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REPORT

TO THE
COMMUNITY


Gateway Community and Technical Colleges Role in
Increasing the Advanced Manufacturing Talent Highway
October 2014

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT


This year marks 10 years since Gateway Community and Technical College
broke ground for the Boone Campus in Florence. The Bank of Kentucky
Classroom and Training Center opened for classes in January 2006, and the
Center for Advanced Manufacturing opened in fall 2010. Designed with a
primary focus on workforce development, the campus facilities, programs, and
services offer an education and training system that is responsive to the dynamic
needs of regional employers. The campus has allowed for extensive partnerships
with key stakeholders that have resulted in a variety of new training programs.

This report provides a comprehensive view of the colleges role in providing
education and training for the regions manufacturing employers. A careful review of the report is
encouraged, however key highlights include the following:
Manufacturing continues to suffer from an outdated perception, especially among younger aged
individuals
The preparation of individuals to enter and advance in advanced manufacturing careers is
accomplished through technical programs, work-based programs and customized training
Since the opening of the Center for Advanced Manufacturing in 2010 more than 1,100
individuals have been served each year in credit-bearing education and training
Student enrollment in apprenticeships has increased 226% over the past four years
Over the past decade the college awarded 1,135 total manufacturing program credentials to 466
students

The report concludes with several challenges and opportunities for leaders in the region to consider. The
talent highway, sometimes referred to as the pipeline, is a complicated issue requiring a regional
approach that will yield results no single institution can achieve in isolation. Addressing the skills gap that
exists within advanced manufacturing, as well as in other key industry sectors, will require bold actions
that can only emerge from the collective impact of strategic partnerships throughout the tri-state region.

As president of the college, I hope that this report will not only describe the colleges efforts at meeting
the needs of regional manufacturing employers over the past decade, but will spur a deeper dialogue
across the tri-state region that will lead to a comprehensive strategy to attract and retain individuals in the
high-tech, high-wage careers found in advanced manufacturing.

Sincerely,



G. Edward Hughes
President/CEO




















ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This report was produced by the Office of Knowledge Management at Gateway Community and Technical
College. Principal researchers were Dr. Patricia Goodman, Vice President for Knowledge Management and
Strategic Initiatives; Jeremy Berberich, Director of Knowledge Management; and Steve Popple,
Knowledge Analyst. Additional contributors to the report include: Amber Decker, Director of Grants and
Contracts; Christi Dover, Workforce Learning Systems Manager; Michelle Flick, Workforce Transitions
Coordinator; Ressie Hall, Manager of Business Operations for Workforce Solutions; Sharon Poore,
Executive Assistant to the President; Carissa Schutzman, Dean of Workforce Solutions; Dr. Tim
Shaughnessy, Associate Provost; Sr. Margaret Stallmeyer, Interim Provost and Vice President for
Academic Affairs; Nicole Stout, Senior Administrative Assistant to the Provost; Dr. Angie Taylor, Vice
President for Workforce Solutions and Innovation; Margaret Thomson, Director of Public Relations; Barry
Wilhite, Workforce Development Liaison; Dee Wright, Division Chair for Manufacturing and Trades; and
the faculty from the Manufacturing and Trades Division

For further information please contact:
Margaret Thomson, Director of Public Relations, at 859-442-1172 or margaret.thomson@kctcs.edu

1





TABLE OF CONTENTS


ROLE OF ADVANCED MANUFACTURING ..........................................................................................................................2
MONITORING EMPLOYER NEEDS: ENVIRONMENTAL SCANNING ...........................................................................4
RESPONDING TO EMPLOYER NEEDS IN ADVANCED MANUFACTURING ......................................................... 11
PROJECTIONS ............................................................................................................................................................................... 15
CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES .................................................................................................................................. 17
APPENDICES .................................................................................................................................................................................. 23


















2


ROLE OF ADVANCED MANUFACTURING

The manufacturing sector has a profound and positive impact on economic development. Every dollar generated in
final sales of manufactured products supports $1.33 in output from other sectors
1
. As the demand for manufacturing
grows, there is a multiplier effect that spurs the creation of jobs, investments, and innovation across other sectors.
According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration
2
, between February 2010
and May 2014 the manufacturing sector added 646,000 jobs and is recruiting to fill another 243,000 positions. In
2012 The Boston Consulting Group
3
argued that the skills gap wasnt as significant as it appeared, but stated that
with the average U.S. manufacturing worker being 56 years of age, if manufacturing continued to expand and
retirements continued at current rates, the national shortage of highly skilled manufacturing workers in areas such
as machinists, welders, industrial-machinery mechanics and industrial engineers could grow to 875,000 by 2020.
While there is national consensus on the need for more skilled manufacturing workers, there are varying
perspectives on the level of training and education required to fill the skills gap. These requirements range from a
high school diploma with some combination of postsecondary education, work experience, and on-the-job training
to a bachelors degree or 36+ months of training/experience. Most discussion around skills requirements focuses
on educational attainment even though education is an imperfect substitute for technical skills. While national
programs and strategies for resolving the manufacturing skills gap are numerous, most experts point to a common
set of programs and strategies. Successful ideas include online training, companies partnering with high schools,
apprenticeship programs, customized workforce training programs, and short-term stackable credentials. A number
of references that discuss the national perspective on advanced manufacturing are located in Appendix A.

REGIONAL PERSPECTIVE

The Cincinnati Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is a 15-county region with a total population of 2,114,580
4
.
The counties located in the Cincinnati MSA include: Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, and
Pendleton Counties in Kentucky; Brown, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties in Ohio; and
Dearborn, Ohio, and Union Counties in Indiana. Advanced manufacturing is one of the major industry clusters
within the Cincinnati MSA that have been identified by the Northern Kentucky Tri-County Economic
Development Corporation
5
(Tri-ED), the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce
6
, and
Partners for a Competitive Workforce
7
.

In 2012 the Strive Partnership, Partners for a Competitive Workforce, Vision 2015, and
Agenda 360 released 2020 J obs Outlook
8
, a regional indicators report aimed at
forecasting the regions job outlook, including where the jobs will be in 2020 and what
education and training will be in highest demand. According to the 2020 J obs Outlook
report, within the Cincinnati region total job openings by 2020 are expected to reach
338,632, composed of 106,115 net new jobs and 232,517 replacement jobs, for total
regional employment of 1,069,405. Within the Cincinnati MSA, the manufacturing
sector holds 10.6% of jobs, compared to the national share of 8%
9
.

1
http://www.themanufacturinginstitute.org/Research/Facts-About-Manufacturing
2
http://www.esa.doc.gov/Reports/manufacturing-great-recession
3
https://www.bcgperspectives.com/content/commentary/globalization_management_two_speed_economy_skills_gap_unlikely_constrain_manufacturing_resurgence
4
Source: US Census, 2010 website http://www.census.gov
5
Tri-EDs list of target industries is available at http://www.northernkentuckyusa.com/target-industry/advanced-manufacturing.aspx
6
Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce industry clusters are available at http://redicincinnati.com/Industry_Clusters/Industry_Clusters.aspx
7
Partners for a Competitive Workforce website available at http://www.competitiveworkforce.com/Career-Pathways.html
8
2020 Jobs Outlook report can be found at http://www.regional-indicators.org
9
US Department of Labor: US Bureau of Labor Statistics website is http://www.bls.gov

3


NORTHERN KENTUCKY

Located in the Cincinnati MSA, Gateway is positioned in a geographical area unique to the State of Kentucky.
Gateways current service area population, as defined by the Kentucky Community and Technical College System
(KCTCS), includes a 7-county region in Northern Kentucky consisting of Boone, Campbell, Gallatin, Grant,
Kenton, Owen, and Pendleton Counties. The total population of this service region is 461,841
10
. Six of these seven
counties, with the exception of Owen County, are located within the Cincinnati MSA. The Northern Kentucky Area
Development District (NKADD) consists of the seven counties within Gateways service region, as well as Carroll
County, which is located within the service region for Jefferson Community and Technical College in Louisville.

According to the 2014 Kentucky Directory of Manufacturers
11
produced by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic
Development, there are 2,421 manufacturing facilities in Kentucky that employ a total of 235,991 individuals. In
the 8-county region of the NKADD the directory
lists 243 manufacturing facilities that employ a
total of 23,388 individuals, representing 10% of
the states manufacturing employment.

Within Northern Kentucky, Boone County holds
the majority share of both manufacturing
facilities and total employment in the
manufacturing industry, with 48% (116) of the
facilities and 57% (13,257) of employment.


Gateways 50-acre Boone Campus was strategically positioned to be a central location serving Northern Kentuckys
advanced manufacturing employers, as well as residents living and working in the southern-tier counties of the
region. The Tri-County Economic Development Corporation (Tri-ED) references the importance of the campus to
the regions manufacturing companies in its recruitment information
12
.


10
Source: US Census, 2010 website http://www.census.gov
11
2014 Kentucky Directory of Manufacturers is available at http://www.thinkkentucky.com/kyedc/kpdf/facilities_by_location.pdf
12
http://www.northernkentuckyusa.com/target-industry/advanced-manufacturing.aspx
County
Number of
Manufacturing
Facilities
Number of
Employees
Boone 116 13,257
Campbell 28 1,550
Carroll 13 2,661
Gallatin 2 3
Grant 9 527
Kenton 65 4,432
Owen 1 450
Pendleton 9 508
TOTAL 243 23,388
Boone
57%
Campbell
7%
Carroll
11%
Gallatin
0%
Grant
2%
Kenton
19%
Owen
2%
Pendleton
2%
DISTRIBUTION OF MANUFACTURING EMPLOYEES
Boone
48%
Campbell
11%
Carroll
5%
Gallatin
1%
Grant
4%
Kenton
27%
Owen
0%
Pendleton
4%
DISTRIBUTION OF MANUFACTURING FACILITIES

4


MONITORING EMPLOYER NEEDS: ENVIRONMENTAL SCANNING

With the rapid and continuous changes in the advanced manufacturing industry, education and training partners like
Gateway must purposefully and proactively evaluate the need for trained individuals. Gateway monitors employer
needs through three primary avenues of environmental scanning: (1) continuous engagement of employers in the
review and revision of curriculum and training available to support the industrys workforce needs; (2) continuous
review of data and information related to occupational projections; and (3) continuous review of the availability of
education and/or training by other institutions and agencies within the region.


ENGAGEMENT OF EMPLOYERS

The college continuously engages the regions manufacturing industry, and other community and education
partners, in formal and informal ways. The primary methods of engagement include, but are not limited to: (1)
technical program advisory committees; (2) leadership of the Manufacturing Network; (3) active participation in
regional workforce councils, boards, and committees; and (4) direct interaction with local employers to develop
customized training to meet their unique needs. The following section briefly describes each method.
Technical Program Advisory Committees
Each technical program has a Program Advisory Committee composed of regional employers that serves as an
advice-giving body to the program. Working directly with the program coordinator and other faculty and staff
members, the committees serve in an advisory capacity to the faculty and administration to ensure alignment
between industry needs and college programs and services. Through two formal meetings per year, the
committees provide counsel in the following areas: development and implementation of new programs and
courses; safety and equipment needs; hands-on projects for student learning; advocacy of the program in the
community; recruitment of students; work-based learning; job placement of students; community and industry
resources available; and recommendations on improvement. Two examples, from many, where committee
recommendations have significantly impacted a program illustrate this process.
Industrial Maintenance Technology: During a review of program curriculum, the committee requested
an increase in teaching metrics as a critical skill directly related to System International (SI), part of ISO
9000 quality management. As a result of the recommendation, increased emphasis was immediately
implemented across the programs courses. The use of the metric and standard systems of measurement
are now a basic skill students learn.
Computerized Manufacturing and Machining: During a review of program equipment in the
Computer Numeric Control (CNC) laboratory, the committee discussed ways to increase access to the
equipment for more students. The college acted upon the committees recommendation to purchase four
3-axis machines to increase the available capacity of the lab. In addition, a manufacturing company
donated another 3-axis machine to the program, valued at $57,628, thereby further increasing the access
to industry-standard equipment for students.
Manufacturing Network
Gateway engages industry partners through a Manufacturing Network, created in 2005. The Network was an
outgrowth of discussions among employers and the college focusing on two primary strategies: (1) incumbent
worker training and (2) technical education programs. The Network partners meet quarterly and meetings are
open to any employer. Over the course of the 2013-2014 year, 71 companies; 12 trade associations, industry
consultants, or other companies; and 15 educational/foundation partners were engaged in the Network. A list of
2013-2014 Network participants can be found in Appendix B. The following are examples of the Networks
impact:

5


2005 The creation of the Manufacturing Network provided a framework organization to advise the
college. The Network conducted a survey of manufacturers regarding their employment and training
needs. The data and subsequent discussions within the Network produced an employer-led advocacy
effort resulting in the capital funding for the Center for Advanced Manufacturing.
2008 The college joined the KCTCS Workforce Competitiveness Initiative that included meetings
with company CEOs and senior leaders to update the college on their needs. A survey of manufacturers
was conducted regarding the updating of their hiring and training needs. The initiative led to a
successfully funded $598,000 National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education grant,
resulting in the creation of the Manufacturing Engineering Technology degree, and three short-term
certificates: Fundamentals of Advanced Manufacturing & Mechatronics; Fundamentals of Advanced
Manufacturing & Machining; and Fundamentals of Advanced Manufacturing & Quality Control. This
mechatronics program was developed following the Siemens model and positioned Gateway to integrate
manufacturing curriculum and training across program areas.
2011 The Network surveyed employers about needs which resulted in the identification of a common
entry-level skill set that could be delivered through the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC).
The Certified Production Technician (CPT) certificate aimed at high school students, women, seniors,
and displaced workers, including veterans, was implemented. To date, 40 students have completed the
CPT. Gateway was first in the state of Kentucky to deliver the CPT for dual credit and was successful at
having the CPT added as an approved industry certification with the Kentucky Department of Education,
which will identify high school students who complete the CPT as career ready for high school
accountability measures.
2011-2012 The Network formed a recruitment committee with strategies aimed at the 6 target
populations (high school students and recent graduates, incumbent workers, displaced workers, veterans,
women, and seniors). STEM days aimed at high school students and their parents were initiated. Gateway
VETS was launched, resulting in the placement of 51 veterans in manufacturing jobs and over 200
veterans attending the college.
2013 The college, supported by Network partners, received a competitive $2.7 million grant from the
Department of Labor designated to accelerate the implementation of new short-term training and
certificates which industry has advised the college to create. In addition, the Raise the Floor Initiative
was launched with a goal of recruiting 80 women into manufacturing fields.
Participation in Regional Workforce Councils, Boards, and Committees
Gateway actively participates in the work of Partners for a Competitive Workforce (PCW)
13
, a partnership within
the tri-state region focused on the skill development of the current and future workforce to meet employer demand.
Managed by United Way of Greater Cincinnati, PCW partners include businesses,
workforce investment boards, chambers of commerce, secondary and post-secondary
educational institutions, service providers, and philanthropic funders. Gateway
president, Dr. Ed Hughes, is a member of the Partners Council, which serves as the
coordinating body for PCW.
Gateway is an active member of the Northern Kentucky Workforce I nvestment
Board (NKWI B)
14
, a volunteer board composed of local business leaders and
professionals with a mission to drive policy, direction, and funding oversight for
the local workforce investment system. Gateways vice president for workforce
solutions, Dr. Angie Taylor, represents Gateway on the NKWIB.

13
Partners for Competitive Workforce website http://www.competitiveworkforce.com/index.html
14
Northern Kentucky Workforce Investment Board website http://www.nkcareercenter.org/

6


Gateway is an active participant in the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, including the Chambers
recently formed Impact Committee, a focused effort to assist manufacturing members with talent development.
The college is an active member of the European American Chamber of Commerceand is becoming more active
with the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber. Gateways president serves as an ex-officio member of the
Northern Kentucky Tri-County Economic Development Corporation (Tri-ED) and participates in employer
recruitment activities as a training partner. Gateway is an active participant in the Economic Competitiveness
Workforce Group of Vision 2015 and the Northern Kentucky Education Council, including the Councils six
action teams. Each of these connections provides specific and general information regarding needs of individual
employers in the region.
Development of Customized Training
In addition to the above connection points, the colleges Workforce Solutions Division exists to meet specific
company training needs and delivers cost-effective customized training and assessment services designed to
improve the performance and efficiency of the companies served. In addition to customized training for
employers, the Division offers open enrollment courses, continuing education courses to assist in maintaining
licensure requirements, provides pre-hire training and credentials, and new-hire training such as boot camps to
help new employees gain necessary skills to be effective workers.

OCCUPATIONAL PROJECTIONS

One of the more challenging aspects of aligning training with employer needs is in the area of job projections. In
order to project employer needs and identify the colleges contribution in filling the talent pipeline, Gateway staff
review a variety of sources to understand current and future market conditions. No single source of information
provides an accurate and complete picture on which to base decisions for the colleges program goals. The initial
sources that are regularly reviewed include the US Department of Labor: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
15
and the
Kentucky Department for Workforce Development, Office of Employment and Training
16
. Due to Gateways
geographical position in the Cincinnati MSA, another source of data includes the Ohio Department of J obs and
Family Services
17
. In addition to the initial, or primary, sources of occupational information reviewed regularly by
Gateway staff, other specialized reports or regional information sources are reviewed as they become available.
Examples of other sources include the 2020 J obs Outlook report previously identified, and data provided by
community partners such as PCW, who conduct regional economic analyses with national sources such as
Economic Modeling Specialists, Intl. (EMSI).

Table 1, Projections for Occupations Related to Gateway Manufacturing Programs, shows a comparison of 10-
year occupational projections for select occupations in manufacturing-related fields across the United States,
Kentucky, Northern Kentucky Area Development District, and the Cincinnati MSA (as reported in the 2020 Jobs
Outlook Report). There are significant variations in the projected growth of manufacturing occupations, depending
upon which geographical region and which jobs classification system is used. The college attempts to match
occupations to existing Gateway programs by comparison of Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code
18
,
based on student academic plan/major. It is important to note that the occupations provided in Table 1 may not be
all inclusive of the skill sets students learn in Gateways traditional manufacturing programs (i.e. certificates,

15
US Department of Labor: US Bureau of Labor Statistics website is http://www.bls.gov
16
Kentucky Department for Workforce Development, Office of Employment and Training website is http://www.oet.ky.gov
17
Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services website is http://www.jfs.ohio.gov
18
The purpose of the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) is to provide a taxonomic scheme that will support the accurate tracking,
assessment, and reporting of fields of study and program completions activity. CIP was originally developed by the U.S. Department of
Education's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) in 1980, with revisions occurring in 1985 and 1990. The 2000 edition (CIP-
2000) is the third revision of the taxonomy and presents an updated taxonomy of instructional program classifications and descriptions.
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/cip2000

7


diplomas, and degrees). The table provides the most consistent comparison of occupations to Gateway
manufacturing programs, based on the CIP code match as well as input from the manufacturing program faculty.

Table 1 - Projections for Occupations Related to Gateway Manufacturing Programs
Gateway Academic Program
Occupation
United
States
Projection
through
2022
10
Kentucky
Projection
through
2020
11
NKADD
Projection
through
2020
11
2020 Johs
Outlook
6
All Occupations NA 12.4% 12.7% 11%
Computer Aided Drafting and Design Architectural and civil drafters 0.7% 2.4% 3.8% 23%
Computerized Manufacturing and Machining Machinists 8.8% 8.8% 14.9% -10%
Electrical Technology Electrical and electronic
engineering technicians
0.0% 2.0% 2.7% -18%
Electricians 19.7% 15.2% 19.8% 3%
Energy Technology Environmental engineering
technicians
18.4% 16.0% 29.6% 44%
Industrial Maintenance Technology Industrial machinery mechanics 18.9% 20.2% 21.9% 42%
Manufacturing Engineering Technology Industrial engineering technicians -3.2% 3.4% 22.4% 2%
Mechanical engineering
technicians
4.6% 2.9% 2.2%
Welding Technology Welders, cutters, solders, and
brazers
5.8% 12.6% 10.1% 8.6%

It should be noted that a projected change in openings includes both job openings for replacement and new openings
due to growth in the field. A job with negative growth may also have projected openings each year; however, in
such a case there are no new openings projected for that occupation, and it may indicate that not all replacements
are being refilled. For all occupations listed in Table 2, it is projected that there will be 442 annual openings within
the Cincinnati MSA region between now and 2020.

Table 2 - Projections for Occupations Related to Gateway Manufacturing Programs
Gateway Academic
Program
Occupation
Employment
2010
Employment
2020
Number
Change
Percent
Change
Replacement
Projection
Total Job
Openings
Annual
Job
Openings
All Occupations 963,290 1,069,405 106,115 11% 232,517 338,632 33,863
Computer Aided Drafting
and Design
Architectural and civil drafters 620 764 144 23% 120 264 26
Computerized
Manufacturing and
Machining
Machinists 4,500 4,070 -430 -10% 826 396 40
Electrical Technology Electrical and electronic
engineering technicians
720 590 -130 -18% 138 7 <1
Electricians 4,230 4,365 135 3% 1,140 1,275 128
Energy Technology Environmental engineering
technicians
170 245 75 44% 33 108 11
Industrial Maintenance
Technology
Industrial machinery mechanics 3,070 4,347 1,277 42% 590 1,867 187
Manufacturing
Engineering Technology
Industrial engineering technicians 440 449 9 2% 84 94 9
Mechanical engineering
technicians
450 387 -72 -16% 86 14 1
Welding Technology Welders, cutters, solders, and
brazers
1,860 1,767 -93 -5% 496 403 40
TOTAL 16,060 16,984 915 6% 3,513 4,428 442

Seventy-nine percent of projected openings in manufacturing are forecasted to be replacements, compared to 69%
of openings for all occupations. These replacements generally require more than entry-level skills and often include
middle skills, including supervision and management training. The total number of openings in the identified
manufacturing occupations (4,428) represents 1.3% of the total job openings in all employment sectors projected
for the region (338,632).

In an attempt to better understand the regions future skill requirements for the manufacturing workforce, in 2012
the Northern Kentucky Industrial Park Association (NKIP) hired Repass and Partners to conduct a survey research
project with two main objectives: (1) to identify and project the needs of manufacturers in Northern Kentucky; and

8


(2) to understand perceptions and attitudes toward employment in the manufacturing sector. The results, provided
in the NKI P Strategic Manufacturing Skill Pipeline Business Plan, included feedback from 39 manufacturing
employers. Based on this research, the NKIP study projected that between 2012 and 2022 there will be a need to
fill 6,249 jobs in 16 manufacturing occupations within the Northern Kentucky region. With the 2020 J obs Outlook
report projecting 338,632 job openings in the Cincinnati MSA between 2010 and 2020, the 6,249 job openings
projected in manufacturing by the NKIP study would represent 1.8% of total job openings in the region. Projections
provided within the NKIP study forecasts that the 6,249 job openings will be in the following 16 broad occupations:

Table 3 NKIP Projected Job Openings
DEMAND LEVEL TITLE GROWTH ESTIMATE
High Demand
Manufacturing Technicians 2,671
Machine Maintenance Specialist 695
Electronic Technician and Repairer 532
Welders 453
Engineer-Process/Manufacturing 326
Engineer-Design 330
Some Demand
Machinists 281
Machine Tool Operator 260
Industrial Electricians 180
Applications Engineer 120
Near Stable
Metal Fabricators 96
Engineering Technician 94
CNC Press Brake Set-Up and Operators 71
CAD Drafters 53
Finishers 49
Hydraulic Pneumatic 38
TOTAL DEMAND 6,249
Source: NKIP Strategic Manufacturing Skill Pipeline Business Plan

Each of the 16 occupations contains a number of more specific job titles. For example, the broad category of
Manufacturing Technicians includes 10 sample job titles, however those titles do not match job titles used by the
US Department of Labor. Using the sample job title Production Operator, a search for matching titles
19
resulted in
8 relevant occupational titles. These include: mixing and blending machine setters, operators, and tenders; chemical
equipment operators and tenders; crushing, grinding, and polishing machine setters, operators, and tenders;
cooling and freezing equipment operators and tenders; multiple machine tool setters, operators, and tenders, metal
and plastic; office machine operators; wellhead pumpers; and first-line supervisors of production and operating
workers.

Without a direct match between the NKIP and Department of Labor job titles, it is not possible to perform a direct,
concise match. An analysis of the NKIP study and the 2020 Jobs Outlook data from the US Department of Labor,
referenced in Table 4, indicates the following:
According to the NKIP study, the Manufacturing Technician occupational category accounts for 43% of
the projected 6,249 job openings, and requires 6 months of training beyond high school
Of the occupations aligned to Gateway programs in Table 4, 55% of the 9 positions require an education
beyond high school, and of the total number of annual openings (442) only 11% (47) require an education
beyond high school
Nearly all of the engineer-related positions identified with the Department of Labor require a bachelors
degree





19
http://www.onetonline.org

9


Table 4 Education, Work Experience and Training Required for Projected Openings in Manufacturing, Related to Gateway Manufacturing
Programs
Gateway Academic
Program
Occupation
Projected Annual
Openings through
2020 (Cincinnati
MSA)
Typical Education
Needed for Entry
Work
Experience in
Related
Occupation
Typical On the
Job Training
Needed to Attain
Competency in
Occupation
Computer Aided Drafting
and Design
Architectural and civil drafters
26
Associates Degree None None
Computerized
Manufacturing and
Machining
Machinists
40
High School Diploma
or Equivalent
None
Long-term on-the-
job training
Electrical Technology
Electrical and electronic
engineering technicians
<1
Associates Degree None None
Electricians
128 High School Diploma
or Equivalent
None Apprenticeship
Energy Technology
Environmental engineering
technicians
11
Associates Degree None None
Industrial Maintenance
Technology
Industrial machinery mechanics
187 High School Diploma
or Equivalent
None
Long-term on-the-
job training
Manufacturing
Engineering Technology
Industrial engineering
technicians
9
Associates Degree None None
Mechanical engineering
technicians
1
Associates Degree None None
Welding Technology
Welders, cutters, solders, and
brazers
40 High School Diploma
or Equivalent
Less than 1 year
Moderate-term on-
the-job training

EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROVIDERS IN THE REGION
Gateway is one of many educational institutions, both secondary and postsecondary, within the Cincinnati MSA
that offer education and/or training in advanced manufacturing. The Colleges environmental scanning process
includes the identification of other education and training institutions within the Cincinnati MSA that deliver
education and/or training in advanced manufacturing. As shown in Table 5, there are four area technology centers
at the secondary level and two other postsecondary institutions that provide education and/or training in advanced
manufacturing at or below the associate degree level. The regions trade associations also offer programs related to
the development of skills that can be applied to advanced manufacturing jobs; however, this report does not attempt
to analyze that component of training.
Table 5 Regional Educational Providers of Manufacturing Education & Training
Gateway Academic Program Regional Education Providers Occupation

Computer Aided Drafting and Design Cincinnati State Technical And Community
College, Ivy Tech Community College
Woodward Career Technical High School
Architectural and civil drafters
Computerized Manufacturing and Machining Cincinnati State Technical And Community
College, Great Oaks Career Campuses
Machinists
Electrical Technology Cincinnati State Technical And Community
College, Boone County Area Technology
Center, Campbell County Area Technology
Center, Ivy Tech Community College
Southeast
Electrical and electronic engineering technicians
Electricians
Energy Technology Cincinnati State Technical And Community
College
Environmental engineering technicians
Industrial Maintenance Technology Cincinnati State Technical And Community
College, Ivy Tech Community College
Southeast
Industrial machinery mechanics
Manufacturing Engineering Technology Cincinnati State Technical And Community
College, Great Oaks Career Campuses, Ivy
Tech Community College Southeast,
Woodward Career Technical High School
Industrial engineering technicians
Mechanical engineering technicians
Welding Technology Cincinnati State Technical And Community
College, Boone County Area Technology
Center, Campbell County Area Technology
Center, Great Oaks Career Campuses, Ivy
Tech Community College Southeast
Welders, cutters, solders, and brazers

10


Located just outside the Cincinnati MSA, Bluegrass Community and Technical College in Georgetown (53 miles
from Florence), Jefferson Community and Technical College in Carrollton (43 miles from Florence), and Maysville
Community and Technical College (64 miles from Florence), all part of the Kentucky Community and Technical
College System, provide education and/or training in advanced manufacturing. Bluegrass offers an advanced
manufacturing technician program; Jefferson offers engineering technology and industrial chemical technology;
and Maysville offers programs in applied engineering technology, electrical technology, industrial maintenance,
computerized manufacturing and machining, and welding.

Beyond the associate degree, students in the region have multiple choices for pursuing postsecondary education.
Northern Kentucky University offers a bachelors degree in mechanical and manufacturing engineering technology,
and both Miami University and the University of Cincinnati offer bachelor and master degrees in various
engineering fields. In addition, Morehead State University offers transfer programs online for all Gateway
manufacturing graduates.























11


RESPONDING TO EMPLOYER NEEDS IN ADVANCED MANUFACTURING

The talent pipeline metaphor often used in reference to the regions collective effort to meet employer needs could
be better conveyed as a talent highway. Rather than a pipeline that often represents a closed system with a single
starting point and ending point, a highway represents multiple entry and exit points, various speeds, and greater
opportunity for personalization of the learning environment.
As one of the key contributors to the manufacturing talent highway for the region, Gateway provides education and
training through two primary options: traditional technical programs and customized workforce training. Within
these options, the college focuses on three primary populations of prospective talent: high school students and/or
recent high school graduates, older adults, and current workers. Within these three primary populations, the
college focuses recruitment efforts on special populations including veterans, women, and seniors as well as
incumbent workers and under-employed, unemployed, and displaced workers.
Individuals from these categories move on and off the talent highway depending on their life circumstances, and
utilize multiple options in technical programs as well as customized training. Likewise, changes in supply and
demand within the manufacturing industry result in variations in the training needs of regional employers. Gateway
provides a variety of options for education and training, both for college credit and without college credit. Trend
data on the numbers of individuals served through education and training programs, as well as data on the numbers
of graduates and credentials awarded, provide an overview of the impact Gateways technical and customized
workforce programming is making within the regions manufacturing industry.

EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAMS
As shown in Table 6, for each of the past four years Gateway has served more than 1,100 individuals per year in
credit-based education and training options. The downward trend in overall numbers served is due in part to the
decrease in the unemployment rate in the region. The unemployment rate for the Cincinnati MSA dropped from
8.6% in 2011 to 7.1% in 2013, and in the first half of 2014 the rate dropped to 5.8%, the lowest since 2008. In
addition, changes in dual credit and articulated credit options for regional school districts resulted in a significant
decline in the number of high school students who took advantage of dual credit opportunities beginning in 2012-
2013. Details on the enrollment numbers provided are located in Appendix C.
Table 6 Numbers Served in Manufacturing-Related Education and Training Offered for College Credit
Credit Education/Training 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014
Technical Program Enrollment
20
438 439 479 542
Non-Credential/Non-Degree
21
23 23 23 13
High School Dual Credit 228 239 37 37
Workforce Technical Skills Training 411 244 283 325
Workforce Performance Skills Training 98 591 597 290
TOTAL 1,198 1,536 1,419 1,207

Gateway currently offers seven (7) technical programs and associated credentials within the areas of manufacturing,
as shown in Table 7. A comprehensive list of manufacturing programs, program descriptions, and credit hours
required is located in Appendix D.

20
Technical Program Enrollment shown in this chart represents an unduplicated number of students enrolled in technical programs in a given
year that includes summer, fall, and spring semesters
21
Gateway serves a number of students each year who come to the college to take one or more courses without the intention of obtaining a
credential. These students do not declare an academic program/major, but instead are classified as non-credential/non-degree-seeking
students.

12


Table 7 Manufacturing Programs and Associated Credentials
PROGRAM CERTIFICATES
*
DIPLOMAS
**
ASSOCIATES
DEGREES
***
Computer Aided
Drafting & Design
Drafter Assistant
Computer Assisted Drafter
Detailer
Computer Aided Drafting & Design General Occupational
Technical Studies
(GOTS)
Computerized
Manufacturing &
Machining
Exploratory Machining I
Machine Tool Operator I
Machine Tool Operator II
CNC Machinist
Machinist
General Occupational
Technical Studies
(GOTS)
Electrical Technology Electrical Motor Control Level I
Electrical Motor Control Level II
Residential Electricity Level I
Residential Electricity Level II
Voice and Data Wiring Installer Level I
Voice and Data Wiring Installer Level II
Electrician Trainee Level I
Electrician Trainee Level II
Industrial Electrician Track
Construction Electrician Track
General Occupational
Technical Students
(GOTS)
Energy Technologies Energy Efficiency and Analysis
Energy Efficiency Electrical Controls Technician
Energy Utility Technician
Outside Plan Technician
Solar/Photovoltaic Technologies
Wind Systems Technologies
N/A Associate in Applied
Science
Industrial
Maintenance
Technology
Industrial Maintenance Electrical Mechanic
Industrial Maintenance Machinists Mechanic
Industrial Maintenance Mechanic Level I
Industrial Maintenance Mechanic Level II
Industrial Maintenance Technician Associate in Applied
Science
Manufacturing
Engineering
Technology
Fundamentals of Mechatronics
Integrated Manufacturing Technologies
Operations Management
Quality Control
N/A Associate in Applied
Science
Welding Technology Arc Welder
Production Line Welder
Tack Welder
Combination Welder General Occupational
Technical Studies
(GOTS)
*
Certificate is defined as a credential that requires completion of an academic program in less than one academic year, or designed for completion in less
than 30 semester credit hours, by a student enrolled full-time.
**
Diploma is defined as a program of study that requires completion of an academic program in at least one but fewer than two full-time equivalent
academic years, or is designed for completion in at least 30 but fewer than 60 semester credit hours, by a student enrolled full-time.
***
Associates Degree is defined as an award that normally requires at least 60 semester credit hours or equivalent.
Technical Program Enrollment
Enrollment in technical programs
22
related to advanced
manufacturing has increased significantly each year over the
last 10 years, with the opening and continued expansion of the
Boone Campus. The Bank of Kentucky Classroom and
Training Center opened for classes in January 2006 and the
Center for Advanced Manufacturing opened in the fall of 2010.
From fall 2006 through fall 2010, enrollment in
manufacturing programs increased 146%
From fall 2010 through fall 2013, enrollment in
manufacturing programs increased 28%
Overall, from 2004 through 2014, enrollment in
manufacturing programs has increased by 190% in
fall terms (149 in fall 2004 to 432 in fall 2013) and
215% in spring terms (136 in spring 2005 to 429 in
spring 2014). See Appendix C for detailed enrollment
trend information.


22
Enrollment in technical programs is calculated based on students declared program of study, or academic major.
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
500
20042005200620072008200920102011201220132014
Manufacturing Technical Program
Enrollment
Fall Spring

13


Workforce Training

In addition to traditional technical programs, the colleges Workforce Solutions Division offers employers a
variety of courses and customized training options in both technical skills and performance skills. Depending
upon the needs of the employer, courses may be offered for college credit if the requested curriculum can be
linked to one or more of the required courses in a traditional manufacturing program, or may be offered as non-
credit training. Technical skills training addresses the development of specific skill sets in defined areas, such as
TIG welding, while performance skills training addresses soft skills needed in supervision and leadership.

Table 8 For-Credit Workforce Training
CREDIT TRAINING 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014
Technical Skills 411 244 283 325
Performance Skills 98 591 597 290
TOTAL 509 835 880 615
The numbers provided for credit training each year represent an unduplicated number of individuals served.
Table 9 Non-Credit Workforce Training
NON-CREDIT TRAINING 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014
Performance Skills 28 35 95 222
Safety and Technical Skills 95 44 28 36
TOTAL 123 79 123 258
Clock Hours 102 52 113 193
Number of Companies 4 5 8 9
The numbers provided for non-credit training include duplicated individuals served.
College Support for Training with Companies
Gateway goes beyond the development and delivery of education and training courses and programs to support
regional manufacturing employers. Two of the most successful examples of this support include funding to assist
employers with the cost of providing training to their employees and an apprenticeship program that blends on-the-
job training and academic coursework.
Gateway offers companies a very unique support program through KCTCS-TRAINS (formerly known as KY
WINS). Part of the Kentucky Skills Network, KCTCS-TRAINS is a partnership of the Cabinet for Economic
Development, Kentucky Career Center (Education & Workforce Development Cabinet), Labor Cabinet and
KCTCS. Through KCTCS-TRAINS Kentucky companies can apply for funding to assist with the cost of providing
workforce training and assessment services to current, as well as potential, employees. KCTCS-TRAINS funds are
distributed on a project basis and require a company cash match of 50%. Workforce Solutions staff work with the
company to prepare the KCTCS-TRAINS application, and once approved, work with the company to execute the
training plan. Between 2010-2011 and 2013-2014, Gateway provided training to 38 manufacturing companies
through the KCTCS-TRAINS program, totaling $2,437,100. These funds represent a substantial investment in
the support of the regions manufacturing industry.
Apprenticeship has reemerged as the training model of choice in advanced manufacturing, as both students and
employees experience the benefits of on-the-job training and academic coursework. Apprentices typically work
full-time for their company and attend Gateway part-time. Companies provide tuition reimbursement and funding
for course materials. From 2011-2012 through early 2014-2015 the number of apprentices have increased 226%,
with more than 100 active apprentices as of September 2014.







14


GRADUATES AND CREDENTIALS

Increasingly, national experts are identifying student success in postsecondary education more broadly than degree
attainment, especially within the community college. Manufacturing employers are in agreement, many placing
higher emphasis on specific skill attainment and performance. While degree attainment remains an important
defining educational milestone, additional measures of success include: completion of a shorter-term credential
such as a certificate or diploma; transfer to a 4-year college/university to pursue a bachelors degree; placement into
employment; and participation in and completion of technical skill-based and/or soft skill-based coursework or
training
23
.
Credential Completion
For the 10-year period of 2004-2005 through 2013-2014, Gateway has awarded 1,135 credentials to 466 students
in manufacturing programs, including 740 certificates, 144 diplomas, and 251 associates degrees. Sixty-five
percent of the total credentials awarded have been at the certificate level. Certificates are designed to provide
specific training of value to employers, and are stackable so students can continue working on additional
certificates, a diploma, or an associates degree. Students with certificates are employable and many stop out, or
leave their program upon completion of one or more certificates. For those students who continue to pursue their
associates degree, the 3-year graduation rate for Gateway graduates has consistently exceeded the rates for regional
peer institutions, as well as the overall rate for 2-year, public institutions. See Appendix E for a full explanation of
graduation rates.
In 2013-2014 Gateway awarded a record number of credentials to a record number of graduates in manufacturing
programs. Eighty-eight (88) graduates received a total of 257 credentials, including 193 certificates, 22 diplomas,
and 42 associates degrees. Appendix F contains a detailed chart that shows the number of credentials that were
awarded in each credential level (certificate, diploma, degree) for each manufacturing program; however, key
outcomes of credentials awarded within manufacturing programs from 2004-2005 to 2013-2014 have included:
Total number of credentials awarded has increased 394%
Total number of individual graduates has increased 95%
Annual number of certificates awarded increased by 485%
Annual number of diplomas awarded increased by 267%
Annual number of associates degrees awarded increased by 223%

Skill-Based Coursework or Training
While increasing the number of individuals who complete associate degrees or other credentials is certainly an
important focus, it is important to understand that preparing more individuals for active contribution on the
manufacturing talent highway is not limited to those who complete a credential. For many students, completing a
course or training program is their goal rather than completing a credential. The retention and success rates of
students in credit-bearing manufacturing courses have continued at the highest levels. An average of the past three
fall semesters shows that 96% of students were retained in their manufacturing courses, and of those retained, 95%
successfully passed their courses. The average of the past three spring semesters shows very similar performance
with 97% of students retained in their manufacturing courses and 94% successfully passing their courses.





23
http://www.burning-glass.com/media/4737/Moving_the_Goalposts.pdf

15


PROJECTIONS
ENROLLMENT
Enrollment projections for technical programs estimate that from 2013-2014 to 2018-2019 fall enrollment could
increase as much as 67% along the trend continued from 2009-2010, and as much as 79% along a more aggressive
trend that takes into account increased retention rates and strategic efforts around marketing and recruitment.
Similarly, projections for spring enrollment indicate a possible increase of 54% for the continued trend and 65%
for a more aggressive trend.

The greatest potential for significant growth is within the high school dual credit population. The continued trend
from 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 going forward would indicate between 2013-2014 and 2018-2019 enrollment from
dual credit high school would increase by 67%. Two additional projections have been calculated for dual credit
high school students to include the expansion of the Certified Production Technician (CPT) certification program,
ramping up to serve 200 students per year by 2018-2019 (bringing potential enrollment to 262), and the development
and implementation of the Northern Kentucky School for Science, Engineering, Mathematics and Advanced
Technology (SEMAT) (see Appendix G), also ramping up to serve 200 students per year by 2018-2019 (bringing
potential enrollment to 462).

304
338
306
345
432
483
534
590
655
727
304
338
306
345
432
483
550
619
701
778
2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Continued Trend Aggressive
228
239
37 37 41 45
51
56
62
228
239
37 37
61
85
131
196
262
228
239
37 37
61
135
231
346
462
2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Continued Trend Aggressive A Aggressive B

16


The expansion of the CPT to high school students could produce a 608% increase in high school enrollment by
2018-2019, and the additional of students enrolled in SEMAT, beginning with 50 students in 2015-2016, could
produce an overall 1149% increase in enrollment of high school students into manufacturing programs.

COMPLETION
Projections for completion include total credentials awarded and the number of individual graduates expected to
earn those credentials. It is estimated that between 2013-2014 and 2018-2019 the total annual number of credentials
awarded will increase by 83% if the existing trend continues, and by as much as 93% for a more aggressive trend.
In relation, it is expected that during that same period the annual number of graduates will increase 103% with the
continuing trend and by as much as 124% in a more aggressive trend.

It is important to note that the projections for the number of graduates only includes students who complete a
traditional certificate, diploma, or associates degree in a manufacturing-related program. Additional students who
complete training and preparation for industry certifications, such as the Certified Production Technician (CPT) are
not included in this number.
Appendix H contains a detailed breakdown of projections, by program.










49
81
87
40
88
97
113
131
153
179
49
81
87
40
88
107
124
144
168
197
2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Continued Trend Aggressive

17


CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Gateway acknowledges that the single most important challenge facing the manufacturing industry and its training
partners is the need to increase the pool of qualified talent for advanced manufacturing. While Gateway has been,
and continues to respond to the needs of regional employers, further increasing the pool of qualified talent calls for
the evaluation of additional challenges that provide a rich array of opportunities for collective consideration and
action. Partners for a Competitive Workforce (PCW), noted on page 5, offers a regional organizational structure for
the collective impact that is needed.

AWARENESS AND RECRUITMENT
CHALLENGE 1: Building Awareness of Advanced Manufacturing Industry
Perhaps the largest roadblock to filling the pool of qualified talent needed by manufacturing employers is the general
negative perception of advanced manufacturing. Nearly every major study released on the industry clearly
articulates this pervasive issue, and despite national marketing efforts such as the National Association of
Manufacturers Dream It, Do It campaign, changing the perception continues to be a challenge, especially with
high school and traditional-aged college students, parents, and high school counselors. Building awareness of the
importance of the manufacturing industry to our region, and the tremendous career potential within that industry,
must be introduced at an early age in the pipeline. The National Science and Technology Council discussed the
changing manufacturing workforce, emphasizing that in order to be responsive to the skill demands of advanced
manufacturing employers, education and training programs must span from cradle-to-career. The critical
challenge is how to expand awareness activities to more students in grades K-12 throughout the region, and
how to make a larger collective impact on resolving the negative perception of the advanced manufacturing
industry.
Each year Gateway holds Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) days for high school
students, designed to introduce them to STEM careers with a special emphasis on advanced manufacturing. Students
participate in hands-on activities, learn about labor market trends and dual credit opportunities, and visit regional
manufacturing partners. In 2012-2013 Gateway partnered with seven regional manufacturing employers to host 12
schools and 320 students for STEM days. In 2013-2014 there was a significant growth in interest as the college
partnered with 10 employers to host 21 schools and 631 students. The post-event survey given in 2013-2014
provided an indication that a positive impact was made on the students in attendance: 78% indicated they would
like to know more about manufacturing programs at Gateway; 75% indicated that they were interested in a
manufacturing career; 97% indicated that they are aware of the opportunities and careers in manufacturing in
Northern Kentucky
Increasing awareness of career opportunities in manufacturing is critical, but it is also vitally important that
increasing numbers of high school students enroll in some form of postsecondary education either while they are in
high school or following graduation. Increasing dual credit programs in advanced manufacturing can provide an
immediate, positive impact in growing the talent pipeline from high schools in NKY. Specifically, the Certified
Production Technician (CPT) certificate should be available to students in the Area Technology Centers as part of
an advanced manufacturing dual credit program at Gateway. The CPT is a nationally recognized certificate through
the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC), for which Gateway provides training and assessment. The
CPT is recognized as proof of entry level skills needed for 42-45% of the positions in the industry. The total cost
of the CPT course, certification exams, and associated materials is $2,250 per student. A coordinated regional
effort is needed to secure a recurring financial commitment to produce and sustain 200 CPT slots annually,
at a total cost of $450,000 per year.

18


Given the shifting landscape of educational needs, with the majority of projected annual openings in manufacturing
requiring a high school education, the region has a prime opportunity to evaluate the high school pipeline in
an innovative approach to meeting the dynamic needs of regional employers.
OPPORTUNITY 1: Coordinated Regional Campaign to Change Perceptions of Advanced Manufacturing
As outlined in the NKIP study, and bolstered by many regional groups, a coordinated and long-term marketing and
recruitment plan for the region is needed. Union, non-union, and industry training programs could also add value
to any marketing initiative. The NKIP study provides one framework for a marketing campaign. The work of PCW
provides a strong Tri-State approach as well as an organizational structure that could lead the efforts to change the
perception of advanced manufacturing careers. A coordinated marketing effort must bring sufficient resources
to mount a sustained 5- to 7-year marketing campaign directed at overcoming the negative perception of
advanced manufacturing careers. No such coordinated effort across the Tri-State or Northern Kentucky region
has emerged. The branding expertise in the region is an asset that should be marshalled as part of this effort. The
high cost of paid advertising in the Cincinnati MSA also indicates the need for a coordinated effort that would pool
available funds.
Gateway will continue to devote marketing resources to shine a light on advanced manufacturing as part of the
colleges overall information campaign. Since 2007 the college has attracted over $4.1 million in grants to support
advanced manufacturing programs, including $127,000 for direct marketing and over $246,600 for recruitment
staff. The targeted populations of these grant projects have included high school students and graduates,
underemployed and unemployed or displaced workers, veterans and women.

SUPPORT FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING
CHALLENGE 2: Student Risk Factors Impacting Completion
There are numerous factors that place community college
students at risk of not completing their educational goals.
These factors can affect their progression toward their
education goal, and can prevent or delay them from
completion of a credential. As part of the application for
admission to the college, students are asked to complete an
Entering Student Survey that provides the college with
information on the students plans for work, their family
composition, income, etc. Most recent survey data indicates
that:
86% of applicants plan to work while they are
attending college
26% plan to work 40 hours per week while attending
college
53% are the first person in their immediate family to
attend college
75% have a household income of less than $25,000

The challenges identified by students at the time of their
application to the college run parallel to the challenges they
face when making the decision to withdraw from college.
According to the information attained by surveying students
0% 10% 20% 30%
2011
2012
2013
2014
2011 2012 2013 2014
Spring 18% 18% 26%
Fall 16% 19% 19%
Students Who Plan to Work 40 hrs/Week
While in College
75% 80% 85% 90%
2011
2012
2013
2014
2011 2012 2013 2014
Spring 80% 84% 86%
Fall 84% 87% 88%
Students Who Plan to Work While in College

19


who leave Gateway prior to the attainment of their educational goals, student departure is most commonly
predicated by the following factors: personal issues, shift changes at work, illness, or employment. Students with
this profile do not enter a pipeline at one end, continue to flow unimpeded through the pipeline and come out the
other end. Instead, they travel the talent highway, moving on and off as life dictates.
Retaining greater numbers of students through the completion of an educational credential requires a holistic
approach to providing wrap-around services that addresses both academic and non-academic barriers.
OPPORTUNITY 2: Coordinated Regional Approach to Support Students in Advanced Manufacturing
Scholarships & Financial Support
Many resources in the region exist that can serve as enticements for students to enter and complete a program in
advanced manufacturing. Unfortunately, those resources are scattered and uncoordinated. For example the
educational institutions may have scholarships devoted the advanced manufacturing careers but they generally are
linked to STEM programs and may go unrecognized by students and counselors. In order to compete for students
in high schools it is necessary to be able to award more scholarship aid to recruit and retain students for
specific advanced manufacturing programs.
Work Based Experiences
Many reports on advanced manufacturing recommend an increase in paid internships, cooperative education and
apprenticeships (See Appendix A). Numerous programs exist but are uncoordinated. For instance, Gateway has
recognized strong success in apprenticeship programs. The initiative has grown from 31 in 2011-2012 to over 100
in the current year, with more companies asking to join the initiative. Apprentices work at the company with good
starting salaries and benefits and attend college on a part-time basis over a 4-year timeframe. Gateway can lend its
expertise to develop other apprenticeship approaches including a consortium model and building partnerships
among union, non-union, industry and college apprenticeship programs. Expanding work-based learning models
into high school partnerships is an opportunity to introduce pre-apprentice programs or other hands-on
opportunities for students to increase employability upon high school graduation.
Cincinnati State and UC have long been national models for cooperative education. While other institutions in the
region, including Gateway, have internship and cooperative education courses, most are offered as elective
courses and have relatively little success in attracting students. A coordinated effort that builds on the co-op,
internship and apprenticeship expertise in the region will yield a cost effective and more impactful result
than an uncoordinated, institution-by-institution approach.
Worker Training Programs
The largest component of any talent pool is the incumbent workforce that is under prepared and/or underemployed.
Worker training programs offered through the Workforce Investment Boards, Kentucky Career Centers, and others
are spread across the targeted industry sectors. If a larger proportion of training dollars could be directed to
supporting individuals into advanced manufacturing, those limited funds could be leveraged to produce a greater
collective impact. For instance, establishing a pool of funds that can be used in addition to federal financial aid and
scholarships that reduce the need for loans could be beneficial. Any regional initiative designed to increase the
talent pool for advanced manufacturing must take into account that most students are and will be working, most
will be attending on a part-time basis and most do not know where the many resources are located that can assist
them matriculate to a certificate, diploma or degree program. Resources that help attract and retain students
must be more coordinated throughout the region.



20


COLLECTIVE CAPACITY THROUGH PARTNERSHIP
CHALLENGE 3: Tracking of Students through the Education Pipeline
The management of information needed for tracking students through the education pipeline from high
school to postsecondary to employment is decentralized across multiple institutions, agencies, and also
crosses state lines. Written agreements between institutions and/or agencies for the sharing of student-level data
are minimal and in most cases, non-existent. The sharing of data across state lines adds another level of challenge
due to the fact that the local region is a tri-state region.
Various sources of information on occupational projections provide an inconsistent picture of the true numbers
required to meet the needs of employers, and the data available on the employment of graduates presents significant
challenges in the region. The employment of Gateway graduates is tracked each spring for technical reporting and
employment status is self-reported by the graduate. The accuracy of the employment information is questionable
because it depends on the student providing truthful information about employment status. KCTCS does a graduate
employment data match with the Kentucky Unemployment Insurance office but the college only receives an
aggregate number/percentage of graduates that are employed. The college does not receive graduate-level, nor
program-level employment data. Additionally, Kentuckys Unemployment Insurance office only provides
information for graduate employment in Kentucky. Therefore, if a Gateway graduate is employed in Ohio or
Indiana, the data are not available to the college.
OPPORTUNITY 3: Regional Framework for Measuring Impact
A substantial opportunity exists within the region to create a framework that measures the overall impact of
recruitment, education, and training efforts on meeting the needs of the advanced manufacturing employers. The
creation and implementation of shared data agreements across institutions, agencies, and state lines would
have a significant impact on recognizing the regional needs, determining best practices for meeting those needs,
and measuring the return on investment for the deployment of resources. The creation of a shared data system
and corresponding dashboard that provides real-time information to all partners would establish the region
as a leader in responsiveness to employer needs and overall economic development. Partners for a Competitive
Workforce (PCW) has received grant funds to develop an alignment of data systems from K-12, higher education,
and state workforce systems.
CHALLENGE 4: Expanding Capacity for Education and Training
Technical programs in STEM and advanced manufacturing have very high production costs per student.
These costs are not covered by public tuition revenues and declining state resources, nor can they be sustained
through external grant revenue. This is especially true in the hiring of new faculty, and the acquisition of equipment
and training resources.
The biggest capacity issue for Gateway is the ability to employ more faculty members in STEM and advanced
manufacturing programs. While the number of faculty positions in advanced manufacturing programs has
increased over the years, sustainable resources needed to further expand course offerings in technical programs is
not available given the mission of the college to address the needs of regional employers in other industry sectors
such as healthcare, information technology, logistics, energy and business/finance. For every new 12-month faculty
member added in the advanced manufacturing programs an additional 10 courses could be offered each year with
between 18 to 25 students enrolled (depending on the program). The general cost of each additional full-time, 12-
month faculty member, including salary and benefits, is approximately $72,500. Supporting increased numbers of
students in manufacturing programs also requires additional faculty to meet general education requirements, which
support the soft skills needed by employers.
With additional faculty and staff Gateway would expand education and training opportunities to include an
expansion in boot camp or accelerated programs that condense training time and provide targeted skill

21


development; expansion of online technical courses and training to provide access anywhere, anytime; expansion
of open labs where students can gain more hands-on access to equipment outside of traditional class time; and
increase contact and partnership development with secondary schools, career centers, and industry partners.
OPPORTUNITY 4: Non-Traditional Resource Development
The development of non-traditional resources to support education and training needs is a tremendous
opportunity for the region. Gateway has been fortunate to be able to use capital funding associated with the new
buildings to purchase state-of-the art trainers and teaching technology. Several large federal grants were secured
which enabled the college to purchase new and upgraded equipment. Since 2007 over $1.2 million for the purchase
of equipment has been secured via federal grants and over $2 million through the construction of the two buildings
on the Boone Campus. Some companies have provided deep discounts to the college for purchasing equipment.
Still others provide equipment that rotates out when a new model is available, usually at little or no cost to the
college. Securing funds to meet the capital renewal needs will require creative use of grants, private gifts
and industry partnerships.

The BIG and BOLD Approach
The Northern Kentucky School for Science, Engineering, Mathematics and Advanced Technology--
SEMAT
The region has made many positive and valiant efforts to address the talent pipeline for advanced manufacturing.
The efforts of individual organizations, colleges and universities, industry associations and companies have resulted
in incremental changes in perceptions of advanced manufacturing. More students are considering these career fields
and more are enrolled. However, these typically have been crisis-oriented, short-term and incremental edge
solutions. Clearly the pace of the change must increase dramatically. Tinkering around the edge with activities
aimed at changing student, parent and high school counselors perceptions through advertising, media campaigns
and small one-off programs will not produce a sustained pipeline of skilled talent worthy of recruitment by
industry. What is needed is a BIG and BOLD idea that will rival those historically successful in other sectors.

Gateway Community and Technical College, in collaboration with the regions public/parochial schools and
industry partners, proposes to create an on-campus high school focusing on science, mathematics, and advanced
technology (manufacturing) for selected high school juniors and seniors. The program will be located on the Boone
Campus of Gateway and will make use of the colleges Center for Advanced Manufacturing where there exists
space capacity during the day. Students will spend their junior and senior years taking a specialized and rigorous
curriculum which will satisfy their respective high school graduation requirements, as well as earning college credit
up to an Associates Degree. The School for Science, Engineering, Math, and Advanced Technology (SEMAT) will
select up to 250 students in a competitive application process. Business and industry partners will provide students
with internships and post-graduate cooperative education opportunities during the summers post-graduation
employment. Special programs for students in their freshman and sophomore years will augment the program and
serve as recruitment for the School. While all students will be certified as college and career ready, students in
the advanced technology track will achieve an additional certification as apprenticeship ready upon graduation
from high school.

The Immediate Need

To launch the School for Science, Engineering, Mathematics, and Advanced Technology, a year of serious
collaborative planning is required. The college will employ a consultant who will bring together a blue ribbon
advisory taskforce of school, college, and business/industry CEOs to advise on design of the program specifics.
The deliverables of the planning process will be:

22


1. Form the Schools Steering Committee headed jointly by the college president, a local superintendent and
an industry CEO and comprised of individuals of influence and affluence.
2. Complete curriculum design and the readiness to be implemented;
3. Obtain necessary accreditations or other licenses to operate;
4. Identify outcome measures;
5. Develop recruitment strategies for students, parents and faculty;
6. Recruit needed business/industry partners; and,
7. Execute a sustainability plan for the program funding through the creation of the SEMAT Endowment
Programs.

The college needs a $150,000 planning grant to initiate the planning if the School is to be launched in 2015-
2016 (an ambitious schedule). The funds will be used to hire a consultant/expert in creating this type of school,
provide stipends to faculty and other curriculum content experts, engage school accreditation experts, conduct focus
groups and generally support the planning committee work including visits to similar programs in the nation.
Conceptual details for The School can be found in Appendix G.


SUMMARY OF CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
The following summary of challenges and opportunities can ignite further dialogue across the tri-state region that
could lead to a comprehensive strategy to attract and retain individuals in the high-tech, high-wage careers found
in advanced manufacturing.

1. A substantial and sustained comprehensive marketing and recruitment campaign that uses the branding
expertise in the region must be planned and executed across the tri-state. The purpose of the coordinated
effort will be to transform the perception of advanced manufacturing into a highly valued and sought-after
career for the identified target populations.
2. Dual credit programs that provide pathways to postsecondary education or direct entry-level positions
need to be increased. Recurring funds are needed that would provide 200 slots annually for high school
students to obtain the Certified Production Technician (CPT) certificate. The CPT is a nationally
recognized, industry standard certification that indicates entry-level preparation for nearly half of the
manufacturing jobs available today.
3. A coordinated regional approach that supports students through programs designed to produce entry- and
middle-level employees must be developed and implemented. Emphasis on coordinated scholarships and
work-based experiences needs to be better coordinated among providers, funders, and employers.
4. The creation of the School for Science, Engineering, Math and Advanced Technology (SEMAT) is a BIG
and BOLD concept that will transform advanced manufacturing into a desired career field for high school
students. The School will rival other magnet schools in the nation and region and will advance the talent
pipeline exponentially.
5. Partners for a Competitive Workforce (PCW) offers the region a nationally recognized organizational
structure and the regional expertise needed to address workforce needs in the manufacturing industry and
beyond. Leveraging this existing resource can serve as a springboard to regional, collective efforts.





23




APPENDICES

























APPENDIX A
RESOURCES ON ADVANCED MANUFACTURING

Accenture. (2014, May 13) Combating the skills shortage in U.S. manufacturing. Retrieved from
http://www.accenture.com/us-en/Pages/insight-combating-skills-shortage-us-manufacturing-
infographic.aspx

Burning Glass Technologies (2014, September 11). Moving the goalposts: How demand for a bachelors
degree is reshaping the workforce. Retrieved from http://www.burning-
glass.com/media/4737/Moving_the_Goalposts.pdf

De Freytas-Tamura, K. (2014, January 18). Britain scrambles to fill skills gap. New York Times. Retrieved
from http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/18/business/international/britain-scrambles-to-fill-skills-
gap.html?_r=0

Davidson, A. (2012, November 20). Skills don't pay the bills. New York Times Magazine, MM16-MM17.
Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/25/magazine/skills-dont-pay-the-
bills.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Davidson, P. (2012, October 15). Study says shortage of skilled workers not that severe. USA Today.
Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2012/10/14/jobs-skills-gap-
study/1630359/

Fehrenback, P. (2013, August 28). Report: Fears of tear-term skills gap are exaggerated. Industry Week.
Retrieved from http://www.industryweek.com/workforce/bridging-skills-gap-best-practices-finding-
keeping-and-growing-talent-0

McCormack, R. (2013, April 19). MIT drills into the manufacturing skills shortage and finds that it doesn't really
exist. Manufacturing and Technology News, 20(5).

Morin, N., & Stahl, J. (2013, September 16). Looking for Shortages of Skilled Labor in the
Manufacturing Sector. FEDS Notes. Retrieved from
http://www.federalreserve.gov/econresdata/notes/feds-notes/2013/looking-for-shortages-of-killed-labor-in-
the-manufacturing-sector-20130926.html

Osterman, P. & Weaver, A. (2014, March 26). Why claims of skills shortages in manufacturing are
overblown. Economic Policy Institute Report. Retrieved from http://www.epi.org/publication/claims-
skills-shortages-manufacturing-overblown/

Shapiro, G. (2014, February 10). How to fix the high-skill labor shortage. U.S. News and World Report.
Retrieved from http://www.usnews.com/opinion/articles/2014/02/10/apprentice-programs-can-help-fix-the-
high-skill-labor-shortage

SHRM Foundation. (2013, April 10). Current issues in hr: Closing the manufacturing skills gap. Current
Issues in HR. Retrieved from http://www.shrm.org/about/foundation/products/documents/4-
13%20skills%20gap%20briefing.pdf

Sirkin, H. (2014, January 14). The coming shortage of skilled manufacturing workers. Bloomberg
Business Week. Retrieved from http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-01-14/the-coming-shortage-
of-skilled-manufacturing-workers

Williams, J. (2014, August 21). How manufacturing can solve its own talent shortage crises. Industry
Week. Retrieved from http://www.industryweek.com/recruiting-retention/how-manufacturing-can-solve-
its-own-talent-shortage-crisis



APPENDIX B

Advanced Manufacturing Firms Represented on GCTC Program Advisory Committees & Networks
Acramold
Aero Tech
Anderson Manufacturing
ATech Training
Balluff
Belcan Corporation
Berenfield
Burdine Anderson Inc.
Celanese
Complete Cabling Systems
Cummins
DESMA USA, Inc.
Duke Energy
Duro Bag
Eagle Manufacturing/Linamar
Edgewood Universal
Ellison Surface Technologies
Emerson Industrial Automation
Emerson Power Transmission
1
st
Electrical Service
Fischer Special Manufacturing
Fives
Gallatin Steel
Glier's Goetta
GrayBar
Hahn Automation
HK Systems
Ideal Industries
IPSCO (formerly Newport Steel)
Itron
Johnson Controls
R.A. Jones & Company
Kastle Electronics
Kellogg's Snacks
Lincoln Electric
L'Oreal
Mach III Clutch
Mauer






Mazak
Messier-Bugatti
Metalex Manufacturing Inc.
Meyer Tool Inc.
MISWACO
Mubea
Nor-Comm
Omni Technologies, Inc.
Perfetti
Progress Rail Services
Richards Industries
RM Welding
Rotek, Inc.
Sandvik Coromant
Schwans
Sheffer Cylinder
Skilcraft
SLB
Snap-On Industrial
SWECO
TK Engineering
Toyota
Tri State Plastics
USA Messier-Bugatti
Valassis
VDV Works
Wagstaff
Waltex, Inc.
Welding Alloys USA
Winelectric
ZF Steering Systems
Zoomtown
Zumbiel Packaging























Associations/Companies/Consultants Related to Advanced Manufacturing Represented on
GCTC Program Advisory Committees and Networks
BICSI (Building Industry Consulting Service International)
Children's Hospital
Cincinnati Bell
CVG Airport
Local 212 IBEW
Multi-Craft


NJATC (National Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee)
Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce
Northern Kentucky Workforce Investment Board
Partners for a Competitive Workforce
US Bank
RR Jordan Consulting



Educational/Training Partners Represented on GCTC Program Advisory Committees and
Networks
Boone County Area Technology Center
Campbell County ATC
Campbell County High School
Cincinnati YWCA
Covington Independent Schools
Dayton Schools
Erlanger-Elsmere Schools
4C for Children











Grant County Schools
Kenton County Schools
Kentucky Tech
Northern Kentucky Education Collaborative
Northern Kentucky University
The Women's Fund for the Greater Cincinnati Foundation
University of Cincinnati













APPENDIX C
ENROLLMENT TREND DATA


CREDIT ENROLLMENT TRENDS
Fall Enrollment Trends
Based on student-declared program of study
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Computer Aided Drafting &
Design
23 24 19 22 34 40 47 27 28 33
Computerized
Manufacturing & Machining
19 13 20 28 26 30 23 32 47 67
Electrical Technology 73 73 64 66 60 87 103 89 73 79
Energy Technologies 0 0 0 0 0 11 17 19 30 25
Industrial Maintenance
Technology
11 13 11 17 21 45 58 41 34 42
Manufacturing Engineering
Technology
7 15 7 23 27 42 33 47 59 108
Welding Technology 16 13 17 26 31 49 57 51 74 78
TOTAL 149 151 138 182 199 304 338 306 345 432

Spring Enrollment Trends
Based on student-declared program of study
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Computer Aided Drafting &
Design
18 24 22 28 36 43 45 28 23 30
Computerized
Manufacturing & Machining
13 12 22 28 36 29 24 33 51 67
Electrical Technology 67 77 57 61 75 89 99 72 74 78
Energy Technologies 0 0 0 0 0 16 15 29 31 25
Industrial Maintenance
Technology
11 10 18 21 27 48 47 47 31 46
Manufacturing Engineering
Technology
12 18 14 21 36 44 42 51 66 115
Welding Technology 15 19 20 31 38 48 55 59 74 68
TOTAL 136 160 153 190 248 317 327 319 350 429

Program Enrollment by Academic Year
Based on an unduplicated count of students over the summer, fall, and spring of the given academic year
PROGRAM 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014
Computer Aided Drafting & Design 63 39 34 40
Computerized Manufacturing & Machining 31 51 71 95
Electrical Technology 129 116 107 109
Energy Technology 26 38 46 34
Industrial Maintenance Technology 70 64 45 65
Manufacturing Engineering Technology 49 67 87 142
Welding Technology 76 76 95 93
Duplicated 444 451 494 554
Unduplicated 438 439 479 542


Non Credential/Non-Degree
Student classification that indicates the students goal is not to complete a credential. The numbers shown represent
those students who took one or more courses in manufacturing.
2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014
TOTAL 23 24 26 15
TOTAL UNDUPLICATED 23 23 23 13

High School Students Enrollment
High school students that took one or more manufacturing courses at Gateway through dual credit arrangements
between Gateway and the high school
COURSE 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014
TOTAL 527 533 66 72
TOTAL UNDUPLICATED 228 239 37 37

SUMMARY - Total Annual Number of For-Credit Students Served
PROGRAM 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014
Traditional Academic Program Enrollment
with Declared Program of Study in
Manufacturing
438 439 479 542
Non-Credential/Non-Degree 23 23 23 13
High School Students 228 239 37 37
Workforce Credit: Technical Skills 411 244 283 325
Workforce Credit: Performance Skills 98 591 597 290
TOTAL UNDUPLICATED 1,198 1,536 1,419 1,207



APPENDIX D
GATEWAY MANUFACTURING PROGRAMS

Current academic programs and associated credentials in the Manufacturing and Trades Division, excluding Air
Conditioning Technology and Plumbing Technology programs, are shown in the tables below. The KCTCS
program description is provided for each program, and for each credential the required credit hours are provided as
a total, and disaggregated by GE (general education) and TECH (technical courses).


PROGRAM CERTIFICATE DIPLOMA
DEGREE
(AAS or GOTS)
COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN
A computer aided drafter and designer is a technical specialist with broad-based skills for architectural, civil, mechanical, and manufacturing fields. In this
program, the students are taught manual drafting techniques and 2D and 3D CAD. Specific skills taught include, but are not limited to, lettering, geometric
construction, orthographic projections, dimensioning and tolerancing, and related technical processes. These skills are required to transform specifications
and instructions of architects, designers, and engineers into complete and precise drawings. The drafter is a skilled technician with a thorough
understanding of the graphic language and is an indispensable contributor to the engineering design team.
General Occupational/Technical Studies TOTAL: 60-68
15-23 (30%) GE
45-53 (70%) TECH
Computer Aided Drafting and Design TOTAL: 48-51
6-9 (15%) GE
42 (85%) TECH

Drafter Assistant TOTAL: 13-16
6-9 (52%) GE
7 (48%) TECH

Computer Assisted Drafter TOTAL: 30-36
6-9 (23%) GE
24-27 (77%) TECH

Detailer TOTAL: 25-28
6-9 (28%) GE
19 (72%) TECH



COMPUTERIZED MANUFACTURING AND MACHINING
Work activities in machine shop involve applying knowledge of machine capabilities, the properties of materials, and shop practices to set-up and operate
various machines. The skills needed to position work pieces, adjust machines, and verify the accuracy of machine functions and finish products are taught
by classroom instruction, demonstration, and hands on experience.
General Occupational/Technical Studies TOTAL: 60-68
15-23 (30%) GE
45-53 (70%) TECH
CNC Machinist TOTAL: 56-59
6-9 (13%) GE
50 (87%) TECH

Machinist TOTAL: 41-47
6-9 (17%) GE
35-38 (83%) TECH

Exploratory Machining I TOTAL: 12
5-6 (46%) GE*
6-7 (54%) TECH

Machine Tool Operator I TOTAL: 15-20
0 GE
15-20 (100%) TECH

Machine Tool Operator II TOTAL: 23-31
3-6 (17%) GE
20-25 (83%) TECH

*Students may opt to take as many as 5-6 hours of general education to satisfy the required 12 hours for this certificate.









ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY
The Electrical Technology Program focuses on preparing students for various entry-level electrical positions in industry and the building trades. The study
of electrical theory in the classroom and the practical application of that theory in labs provide the foundation of this program.
General Occupational/Technical Studies TOTAL: 60-68
15-23 (30%) GE
45-53 (70%) TECH
Electrical Technology: Industrial Electrician Track TOTAL: 54-56
6-9 (14%) GE
48 (86%) TECH

Electrical Technology: Construction Electrician Track TOTAL: 48-49
6-9 (15%) GE
40-42 (85%) TECH

Electrical Motor Control Level I TOTAL: 28-30
3 (10%) GE
25-27 (90%) TECH

Electrical Motor Control Level II TOTAL: 35-38
3 (8%) GE
32-35 (92%) TECH

Residential Electricity Level I TOTAL: 14
0 GE
14 (100%) TECH

Residential Electricity Level II TOTAL: 21-22
0 GE
21-22 (100%) TECH

Voice and Data Wiring Installer Level I TOTAL: 15
3 (20%) GE
12 (80%) TECH

Voice and Data Wiring Installer Level II TOTAL: 14
0 GE
14 (100%) TECH

Electrician Trainee Level I TOTAL: 8
0 GE
8 (100%) TECH

Electrician Trainee Level II TOTAL: 13
0 GE
13 (100%) TECH


ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES
It is focused on preparing graduates to enter the workforce in positions such as entry-level utility apprentice, line maintenance technician,
transformer/relay technician, fiber optic technician, outside plant fiber optic technician, network communications technician, voice and data wiring
technician, or renewable energy and energy efficiency specialist. The degree provides a broad foundation across many facets of utility and communication
technologies, resulting in a multi-skills technician valued by the workforce. Hands on instruction is used to teach students aspects of smart grid technology,
fiber optics installation, utility operation, line maintenance, underground operations, substation operations, transmission distribution, solar/photovoltaic
systems installation, design and placement of wind energy systems, energy efficiency analysis, electrical energy efficiency control technologies, and job
safety.
Associate in Applied Science TOTAL: 60-64
18-22 (32%) GE
42 (68%) TECH
Energy Efficiency and Analysis TOTAL: 7-10
3 (35%) GE
7 (65%) TECH

Energy Efficiency Electrical Controls Technician TOTAL: 21
0 GE
21 (100%) TECH

Energy Utility Technician TOTAL: 15-18
3 (18%) GE
12-15 (82%) TECH

Outside Plant Technician TOTAL: 16-19
3 (17%) GE
13-16 (83%) TECH

Solar/Photovoltaic Technologies TOTAL: 13
0 GE
13 (100%) TECH

Wind Systems Technologies TOTAL: 14
0 GE
14 (100%) TECH





INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY
An understanding of the requirements and opportunities in maintenance, good safety practices, pride in workmanship, and an understanding of the
principles and accepted practices of the maintenance trade are covered in this program. Students are trained to hold positions in factories, hospitals, hotels,
etc., where multi-skills maintenance personnel are needed.
Associate in Applied Science TOTAL: 63-68
18 (27%) GE
45-50 (73%) TECH
Industrial Maintenance Technician TOTAL: 48-53
6 (12%) GE
57-62 (88%) TECH

Industrial Maintenance Electrical Mechanic TOTAL: 12-15
0 GE
12-15 (100%) TECH

Industrial Maintenance Machinists Mechanic TOTAL: 19-21
0 GE
19-21 (100%) TECH

Industrial Maintenance Mechanic Level I TOTAL: 13-15
0 GE
13-15 (100%) TECH

Industrial Maintenance Mechanic Level II TOTAL: 22-26
0 GE
22-26 (100%) TECH


MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
Focused on producing graduates to work as engineering technicians and first-line supervisors in manufacturing firms. The degree provides a broad
foundation across many facets of operations management and manufacturing technologies. Graduates will be able to assist in leading projects across
multiple disciplines in advanced manufacturing firms. They will possess an understanding of manufacturing operations and possess the interpersonal skills
to lead work groups. They will be able to work in almost any manufacturing setting from discrete manufacturing to continuous flow and assembly line
operations.
Associate in Applied Science TOTAL: 63-67
24 (37%) GE
39-43 (63%) TECH*
Fundamentals of Mechatronics TOTAL: 6
0 GE
6 (100%) TECH

Integrated Manufacturing Technologies TOTAL: 19
0 GE
19 (100%) TECH

Operations Management TOTAL: 12
3 (25%) GE
9 (75%) TECH**

Quality Control TOTAL: 21-22
6 (28%) GE
15-16 (72%) TECH^

*As many as 23 hours toward the 39-43 hour block of technical courses may be taken from approved courses in Business Administration Systems curriculum.
**The 9 hours of technical courses for this certificate may all be Business Administration Systems courses.
^ 9 hours of the 15-16 hour technical course requirements for this certificate are non-manufacturing courses, such as quality management and statistics.

WELDING TECHNOLOGY
Students in this program will learn various welding techniques, careers and the skills needed to be successful in the Welding Technology field. Welding
occupations are primarily concerned with joining, surfacing, or repairing structures or parts made of metal or other weldable materials. The skills and
knowledge needed to determine the appropriate welding technique required for a specific project and to successfully perform that technique are gained
through course work and practical experience.
General Occupational Technical Studies TOTAL: 60-68
15-23 (30%) GE
45-53 (70%) TECH
Combination Welder TOTAL: 47-55
6 (12%) GE
41-49 (88%) TECH

Arc Welder TOTAL: 24-25
0 GE
24-25 (100%) TECH

Production Line Welder TOTAL: 19-20
0 GE
19-20 (100%) TECH

Tack Welder TOTAL: 7-10
0 GE
7-10 (100%) TECH


APPENDIX E

GRADUATION RATE

The National Center for Education Statistics
1
(NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to
education. Specifically, the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System
2
(IPEDS) is the primary source for data on
colleges, universities, and technical and vocational postsecondary institutions in the United States. The Graduation Rate, as
defined by IPEDS, is the number of students entering the institution as full-time, first-time, degree/certificate-seeking
undergraduate students who complete their program within 150% of normal time to completion.

Cohort Tracking
The Graduation Rate, as defined by IPEDS, is based on the entering cohort of students in a given year, defined by the parameters
of the definition above. The progression of the cohort of students is then tracked longitudinally for three years (150% time).
The normal (100%) time-to-completion for an associate degree is 2 years for a full-time student. Associate degree requirements
are typically 60 credit hours so the IPEDS calculation assumes that the student takes 15 credit hours per semester for four
semesters and passes/completes all attempted credit hours. In comparison, 4-year colleges and universities are tracked
longitudinally for 6 years (150%) to complete a 120 credit hour bachelors degree.

Parameters
Enrollment into Cohort
The Graduation Rate cohort definition used by IPEDS is not all-inclusive of the student population served by community
colleges. There are significant populations of new students who are not counted in the calculation:
Includes only full-time students (taking 12 or more credit hours); excludes part-time students
Includes only those students who enroll in college for the first-time; excludes students who transfer in credit from
another institution
Includes only degree- or certificate-seeking students; excludes diploma-seeking students
For example, as shown in Figure 1, Gateways entering student cohort for fall 2012 included 485 students. After removing the
exclusions identified in the IPEDS definition of the cohort, only 158 (33%) of the students in the fall 2012 entering cohort
would be eligible to be included in the calculation of the graduation rate.
Figure 1 Fall 2012 Entering Cohort Calculation










1
National Center for Education Statistics website: http://nces.ed.gov
2
Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System website: http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds
Graduation Rate

Table 1 shows the most recent 4 years of the IPEDS graduation rate as the national rate for 2-year, public colleges as well as
each of the colleges within the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS). As of 2012 Gateway was tied
for 2
nd
place in graduation rate among the KCTCS colleges, with a rate (33%) that far exceeded the other two institutions
located in urban areas: Bluegrass (19%) and Jefferson (15%). Gateways rate of 33% was also above the national rate of 27%.

Table 1 IPEDS Graduation Rate Trends
Institution 2009 2010 2011 2012
2-Year, Public Colleges 27% 28% 27% 27%
KENTUCKY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGES
Ashland Community and Technical College 19% 21% 23% 19%
Big Sandy Community and Technical College 13% 16% 14% 17%
Bluegrass Community and Technical College 17% 17% 20% 19%
Elizabethtown Community and Technical College 26% 28% 27% 31%
Gateway Community and Technical College 32% 27% 35% 33%
Hazard Community and Technical College 25% 23% 28% 35%
Henderson Community College 17% 20% 25% 21%
Hopkinsville Community College 18% 17% 17% 23%
Jefferson Community and Technical College 13% 12% 13% 15%
Madisonville Community College 43% 39% 37% 33%
Maysville Community and Technical College 34% 37% 32% 32%
Owensboro Community and Technical College 25% 29% 32% 35%
Somerset Community College 29% 25% 24% 23%
Southcentral Kentucky Community and Technical College 36% 46% 28% 29%
Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College 42% 33% 32% 26%
West Kentucky Community and Technical College 39% 39% 39% 35%
REGIONAL PEER INSTITUTIONS
Cincinnati State Technical Community College 17% 13% 13% 15%
Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) 4% 5% 4% 8%
University of Cincinnati Clermont 25% 24% 26% 25%
Source: National Center for Educational Statistics (http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/datacenter)



APPENDIX F
GATEWAY MANUFACTURING PROGRAMS
GRADUATES & CREDENTIALS AWARDED

2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
CREDENTIALS CREDENTIALS CREDENTIALS CREDENTIALS CREDENTIALS
Program CER DIP DEG TOT GR CER DIP DEG TOT GR CER DIP DEG TOT GR CER DIP DEG TOT GR CER DIP DEG TOT GR
Computer Aided Drafting & Design 0 0 5 5 5 1 0 4 5 4 0 1 3 4 4 0 0 2 2 2 0 1 3 4 4
Computerized Manufacturing & Machining 15 0 1 16 13 11 2 2 15 11 20 8 3 31 15 6 4 4 14 4 1 0 3 4 4
Electrical Technology 15 4 7 26 23 2 6 6 14 14 3 7 8 18 18 0 5 8 13 13 1 1 2 4 2
Energy Technologies 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial Maintenance Technology 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 3 9 0 0 9 5 1 1 0 2 2
Manufacturing Engineering Technology 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 4 4 0 0 2 2 2 1 0 5 6 6
Welding Technology 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 2 2 6 3 2 11 7 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 3
TOTAL DUPLICATED 33 6 13 52 46 14 9 13 36 31 32 20 19 71 51 15 9 17 41 27 5 4 15 24 21
TOTAL UNDUPLICATED 45 31 51 27 21


2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014
CREDENTIALS CREDENTIALS CREDENTIALS CREDENTIALS CREDENTIALS
Program CER DIP DEG TOT GR CER DIP DEG TOT GR CER DIP DEG TOT GR CER DIP DEG TOT GR CER DIP DEG TOT GR
Computer Aided Drafting & Design 0 0 3 3 3 0 0 12 12 12 17 6 11 34 11 3 1 3 7 4 4 2 3 9 5
Computerized Manufacturing & Machining 27 10 4 41 18 34 14 6 54 21 22 2 0 24 18 6 4 2 12 5 69 10 5 84 42
Electrical Technology 4 1 8 13 9 12 0 4 16 12 33 10 11 54 18 25 6 9 40 13 34 4 6 44 13
Energy Technologies 5 0 0 5 5 5 0 0 5 5 14 0 1 15 11 20 0 4 24 12 39 0 10 49 15
Industrial Maintenance Technology 18 1 2 21 11 45 3 6 54 23 45 0 8 53 22 21 3 3 27 7 29 1 7 37 10
Manufacturing Engineering Technology 12 0 7 19 12 33 0 9 42 28 7 0 5 12 9 2 0 1 3 2 9 0 6 15 9
Welding Technology 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 2 9 3 30 8 10 48 13 3 3 1 7 3 9 5 5 19 8
TOTAL DUPLICATED 66 12 24 102 58 134 19 39 192 104 168 26 46 240 102 80 17 23 120 46 193 22 42 257 102
TOTAL UNDUPLICATED 49 81 87 40 88





NOTES:
Academic year is defined as consecutive summer, fall, and spring semesters
Graduates earning credentials from more than one program in the specified academic year are counted once per program. Duplicated and unduplicated graduates are provided.


APPENDIX G


Northern Kentucky School for Science, Engineering, Math and Advanced Technology
at Gateway Community and Technical College

Guiding Principles

The School for Science, Engineering, Math, and Advanced Technology, conceptually, will operate as a
separate high school on the Boone Campus of Gateway Community and Technology College. Ideally the
School will be funded by a $20 million endowment which will shield the School from cyclical state and
private funding streams. It will employ its own principal and faculty who will create and deliver rigorous
integrated curriculum which will meet the following goals:

1. Satisfy all high school graduation requirements.
2. Satisfy college graduation requirements for stackable certificates leading to the Associates
Degree;
3. Meet and exceed industry skills needed for employment in careers needed to sustain the regions
economy;
4. Utilize the assets in the region including the Center for Advanced Manufacturing, training
facilities, company expertise, and unique programs of the regions universities;
5. Achieve magnet school status in the region and be a highly desired program for students and
parents; and
6. Become a national model of excellence and community/industry/college collaboration.

Internal Program Operational Concepts

The best way to conceptualize the operation of the School is to follow a students progression to and
through the School.

Middle School Years
Students and their parents, teachers and counselors will be involved in the Schools outreach
program including program competitions similar to Lego Leagues, SEMAT Explorer programs
aimed at creating interest in taking the right courses in preparation for admission in to the School
or into other postsecondary education programs in traditional STEM (Science, Technology,
Engineering and Math) disciplines. Summer programs on campus will be offered to engage and
heighten interest in advanced technology as a STEM discipline.

Freshman Year the student will be exposed to the School through a visit to Gateway during
STEM Days, contacts by school/college counselors, and an opportunity to participate in a special
summer SEMAT exploration camp. The students Individual Learning Plan (ILP) would reflect
the career pathway leading to SEMAT.

Sophomore Year during the school year, the student will receive a special invitation to SEMAT
events, meet with SEMAT faculty during special recruitment events (along with parents), and
will be invited to apply for admission into SEMAT for the following year.
Junior Year upon admission to SEMAT (occurs in February of sophomore year), the student
will be assigned a SEMAT career coach and begin a series of orientations and special events
designed to prepare the student and family for the SEMAT experience. The student will be
advised into classes and registered for a summer Bridge to SEMAT program. During the


students junior year, all classes will be taught at Gateway and the student will return to their
home school for other extracurricular activities. The curriculum for the School will include team
projects in collaboration with the regions high tech companies.

Summer between Junior/Senior Year the student will work in a high tech company in a
meaningful position related to their career interest. The student will engage the SEMAT
faculty/career coaches and employers in special SEMAT seminars designed to build on the
students experiences. The students will work in teams to produce meaningful projects for the
Schools business partners and other companies.

Senior Year the student will continue to take classes at Gateway and maintain their affiliation
with their home school for all other activities. During the year, students will work in teams and
produce meaningful projects for companies. Special activities for students and their parents will
be designed to sharpen the students career choice and career pathway. Employment placement
into employment or advanced education following high school graduation will be the culminating
SEMAT.

The Immediate Need

To launch the School for Science, Engineering, Mathematics, and Advanced Technology, a year of
serious collaborative planning is required. The college will employ a consultant who will bring together a
blue ribbon advisory taskforce of school, college, and business/industry CEOs to advise on design the
program specifics. The deliverables of the planning process will be:
1. Form the Schools Steering Committee headed jointly by the college president, a local
superintendent and an industry CEO and comprised of individuals of influence and affluence.
2. Complete curriculum design and the readiness to be implemented;
3. Obtain necessary accreditations or other licenses to operate;
4. Identify outcome measures;
5. Develop recruitment strategies for students, parents and faculty;
6. Recruit needed business/industry partners; and,
7. Execute a sustainability plan for the program funding through the creation of the SEMAT
Endowment Programs.

The college needs a $150,000 planning grant to initiate the planning if the School is to be launched in
2015-16 (an ambitious schedule). The funds will be used to hire a consultant/expert in creating this type
of school, provide stipends to faculty and other curriculum content experts, engage school accreditation
experts, conduct focus groups and generally support the planning committee work including visits to
similar programs in the nation.

Program Sustainability Need

The Schools long-term success will require long-term, sustainable funding that is not impacted by the
unpredictability of state, federal funding and industry business cycles. The annual costs of the School is
estimated to be in the range of $1.0 1.25 million. A $20 million endowment is eventually needed to
sustain the operations of the School and to fully sustain the School and protect it from the cyclic public
funding for education. An initial $10.0 million endowment will ensure that the School can open and be
sustained at a level of 100 students. Eventually the endowment and/or public funds through SEEK and
tuition may need to be developed to sustain the school as student enrollment approaches the 200-250
level. Support will be sought annually from individuals, companies, the Commonwealth of Kentucky
and the schools through SEEK (public school formula funding model). The SEMAT School Endowment
will provide the primary source of funding necessary to recruit and retain students, parents, faculty and


staff as well as industry and community leaders of the sustainability of the School. A basic fundraising
plan has been developed and is ready to be fully executed once the planning for the School is complete.
The immediate need is for the planning to be initiated.

The college has available space to initially house the School and will dedicate the classroom and lab
space necessary to operate the School. While the Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Bank of
Kentucky Classroom and Training Center will be the cornerstones for the instructional program and the
initial programming can commence in it, once fully operational a separate Center for Student Innovation
and Success should be built to house the Schools faculty and to provide areas for unique student support
as well as to provide food service for students. This is consistent with programs at other community
colleges in the nation. The Center for Student Innovation and Success will be funded privately with $5.0
million gift. It will be maintained by Gateway and it will become a public focal point on the campus for
the School.

The Promise of the Opportunity

If the region does not commit to a bold approach that places a spotlight on the opportunities that high
school students have available in advanced manufacturing similar to other disciplines like the School for
Creative and Performing Arts in Cincinnati, it is less likely that young people will choose these career
fields. Combining and focusing the assets that are in the region to launch SEMAT will be transformative
and will compliment many other positive initiatives initiated to help resolve the workforce issue.




APPENDIX H
ENROLLMENT & COMPLETION PROJECTIONS
2014-2019
HISTORICAL TRENDS PROJECTIONS
2
0
0
9
-
2
0
1
0

2
0
1
0
-
2
0
1
1

2
0
1
1
-
2
0
1
2

2
0
1
2
-
2
0
1
3

2
0
1
3
-
2
0
1
4

2
0
1
4
-
2
0
1
5

2
0
1
5
-
2
0
1
6

2
0
1
6
-
2
0
1
7

2
0
1
7
-
2
0
1
8

2
0
1
8
-
2
0
1
9

ENROLLMENT
Fall Technical Program Enrollment 304 338 306 345 432
Continued Trend
1
483 534 590 655 727
Aggressive
2
483 550 619 701 778
Spring Technical Program Enrollment 317 327 319 350 429
Continued Trend 470 511 558 608 663
Aggressive 470 526 586 650 709
Dual Credit High School* 228 239 37 37
Continued Trend 41 45 51 56 62
Aggressive A** 61 85 131 196 262
Aggressive B*** 61 135 231 346 462
COMPLETION
Total Credentials Awarded 102 192 240 120 257
Continued Trend 256 297 346 403 471
Aggressive 269 314 366 422 495
Associate Degrees 24 39 46 23 42
Continued Trend 44 51 56 62 72
Aggressive 46 54 59 65 76
Diplomas 12 19 26 17 22
Continued Trend 31 36 46 53 64
Aggressive 34 40 51 58 70
Certificates 66 134 168 80 193
Continued Trend 181 211 247 287 335
Aggressive 190 222 259 301 352
Graduates 49 81 87 40 88
Continued Trend 97 113 131 153 179
Aggressive 107 124 144 168 197
*Dual Credit High School does not contain a breakdown of historical data or future projections at the program level.
**Aggressive A projection numbers assume an increasing number of high school students take the Certified Production Technician (CPT) certificate.
*** Aggressive B projection numbers assume that, in addition to the CPT numbers, the SEMAT school becomes a reality, adding an additional 50
students each year beginning in 2015-2016


HISTORICAL TRENDS PROJECTIONS
2
0
0
9
-
2
0
1
0

2
0
1
0
-
2
0
1
1

2
0
1
1
-
2
0
1
2

2
0
1
2
-
2
0
1
3

2
0
1
3
-
2
0
1
4

2
0
1
4
-
2
0
1
5

2
0
1
5
-
2
0
1
6

2
0
1
6
-
2
0
1
7

2
0
1
7
-
2
0
1
8

2
0
1
8
-
2
0
1
9

ENROLLMENT
Fall Technical Program Enrollment 304 338 306 345 432
Continued Trend 483 534 590 655 727
Aggressive 483 550 619 701 778
Computer Aided Drafting and Design 40 47 27 28 33
Continued Trend 48 53 59 66 73
Aggressive 48 55 62 70 78
Computerized Manufacturing &
Machining
30 23 32 47 67
Continued Trend 53 59 65 72 80
Aggressive 53 61 68 77 86
Electrical Technology 87 103 89 73 79
Continued Trend 121 134 148 164 182
Aggressive 121 137 155 176 194
Energy Technologies 11 17 19 30 25
Continued Trend 29 32 35 39 44
Aggressive 29 33 37 42 47
Industrial Maintenance Technology 45 58 41 34 42
Continued Trend 63 69 77 85 94
Aggressive 63 72 80 91 101
Manufacturing Engineering Technology 42 33 47 59 108
Continued Trend 82 91 100 111 123
Aggressive 82 93 105 119 132
Welding Technology 49 57 51 74 78
Continued Trend 87 96 106 118 131
Aggressive 87 99 112 126 140



1
Continued Trend projections assume that no new projects or applications of focus are introduced, and the historical trend continues for the next five years.
2
Aggressive projections show projected growth as a result of the opportunities and corresponding investments identified.





HISTORICAL TRENDS PROJECTIONS
2
0
0
9
-
2
0
1
0

2
0
1
0
-
2
0
1
1

2
0
1
1
-
2
0
1
2

2
0
1
2
-
2
0
1
3

2
0
1
3
-
2
0
1
4

2
0
1
4
-
2
0
1
5

2
0
1
5
-
2
0
1
6

2
0
1
6
-
2
0
1
7

2
0
1
7
-
2
0
1
8

2
0
1
8
-
2
0
1
9

ENROLLMENT
Spring Technical Program
Enrollment
317 327 319 350 429
Continued Trend 470 511 558 608 663
Aggressive 470 526 586 650 709
Computer Aided Drafting and Design 43 45 28 23 30
Continued Trend 47 51 56 61 66
Aggressive 47 53 59 65 71
Computerized Manufacturing &
Machining
29 24 33 51 67
Continued Trend 56 61 67 73 80
Aggressive 56 63 70 78 85
Electrical Technology 89 99 72 74 78
Continued Trend 113 123 134 146 159
Aggressive 113 126 141 156 170
Energy Technologies 16 15 29 31 25
Continued Trend 33 36 39 43 46
Aggressive 33 37 41 45 50
Industrial Maintenance Technology 48 47 47 31 46
Continued Trend 56 61 67 73 80
Aggressive 56 63 70 78 85
Manufacturing Engineering Technology 44 42 51 66 115
Continued Trend 85 92 100 109 119
Aggressive 85 95 105 117 128
Welding Technology 48 55 59 74 68
Continued Trend 80 87 95 103 113
Aggressive 80 89 100 111 120



HISTORICAL TRENDS PROJECTIONS

2
0
0
9
-
2
0
1
0

2
0
1
0
-
2
0
1
1

2
0
1
1
-
2
0
1
2

2
0
1
2
-
2
0
1
3

2
0
1
3
-
2
0
1
4


2
0
1
4
-
2
0
1
5

2
0
1
5
-
2
0
1
6

2
0
1
6
-
2
0
1
7

2
0
1
7
-
2
0
1
8

2
0
1
8
-
2
0
1
9

COMPLETION
Total Credentials Awarded 102 192 240 120 257
Continued Trend 256 297 346 403 471
Aggressive 281 328 385 442 517
Computer Aided Drafting and Design 3 12 34 7 9
Continued Trend 18 21 24 28 33
Aggressive 20 23 27 30 35
Computerized Manufacturing &
Machining
41 54 24 12 84
Continued Trend 61 71 83 97 113
Aggressive 69 81 95 110 129
Electrical Technology 13 16 54 40 44
Continued Trend 46 53 62 73 85
Aggressive 52 60 71 82 95
Energy Technologies 5 5 15 24 49
Continued Trend 28 33 38 44 52
Aggressive 30 35 41 47 55
Industrial Maintenance Technology 21 54 53 27 37
Continued Trend 54 62 73 85 99
Aggressive 60 69 81 94 110
Manufacturing Engineering Technology 19 42 12 3 15
Continued Trend 26 30 35 40 47
Aggressive 28 32 37 43 50
Welding Technology 0 9 48 7 19
Continued Trend 23 27 31 36 42
Aggressive 25 30 35 40 47














HISTORICAL TRENDS PROJECTIONS

2
0
0
9
-
2
0
1
0

2
0
1
0
-
2
0
1
1

2
0
1
1
-
2
0
1
2

2
0
1
2
-
2
0
1
3

2
0
1
3
-
2
0
1
4


2
0
1
4
-
2
0
1
5

2
0
1
5
-
2
0
1
6

2
0
1
6
-
2
0
1
7

2
0
1
7
-
2
0
1
8

2
0
1
8
-
2
0
1
9

COMPLETION
Associate Degrees 24 39 46 23 42
Continued Trend 44 51 56 62 72
Aggressive 48 56 62 68 79
Computer Aided Drafting and Design 3 12 11 3 3
Continued Trend 8 9 10 11 13
Aggressive 9 10 11 12 14
Computerized Manufacturing &
Machining
4 6 0 2 5
Continued Trend 4 5 6 6 7
Aggressive 5 6 6 7 8
Electrical Technology 8 4 11 9 6
Continued Trend 10 11 12 14 16
Aggressive 11 12 14 15 17
Energy Technologies 0 0 1 4 10
Continued Trend 4 5 5 6 6
Aggressive 4 5 6 6 7
Industrial Maintenance Technology 2 6 8 3 7
Continued Trend 7 8 8 9 11
Aggressive 7 8 9 10 12
Manufacturing Engineering Technology 7 9 5 1 6
Continued Trend 7 8 9 10 12
Aggressive 8 9 10 11 13
Welding Technology 0 2 10 1 5
Continued Trend 4 5 6 6 7
Aggressive 5 6 6 7 8



HISTORICAL TRENDS PROJECTIONS

2
0
0
9
-
2
0
1
0

2
0
1
0
-
2
0
1
1

2
0
1
1
-
2
0
1
2

2
0
1
2
-
2
0
1
3

2
0
1
3
-
2
0
1
4


2
0
1
4
-
2
0
1
5

2
0
1
5
-
2
0
1
6

2
0
1
6
-
2
0
1
7

2
0
1
7
-
2
0
1
8

2
0
1
8
-
2
0
1
9

COMPLETION
Diplomas 12 19 26 17 22
Continued Trend 31 36 46 53 64
Aggressive 34 40 51 58 70
Computer Aided Drafting and Design 0 0 6 1 2
Continued Trend 3 3 4 5 6
Aggressive 3 4 5 5 6
Computerized Manufacturing &
Machining
10 14 2 4 10
Continued Trend 13 15 15 22 27
Aggressive 14 17 21 24 29
Electrical Technology 1 0 10 6 4
Continued Trend 7 8 10 12 14
Aggressive 7 9 11 13 15
Energy Technologies -- -- -- -- --
Continued Trend -- -- -- -- --
Aggressive -- -- -- -- --
Industrial Maintenance Technology 1 3 0 3 1
Continued Trend 2 3 4 4 5
Aggressive 3 3 4 5 6
Manufacturing Engineering Technology -- -- -- -- --
Continued Trend -- -- -- -- --
Aggressive -- -- -- -- --
Welding Technology 0 2 8 3 5
Continued Trend 6 7 8 10 12
Aggressive 6 8 10 11 13















HISTORICAL TRENDS PROJECTIONS

2
0
0
9
-
2
0
1
0

2
0
1
0
-
2
0
1
1

2
0
1
1
-
2
0
1
2

2
0
1
2
-
2
0
1
3

2
0
1
3
-
2
0
1
4


2
0
1
4
-
2
0
1
5

2
0
1
5
-
2
0
1
6

2
0
1
6
-
2
0
1
7

2
0
1
7
-
2
0
1
8

2
0
1
8
-
2
0
1
9

COMPLETION
Certificates 66 134 168 80 193
Continued Trend 181 211 247 287 335
Aggressive 199 232 272 316 368
Computer Aided Drafting and Design 0 0 17 3 4
Continued Trend 7 8 10 11 13
Aggressive 8 9 11 13 15
Computerized Manufacturing &
Machining
27 34 22 6 69
Continued Trend 43 51 59 69 80
Aggressive 50 58 68 79 92
Electrical Technology 4 12 33 25 34
Continued Trend 31 36 42 49 57
Aggressive 34 39 46 54 63
Energy Technologies 5 5 14 20 39
Continued Trend 24 27 32 37 44
Aggressive 26 30 35 41 48
Industrial Maintenance Technology 18 45 45 21 29
Continued Trend 45 53 62 72 84
Aggressive 50 58 68 79 92
Manufacturing Engineering Technology 12 33 7 2 9
Continued Trend 18 21 25 29 34
Aggressive 20 23 27 32 37
Welding Technology 0 5 30 3 9
Continued Trend 13 15 17 20 23
Aggressive 14 16 19 22 26



HISTORICAL TRENDS PROJECTIONS

2
0
0
9
-
2
0
1
0

2
0
1
0
-
2
0
1
1

2
0
1
1
-
2
0
1
2

2
0
1
2
-
2
0
1
3

2
0
1
3
-
2
0
1
4


2
0
1
4
-
2
0
1
5

2
0
1
5
-
2
0
1
6

2
0
1
6
-
2
0
1
7

2
0
1
7
-
2
0
1
8

2
0
1
8
-
2
0
1
9

COMPLETION
Graduates* 49
^
81
^
87
^
40
^
88
^
Continued Trend 97 113 131 153 179
Aggressive 107 124 144 168 197
Computer Aided Drafting and Design 3 12 11 4 5
Continued Trend 10 12 14 16 19
Aggressive 11 13 15 18 21
Computerized Manufacturing &
Machining
18 21 18 5 42
Continued Trend 29 33 39 46 53
Aggressive 32 36 43 51 58
Electrical Technology 9 12 18 13 13
Continued Trend 19 22 25 30 35
Aggressive 21 24 28 33 39
Energy Technologies 5 5 11 12 15
Continued Trend 16 19 22 25 30
Aggressive 18 21 24 28 33
Industrial Maintenance Technology 11 23 22 7 10
Continued Trend 19 22 26 30 35
Aggressive 21 24 29 33 39
Manufacturing Engineering Technology 12 28 9 2 9
Continued Trend 14 16 18 21 24
Aggressive 15 18 20 23 26
Welding Technology 0 3 13 3 8
Continued Trend 9 11 12 14 17
Aggressive 10 12 13 15 19
*The graduates numbers provided here do not include those individuals completing the Certified Production Technician (CPT) certificate
^
The historical numbers for graduates overall is an unduplicated count of individuals who completed a credential in one of the specified
manufacturing programs. Many graduates of manufacturing programs complete/earn credentials in more than one program; therefore the historical
numbers shown for graduates in specific programs are in some cases duplicated.










































Gateway Community and Technical College
Center for Advanced Manufacturing
500 Technology Way
Florence, KY 41042
www.gateway.kctcs.edu
859-441-4500