TIME BATHER - needed for
busy grooming shop. Will train. Must
be available 5 days per week, in morn-
ings, year round. Must have trans-
portation and be flexible. DO NOT
STOP BY OR CALL! Please send lettr
of interest to: Wizard of Pawz
Grooming, 328 Plain Road, Bath, NH
03740.
NEW ENGLAND
OUTDOOR FURNACES
Central Boiler wood and pellet
furnaces. Save up to $1,600.
Call 866-543-7589
(tfn)
HOUSE CLEANING - Reliable, effi-
cient, experienced. Weekly or once
before a big event. Plymouth,
Newfound, Waterville area. Please call
603-536-1997 or email:
slheath54@gmail.com. (10/10)
CONTENTS FROM HOUSE DEMOLI-
TION in Monroe, N.H., windows,
doors, cabinets, fixtures, tubs, sinks,
Etc., or whole house call for pricing!
Info. (603-638-2200) (tfn)
---------------------------------------------------
ENJOY 100 PERCENT GUARAN-
TEED, DELIVERED TO-THE-DOOR
HOUSECLEANING
HOMEHEATING
MISC.
OMAHA STEAKS!
SAVE 74 percent PLUS 4 FREE
Burgers - The Family Value Combo -
ONLY $39.99. ORDER Today 1-800-
617-6252 Use code 49377LPP or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/dad60 (tfn)
---------------------------------------------------
CANADA DRUG CENTER is your
choice for safe and affordable medica-
tions. Our licensed Canadian mail
order pharmacy will provide you with
savings of up to 75 percent on all your
medication needs. Call today 1-800-
267-6917 for $10.00 off your first pre-
scription and free shipping.
(TFN)
RUMNEY NH LAND - 79
commercial/residential acres with river
and valley views. Also, timber and
1050 of frontage with double access
on busy Route 25. $296,000. (603)
726-3552. (rts (2/28)
VIEW 14 PEAKS post & beam house,
barn, guest house, next to conserva-
tion land $629,000, SQUAM WATER-
FRONT homes, 2 bedroom & 4 bed-
room, 5 slips, 1.2 acres, town water
and sewer 2 bedroom for $425,000
both for $850,000 WATERVILLE
condo, fireplace, furnished, sleeps 9
$249,900. VIEWS REPRODUCTION
CAPE barn, studio 3 fireplaces,
orchard $324,900 GORGEOUS CAPE
5 car, cathedral ceilings, formal dining
3000+ square feet, finish 2000 more
$425,000 HOLDERNESS First floor
master, gourmet kitchen, barn,
$339,900 PLYMOUTH: 2 bedroom
condo, $65,000. 5 bedroom 2 bath, 2
pellet stoves $169,000 RUMNEY
ranch, garage $139,000 Coldwell
Banker Residential Brokerage 603-
253-4345, Lynn 603-926-9700 or (603)
536-5683 (10/10)
RENTALS
REALESTATE
Mobile Home Owners Wanted
Swiftwater Estates Cooperative Inc. Pioneer Rd, Bath, NH
Resident-Owned Community 603-747-2155
If you are looking for a place to re-locate your mobile home, or
place a new one this is the place you have been looking for.
Swiftwater Estates is a 16 unit park situated on 13.17 acres in
the town of Bath on town water and its own septic sysytems.
The park is located in a rural area south of the village of
Swiftwater, on the east side of Route 112, also known as Wild
Ammonoosue Road. It has easy access to Interstates; I- 91 and
I- 93, 10 minutes from local Hospital, Shopping, and
Restaurants, within the Bath, Woodsville school district. Dogs
and cats welcome. $265.00 per month. First and last months
rent required upon approval and $100.00 Cooperative member-
ship fee.
DISH NETWORK. DISH TV Retailer.
Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.)
& High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where available.)
SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY
Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-764-
8907 (TFN)
PAYING CASH - for old watches &
pocket watches (working or not), gold
and silver items, old religious items,
Masonic and military items, knives,
swords, pocket knives, American & for-
eign coins & currency, any old unusual
items. Doug 603-747-4000. (12/19)
TELEVISION SERV.
WANTED
From Here
To Iraq
And Beyond!
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News
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Thousands!
Now Online Too!
northcountrynewsnh.com
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DID YOU KNOW?
At their closest point, the Russian and U.S.
borders are less than two miles apart!
One out of three U.S. women owns a gun!
It takes six months to build a Rolls
Royce...and 13 hours to build a Toyota!
Every workday, 6.7 million people
commute to Manhattan!
On some Caribbean islands, the oysters
can climb trees!
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page B8
Come
Visit
Adult Bible Study ................ 10 a.m.
Sunday School ..................... 10 a.m.
Sunday Morning Service ..... 11 a.m.
Evening Service ................... 6 p.m.
Wednesday Night Prayer ...... 7 p.m.
Calvary Baptist Church
20 Elm Street Woodsville, N.H.
(603) 747-3157 = Pastor Alan Morrison
Open hearts
Open minds
Open doors
The people of the
United Methodist Church
Pastor David J. Moore
North Haverhill, NH 787-6887
Warren United Methodist Church
On The Common Warren, NH
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICES
SUNDAY SCHOOL 10.00 AM
WORSHIP 10:00AM
North Country Church Directory
Inspiring Words for You!
Dear Friends, Matthew 14:2234
talks about faith and Peter and a
storm. With a message for us. "COME,
DO NOT BE AFRAID". We can have little faith
or much faith. Do we really trust in Him or
don't we?! That is a question you must ask
yourself. Because when the storms come, and
they will, you need to know. Jesus beckoned
Peter to come and at least he got out of the
boat and began to walk on the water,walking
on top of the problem, not the other way
around! But when the storm roared he lost
his faith,took his eyes off Jesus and began to
sink!I wrote a song "Keep Your Eyes On
Jesus". In these dark difficult days, we cannot
take our eyes off of Jesus Yeshua! He told
them to not be afraid have faith. It is I, Jesus.
So keep your eyes on Him!!!!!
~Submitted by Jeannine Bartlett
10:30am
10:30am
9:00am
9:00am
Its Time To Prepare For Winter Driving, Says PIANH________________________________________________
Your Church Can Be In This Spot,
In Full Color For Only $15 an
Issue! Or Only $10 for A
Black & White Ad!
Good Old Fashioned,
Honest Pricing..
Now Thats A Bargain!
Helping Our Local
Churches Save!
Give Us A Call Today!
603-764-5807
You Can Be In This Spot, In Full Color
For Only $25 an Issue!
Thats Only $50 per Month!!
Good Old Fashioned, Honest Pricing..
Now Thats A Bargain!
Helping Our Local Businesses Save!
Give Us A Call Today! 603-764-5807
Winter is still weeks away, but
now is the time to start prepar-
ing. With the cold weather
comes the need to be extra care-
ful on the road. Winter dangers,
including snow and ice on
roads, and reduced visibility
from winter precipitation, make
it important for drivers to pre-
pare and focus to prevent acci-
dents. The Professional
Insurance Agents of New
Hampshire Inc. reminds
motorists that driving carefully
in winter weather will help
them arrive at their destinations
safely, and keep their car insur-
ance rates down, too. Being
prepared is smart protection for
drivers, their loved ones and
others on the road, especially in
winter conditions.
"Adequate coverage, including
a sufficient medical payments
limit, is essential at all times,
but a good time for review is
before the winter weather hits
this season," says PIANH
President Scott Johnston.
"Don't fall victim to promises
of cheap insurance that won't
meet your needs in the event of
an accident. Your professional,
independent insurance agent
can review your policy and
offer affordable suggestions
that will help you recover your
losses and protect your assets in
the event of an accident. And, if
an accident does occur, having
a professional agent on your
side will help make the claim
process smooth and less stress-
ful."
Once you are sure you have the
right coverage for your unique
circumstances, remembering
these safety tips can help keep
you safe this winter:
Make sure your vehicle is
mechanically ready for the rig-
ors of winter with a mainte-
nance check.
Have your tires checked before
winter begins. Remember to
check tire air pressure frequent-
ly, as it decreases in cold weath-
er.
Keep your fuel tank at least half
full.
Make sure you have sufficient
fluids in the reservoirs, includ-
ing washer fluid, that is rated a
minimum of -40C temperature
range. Keep an extra jug in the
vehicle.
Clear snow and ice from all
windows, lights, mirrors, and
the roof of your car.
Stay alert, slow down, and stay
in controlthree key elements
of safe winter driving.
Drive according to highway and
weather conditions.
Keep a safe distance between
you and the vehicle in front of
you.
In case of an accident
If you are involved in an acci-
dent, remember, safety comes
first, PIANH says. If you or
someone in your vehicle is
injured, do not get out of the car
unless you are in immediate
danger. Call the police or 911. If
everyone is alright, and your
cars are in traffic, move them
off the street and into a safe
area. It can be tempting to leave
the police out of it if the dam-
age appears to be minor.
However, your insurance com-
pany will need the accident
report from the police to file
your claim. It can delay your
claim if you don't have it.
While you wait for the authori-
ties to arrive, exchange infor-
mation with the other driver,
such as insurance information,
drivers license number, name,
address and phone numbers on
how to reach them. If there are
any witnesses to the accident,
get their information with their
phone numbers. If possible,
write down as many details as
you can about the accident
while it's still fresh in your
mind. Contact your insurance
agent as soon as possible to
report the accident and have the
claim process started. If you
have a camera or camera phone,
take photos of the damage to all
the vehicles involved as soon
after the accident as possible.
This will come in handy should
the other driver try to claim
more damage than the accident
actually caused.
"Call your insurance agent to
review your policy," says
Johnston. "Your agent can offer
suggestions that will help you
recover your losses quickly in
the event of an accident. Should
an accident occur, the value of
having an independent agent on
your side will help make the
claims process go smoothly and
help relieve some of the stress
from the loss."
PIANH is a trade association
representing professional, inde-
pendent insurance agencies,
brokerages and their employees
throughout the state.
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Page B9 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
Building - Const. - Drywall
North Country Business Directory - Support Your Local Businesses....
A Very Fair Deal! Only $10 Every Two Weeks! Thats Only $260 For An Entire Year! Or Opt For Color!! Only $12 Every Two Weeks!
Bobs
Bobs
Construction
Construction
Concrete Foundations Floors Slabs
Foundations Under Existing Houses
931 Buchler Rd Wheelock, VT 05851
http://bobsconcreteconstruction.com/
Ph: 8026268763 Cell: 8025355860
Fax 8026269350
Auto Detailing
Have your vehicle looking like
new again - inside & out:
Hand wash, waxing, windows,
interior and upholstery
Mark Pollock Owner
603-787-6247
Petes Tire & Auto
Major & Minor Auto Repairs
Towing Available
Pete
Thompson
Owner
Briar Hill Road North Haverhill, NH
603-787-2300
Auto / Truck Care
PATTENS AUTO REPAIR
Expert Auto - Lt. Truck Repairs
All Makes and Models
Complete Line Of Accessories Avail.
Specialize in Muscle & Performance
Authorized Amsoil Dealer
Official NH Inspection Station
Kevin Patten - 603-764-9084
1243 Mt. Moosilauke Hwy. Wentworth, NH
Auto / Truck Care
AMES AUTO
& OUTDOOREQUIPMENT
Sales & Service
Automotive Repairs A-Z
State Inspections Used Car Dealer
Chainsaws Trimmers
Brush Cutters Blowers
Authorized Jonsered Dealer
458 Buffalo Rd. Wentworth, NH
Owner, Jeff Ames 603-764-9992
Where The Customer Counts!!!
Appliances & Repair
603-787-6677
Serving New Hampshire & Vermont
Factory Authorized Service Provider
Whirlpool Maytag Frigidaire Sub Zero Wolf
Bosch Dacor LG Thermador Fisher Paykel
Don Bowman, Owner
We Promptly Service All Brands
Authorized Servicer of
Maytag Whirlpool Crosley GE
Henrys
Appliance
Repair
Phone
603-272-4387
Over 16 Years
Of Service...
224 River Rd. Piermont, NH
Animals / Feed / Grooming
Wizard of Pawz
Grooming
328 Plain Rd. Bath, NH
603-747-4171
Lloyd Donnellan
603-838-6622
Mobile Grooming Shop For Dogs And Cats
Tatooing
239 West End Rd.
Landaff, NH 03585
Grooming for
your furry friends...
Animal Damage Control
precisioncarcare.nh@gmail.com
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page B10
North Country Business Directory - Support Your Local Businesses....
Chamber Of Commerce
THE BAKER VALLEY
CHAMBER Of COMMERCE
P.O. Box 447, Rumney, NH 03266
Serving the Baker Valley
for Over 35 Years
If you are planning a visit or are interested in
moving to the area, contact the BVCC at
bakervalleychamber@yahoo.com
to request a brochure.
Visit us on the Web at:
www.bakervalleychamber.org
Business Services Marketing
Business Opportunities
Chair Caning
Melanies
Woven Memories
Handwoven Caning
Splint - Rush Seating
Shaker Tape - Baskets
& Minor Repairs
Competitive Pricing~ Quality Work
Melanie Miller 802-467-1326
melaniemiller58@yahoo.com
www.melanieswovenmemories.com
David A. Berman
Justice of the Peace
Personalized Advertising Products
I guarantee I can save you money!*
(*Ask for details)
(603) 786-9086
bermbits@gmail.com
PO Box 280 Rumney, NH 03266
Where Else Can You
Advertise Your Small
Business For Only
$20-$24 per Month?
Northcountr y News Northcountr y News
603-764-5807 603-764-5807
Building - Const. - Drywall Building - Const. - Drywall
CUSTOM HOMES FROM START TO FINISH
Framing Roofs Finish Decks Siding
All Your Building Needs...
89 Howe Hill Road Benton, NH 03785
603-787-6854
Additions, Decks, Remodeling,
Roofing, Vinyl Siding,
Snow Plowing, Etc..
Gagnon Builder
Gary Gagnon
603-838-6285
257 Pettyboro Rd. Bath, NH
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Page B11 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
Electricians
CONQUEROR ELECTRIC
23 HOUR/7 DAY EMERGENCY SERVICE
Roland Clifford
Lic. NH 8085 VT EM-3119
Fully Licensed & Insured
Residential Commercial No Job Too Small
New and Old House Wiring
Underground Service Installations
Upgrade Service Installations
Troubleshooting
N. Haverhill, NH 603-787-2360
Crushed Ledge Products
Dental
97 Monroe Rd.
(Rte 135 on the
Woodsville &
Bath Border)
Wed., Thur., Fri. 85 Sat. from 82
Appointments can be scheduled by
calling during those hours. Messages can
be left any time.
Dr. Ralph M. Faluotico, Jr.
603-747-2037
North Country Business Directory - Support Your Local Businesses....
MARTINS QUARRY
Selling Crushed Ledge Products
Repair your driveway today
Competitive Prices
Delivery Available Serving VT & NH
7:00 4:00 p.m. M-F
(802) 222-5570
107 Rock Quarry Dr. Bradford, VT
TEDS EXCAVATING
603-787-6108
Septic Systems Bush Hogging
Driveways Foundations
Land Clearing
Sewer & Plumbing License
Over 30 Years Experience
Concrete - Excavation - Trucking
Concrete - Excavation - Trucking
Computers & Service
Computers & Service
Paige Computer Services
Custom Built Systems, Repairs, Parts,
Accessories, Software, Training
For All Your Computer Needs
50 Smith Street
Woodsville, NH 03785
(603) 747-2201
paigecs@gmail.com
Hours
Mon-Fri 10-6
Sat by appt.
Closed Sunday
RICH CLIFFORD
CONCRETE FORMCOMPANY
Foundations, Floors, Slabs, Retaining
Walls, Curbings & Sidewalks
Sanding & Plowing
54 Clifford Drive
North Haverhill, NH
603-787-2573
Septic And Water Systems,
Cellar Holes, Driveways, Roads,
Landclearing, Stumping
HORNE
EXCAVATING
We Are Your Total
Excavating Company
Maurice Horne 787-6691 Kevin 787-2378
776 French Pond Rd. N. Haverhill, NH
Chamber Of Commerce
Cleaning Service
Lower Cohase Regional
Chamber of Commerce
P.O. Box 209, Bradford, VT 05033
Mark J. Nielsen - Exec. Director
1.802.757.2549
For Local Information Go To
WWW.COHASE.ORG
Community Calendar,
Business Directory, Area
Maps, Information on
Local Events
PO Box 1017 - Lincoln, NH 03251
603-745-6621
www.lincolnwoodstock.com
Coins
Wally Morabito
Wally@NCCNH.com
Tues-Fri 10-5 Sat 10-3
Tel: (603) 536-2625
Fax: (603) 536-1342
64 Main Street
Plymouth, NH 03264
Buying Selling Appraisals
Dennis Gilpatric
Dennis@NCCNH.com
, LLC.
Gils Construction
Foundations & Floors
Free Estimates
Gilman LaCourse / Chris Cass
802-748-9476 or 603-455-7567
2085 New Boston Road St. Johnsbury, VT
chriscass888@gmail.com
Jared S. Field
PC Repairs, Custom Built Systems & More!
thepcforme@gmail.com
141 Central Street
Saint Johnsbury, VY 05819
10% Off First Time Order
The PC For Me
If I cant fix it, then you dont pay!
www.thepcforme.com
NH 603-638-3008
VT 802-424-0588
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page B12
Starting At Only $20/month
Can You Actually Afford
Not To Advertise?
Call Today! 603-764-5807
North Country Business Directory - Support Your Local Businesses....
Hardware & Home Supplies
802-222-5280 800-455-5280
Largest Marvin Integrity window
and door showroom in the area.
Exit 16 on I-91, Bradford, VT
Visit our website: obiweb.com
Hair Salon & Services
Joans Hair Design
Rte. 10
Haverhill, NH
989-9899
Professional Care ...
...Is Best For Your Hair
Joan Wiggins ~ Stylist
Gifts - Crafts - & More
Piermont
Plant Pantry Greenhouses
Bedding Vegetables Plants
Hanging Baskets Perennials & Mums
Wholesale / Retail
Rte. 25 Abby Metcalf
Piermont, NH (603) 272-4372
Email: plants7@yahoo.com
Greenhouse - Plants
Garden Design & Services
Heating Oil, Diesel & Gasoline
24-Hour Burner Service
(For Customers Only)
W.E. Jock Oil Co., Inc.
802-757-2163
Wells River, VT 05081
SEETHIS?
YOUR ADCOULD
BEHERE!
Fuels
Ryezak Oil & Propane
Bulk & Bottled Propane Service
Home Heating Oil
Residential Commercial
1536 NH Route 25 Rumney, NH
603-786-9776
Electricians
Farrier - Horseshoeing
Gregory Nourys
Horseshoeing
Warren, NH 603-764-7696
Hot & Cold
Shoeing
Complete
Farrier Service
Order Mouthwatering Gifts for Any Occasion
100% SATI SFACTI ON GUARANTEED
giant strawberries | #1 seller | over 35 million berries dipped
To redeem this offer visit www.Berries.com/easy or all 800-912-4998
*20% off discount will appear upon checkout. Minimum product purchase of
$29.00. Discounts do not apply to gift cards or certicates, same-day deliv-
ery, shipping and handling, taxes or third-party hosted products (e.g. wine)
and cannot be combined with other offers or discounts. Discounts not valid
on bulk or corporate purchases of 10 units or more. Offer expires: 6/30/14.
HAND-DIPPED BERRIES
$
19
99
from
+s/h
Save 20%
*
Treat anyone in
your life for less!
Support Your Local
Small Businesses!
Use This Directory To
Assist In Your Search.
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Page B13 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
Plumbing / Heating / Duct Work
Pet Aquarium & Supplies
Mortgage Home Lending
Modular Homes
Meat Products
PLUS, 4 More
Burgers FREE!
48643BBE Reg. $154.00
The Favorite Feast
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49
99
2 (5 oz.) Filet Mignons
2 (5 oz.) Top Sirloins
4 (4 oz.) Boneless Pork Chops
4 (4 oz.) Omaha Steaks Burgers
4 Stufed Baked Potatoes
4 Caramel Apple Tartlets
Call 1-800-617-6252 and ask for 48643BBE
www.OmahaSteaks.com/fmb84
Limit 2. 4 (4 oz.) burgers must ship with The Favorite Feast (48643). Not valid with other offers, including Reward cards & codes.
Standard S&H added. Other restrictions may apply. Expires 11/30/14. 2014 OCG | 20180 | Omaha Steaks, Inc.
Tropical & Marine Fish Corals
Inverts Birds Reptiles
Small Animals Supplies
Dog & Cat Supplies
Starting At Only $20/month
Can You Actually Afford
Not To Advertise?
Call Today! 603-764-5807
594 Tenney Mtn. Hwy. Plymouth, NH
Open 7 Days 603.536.3299
www.plymouthpet.com
North Country Business Directory - Support Your Local Businesses....
Home Inspections
Maple Products & Supplies
Justice of the Peace
Log Home Maintenance
Serving Central & Northern NH and VT
Residential & Commercial
Building Inspections
Water & Air Radon Testing
ASHI# 248268
NH Licence# 0060
TODD DUKETTE
Toll Free: 866-388-2692
Office: 603-787-5956
info@cbphi.com www.cbphi.com
GREEN ACRES SUGARHOUSE
John Green 6037649692
WARREN, NH
Maple Products & Supplies
Syrup, Candy & Cream
New & Used Equipment
Jugs, Filters, Line, Tanks, Labels,
Grading Kits, Hydrometers & More!
PANCLEANERS EXCELLENT PRICES!
Visitors Welcome ~ Please Call For Info
Health Centers
Heating - Stoves - Accessories
Masonry & Service
E.L. Masonry
Chimneys
Brick Steps
Walkways
Stone Work
Free Estimates
Emile Lavoie 603-764-5805
NORTH COUNTRY MORTGAGE
Licensed by the NH Banking Department
NMLS # 49467
Proudly Serving The Granite State
Shawn P. Economides
Branch Manager / Sr. Loan Officer
NMLS # 166706
North Country Mortgage
4 Central Square
Bristol, NH 03222
Tel: (603) 744-8875
Fax: (603) 744-8876
Cell: (603) 348-8875
Gas, Wood, Oil & Pellet Stoves
Inserts & Furnaces Maple Suagaring Supplies
Hardware, Plumbing, Lumber, Housewares
& So Much More...
230 NH Rt. 25 Warren, NH 03279
603-764-9496 M-Sat 8-5 / Sun 10-2
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page B14
Support Your Local
Small Businesses!
Use This Directory To
Assist In Your Search.
North Country Business Directory - Support Your Local Businesses....
Septic Services
Maplewood,
A Senior Residence
Formerly, Home For The Aged
14 Maple Street
Woodsville, NH 03785
603-747-3493
Residential Home with private rooms,
24 hour supervision, home-cooked meals,
housekeeping and laundry included.
A non-profit organization
serving people since 1921
Senior Services
RVS / Campers / Sales & Serv.
Rubbish / Salvage / Trucking
Roofing / Standing Seam
Nicholas Kendall
Specializing in
Standing Seam Roofing
Colors, Copper & Galvinized Steel
Free Estimates
PO Box 128 South Ryegate, VT 05069
(802) 584-4065
kendallstandingseam@yahoo.com
www.kendallstandingseam.com
KENDALL
STANDING
SEAM
STOCKLEY
TRUCKING / SALVAGE
405 South Main St., Lisbon
Buying Copper, Brass, Alum. Etc..
FREE CAR REMOVAL
Hours: Mon. - Fri. 7-4
603-838-2860
Solutions For All Of Your Disposal Needs
Servicing Residential & Commercial
Customers With Curbside Pickups
Containers For Cleanouts & Construction
Projects Of Every Size
Pike, NH 989-5300
Radio - Local
Readings Healing Support
Real Estate
Lynne Tardiff
LMC
Licensed in
NH & VT
79 Union St.
Littleton, NH 03561
603-259-3130
www.TardiffRealty.com
[|z{x ext
Archangel Intuitive
Spiritual Guidance Coach
Readings
Hospice Certified - Grief Support
Magdrael PO Box 71
(Marsha Lorraine Downs) Glencliff, NH
higherrealm01@gmail.com 603-764-9151
Power Equip. & Outdoor Fun
Print & Design
Prescription Services Canada
Call toll-free: 1-800-267-6917
Are You Still Paying Too Much For Your Medications?
You can save up to 75% when you fill your prescriptions
at our Canadian and International prescription service.
Celecoxib
$62.00
Celebrex
TM
$568.87
compared to
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Call Toll-free: 1-800-267-6917
Please note that we do not carry controlled substances and a valid prescription
is required for all prescription medication orders.
Use of these services is subject to the Terms of Use and accompanying policies at www.canadadrugcenter.com.
Typical US brand price
for 200mg x 100
Generic equivalent of
Celebrex
TM
. Generic price
for 200mg x 100
Call the number below and save an additional $10 plus get free
shipping on your frst prescription order with Canada Drug Center.
Expires June 30, 2014. Ofer is valid for prescription orders only and
can not be used in conjunction with any other ofers. Valid for new
customers only. One time use per household.
Get An Extra $10 Of & Free
Shipping On Your 1st Order!
Order Now! 1-800-267-6917
Use code 10FREE to receive this special ofer.
Starting At Only $20/month
Can You Actually Afford
Not To Advertise?
Call Today! 603-764-5807
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Page B15 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
Surveying Timber Harvesting / Tree Work
David Whitcher
Warren, NH 603-764-9982
NHTHC Certified
Member N.H.T.O.A.
Whitchers Tree Farm Whitchers Tree Farm
We Cut Wood & The Price We Cut Wood & The Price
u u Logging Logging
u u Firewood Firewood
u u Land Clearing Land Clearing
u u Tree Work Tree Work
Harry J. Burgess
Surveying/Forestry
192 Hibbard Road Bath, NH
Ph: (603) 838-5260 Fax: (603) 838-6692
Support Your Local
Small Businesses!
Use This Directory To
Assist In Your Search.
Television Services
Services Stonework
SHARP STONEWORK
Granite Work
Stone Walls Patios
Walkways
Mini Excavating & Loader Work
Fully Insured Free Estimates
Donny Sharp Sr. Alexandria, NH
603-744-5764
Call 7 days a week 8am - 11pm EST Promo Code: MB0114
1-800-764-8907
CALL NOW AND SAVE UP TO 50%!
mo
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TWO SIZE UNITS AVAILABLE
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ATV, Camper and Boat outside storage available
call for details
DAVIS REALTY OF NH & VT, INC 6037473211
Storage Facilities
Services
North Country Business Directory - Support Your Local Businesses....
NYSTROM SURVEYING AND MAPPING
BOUNDARY SURVEYS - SUBDIVISIONS
STATE AND LOCAL PERMITTING
NYSTROMSURVEYINGANDMAPPING.COM
156 ALLAGASH ROAD
NORTH HAVERHILL, NH 03774
LENYSTROM@HOTMAIL.COM
LEEANN NYSTROM
N.H. LICENSED LAND SURVEYOR #983
603.787.9029 OR CELL 603.454.4980
Sporting Hunting Fishing
Charlies
Gun & Sport
New & Used Guns Bought Sold & Traded
116 Main Street N. Woodstock, NH
603-745-6112 6 days 9-5
- Hunting & Fishing Supplies
- Huge Fly Selection
- Gold Panning Supplies - Knives
~Snowshoe Rentals & Much More!
Starting At Only $20/month
Can You Actually Afford
Not To Advertise?
Call Today! 603-764-5807
Wildlife - Photography
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page B16
THE FLUME GORGE
A twomile selfguided nature walk
that includes an 800' long gorge
with sheer 70'90' rock walls. Other
attractions are the pool, glacial
boulders and covered bridges.
603-745-8391
EXIT 34A OFF I-93
CANNON MOUNTAIN
AERIAL TRAMWAY
An 80passenger tram, which makes
a quick ascent 2,180 vertical feet to
the 4,080' summit. On clear days,
visitors to the summit can see
views of four states and Canada.
cannonmt.com
603-823-8800
EXIT 34B OFF I-93
DISCOVERY PASS Two amazing attractionsone low price!
Adult (age 13+) Just $29
Child (age 612) Just $23
Elevate
your
vacation!
amongst
giants!
Like walking
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White Mountain National Forest Annoumces Dry River Trail Is Open_________________________________
Page A9 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
The Forest Service is pleased to
announce that the Dry River
Trail and the Isolation Trail,
both within the Presidential-
Dry River Wilderness, are now
open to the public. In 2011,
these trails were severely dam-
aged by Tropical Storm Irene.
With the help of several part-
ners, the White Mountain
National Forest has completed
enough work to reopen them
this fall. According to Forest
Service trail crew lead Caitlin
Campbell, Working in Dry
River is always an adventure,
and were excited to have the
trail open so the public can
enjoy the adventure as well.
Hikers should understand that
these trails have been recon-
structed at a lower standard
than most trails they are famil-
iar with and from what was
there before. They can expect a
narrower and rougher tread, and
will need to occasionally find
the route in order to navigate
the length of the trail. This
work comes during a year when
the country celebrates the 50th
anniversary of the signing of
the Wilderness Act, which
allowed Congress to set aside
tracts of public land to be man-
aged for wilderness values.
These trails and others in the
Presidential-Dry River
Wilderness, managed in the
spirit of Wilderness values, pro-
vide visitors a primitive experi-
ence with lower development
levels than a typical White
Mountain trail.
The Forest Service was not able
to complete this work alone.
Numerous partners provided
input surrounding the decision
to continue to provide trail
access in these areas, but to a
lower and more sustainable
standard. These partners includ-
ed NH Fish and Game
Department, NH State Parks,
surrounding towns, local trail
clubs, outfitters, guides, and
interested members of the pub-
lic. This project was a part of
the NH Drinking Water
Improvement effort with
Natural Resources
Conservation Services and is a
part of the Treasured Landscape
Campaign with the National
Forest Foundation (NFF). NFF
NH Pheasant Season Open____________
New Hampshire's hunting season for pheasant opened on October
1 and continues through December 31. There will be 73 stocking
sites in 50 towns. This fall, 12,260 adult ring-necked pheasants
will be released in all 10 counties during the three-month season,
an average of 140 birds per site. Pheasant hunters have a daily
bag limit of 2, and a season limit of 10 birds.
Pheasants will be released on select state Wildlife Management
Areas, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers flood control areas and pri-
vate lands open to public hunting. Each site will receive approx-
imately 140 birds for the season, with the exception of federal
flood control areas, which will receive approximately 36 more
birds per site. Fish and Game will continue to release birds as
close to opening day as possible and to consistently stock a
Thursday/Friday schedule in-season. All stocking will be com-
pleted by the start of moose season on October 18.
"Please keep safety foremost in mind: wear hunter orange, control
your firearm muzzle and know where your hunting partners are at
all times. Shoot only within your zone of fire, and keep your hunt-
ing dog under
Story continues on page A15
continues to fundraise for trail
restoration work in the
Presidentials, focusing on
resources to reopen the still
closed section of the Rocky
Branch Trail, located in an adja-
cent drainage to Dry River.
Work on the Rocky Branch
Trail is expected to occur in the
summer of 2015. If you are
interested in helping NFF with
this effort please visit
www.nationalforests.org for
more information.
For more information about the
Dry River and Isolation Trails,
please contact the Saco Ranger
District of the White Mountain
National Forest at (603) 447-
5448.
Photos:
1. Trail crew clears heavy
blowdown in the bottom of
Oakes Gulf on the Dry River
Trail
2. Crew leader Caitlin
Campbell amidst an area of
trail loss along the Dry River.
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page A10
Newfound Pathways Trail Work Days Slated________________
CENTRAL NH AGGREGATES, LLC
ROUTE 25, RUMNEY, NH 603-786-2886 or 603-481-0840
Hours of operation:
7:00 am 4:00 pm Monday thru Friday
7:00 am noon Saturdays and by appointment
Sand N Crushed Stone N Crushed Gravel Screened Loam
Mulch N Clay N Stone Dust N Ledge Pak
*Delivery Available
Supporting Local Musicians Turn It On!
www.freevermontradio.org
Featuring locally grown
Vermont music from the
Green Mountains!
Mountain Beat
with Sky King
A Slambovian State
of Mind
You will not find Slambovia on
any map, but you will know
when you are there! Slambovia
is a mythical musical state of
mind that appears when and
where ever Joziah Longo and
company take the stage as the
Slambovian Circus of Dreams.
And it was on the stage of
Alumni Hall in Haverhill NH
on September 27th as part of
the Court Street Arts music
series, the Circus delighted a
crowd of both new and long
time fans. Loosely labeled as a
Folk Rock band, the Circus
defies any categorization as the
music spans many styles. In a
radio interview years back
Joziah referred to their style as
Punk Classical Hillbilly
Floyd which still sums it up
quite nicely.
Starting the show with the title
track from their 2011 album
The Grand Slambovians we
were greeted with the declara-
tion that Time has come to
find the reasons, time has come
to find the whys as Guitarist
Sharkey McEwen provided the
fuel for the hypnotic journey,
playing slide mandolin through
effects reminiscent of Pink
Floyd. The adventure had
begun!
It was back in 2003 that I was
first introduced to Gandalf
Murphy and the Slambovian
Circus of Dreams at the Middle
Earth Music Hall in Bradford
VT. Upon entering that evening
I remarked to the owner Chris
Jones that I had heard this band
was pretty good. His response
was that if they were not my
favorite band by the end of the
evening he would refund my
ticket price. There was no
refund and over a decade later I
am still a die hard fan. And of
course there were many in
attendance this past Saturday
who were at that same show
back in 2003.
The Slambovian Circus of
Dreams was founded back in
the late 90's in Sleepy Hollow
NY. Joziah, Tinkerbell Lloyd
(Cello, accordion, flute and
vocals) and Sharkey were mem-
bers of a progressive rock band
the Ancestors which achieved
some commercial success, but
with this new project they
decided to build from the
ground up with a grass roots
appeal. And it has worked.
From open mics and tiny ven-
ues the Circus now headlines
festivals all over the country
and the UK .
Tink , Joziah and Sharkey are
the founding members with the
latest member Eric Puente
Joining the band on drums in
2012. (Former drummer and
founding member Tony Zuzulo
is is still fondly remembered by
fans and band mates alike) On
special occasions Orien and or
Chen Longo (Twin sons of
Joziah and Tink) will join the
band. All in all a family affair.
And as Joziah remarked to me
in a recent phone call, We con-
sider all you folks family! and
it is true as during the breaks it
feels more like a Family holi-
day than a meet and greet. But
as Jo will tell you Its always a
Holiday in Slambovia!
(www.slambovia.com for more
on the band and also check out
Court Street Arts at
http://www.alumnihall.org for
more great live events!)
( quick note : thanks Ffej Karp
for providing the photo from
our last column on the Baker
River Music Festival)
Happy Fall, everyone!
Newfound Pathways has three
trail work parties coming up
this fall, and we can really use
your help! We'll use non-motor-
ized hand tools, clearing and
smoothing the trail surfaces at 2
locations in Hebron on the fol-
lowing days:
Saturday, October 11, 2014
9AM-1PM
Meet at: Route 3A at Favor
Road, Hebron, NH
We will clear and smooth our
new trail that runs parallel to
Route 3 A, just north of Camp
Pasquaney.
Saturday, October 18, 2014
9AM-1PM
Meet at: Route 3A at Favor
Road, Hebron, NH
We will clear and smooth our
new trail that runs parallel to
Route 3 A, just north of Camp
Pasquaney.
Please wear long pants, long
sleeve shirts, and work boots if
you have them, and bring any
of the following you may have:
Gloves, Rake, Safety Glasses,
Hard Hat, Hoe, Pick
If you happen to have trail work
tools, such as a Pulaski,
Mcleod, or Mattock , then
great! Please bring them.
Well provide drinks and
snacks.
For additional information, or
any questions you may have,
please email Beth at bgeev-
er1@gmail.com, call Jan at
603-744-1048, or Beth at 503-
313-8831.
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Page A11 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
PSU Facility Flute Recital At
Silver Center__________________________
Tek Talk...With Eli Heath
Of Paige Computer Services
Tech Tips, Talk & Advice For Your Computer
L
UNION
ence. Making a differ
UNION CREDIT CREDIT
n lights ther nor
L NNNL NL
Aubrie Dionne, flute and Chris
Gantner, piano
The Department of Music,
Theatre, and Dance at
Plymouth State University will
present a faculty recital by
Aubrie Dionne, flute, at 1 p.m.
Sunday, October 12 in the
Smith Recital Hall at the Silver
Center for the Arts. She will
present a program featuring the
lovely and virtuosic works of
flute literature.
The program includes
Debussys Syrinx, one of the
most famous flute solos of all
time, according to Dionne. The
work depicts the Greek myth of
Pans pursuit of the river
nymph, Syrinx. The program
also includes the music of a
lesser-known French baroque
composer, Jean-Baptiste
Loeillet, and a closing piece
with colorful harmony by Lili
Boulanger, a female composer
who was born in Paris.
Aubrie Dionne is an active per-
former, teacher, conductor, and
adjudicator in New England.
Recently named the principal
flutist of the New Hampshire
Philharmonic, she has also per-
formed with the Great Waters
Music Festival, Granite State
Opera, Brockton Symphony,
Manchester Chamber Players,
Hanover Chamber Orchestra,
Granite State Symphony, and
the Manchester Choral Society.
Ms. Dionne is on faculty at the
Manchester Community Music
School, Plymouth State
University, and the Summer
Youth Music School at UNH.
Organist, harpsichordist and
pianist Chris Gantner will
accompany Ms. Dionne.
Gantner performs at a variety of
churches throughout New
England and has played with
the Granite State Symphony
and on several recital series
including the Manchester
Chamber Players. He taught
elementary music for seven
years, inspiring many youth to
develop an appreciation of
music.
Free tickets for the recital are
available at the Silver Center
Box Office, (603) 535-2787 or
(800) 779-3869.
Information about the
Department of Music, Theatre,
and Dance is online at
Plymouth.edu/department/mtd.
General information about
events at Plymouth State
University is online at
T h i s W e e k @ P S U ,
ht t p: / / t hi sweek. bl ogs. pl y-
mouth.edu.
Today we have to use the inter-
net for just about all of our per-
sonal business, from banking
and shopping to downloading
files.
If you connect to the Internet,
allow other people to use your
computer, or share files with
others, you should take steps to
protect your computer from
harm. Why? Because there are
computer criminals (sometimes
called hackers) who attack
other people's computers. These
people can attack directly, by
breaking into your computer
through the Internet and steal-
ing your personal information,
or indirectly, by creating mali-
cious software to harm your
computer.
Fortunately, you can help pro-
tect yourself by taking a few
simple precaution, here are
some tools to help you do that.
Shields Up you can find this at
www.grc.com, when you go
there click the logo to run tests
on your computers 1056 inter-
net access ports, when the test
is finished you will receive a
detailed listing of what ports
are open and how to fix the
problem if they are.
Symantec Security Check
http://security.symantec.com
this site will also check your
computers security on the inter-
net in addition it will also scan
your computer for viruses.
unlike Shields Up, to run the
program the website will
require you to install ActiveX
Controls to your computer to
test it, after testing my comput-
er I received a warning that no
antivirus program was found on
my computer, that information
is wrong because I am running
their Norton Antivirus, so dont
be hooked into buying their lat-
est antivirus product if yours is
installed correctly and all the
updates are installed.
Audit My PC www.audit-
mypc.com has a variety of tests
from checking your computers
firewall and spyware to testing
the speed of your broadband
internet connection.
PC Flank www.pcflank.com
has several tests to check your
computer from checking the
Internet Explorer to scanning
your computer for viruses.
These are a few of the on-line
programs available to test your
computers security.
Free File are you tired of send-
ing e-mail by text, would it be
nice if you can send a voice
message instead go to
www.speak-a-message.com to
download a free home edition
of their program. It will allow
you to record voice messages
send those recordings by e-
mail, save them in WMA for-
mat and will work with any e-
mail program. You will need a
microphone connected to your
computers sound card to use the
program or if using a laptop the
microphone may be built into it.
Keep in mind these programs
are not designed to replace your
antivirus or antimalware pro-
grams, they are only designed
to assist you in checking how
secure your computer is.
If you should have any ques-
tions please e-mail me a
paigecs@gmail.com or call
603-747-2201, you can also
visit my web site at www.paige-
computerservice.com. So until
next time if you have a comput-
er issue remember it is not your
fault, Happy Computing!
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page A12
Your
Northcountry
News
Serving Over 40
Towns And
Thousands
Of People In The
North Country &
Were Darn Proud
Of It!
Join Our Very
Large Family!
603-764-5807
OBITUARY
Our Corner Store Early Fall Bag Sale__
WALKER MOTOR SALES, INC.
RT. 10 WOODSVILLE, NH
603-747-3389 or 603-747-3380
FIND US ON THE WEB AT:
www.WalkerMotorSales.com
Good Selection of Program and Pre-owned Vehicles
2014 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, blue, loaded,15,000 miles...
2014 Chrysler 300C AWD
6 cyl, gray, loaded. leather, nav, 11,000 miles..
2014 Jeep Compass 4x2, white, clean,12,000 miles...
2013 Dodge Durango Crew AWD
black, loaded, sunroof, rear DVD, 30,000 miles...
2013 Chrysler 200 Touring, 4-dr, silver, loaded, 17,000 miles
2013 Dodge Gr. Caravan SXT, white, loaded, 23,000 miles...
2013 Jeep Compass AWD Latitude
red, one owner, clean, 21,000 miles...
2012 Honda FIT Sport, gray, one owner, clean, 44,000 miles...
2012 Jeep Gr. Cherokee Limited 4x4
blue, loaded, one owner, 40,000 miles...
2012 Chrysler 200 Touring, silv., loaded, clean, 44,000 miles...
2011 Honda Civic EX
2-dr, black, loaded, sunroof, clean, one owner...
2011 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 4x4
blue, one owner, RIGHT HAND DRIVE...
2011 Dodge Journey SXT FWD
red, loaded, one owner, 43,000 miles...
2011 Chrysler Town and Country Limited
black, loaded, leather, rear dvd, 66,000 miles...
2011 Jeep Gr. Cherokee Laredo 4x4
red, loaded, one owner, low miles, 2 IN STOCK...
2011 Dodge Durango 4x4 Crew, white, loaded, one owner...
2011 Jeep Compass AWD Latitude
silver, one owner, clean, 32,000 miles...
2010 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 4x4, blue, loaded, clean...
2010 Jeep Patriot Sport 4x4, silver, loaded, one owner, clean...
2010 Jeep Liberty Sport 4x4, green, loaded, 50,000 miles...
2010 Jeep Wrangler Sport 4x4
black, hard top, auto, air, one owner, clean...
2010 Chrysler Town and Country Touring
Maroon, loaded, one owner, 55,000 miles..
2008 Nissan Titan 4-dr 4x4 Pickup, green, loaded...
2007 Chrysler Pacifica Limited AWD
silver, loaded, sunroof, leather, nav, clean...
This Months
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Congratulations Aiden G.
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Warren, NH- Bernice M.


Lamothe, 103, a life long resi-
dent of Warren, died at the
Grafton County Nursing Home
on Monday, September 29,
2014.
Bernice was born in Warren,
NH on November 15, 1910, to
Edward and India (Elliott)
Lupien, Sr. Following gradua-
tion from Plymouth Normal
School, she attended Hesser
Business College in
Manchester, NH for two years.
She married Roderick A.
Lamothe on April 29, 1934.
Bernice was the secretary and
treasurer for the Mica Crystal
Company in Warren for many
years. She worked part time in
the Warren Post Office in the
1950s and 1960s. Then, from
1963 through 1980, Bernice
was employed by Equity
Publishing of Orford, NH. She
was very active in the Warren
community serving as a Town
Auditor, Supervisor of the
Checklist, school board mem-
ber and library trustee. She was
also a charter member of the
Minerva Temple #40 of Pythian
Sisters and over the past 80 plus
years has held most of the
offices within the organization.
She was predeceased by her
husband, Roderick A. Lamothe
on September 5, 1963; by their
son, Peter E. Lamothe on April
27, 2012; two brothers, Lewis
Edward Lupien and an infant
brother; and a special niece,
Helen Hurley. She is survived
by a daughter-in-law, Marie D.
Lamothe of Warren; a sister,
Bernadette Hurley of Peabody,
MA; a brother, Edward R.
Lupien, Jr. and wife Judy of
Warren; three granddaughters,
Sherri Lamothe Iosia of
Ossipee, NH, Lisa Lamothe
Jean of Warren, and Alana
Lamothe MaGuire of
Youngsville, LA; nine great
grandchildren, India Marie
Dunn, Brendon Dunn, Rikki
Dunn, Caleb Lamothe, Jessica
Southworth, Nathan Taylor,
Casey Shinn, Colby Shinn, and
Cori Short; and five great great
grandchildren, Blair McCurdy,
Andrew Allen, Tanner
Southworth, Owen Southworth,
and Landyn Taylor; her name-
sake, Bernice Blake of North
Haverhill, NH; several nieces,
nephews, and cousins.
There will be no calling hours.
A graveside service was held on
Monday, October 6 at the
Warren Village Cemetery with
Father Alan Tremblay of St.
Josephs Catholic Church,
Woodsville, as celebrant.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the Grafton County Nursing
Home Association, 3855
Dartmouth College Highway,
North Haverhill, NH 03774;
Joseph Patch Library, Warren,
NH 03279; Minerva Temple
#40 Pythian Sisters, Warren,
NH 03729; or the Alzheimers
Association MA/NH Chapter,
480 Pleasant Street, Watertown,
MA 02472.
Our Corner Store located at 4
Main street in Whitefield will
be holding an early fall bag sale
on Friday and Saturday,
October 10 and 11.
Cost is $5.00 a bag. We have a
good supply of household
items, cooler weather clothing
as well as books and puzzles.
Donations of gently used cloth-
ing and household articles and
furniture are welcome during
store hours.
Maybe its time to clean out
your closets to keep our shelves
stocked with merchandise to
share with others in the commu-
nity?
One of our volunteers, a local
nursing professional, will be
available on Friday from
11:00AM to 1:00PM for free
blood pressure and glucose
screenings at our Ask a Nurse
table. Questions about other
health issues will also be wel-
comed.
Our Corner Store is overseen by
an ecumenical board of direc-
tors who are affiliated with
multiple churches and denomi-
nations in Whitefield, Littleton,
and Jefferson.
Recipients of funds will be non-
profit community service
groups in the area and individ-
ual community members who
find themselves in need of
emergency assistance.
Hours of operation are Monday
through Saturday from
10:00AM to 5:00PM. We are
closed on Sunday.
For more information, call the
store at 837-8877.
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Page A13 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
Keeping Each Other Well
by Elizabeth Terp








































































































































































Cosauke...
Adventures in
Homesteading
Beth
Weick
A Spartan Pumpkin
My pumpkins this year were
cast off plants - though once des-
tined for a clients field plot,
ultimately these and others were
scattered in marginal areas at the
edge of my own garden beds and
sheet mulched areas. They grew
slow at the start, leaves yellow-
ing, objecting to poor conditions
and a lack of attention. But
comfrey planted nearby dis-
played verdant vigor, and the
neighboring stand of jerusalem
artichokes obviously seemed
quite pleased with their situa-
tion. So, the pumpkins picked
up their spirits and strengthened
their resolve - and thus began
creeping, crawling, spreading,
and climbing over their ghetto
garden corner. As if almost
against their will, they grew
healthy. Pumpkins formed,
developed, colored
Nonetheless, a late start to the
season was a bit much to over-
come. With a heavy frost pre-
dicted, I harvested them in mid-
September while still mid-sized
and immature. One caught my
fancy with caricature-esque
bumps and lumps on one side,
and an upside-down egg shape.
I knew just what I wanted to do
with it.
Which was not the predictable
and reasonable things I should
have done, say pumpkin pie or
harvest soup simmered on the
woodstove. No, this one I kept
inside, tilted atop the bookshelf
with two particular folks in
mind.
Come the end of September,
young friends came to visit.
Teo, had just turned 9, and his
sister Linea was not far behind
at 7. They gleefully announced
their presence, along with their
new dog Midnight. While Ryan
and I caught up with their par-
ents, the kids abundant energy
merged with curiosity, leaving
the garden vulnerable to wonton
treading - by an excited
Midnight more than anything.
So, it was time. The occasion
had occurred.
Out came the lopsided pumpkin,
a large spoon, and carving
knives. A creation station came
into being beside the compost
pile. Ideas were flying before I
could hand off the pumpkin.
Harry Potter was the first goal,
with a lightning strike scar
quickly notched. The process
then back-tracked to topping the
gourd and spooning out the inte-
rior...which rapidly shifted to
carving a telescope tube. At this
point the pumpkin was split into
quite unequal halves.
Teo pursued his with gusto,
Linea directing with instructions
from the sideline. They created
a cap, then a helmet, and finally
a warriors headress. With
three-dimensional horns and
decorative features, the excite-
ment was palpable. In a moment
of inspiration, the choice to
make a Spartan headpiece
gained momentum and a fan-
shaped cabbage leaf became the
crowning piece.
It was a fun project as much for
us to witness and the creators to
create. Simple fun, albeit with
food. To share in the kids
curiosity and creativity, amidst
this world of screens and gadg-
ets, seemed like a special thing.
They are youth who recognize
their vegetables and where they
come from, who have seemingly
endless curiosity for the garden
in front of them, and who can
relish the luxury of using (in this
case immature & unripe) pro-
duce for a bout of unrivaled
artistry. If only such simple
pleasure and abundance could
fill more moments, for more
people. Perhaps, then, the con-
nection between folks and their
food, and families and their sur-
roundings would gain more
depth and greater compassion.
Thanks to one lopsided piece of
produce, we shared in just that.
Time for fall clean-up of your
garden and landscaped areas!
Weeding, mulching and pruning
services available, plus edible
landscapes and garden designs.
Contact Beth via
b.a.weick@gmail.com for your
annual, perennial, herbal, or
ornamental garden needs (see
Business Directory listing under
Garden Design & Services).
WOOD
PELLETS
Call for
Pricing
Whats this about Tritan, the
new BPA-free plastic?
This week we learned that
Tritan, the new plastic being
used in commercial products,
including the new bins Whole
Foods is renovating their stores
with, is more estrogenic than
BPA (Bisphenol-A), the plastic
we have been trying to avoid.
Now, we learn that Tritan, pro-
duced by Eastman Chemicals,
is not being regulated by the
EPA due to slick maneuvering
reminiscent of the Tobacco
industrys saga which claimed
that tobacco smoke was not a
health hazard.
Mariah Blakes piece in the
March/April issue of Mother
Jones, The Scarey New
Evidence on BPA-free Plastics:
And the Big Tobacco-style
campaign to bury it, sounds an
alarm for us. We learn that the
BPA-free Nalgene, Camelback,
Evenflo, Tupperware,
Rubbermaid, and Cuisinart
products we thought were safe,
all contain Tritan, without
warning labels for us.
Plastic water bottles have also
been found to be estrogenic,
with increasing amounts of the
chemicals released into water
when exposed to UV waves,
left in the car, sitting on grocery
shelves, or run through the
dishwasher. There is a long list
of estrogenic health problems,
including brain and organ
development in utero, cancer,
diabetes, obesity, problems
with bone growth, ovulation,
heart function, and more.
When George Bittner, professor
of neurobiology at U Texas-
Austin released a research
paper he coauthored in the NIH
(National Institutes of Health)
journal, Environmental Health
Perspectives, stating that virtu-
ally all commercially available
plastics were estrogenic, he was
successfully sued by Eastman
Chemicals. How is this possi-
ble? Simple: for their research
tests, Eastman used Charles
River Sprague Dawley Lab
Rats, which are insensitive to
estrogens and can stand a 100x
higher dose than can humans
without effect. The jury did not
grasp the significance of this
ploy. Of course, their results
were negative.
The above tactics, combined
with well-oiled rhetoric in the
court proceedings that snowed
the jury, mean that our health
effects were jeopardized again,
just as in the tobacco years.
According to Blake, The EPA
quietly withdrew a request for
white house approval to add
some endocrine disrupting
chemicals- among them BPA
[and others] to its chemicals of
concern list because it found
that they may present an unrea-
sonable risk to human health.
This would require chemical
makers to share safe-testing
data with federal regulators.
This despite the 1996 law
passed by congress requiring
the EPA to screen 80,000 chem-
icals for endocrine-disrupting
effects and report back by 2000.
That report has not been forth-
coming.
Meantime, for our own safety,
we need to consider storing
foods in glass jars, give tap
water the respect it deserves,
check out stainless containers
for our packs, and look to
whole foods a meal at a time, as
we create safety measures that
give us some control over our
health.
Elizabeth Terp welcomes your
comments at PO Box 547,
Campton, NH 03223, e-mail:
elizabethterp@yahoo.com, or
her Keeping Each Other Well
Blog: http://elizabethterp.com.
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page A14
The explosion in palm oil use, largely to replace unhealthy
trans fats in food, has wreaked havoc on tropical rainforest
ecosystems across Southeast Asia, pushing some endangered
species -- including orangutans like the one pictured here -- to
the brink. Credit: Orangutan: Roger Smith; Clearcut:
Greenpeace
3255 Dartmouth College Hwy. North Haverhill, NH 03774
(603) 787-6351 Fax (603) 787-2564
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"Inspiring Healthy Choices For Life"
Dear EarthTalk: How is it that
some food purveyors are con-
tributing to the destruction of
tropical rainforests by ditching
unhealthy trans fats?
-- Billy S., Salem, OR
Most public health advocates
applaud efforts by processed
food producers, restaurants and
fast food chains to get rid of so-
called trans fatspartially
hydrogenated oils added to
foods to improve texture and
extend shelf life but which can
aggravate heart disease. In 2013
the U.S. Food & Drug
Administration (FDA) pro-
posed eliminating trans fats
altogether, but it is unclear if
and when such a change will
take effect. In anticipation,
many big trans fat buyers have
switched to palm oil, much of
which comes from former trop-
ical rainforest lands cleared for
agricultural production across
Southeast Asia.
The concern is that a lot of
companies will switch to palm
oil in order to reduce trans fats
without thinking more broadly
about the health and environ-
mental implications of that,
says Bill Barclay, Policy and
Research Director at the non-
profit Rainforest Action
Network (RAN).
Palm oil may be a good substi-
tute for trans fats in that it stays
solid at room temperature and is
therefore useful as a food addi-
tive in things like snack bars.
But it isnt much healthier: A
2009 study by the federal
Agricultural Research Service
found that palm oil would not
be a good substitute for trans
fats by the food industry
because consuming either type
of fat results in similar spikes in
artery-clogging LDL (bad)
cholesterol and a protein
(apolipoprotein B) that distrib-
utes it throughout the blood-
stream.
Meanwhile, the explosion in
palm oil use over the past few
decades for biofuels and as a
food ingredient and additive has
wreaked havoc on tropical rain-
forest ecosystems across
Southeast Asia. Environmental
leaders are concerned that even
more demand for palm oil could
push some endangered
speciesincluding orangutans,
Sumatran tigers and pygmy ele-
phantsover the brink.
They're losing critical habitat
that threatens their survival and
that's largely driven by palm oil
expansion, says RANs
Barclay.
Higher carbon emissions are
another down side. According
to the Union of Concerned
Scientists (UCS), the tropical
peat soils that predominate in
Southeast Asia rainforests store
huge amounts of carbon.
Clearing and draining these
fields to create palm oil planta-
tions releases this carbon into
the atmosphere.
Green groups continue to work
with palm oil producers and the
governments that regulate them
to promote more sustainable
production and processing and
toughen standards for conver-
sion of land to agricultural use,
but progress has been slow. A
recent commitment by five of
the worlds largest producers
and traders of palm oil to stop
clearing critical forest areas
for one year during a study is a
step in the right direction, but
theres no telling whether other
producers will step up their own
expansion efforts to fill the
void, let alone what kind of
ramped up production will hap-
pen when the study is complete.
And while food scientists are
working on other alternatives to
trans fats that could be greener
and healthier, none are as a
cheap-to-produce and easy-to-
process as palm oil, at least for
applications requiring a food
product to sit on store shelves at
room temperature. The best
thing we as consumers can do
to keep our arteries and our
consciences clear is to dial back
our consumption of foods that
include palm oil or any other
trans fat alternatives. Indeed,
theres never been a better time
to put down those packaged
baked goods and processed
snacks altogether.
CONTACTS: FDA,
www.fda.gov/Food/ucm292278
.htm; RAN, www.ran.org;
UCS, www.ucsusa.org.
EarthTalk is written and edit-
ed by Roddy Scheer and Doug
Moss and is a registered trade-
mark of E - The Environmental
M a g a z i n e
(www.emagazine.com). Send
questions to:
earthtalk@emagazine.com.
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Page A15 October 10, 2014 northcountrynewsnh.com |NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS
NH Pheasant Season Open________________________________
Nice picture of an American Bald Eagle sitting in a tree in
Lisbon, NH recently. - Valerie Pickens, Nature's Wonders
Photography
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Continued from page A9
control," said Fish and Game
Pheasant Project Leader Karen
Bordeau. "Do take the time to
thank private and federal
landowners when you use their
lands. Your hunting ethics on
their lands and your thoughtful-
ness will help keep these lands
open."
Fish and Game asks hunters to
refrain from training dogs at
release sites during the three
days prior to October 1. Dog
training flushes pheasants from
release sites, often onto posted
property or other areas not suit-
able for hunting.
The list of towns to be stocked
(including road names) can be
seen on the Fish and Game
website at
http://www.huntnh.com/Huntin
g/Hunt_species/hunt_pheas-
ant.htm; printed lists are also
available at Fish and Game
headquarters and regional
offices.
Pheasant hunters must purchase
a $26 pheasant license, in addi-
tion to the regular New
Hampshire hunting license or
non-resident N.H. small game
license. Licenses can be pur-
chased at
http://www.huntnh.com or from
any Fish and Game license
agent. Pheasants are purchased
exclusively with revenues from
the sale of pheasant licenses.
All pheasant hunters are urged
to follow these basic safety
guidelines:
Wear hunter orange on your
head, back and chest.
Control your firearm muzzle at
all times.
Always wear safety glasses.
Know where your hunting part-
ners are at all times.
Shoot only within your zone of
fire.
Be sure of your target and what
is beyond.
Always keep your hunting dog
under control.
For more information on hunt-
ing in New Hampshire, includ-
ing online license and permit
sales, visit
http://www.huntnh.com/Huntin
g/Hunting.htm.
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NORTHCOUNTRYNEWS| ncnews@gmail.com October 10, 2014 Page A16
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