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CHAPTER - I
1.1. INTRODUCTION
In todays world of hyper competition and globalization, every
company is trying to survive and to perform their best in the existing
condition to attain the desired level of their potential customers. In this
global economy the change is created by liberalization in our country. India is
now playing a major role. The big !"s have all entered in our mar#et
with their wide range of superior $uality products between our and their
products at large.
Today Indian mar#et is growing in world and many company
exist with superiors product line especially in electronic home
appliances. %o it is very important to pay attention towards products and #ing
i.e., customers. In present scenario customers are more aware about and
sound enough to ta#e the most rational decision only to achieve
satisfaction. !ow a days both men and women are going for employment not
only to meet their financial demand but also to live with comfort. &s a result,
the needs and wants of the people have increased.
"onsumer behavior is helpful in understanding the purchase behavior
and performance of different consumers. 'enerally consumers differ in term
of sex, age, education, occupation, income family setup, nationality and social
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status. &ccording to these different bac#ground factors consumers may have
different needs.
The consumer mar#et consists of all the household and individual who
buy goods and services for their personal use. "onsumers differ tremendously
in income, educational level, taste and age. %o it is necessary for the mar#eter
to develop the products or services designed to suit their needs.
)ome appliances are that without which a modern home is
considered incomplete, especially in urban areas. In metro cities and big
towns, appliances are regarded as a boon, as they are instrumental in
cutting down the time involved in most of the domestic chores. The
Indian consumer household appliances industry has an annual turnover
of approximately *s.1+, billion.
%o the researcher underta#en the project entitled, -& study on
consumer buying behavior towards home appliances in .ondicherry city/, to
identify why consumers ma#e the purchases of home appliances, what
factors influence consumer purchases and their level of involvement in
purchase decision.

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1.2. STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM
In olden days, mar#eters had close and direct contract with the
consumer which enabled them to understand consumers. 1ut the growth in the
size of firms and mar#ets has made it impossible on the part of the mar#eters
to have such a close contract. This necessitated the present mar#eting
managers to conduct consumer research to have an idea about the behavior of
consumers.
Though consumer perception of price, $uality value are considered to
be the determinants of shopping behavior and product choice, the use of
price as an indicator of $uality has not been explored. "onsumer
appears to depend more on price than on $uality on some product categories
than others
'enerally consumer behavior is affected by a variety of factors ranging
from personal motivation needs, attitudes and values, personality
characteristics, socioeconomic and cultural bac#ground, age, sex, professional
status to social influences of various #inds exerted by family, friends,
colleagues and society as whole. . The researcher wants to #now the answer to
the factors that determine the purchase behavior of the consumers
regarding electronic home appliances.
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1.3. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:
To study the buying behavior of the consumer towards electronic
home appliances in .ondicherry city.
SECONDARY OBJECTIVE:
To find out factors that influence buying decision.
To find out sources of information used by customers before
ma#ing decision of specific brand of electronic home appliance.
To #now about features for which the potential customers loo#s for
when they buy branded home appliance.
To find out sources of information used by customers before
ma#ing decision of specific brand of home appliance.
To find out whether consumer ma#e any preplan and save money for
the purpose of purchasing electronic home appliances.
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1.4. SCOPE OF THE STUDY
SCOPE OF COVERAGE:
The study considers consumers of middle and upper middle class
families in .ondicherry with an income level range between 1,,,,, 4 0,,,,,.
It excludes from its purview the purchase made as gift articles. The present
study includes washing machine, air conditioner, refrigerator, micro oven,
mixi and grinder alone i.e. it excludes other electronic home appliances. The
interaction was made with the head of the family, both male and female.
5urther the study has herein certified to the purchase made during the year
(,1,.
NEED OF THE STUDY:
The study has been designed to give a better understanding of how
consumers ma#e their purchase for electronic home appliances.
This study helps to #now about customers expectation and opinion
regarding electronic home appliances.
This %tudy helped to #now the different services provided by
electronic home appliance companies.
This study provides better suggestions to the companies regarding
attitude, taste and preferences of the consumer towards electronic home
appliances.
This study is helpful for the company in formulating product planning
mar#eting strategies, mar#et segmentation and advertising strategies etc
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1.5. LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
The study is limited to .ondicherry city alone i.e. the findings of the
study will not applicable to other cities.
The study is limited to 1,, respondents. It comprises of 3, male and 3,
female respondents.
7ue to changing behavior of the consumer the study is subjected to
personal bias.

1.6. THEORITICAL PERSPECTIVE
8
M!"#"$ %& B'() B*!+#%)
-The process whereby individuals decide what, when, how and from
whom to purchase goods and service can be termed as the consumers or the
buyers behavior/.
DEFINITION OF BUYER BEHAVIOUR
&ccording to 9ebster :1+86; -buyer behaviour is all psychological,
social and physical behaviour of potential consumer as they become aware of
to evaluate purchase, consume and tell other people about products and
services/.
CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
"onsumer behaviour can be defined as -&ll psychological, social and
awareness to evaluate, purchase, consume and tell others about products and
services. This shows that there is always an attempt on the part of the
mar#eter to understand and study <consumer behaviours. This can be referred
to as an attempt to understand and predict human actions in the buying role.
The study of consumer behaviour is comparatively a new research field.
9ho buys products= services>
)ow do they buy product= service>
9here do they buy goods= service>
9hy do they buy goods= service>
?
)ow after do they buy> &nd so on@
1asically human beings have sociable in nature and their buying decision or
freedom of choice is determined by the affluence of the individual consumer
and the society in $uestion.
&ccording to Astrow B %miths 7ictionary of mar#eting, the term
consumer behaviour refers to the actions of consumers in the mar#et place and
the underlying motives for those actions. ar#eters except that by
understanding what causes consumers to buy particular goods and services,
they will be able to determine which products are needed in the mar#et place,
which are obsolete, and how best to present the goods to the consumer/.
&ccording to 'lenn 9alters -consumer behaviour is that exhibiting by
people in planning, purchasing and using economic goods and services.
"onsumer behaviour is and integrated part of human behaviour and cannot be
separated from it. In fact, consumer behaviour is a subject of human
behaviour. This does not mean that all human behaviour in consumption
oriented/.
&ccording to Coudon and 7ella 1itta, consumer behaviour is -the
decision ma#ing process and physical activity individuals engage in when
evaluating ac$uiring, using, or disposing of goods and services/.
C',-%.), !"/ C%",'.),
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The term -customer/ typically used to refer to some one who purchases
from a particular store or company. Thus a person who shops at %pencer or
who uses Indane gas is viewed as customer a customer of these firms. The
term -consumer/ more generally refers to anyone engaging in any of the
activities used in the above mentioned definition of consumer behaviour.
Therefore a customer defined in terms of a specific firm while a consumer is
not.
The traditional view point has been define consumers strictly in terms
of economic goods and services. This position holds that consumers are
potential purchasers of product and services offered for sale.
U0-#.!- C%",'.)
Those individuals who purchase for the purpose of private individual
consumption are called as ultimate consumers. The study of ultimate
consumers reveals much about industrial or intermediate buyers and other
involved in purchasing for business firms and institutions.
I"/#+#/'!0 B'()
The most commonly thought of consumer situation is an individual
ma#ing a purchase with little or no influence from others. )owever, in some
cases a number of people can be jointly involved in a purchase decision. 5or
example, planning a vacation or deciding on a new car can involve an entire
family. In other cases the purchaser may just be ac$uiring a product for
someone else who has specified exactly what was wanted. %ome purchase
1,
situations involve at least one person in each of these roles, while in other
circumstances a single individual can ta#e on several roles at the same time.
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The relevance and importance of understanding consumer behaviour is
rooted in the modern mar#eting concept. In order to operationalise this
concept, management attempts to solve some consumption problems of
consumers. )owever no business man can help consumer solve their
consumption problems unless he understands them and ma#es an attempt to
comprehend the buying process and the factors influencing it.
"onsumer behaviour is dynamic and therefore, it is necessary to
continuously study, analyze, understand and maintain this understanding to
the mar#eting management so that effective decisions can be ta#en in respect
of product, price, promotion and physical distribution.
S-'/(#"$ 2%",'.) 3*!+#%')
It is useful to view consumer behaviour as part of human behaviour
because we can then study it by borrowing approaches that have been
developed in the behaviour sciences. Ane such borrowed approach views
consumer behaviour as entailing a decision ma#ing process involving
considerable mental activity. It treats the three cases of variables discussed
below as being essential to understanding behaviour.
P')1%, %& C%",'.) B*!+#%')
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Dust as consumer and mar#eters are diverse, the reasons why people
study consumer behaviour are also diverse. The field of consumers behaviour
holds great interest for us, as consumers as mar#eters, and as scholars of
human behaviour.
&s "onsumers, the benefit from insight into our own consumption
related decisions as to what we buy, why we buy, how we buy and the
promotional influences that persuade us to buy.
&s mar#eters and future mar#eters, it is important for us to recognize
why and how individuals ma#e their consumption decision so what we can
ma#e their better strategic mar#eting decision. If mar#eters understand
consumer behaviour, they can predict how consumers are li#ely to react
various informational and environment cues and can shape their mar#eting
strategies accordingly.
&s scholars of human behaviour, we are concerned with understanding
consumer behaviour with gaining insight into why individuals act in certain
consumption related ways with learning what internal and external influences
impel them to act as they do indeed. The desire for understanding
consumption related human behaviour has led to a Eniversity of theoretical
approaches to its study.
N/ &%) -* C%",'.) B*!+#%')
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& sound understanding of "onsumer behaviour is essential for the long
run success of any mar#eting problem. In fact it is seen as a "orner stone of
the mar#eting concept and important orientation of philosophy of many
mar#eting managers.
T(1, %& C%",'.) B'(#"$ B*!+#%)
Types of consumer buying behavior are determined byF
Cevel of Involvement in purchase decision. Importance and intensity of
interest in a product in a particular situation.
1uyers level of involvement determines why he=she is motivated to
see# information about a certain products and brands but virtually
ignores others.
)igh involvement purchasesGG)onda otorbi#e, high priced goods, products
visible to others, and the higher the ris# the higher the involvement. Types of
ris#F
.ersonal ris#
%ocial ris#
Hconomic ris#
The four type of consumer buying behavior areF
*outine *esponse=.rogrammed 1ehaviorGGbuying low involvement
fre$uently purchased low cost itemsI need very little search and
decision effortI purchased almost automatically. Hxamples include soft
drin#s, snac# foods, mil# etc.
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Cimited 7ecision a#ingGGbuying product occasionally. 9hen you
need to obtain information about unfamiliar brand in a familiar product
category, perhaps. *e$uires a moderate amount of time for information
gathering. Hxamples include "lothesGG#now product class but not the
brand.
Hxtensive 7ecision a#ing="omplex high involvement, unfamiliar,
expensive and=or infre$uently bought products. )igh degree of
economic=performance=psychological ris#. Hxamples include cars,
homes, computers, education. %pend alot of time see#ing information..
Information from the companies I friends and relatives, store
personnel etc. 'o through all six stages of the buying process.
Impulse buying, no conscious planning. The purchase of the same
product does not always elicit the same 1uying 1ehavior. .roduct can
shift from one category to the next.
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There are number of reason as to why the study of "onsumer behaviour
has been developed as a separate mar#eting discipline. ar#eters had long
noted that consumers do not always out or react as mar#eting theory would
suggest. The size of consumer mar#eting in this country is vast and is
constantly expanding.
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"onsumer .reference was changing and becoming highly diversified
even in industrial mar#ets where needs for goods and services are always
diversified and less predicate purchases behaviour. %o the mar#eting
researchers began to study the buying behaviour of "onsumer.
*esearch into "onsumer behaviour provided them with the necessary
insights to develop products and services and to design persuasive
promotional strategies.
"onsumer research has revealed that a large segment of concerned
consumers who favour products that have been modified to meet environment
concerns and many mar#eters have responded with what has come to be
#nown as green mar#ets.
C%",'.) B'(#"$ P)%2,,
This is an important process which has a vital role in consumer
behaviour study. This is the first essential step to understand consumer
behaviour. The objective of studying consumer buying process is to #now
how a consumer ma#es his decision regarding buying or not buying and
commodity. In most cases, a decision involves the selection of and option
from two or more attractive choices.
The buying process is the process of decisionGma#ing leading to a
purchase function. It represents a problemGsolving approach. The mechanism
is the same as in any processing activity in which we supply some input
followed by the processing activity and finally the output comes before us.
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7uring the last two decades, numerous models of consumer behaviour
depicting the buying process have been developed. &ll these models treat the
consumer as decisionGma#ers who come to the mar#et place to solve his
consumption problems and to achieve the satisfaction of his needs.
The simple model given is composed of three stages 4 <Input, process
and output. Input as a stimulus. It is provide by two sets of stimulus
variables, namely, the firms mar#eting efforts and the social environment.
The firms mar#eting efforts are designed to positively expose, inform and
influence consumer. These efforts include product= service itself, advertising,
price strategies, distribution networ# and in fact all mar#eting functions. 5or
example, when a company introduces a new brand of detergent powder or a
television set, it may run a series of radio and TJ commercials with
supporting press advertisements. The social environment serves as a nonG
commercial source of consumer information and influence which is not under
the direct control of the firm. It includes reference groups and individuals,
members of the family, social class and castes, culture, and the li#e. 1oth
these stimulus variables influence consumers and the buying process.
INPUT PROCESS OUTPUT
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S-!$, %& B'(#"$ P)%2,,
The buying process is composed of a number of stages and is
influenced by ones psychological framewor# comprising the individuals
personality, motivations, perception and attitudes.
5or certain commodities, the buyer or consumer ta#es his buying
decision immediately without much consideration. These are items of daily
use. 5or some other commodities mainly luxury or durable items, the
consumer thin#s much before ta#ing decision to purchase it. %ometimes, the
consumer may also consult others. 'enerally, the purchaser passes through
five distinct stages in ta#ing a decision for purchasing a particular commodity.
These stages areF :i; need arousal :ii; information research :iii; evaluation
behaviour :iv; purchase decision and :v; postGpurchase feelings.
N/ )2%$"#-#%"
& buying process starts with need arousal. & need can be activated
through internal or external stimuli. The basic needs of a common man arise
to a particular level and become a drive and he #nows from his previous
experience how to satisfy these needs li#e hunger, thirst, sex, etc. This is a
case of internal stimulus. & need can also be aroused by an external stimulus
such as the light of new product in a shop while purchasing other usual
products.
There is twoGfold significance of need arousal to a mar#eter.
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1. The mar#eter must identify the drive that might actually or
potentially connect to the product class or brand and ma#e the
buyer feel that the product can satisfy his needs.
(. It also recognizes that the need levels for the product fluctuate
over time and are triggered by different cues. The mar#eter can
arrange cues to conform better to the natural rhythms and timing
of need arousal
P)%/'2- A4!)",,5 I"&%).!-#%" S!)2*
&fter need arousal, the consumer tries to solve it and gathers the
sources and information about the product. 7epending upon the intensity of
need, it produces two states in an individual. The first state is called
heightened attention when the consumer becomes more receptive to the
information regarding the item he needs. )e becomes alert to information
bearing on the need and its gratification. If a consumer needs to purchase a
television, he will pay more attention to TJ advertisement. )e #eeps
remembering the remar#s made by friends and associates about TJs.
If need is more intense, the individual enters a state of active
information search and he tries to collect more information about the product,
its #ey attributes, $ualities of various brands and about the outlets where they
are available. There are four sources of consumer information.
a. .ersonal sources :family, friends, neighbors, etc.;
1?
b. "ommercial sources :advertisement, salesmen, dealers;
c. .ublic sources :mass media, consumer 4 rating organizations;
d. Hxperimental sources :handling, examining, using the product;
The mar#eter will find it worthwhile to study the consumers
information sources whenever
a. & substantial percentage of the target, mar#et engages in search.
b. The target mar#et shows some stable patterns of using the respective
information sources.
Identifying the information sources and their respective roles and
important necessitates for interviewing consumers about the sources of
information. The findings can later on be used to plan the firms
advertisements. Interest may be viewed as a state of wind that exists when a
consumer perceives and need and= or is aware of alternative products capable
of satisfying that need. "onsumer interest is indicated in consumers
willingness to see# further information about a product. &t this stage, the
consumer is actively involved in the buying process and pays attention to the
product. )owever, if he loses interest during this involvement, his= her
attention will be diverted and the buyingGdecision process will brea# down.
5or example, a housewife re$uiring a washingGaid, may loo# for further
information about these machines once she become aware of such machines.
The #ind of information she may loo# for is about the alternative washing
1+
machines available in the mar#et place, their relative prices, operational
efficiency, and warranty and service facilities.
E+!0'!-#%" !"/ I"-"-#%"
Ance interest in a product:s; is aroused, a consumer enters the
subse$uent stage of evaluation and intention. The evaluation stage represents
the stage of mental trial of the product. 7uring this stage, the consumer
assigns relative valueGweights to different product= brands on the basis of
accumulated stoc# of product information and draws conclusions about their
relative satisfactionGgiving potential value. &fter this evaluation, the consumer
develops the intention either to purchase or rejects the product =brand. The
final purchase will however depend on the strength of the positiveGintention,
that is the intention to buy. In the above example of the housewife, after
arousal of her interest in washing machines, she will compare the stoc# of
information she has accumulated about the different washing machines in the
mar#et and then evaluate the value of each one of them before she develops
the intention to buy. )owever, if she feels that a washer man= woman would
serve the need, then she may altogether reject the idea of buying any washing
machine.
An the basis of the evaluation of behaviour of consumers, mar#eter can
improve or develop the product and segment the mar#et on the basis of
product 4 attributes.
FACTORS INFLUENCING CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
(,
Jarious factors influencing consumer behaviour are "ultural factors
psychological factors, personal factors and social factors.
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)uman perception and behaviour is predominantly influenced by the
particular culture in which the people live. "ultural influences emanate from
the culture at large, from various subGcultures and from social class.
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"ulture is a complex of symbols and artifacts by a society and handed
down from generation to generation as determinants and regulators of the
human behaviour. "ulture contains habits, s#ills, arts, institutions and values
of a given group of people at a particular place and time. &lthough, world
over people have same
basic needs but how these needs are transferred into wants and how people go
about satisfying those wants vary greatly as a result of their diverse cultures.
To a large extent, culture dictates the way people are expected to behave and it
both guides and influences personal and group interactions. 5or these reasons,
understanding culture is critical to understanding of consumer perception
world wide.
S'3-C'0-')
9ithin the culture there are segments that share distinguishing
meanings, values and patterns of behaviour that differ from those of overall
culture. The subGcultures may be based on factors such as nations origin
(1
:Indian, 'erman and .olish etc.;, race :&sian, &ryan, &merican and &frican;
'eographic region :%outh Hast &sian, !ew Hngland; or religion :)indu,
uslim and "atholic;. The members of subGcultures share certain values and
attitudes with one another. ar#eters who aim to target subGculture should
understand its members needs and wants to develop strategies to meet them.
R&)"2 G)%'1 A110#2!-#%" #" C%",'.) B*!+#%')
The reference group concept is used by advertisers to persuade
consumers to purchase products and brands by portraying products being
consumed in socially pleasant situations. Ar else, use prominent and attractive
people to endorse products or services and often, by using stereotype group
members as spo#espersons in advertising.
9here reference group influence is operative, it is necessary that the
advertising should stress the #inds of people who buy the product and
therefore what specific reference.
S%2#!0 C0!,,
%ocial class is a division of a ran#ing within the society based on
education, occupation and type of residential hood. The class system may be
based on religion, worship or landed wealth. The social classes tend to have
varying attitudes and values that are reflected in the consumer behaviour of
their members. The typical class structure isF
Epper class
((
Epper middle class
iddle class
9or#ing class
Cower class
iddle class and wor#ing class combined ma#es the mass mar#et for
any country. The members of these classes may have comparable incomes but
their sources of income and use pattern may be $uite different. The
differences between these groups should be identified and strategies should be
designed accordingly. Epper and upper middle class form the affluent
consumer.
P,(2*%0%$#2!0 F!2-%),
aslows theory
.erception
Cearning
1eliefs B &ttitudes
M!,0%46, H#)!)2*( %& N/,
&braham aslows )ierarchy of needs theory sets out to explain what
motivates individuals in life to achieve. )e set out his answer in a form of a
hierarchy. )e suggests individuals aim to meet basic psychological needs of
hunger and thirst. 9hen this has been met, they then move up to the next
stage of the hierarchy, safety needs, where the priority lay with job security
and #nowing that and income will be available to them regularly. %ocial needs
(0
come in the next level of the hierarchy, the need to belong or be loved is a
natural human desire and people do strive for this belonging. Hsteem need is
the need for status and recognition within society. %tatus sometimes drives
people, the need to have good job title and be recognized or the need to wear
branded clothes as a symbol of status. %elfGactualization is the realization that
an individual has reached their potential in life. The point of selfGactualization
is down the individual. 9hen do you #now you have reached your point of
selfGfulfillment> 1ut how does this concept help and organization trying to
mar#et a product or service. aslows concept suggests that needs change as
we go along our path of striving of selfGactualization. %o aslows concept is
useful for mar#eters as it can help them to understand and develop consumer
needs and wants.
B0#&, !"/ A--#-'/,
1elief is a specified, deeply held conviction. & person might believe
that a saving institution :ETI, .ostal deposits; pay more interest than a
commercial ban# :%tate 1an# of India or any other %cheduled 1an#;. This
belief influences the persons attitude and behaviour as he or she will transact
business with institution and not the commercial ban#.
ar#eters, who are well conversant with consumer beliefs and
attitude loo# for as to when these beliefs and attitude are erroneous therefore,
act to correct them. )owever, as a result of selective distortion,
advertisements that communicate messages that conflict with peoples beliefs
(2
must be produced in such a way that will reduce the li#elihood of target
audience dismissal.
&n attitude is a positive or negative education, feeling or tendency
towards something. 1eliefs are accepted facts right or wrong but attitudes are
more li#ely feelings :good or bad;. .eople posses attitude about everything,
be it materials or humanGbeing. It is very difficult to change and it greatly
affects the buying behaviour. 5or example, the attitude towards thrift and of
credit significantly affects the ban#ing behaviour.
P),%"!0 F!2-%),
&ge and life style stage
Hducation and occupation
Income
.ersonality and self concept
S%2#!0 F!2-%),
*elevance group
.rimary and secondary group
5ormal B informal group
embership and symbolic group
FAMILIES AND HOUSEHOLDS
It is important to understand the difference between various terms that
are fre$uently encountered when discussing the concept of family. There is a
difference between the terms -family/ and -households/, since mar#et
(3
statistics may be gathered on either of this basis. & household includes the
related family members and all the unrelated persons who occupy a housing
unit. The term -family/, however is more limited and refers to a group of two
or more persons related by blood, marriage, or adoption and residing together
in a household.
It should be noted that mar#eters are interested not only on the
concept of families but also of households, since both may form the basis or
framewor# of much consumer decision ma#ing and buying behaviour. The
mar#eter will use the concept that seems most relevant for segmenting
mar#ets. 5or example, manufactures of refrigerators, dish washes, ranges and
other #itchen appliances would probably find households to be the most
relevant dimension in estimating mar#et size since purchase and replacement
of these appliances would depend more on household formation than family
formation. An the other hand, sellers of childrens clothing and toys would
probably be more interested in data on familities.
F!.#0( P')2*!, D2#,#%",
5amily purchasing decisions will be examined from four perspectivesI
:1; *ole structure :(; .ower structure :0; %tage in the decision ma#ing
process and :2; 5amily specific characteristics. It is very important that the
mar#et understand who influences whom and how in the family buying
process so that the proper mar#eting strategy may be developed.
R%0 S-)'2-')
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In every family it has its own role structure, with each member
playing his or her role. &lthough several theories have been used to describe
the structure of material roles in decision ma#ing, from the stand point of
those interested in consumer behaviour, the following categorization appear to
be most helpful
I",-)'."-!0 !"/ E71),,#+ R%0,
In traditional families among throughout the world the husband is
more li#ely to provide material support and primary leadership authority
within the family, and the wife is more li#ely to provide affection and moral
support. This distinction relates to what are #nown as instrumental and
expressive needs of all small groupsI that is the need for leadership and
fulfillment of the tas# on the one hand, and the need for morale ad cohesion
on the other.
9ithin the family, the instrumental role has typically played by the
father and the expressive role by the mother. That is, men tend to be tas#
oriented leaders, while women lead in socialGemotional behaviour. The result
of this is that in purchasing decisions husbands tend to concern themselves
with functional product attributes and to exert more influence in deciding,
whether to buy and inclosing the sale. The wife concerns herself more with
aesthetic product attributes and with suggesting the purchase.
I"-)"!0 !"/ E7-)"!0 R%0,
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&nother differentiation of roles occurs in the family with regard to the
husbands primary concern with matters external to the family and wifes
concern largely with internal matters.
P')2*!, P)%2,, R%0
There are several ways of viewing family members roles as they
relate to the purchase decision and consumption process. There are six roles
that may be performed by various family members.
5irst, one or another family member may be initiator :i.e., the
individual who recognizes the problem or need for the item;. In his role, the
suggestion may be made by the wife, for example, that household needs a
food processor in order to more easily prepare meals. & second role is that of
influencer, which is the person who informs or persuades others in a purchase
situation. )e may also be thought of as an opinion leader in that he exerts
personal influence on other family members with regard to a particular
purchase situation.
P')2*!, D2#,#%"
There are three more important considerations for ta#ing the buying
decisionF
a; &ttitude of others such as wife, relatives and friends.
Interestingly, it depends more upon the intensity of their
negative attitude and consumers motivation to comply with
the other persons wishes.
(?
b; &nticipated situational factors, such as expected family
income, expected total cost of the product and the expected
benefits of the productI and
c; Enanticipated situational factors, li#e accidents, illness etc.
P%,- 8 1')2*!, F0#"$,
If the product matches his expectations, the consumer is satisfiedI if it
exceeds, he is highly satisfiedI and if it falls short of expectations, he is
dissatisfied.
O'- P'-
Autput is the endGresult of the inputs of consumer behaviour. It
emerges after these inputs are duly processed by the consumer. Autput is
composed of purchase and postGpurchase behaviour
P')2*!,
.urchase is a consumer commitment for the product. It is the terminal
stage in the buying decision process that completes and transaction. It occurs
either as a trial and= or adoption. If a consumer is buying something for the
first time, then from the behaviour viewpoint, it may be regarded as a trial.
This trial enables him to accumulate experience about the product purchased.
If his experience is positive in terms of the satisfaction derived, then repeated
purchases may occur, otherwise not. 5or example, when an new brand of
bathing soap is introduced in the mar#et, the consumer may buy it for the first
time as a trial. )owever, repeated purchases will occur only when he is
(+
satisfied with its performance. 1ut the possibility of the trial purchase is not
available in all cases. In the case of consumer durables such as scooters,
refrigerators and the li#e, a trial is not possible, because once a product is
purchased, it has to be adopted and repeatedly used. &doption means a
consumer decision to commit to a full or further use of the product. In the
example of the housewife, the washing machine is not open for a trial
purchaseI it will have to be adopted onl
P%,- 8 P')2*!, B*!+#%')
.ostGpurchase behaviour refers to the behaviour of the consumer after
his commitment to a product has been made. It originates out of consumer
experience regarding the use of the product and is indicated in terms of
satisfaction. This behaviour is reflected in repeat purchases or abstinence from
future purchases. If productGuse experience indicates satisfaction, then repeat
purchases will occur, otherwise not.
C%",'.) D2#,#%" B*!+#%')
It is a natural behaviour with most consumers to name the general
objectives of creating and maintaining a collection of goods and services that
provides current and future satisfaction. 5or example, an average adult must
ma#e several decisions daily regarding food, clothing, shelter, education,
transportation etc, but when they ma#e decision they use different decisionG
ma#ing behaviours.
0,
The various types of "onsumers decision ma#ing vary considerably
and are classified as follows.
a; *outine response behaviour
b; Cimited decision ma#ing
c; Hxtensive decision ma#ing
INTRODUCTION OF HOME APPLIANCES:
& major appliance, or domestic appliance, is usually defined as a large
machine which accomplishes some routine house#eeping tas#, which
includes purposes such as coo#ing, food preservation, or cleaning,
whether in a household, institutional or industrial setting. ajor
appliances are differentiated from small appliances because they are
large, difficult to move, and generally fixed in place to some extent.
&nother fre$uent characteristic of major appliances is that they
may have substantial electricity re$uirements that necessitate special
electrical wiring to supply higher current than standard electrical outlets
can deliver. This limits where they can be placed in a home. ajor appliances
have become more technically complex from the control side recently
with the introduction of the various Hnergy Cabeling rules across the
world. This has meant that the appliances have been forced to become
more and more efficient leading to more accurate contr ollers in order to
meet the regulations.
H%. !110#!"2, 2%.1!"#, #" I"/#!:
01
)ome appliances are that without which a modern home is
considered incomplete, especially in urban areas. In metro cities and big
towns, appliances are regarded as a boon, as they are instrumental in
cutting down the time involved in most of the domestic chores.
There are many home appliance companies in India li#e
Jideocon, Joltas, 'odrej, 1luestar, Kenstar etc. apart from them there are
various international companies also that deal in domestic manufactures
are %amsung, C', 9hirlpool, Kenmore etc. with the arrival of
international brands in Indian mar#et, the competition among rival
companies have become stiff, which results in further improvement in
$ualities and depreciation in prices of most of the home appliances in
India. %ince a majority of products are electrically operated, the focus is
on such household appliances that are efficient in power consumption.
ost of the leading home appliances manufacture and companies
have set up their exclusive retail outlets in important towns and cities of
the country. 1esides there are local home appliances suppliers,
manufactures, wholesalers and retailers spread throughout India.
C%",'.) 02-)%"#2, !"/ *%. !110#!"2, -
The Indian consumer electronics products and household appliances
industry has an annual turnover of approximately *s.1+, billion. The #ey
0(
products in the Indian consumer electronics are colour TJ, refrigerators,
air conditioners and washing machines, micro oven, mixi, grinder index
stove etc. &t the product level, within the consumer electronic household
appliances industry in India the penetration level of "TJ is the highest,
followed by refrigerators, washing machines and air conditioners.
THE TOP FIVE ELECTRONIC HOME APPLIANCES:
C'
I51
9)I*C .AAC
%&%E!'
JI7HA"A!
G
1.9. REVIE: OF LITERATURE
Ane telephone survey of 1,13 adults in 'reat 1ritain as#ed respondents
about purchase of electrical appliances and found that ?(L of people claim to
buy them <all the time, whilst 6L have only done so on the odd occasion,
rarely or not at all :1roo# Cyndhurst (,,2;.
00
The same survey found that 13L thin# that buying electrical appliances
would ma#e a <lot of difference to environmental impact, whereas 31L
thought it would not. The report does not suggest reasons for these opinions,
but it is worth noting that assessments of the steadily increasing efficiency of
many appliances, notably refrigeration and washing appliances, means that
only relatively new machines are worth repairing or remanufacturing on
environmental grounds :"** (,,8;.
There is slightly more research on peoples readiness to purchase
electronic home appliances goods. *egardless of the answer to the $uestions,
literature on peoples attitudes towards electronic home appliances is
positively considered in this report.
1arr and 'ilg :(,,1I (,,3I 1arr (,,8; report on a representative survey
of selfGreported behaviour and attitudes towards electronic home appliances .
)e as#ed the factors that affects the consumer in buying electronic home
appliances, which found that 6?L of respondents cited cheaper cost as a
reason for buying electronic home appliances.
*esearch in Dapan on home electric appliances found that, even where
respondents family and friends were the most widespread source for buying
electronic home appliances and they are buying considering it as an inevitable
and increases social status.
*esearch by %hun B Munjie :(,,6; showed that there are product types,
which are more li#ely to be sold online such as software, boo#s, electronics
02
and music and mainly electronic home appliances. *eason for this is that
when purchasing these types of products, one does not re$uire personal
inspection and most, if not all features, can be outlined in the product
description and images. ost products in the mobile phone family belong to
this category
&ccording to the recent research on consumer behaviour on the Internet
users :"otte, "howdhury, *atenshwar B *icci, (,,6;, there are four distinct
consumer groups with different intentions and motivationsF
Hxploration
Hntertainment
%hopping
Information
ajority of young adults interviewed for purpose of this research to
identify their attitudes towards buying behavior of electronic home appliances
and they tend to be active information see#ers. They said buying electronic
home appliances produces high satisfaction because of valuable information
and honest price of the product. & high level of technological confidence
within this group tends to be an encouraging factor when it comes to product
information research online.
any people use contrasts and colours that express feelings according
to their state of mind. Thus, the products properties, li#e design, comfort,
03
individuality, have a decisive role on apparels buying behaviour, which may
vary depending on a set of factors, mainly on sex :5ischer and &rnold, 1++2;.
"onsumer behaviour research is the scientific study of the processes
consumers use to select, secure, use and dispose electronic home appliances
that satisfy their needs. Knowledge of consumer behaviour directly affects
mar#eting strategy :&nderson et al, (,,3;. This is because of the mar#eting
concept, i. e., the idea that firms exist to satisfy customer needs :9iner, (,,,;.
5irms can satisfy those needs only to the extent that they understand
their customers. 5or this reason, mar#eting strategies must incorporate
#nowledge of consumer behaviour into every facet of a strategic mar#eting
plan :%olomon, (,,(;
The human behaviour is complex, replete with controversies and
contradictions and comes as no surprise to mar#eting academicians as well as
practioners. There is a widespread recognition that consumer behaviour is the
#ey to contemporary mar#eting success :)aw#ins et al., (,,0;. "onsumer
behaviour has been legitimized in mar#eting for it provides the conceptual
framewor# and strategic thin#ing for carrying out successful segmentation of
mar#ets :%chiffman and Kanu# (,,,;.
There have been a number of debates between positivistic and
interpretive consumer researchers :)udson and Azanne 1+??;. In this way, the
field of consumer behaviour has been characterized by diversity of
06
viewpointsI as a result, the entire field now is based on an interdisciplinary
science :Kassarjian 1++3;.
The understanding of consumer behaviour appeals to a set of different
areas of #nowledge=factorsF psychological, cultural social psychological,
physioGpyschological, genetics anthropology. Ane of them is the psychology
since consumer behaviour deals with emotions, beliefs and attitudes. *esearch
on emotions within mar#eting has evolved three approachesF the categories
approach, the dimensions approach and the cognitive appraisals approach
:9atson and %pence, (,,8;. The categories approach groups emotions around
exemplars and considers their different effects on consumption related
behaviour.
The dimensions approach uses the affective dimensions of valence and
level of arousal to distinguish between emotions and the effects they have on
consumer behaviour. the cognitive appraisals approach has used emotions
underlying motivational and evaluative roots to explain their influences on
consumption related behaviours. This approach supposes that underlying
evaluations of a situation :e.g. its desirability, certainty, etc.; combine to elicit
specific emotions. This approach may be used to explain how an extensive
range of emotions, including those with similar valence and arousal levels, are
elicited and how they lead to different behavioural responses.
The cognitive approach has been considered relevant for understanding
the emotional responses of consumers in the mar#etplace :Dohnson and
08
%tewart, (,,3F 0;. 1agozzi et al. :1+++; propose that the cognitive appraisals
approach offers a more complete explanation of consumers behavioural
responses to emotions than other one.
Ane of the most influential areas within consumer behavior is consumer
decision 4 ma#ing :1argh (,,(I %imonson et al. (,,1I 1ettman, Cuce, and
.ayne 1++?;. &t the conceptual level, various consumer decisionG ma#ing
models have been proposed in the literature in recent decades. )owever, many
researchers believe that a specific, situationand productGoriented model is
needed in studying purchasing :Hrasmusm,
1oshoff, and *ousseau (,,1;. &part from this, investigating decisions,
that can change lives of consumers, such as car or house purchase, can ma#e
an essential contribution to consumer behavior #nowledge :9ells 1++0;.
&ccording to Hrasmus, 1oshoff, and *ousseau :(,,1;, an exploratory
approach with the intention to unfold the truth may provide opportunities for
an understanding of the complexity of specific decisionGma#ing
circumstances, such as firstGtime house buying
In view of the existing literature exploring consumer decision ma#ing
when purchasing highGinvolvement and emotionally charged products, the
purpose of this research was threefoldF :a; to develop a conceptual model of
decision 4 ma#ing for a prefabricated house purchaseI :b; to gain #nowledge
of factors impacting this process from the empirical standpointI and :c; to
0?
offer implications for beneficial strategic household purchases. %trategic
decision ma#ing refers to the process of decision ma#ing with longGterm
commitments of resources and affecting the budget available for other goods
and services :'ronhaug, Kleppe, and )au#edal 1+?8, (2(;. 1ased on the
existing literature, we assume that this process involves a certain amount of
perceived ris#, especially since it represents large financial obligations :'ibler
and !elson (,,0I itchell 1+++I 'ronhaug, Kleppe, and )au#edal 1+?8I
1eatty and %mith 1+?8;.
Aur goal is also to offer implications for consumers, real
estatemar#eters and consumer researchers. The specific product selected in
this study was a prefabricated house. The house is the most important durable
good in the household and re$uires high involvement as well as complex
decision ma#ing. %ome similarities can be drawn with other durable products,
particularly cars. )ence, the empirical literature in this area and the real estate
literature serve as a basis for conceptual and empirical wor# in this study.
"onsumer behavior has been an important research topic for decades. &
review of existing theoretical efforts indicates a clear shift from rational to
psychological and social decision factors. )owever, even the recent models
have not managed to embrace all the #nowledge in the field of consumer
behaviorF subconscious processes, the role of needs, goals and emotions
:1argh (,,(;. &part from leaving out these important findings the existing
literature also lac#s studies of decisions that consumers are most concerned
0+
about, termed <big or <strategic decisions :1azerman (,,1, 3,,I 'ronhaug,
Kleppe, and )au#edal 1+?8, (2(;.
CHAPTER - II
2.1. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
The researcher decided to collect primary data through survey method
from the house holds situated at .ondicherry city. )e selected 3, male head of
the family from 3, housesI 3, female members :wives of head of the family;
2,
from another 3, houses. Thus the total sample for the present study consisted
of 1,, respondents comprising 3, male and 3, female respondents. The
researcher has chosen only middle class and lower middle class family for the
present study. Therefore $uota and convenient sampling method was adopted
in selecting the house.
P#0%- ,-'/(:
1efore collecting the data through $uestionnaire a pilot study was
conducted with 1, respondents at the researchers town at .ondicherry city for
testing the $uestionnaire and feasibility of the study. %ome wea#nesses were
brought to light by the respondents. Cater, improvements in the $uestionnaire
were made from the experience so gained.
R,!)2* D,#$":
In this study the researcher has made an attempt to describe the factors
pertaining to behavior of consumers and its effect on the purchasing of
consumers towards electronic home appliances. There has also been an
attempt to find out whether there is any association between the behaviour of
the consumer and the preference of the electronic house hold product. )ence,
in order to achieve these targets the researcher has used descriptive and
diagnostic study.
DESCRIPTIVE STUDY:
U"#- %& !"!0(,#,:
21
In this research the researcher collected the data from the consumer
treating each consumers response as an individual data source.
T(1 %& #"+,-#$!-#%":
C!,'!0 )0!-#%",*#1:
In this research, the researcher wants to delineate the cause of
one or more problems related with consumer behaviour.
T#. *%)#;%":
C)%,, ,2-#%"!0 ,-'/#,:
The researcher gathered the data just once, perhaps over a period
of days or wee#s or months in order to answer a research $uestion.
S-'/( ,--#"$:
N%" 8 2%"-)#+/:
The research is conducted in a nonG contrived setting that is
among the consumers of .ondicherry city.
SAMPLING:
&s it is not possible to collect the information from the whole
population. %o sampling method is adopted by the researcher to collect the
needed information.
U"#+),:
2(
The universe constitutes of consumers in .ondicherry city.
S!.10 ,#;:
5rom among the all consumers the researcher focus is about 1,,
respondents in that 3, male and 3, female respondents of middle and lower
middle class family.
S!.10 -2*"#<':
The researcher has selected non G probability %ampling Techni$ue due
to un#nown population, and in that the researcher has selected $uota sampling
relating to the study.
='%-! ,!.10#"$:
It is the nonprobability e$uivalent of stratified sampling. Ci#e stratified
sampling, the researcher first identifies the stratums and their proportions as
they are represented in the population. Then convenience or judgment
sampling is used to select the re$uired number of subjects from each stratum.
2.2. DATA COLLECTION METHOD
The tas# of data collection begins after a research problem has been
identified and research design chal#ed out.
There are two types of data. !amely
.rimary data
20
%econdary data
P)#.!)( /!-!:
The primary data are those which are collected afresh and for the first
time. The researcher has chosen $uestionnaire and personal interview for
collecting primary data from the respondents.
=',-#%""!#):
The $uestionnaire is prepared for the survey according to the
dimensions of consumer behaviour.
P),%"!0 I"-)+#4:
It is too conducted with the help of $uestionnaire prepared for the
survey.
S2%"/!)( /!-!:
The secondary data are those which have been collected for some other
purpose and are in existence. The records and documents pertaining to the
details of consumer buying behavior and companies of electronic home
appliances constitute the secondary source.
R,!)2* #",-)'."-:
& structured $uestionnaire is framed which contains.
O1"-"// <',-#%",:
It gives freedom to the respondents to express their views freely.
C0%,/-"// <',-#%",:
22
This type of $uestions does not allow the respondents to express
their view freely. It consist of,
7ichotomous $uestions.
ultiple choice $uestions.
TOOLS FOR ANALYSIS:
The tools for analysis are
1. .ercentage &nalysis.
(. Karl .earsons coGefficient of correlation
0. "hi s$uare
2. 9eighted average method
3. "ross sectional analysis
1. P)2"-!$ A"!0(,#,:
It was used to find the percentage values for all different $uestions used
in ma#ing comparison between two or more series of data.
!o. of respondents
.ercentage &nalysis N GGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG O 1,,
Total !o. of respondents
2. >!)0 P!),%"6, 2%-&&#2#"- %& 2%))0!-#%":
It is a statistical measurement of the relationship between two variables
!POMG:PO; :PM;
r N GGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG
Q!PO
(
G:PO;
(
R Q!PM
(
G:PM;
(

23
3. C*#-S<'!) T,- ?@AB:
Karl .earson first used chi s$uare test in the year of 1++,.
"hi G %$uare is a nonGparametric techni$ue, most commonly used
way a research to test the analysis. The main objective of chiGs$uare is to
determine whether significant difference exist among group of data.
FORMULA:
C!02'0!-/ +!0':
"hi G %$uare test :ST; N U :Ai G Hi;
(
= Hi :(.0.(,, (.0.(1, (.0.((;
Ai N Abserved fre$uency
Hi N Hxpected fre$uency
T!3'0!-/ +!0':
7egree of freedom v N :c 4 1; :rG1;
V 3L level of significance.
9here c N no. of columns
r N no. of rows
If calculated value of :ST; W tabulated value of :ST;,.,3L
), is accepted, )1 is rejected.
If calculated value of :ST; X tabulated value of :ST;,.,3L
), is rejected, )1 is accepted.
N'00 H(1%-*,#, ?HCB:
& null hypothesis is a proposition that states a definitive, exact
relationship between two variables.
A0-)"!- H(1%-*,#, ?H1B:
The alternate hypothesis is a statement expressing a relationship
between two variables or indicating differences between groups.
26
4. :#$*-/ A+)!$ M-*%/:
Ane of the limitations of the arithmetic mean which discussed about is
that it gives e$ual importance to all the items. 1ut there are cases there the
relative importance of the different items.
F%).'0!:
91*1 Y 9(*( Y 90*0 Y 92*2 Y93*3
9eighted average N GGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG
91 Y 9( Y 90 Y 92 Y93
5. C)%,,-,2-#%"!0 !"!0(,#,F
It is a form a class of research methods that involve observation of
all of a population, or a representative subset, at a defined time. It aim to
provide data on the entire population under study. It is a type of observational
study. Enli#e caseGcontrol studies, they can be used to describe absolute ris#s
and not only relative ris#. They may be used to describe some feature of the
population or they may support inferences of cause and effect.
2.3. DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
This chapter presents the findings of the study the researcher has
arrived at with the help of basic four $uestions. They are as followsF
1. %ex
(. Accupation
0. 5amily %ize
2. onthly income
28
TABLE: 2.3.1
TABLE SHO:ING SED 8 :ISE CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS
S7 N%. %& R,1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
ale 3, 3,
5emale 3, 3,
T%-!0 1CC 1CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that e$ual numbers of male and
female respondents were selected for the present study.
CHART: 2.3.1
CHART SHO:ING SED 8 :ISE CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENTS
TABLE: 2.3.2
TABLE SHO:ING OCCUPATION OF THE RESPONDENTS
O22'1!-#%" N% %& R,1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
Hmployed 2, 2,
1usiness 6, 6,
T%-!0 1CC 1CC
INFERENCE:
It is clear from the above table that 6,L of the respondents are doing
business and only 2,L of the respondents are employees.
2?
CHART: 2.3.2
CHART SHO:ING OCCUPATION OF THE RESPONDENTS
TABLE: 2.3.3
TABLE SHO:ING FAMILY SIEE OF THE RESPONDENTS
F!.#0( S#; N%. %& R,1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
Cess than 3 6, 6,
3 to ? 01 01
ore than ? + +
T%-!0 1CC 1CC
INFERENCE:
The above table reveals that the family size of 6,L of the respondents
are having less than five, 01L respondents are having a family size of 3 to ?
2+
and only +L of the respondents are having a family size of more than ?
members.
CHART: 2.3.3
CHART SHO:ING FAMILY SIEE OF THE RESPONDENTS
TABLE: 2.3.4
TABLE SHO:ING INCOME LEVEL OF THE RESPONDENTS
M%"-*0( I"2%. N%. %& R,1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
1elowG3,,, 2, 2,
3,,1G1,,,, (, (,
1,,,1G13,,, (1 (1
&bove 13,,, 1+ 1+
T%-!0 1CC 1CC
INFERENCE:
The above table reveals that 2,L of the respondents are earning a
monthly income of less than 3,,,. (,L of the respondents earn income
between 3,,1 and 1,,,,I (1L of the respondents are having an income of
3,
between 1,,,1 and 13,,, and the remaining 1+L respondents are having
monthly income of above 13,,,.
CHART: 2.3.4
CHART SHO:ING INCOME LEVEL OF THE RESPONDENTS
TABLE: 2 3.5
TABLE SHO:ING A:ARENESS OF RESPONDENTS TO:ARDS ELECTRONIC
HOME APPLIANCES
A4!)",, N%. %& ),1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
Mes 86 86
!o (2 (2
T%-!0 1CC 1CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that 86L of the respondents are
aware of electronic home appliances and (2L of them are not that much
aware of electronic home appliances.
CHART: 2 3.5
CHART SHO:ING A:ARENESS OF RESPONDENTS TO:ARDS ELECTRONIC
HOME APPLIANCES
31
TABLE: 2 3.6
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
SAVING MONEY TO PURCHASE HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES
S7 S!+#"$ .%"( N%- ,!+#"$ .%"( T%-!0
ale 21:?(; +:1?; 3,
5emale 08:82; 10:(6; 3,
T%-!0 9F 22 1CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is clear that nearly ?, percent of the
respondents save money to purchase house hold appliances. It is also clear
from the table that both male and female e$ually save to purchase the
appliances.
CHART: 2.3.6
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
SAVING MONEY TO PURCHASE HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES
3(
TABLE: 2.3.9
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
CASH5 CREDIT PURCHASE OF ELECTRONIC HOME APPLIANCES
S7 C!,* 1')2*!, C)/#- 1')2*!, T%-!0
ale 0,:6,; (,:2,; 3,
5emale 0+:8?; 11:((; 3,
T%-!0 9F 22 1CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that 8? percent of the respondents
prefer to buy home appliances only by paying cash. It is also evident that only
6, percent of the male respondents purchase the home appliances by paying
immediate cash. 9here as, in the case of female, more than 83 percent of the
respondents purchase home appliances by paying cash. This is due to the fact
ladies generally hesitate to purchase goods on credit fearing that they may not
be able to repay the amount at a later date.
CHART: 2.3.9
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
CASH5 CREDIT PURCHASE OF ELECTRONIC HOME APPLIANCES
30
TABLE: 2.3.F
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
BUYING HOME APPLIANCES FOR PRESTIGE5 UTILITY
S7 P),-#$ U-#0#-( T%-!0
ale 8:12; 20:?6; 3,
5emale (0:26; (8:32; 3,
T%-!0 3C 9C 1CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that 8, percent of the respondents
buy home appliances for their ultimate utility and only 0, percent respondents
say that they purchase a particular home appliance as a prestige issue.?3
percent of the male respondents say that the purchase of home appliance is
essentially for the utility purpose. 9here as, in the case of female respondents,
only a little more than 3, percent say that they purchase the house hold item
for utility purpose. 5orty six percent of the female respondents say that they
purchase a particular household appliance just for prestige.
CHART: 2.3.F
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
BUYING HOME APPLIANCES FOR PRESTIGE5 UTILITY
32
TABLE: 2.3.G
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
BUYING BEHAVIOUR TO:ARDS IMPORTED5INDIAN MADE HOME
APPLIANCES
S7 I.1%)-/ I"/#!" T%-!0
ale 16:0(; 02:6?; 3,
5emale ,0:6; 28:+6; 3,
T%-!0 1G F1 1CC
INFERENCE:
It is evident from the above table that more than ?,L of the
respondents prefer to buy only Indian made appliances and only a little less
than (,L respondent wish to buy foreign made appliances.
CHART: 2.3.G
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
BUYING BEHAVIOUR TO:ARDS IMPORTED5INDIAN MADE HOME
APPLIANCES
33
TABLE: 2.3.1C
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
SPOT 8 DECISION5 PREPLANNED PURCHASE
S7 S1%- D2#,#%" :00 P0!""/ T%-!0
ale ?:16; 2(:?2; 3,
5emale 12:(?; 06:8(; 3,
T%-!0 22 9F 1CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that nearly ?,L percent of the
respondents, both male and female, purchase home appliances my ma#ing a
preplanning.
CHART: 2.3.1C
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN MALE AND FEMALE FOR
SPOT 8 DECISION5 PREPLANNED PURCHASE
36
TABLE: 2.3.11
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND SAVING5
NON SAVING MONEY FOR THE PURCHASE OF HOME APPLIANCES
O22'1!-#%" S!+#"$ M%"( N%- S!+#"$ M%"( T%-!0
Hmployed 0,:83L; 1,:(3L; 2,
1usiness 2?:?,L; 1(:(,L; 6,
T%-!0 9F 22 1CC
INFERENCE:
The table reveals that nearly ?,L of the respondents both employed
and business people save money for the purpose of purchasing home
appliances. &ccording to the majority of the respondents, they save money for
the purpose of buying a specific home appliance.
CHART: 2.3.11
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND SAVING5
NON SAVING MONEY FOR THE PURCHASE OF HOME APPLIANCES
38
TABLE: 2.3.12
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND PURCHASE
OF HOME APPLIANCES FOR PRESTIGE5 UTILITY
O22'1!-#%" P),-#$ U-#0#-( T%-!0
Hmployed 6:13L; 02:?3L; 2,
1usiness 06:6,L; (2:2,L; 6,
Averall L 2( 3? 1,,
INFERENCE:
The table reveals that majority of the people purchase the home
appliances just for utility rather than as a prestige. An the other hand, in the
case of business people the story is entirely different. They purchase the
article just for prestige purpose, irrespective of its usage.
CHART: 2.3.12
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND
PURCHASE OF HOME APPLIANCES FOR PRESTIGE5 UTILITY
3?
TABLE: 2.3.13
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND BUYING
BEHAVIOUR OF PEOPLE TO:ARDS INDIAN OR IMPORTED
O22'1!-#%" I.1%)-/ I"/#!" M!/ T%-!0
Hmployed ,6:13L; 02:?3L; 2,
1usiness 10:((L; 28:8?L; 6,
Averall L 1+ ?1 1,,
INFERENCE:
It is evident from the above table that more than ?1L of the respondents both
employed and businessI prefer to purchase only Indian made home
appliances. There is a general awareness among all sections of the people that
the $uality of Indian goods is e$ually good when compared with foreign made
articles.
CHART: 2.3.13
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND BUYING
BEHAVIOUR OF PEOPLE TO:ARDS INDIAN OR IMPORTED
3+
TABLE: 2.3.14
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND
PREFERENCE FOR PURCHASING GOODS ON CASH5 CREDIT BASIS
O22'1!-#%" C!,* P')2*!, C)/#- P')2*!, T%-!0
Hmployed 0,:83L; 1,:(3L; 2,
1usiness (2:2,L; 06:6,L; 6,
T%-!0 91 2G 1CC
INFERENCE:
The above table reveals the preference of the employed and business
people regarding purchase of home appliances either on credit or for cash. The
table shows that 0=2
th
of the employed respondents say that they prefer to buy
home appliances on cash basis only. An the other hand 6,L of the business
people say that they prefer to buy home appliances for credit.
CHART: 2.3.14
CHART SHO:ING P RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND
PREFERENCE FOR PURCHASING GOODS ON CASH5 CREDIT BASIS
6,
TABLE: 2.3.15
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND SPOT
DECISION5 PREPLANNED BUYING DECISION AMONG EMPLOYED AND
BUSINESS PEOPLE
O22'1!-#%" S1%- D2#,#%" :00 P0!""/ T%-!0
Hmployed ,8:1?L; 00:?(L; 2,
1usiness 13:(3L; 23:83L; 6,
T%-!0 22 9F 1CC
INFERENCE:
The above table reveals that nearly ?,L of the respondents both
employed and business people ma#e a through planning before purchasing
home appliances. These respondents say that preplanning help them to
purchase the home appliances with out any difficulty. It also reduces the
future financial burden to a great extent.
CHART: 2.3.15
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN OCCUPATION AND SPOT
DECISION5 PREPLANNED BUYING DECISION AMONG EMPLOYED AND
BUSINESS PEOPLE
61
TABLE: 2.3.16
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN FAMILY SIEE AND
SAVING5NON SAVING HABITS
F!.#0( ,#; S!+/ 1')2*!, N%"-,!+/ 1')2*!, T%-!0
Cess than 3 32:+,L; ,6:1,L; 6,
3 to ? (1:68L; 1,:00L; 01
ore than ? ,1:11L; ,?:?+L; +
T%-!0 96 24 1CC
INFERENCE:
It is clear from the above table that +,L of the respondents who are
having a family size of less than 3 are able to save money for purchasing
home appliances. In the case of respondents who are having a family size of
3G?, only 68 percent of the respondents are able to save money to purchase the
home appliances. It is interesting to note that, a merger 11L of the
respondents save money to purchase home appliances in the case of those who
are having a family size of more than ?.
CHART: 2.3.16
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN FAMILY SIEE AND
SAVING5NON SAVING HABITS
6(
TABLE: 2.3.19
TABLE SHO:ING FAMILY SIEE AND CASH OR CREDIT PURCHASE
F!.#0( ,#; C!,* P')2*!, C)/#- P')2*!, T%-!0
Cess than 3 3,:?0L; 1,:18L; 6,
3 to ? (,:63L; 11:03L; 01
ore than ? ,0:00L; ,6:68L; +
T%-!0 93 29 1CC
INFERENCE:
The above table shows that more than ?, percent who are having a
family size of less than 3, purchase home appliance for cash. This can be
evident from the above table that only a small percentage of respondents who
are having a family size of more than ? purchase home appliances on cash.
CHART: 2.3.19
CHART SHO:ING FAMILY SIEE AND CASH OR CREDIT PURCHASE
60
TABLE: 2.3.1F
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN FAMILY SIEE AND PURCHASE
OF HOME APPLIANCES FOR PRESTIGE5 UTILITY
F!.#0( ,#; P),-#$ U-#0#-( T%-!0
Cess than 3 2(:8,L; 1?:0,L; 6,
3 to ? (0:82L; ,?:16L; 01
ore than ? ,0:00L; ,6:68L; +
T%-!0 3C 9C 1CC
INFERENCE:
It is evident from the above table that those with small family purchase
the particular home appliances just for the sa#e of prestige. In the case of large
family, the respondents say that they purchase various household appliances
not for the sa#e of prestige, but for really using it in the house.
CHART: 2.3.1F
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN FAMILY SIEE AND PURCHASE
OF HOME APPLIANCES FOR PRESTIGE5 UTILITY
62
TABLE: 2.3.1G
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN FAMILY SIEE AND PURCHASE
OF FOREIGN5 HOME MADE APPLIANCES
F!.#0( ,#; I.1%)-/ I"/#!" T%-!0
Cess than 3 1(:(1L; 2?:8+L; 6,
3 to ? ,3:16L; (6:?2L; 01
ore than ? ,(:((L; ,8:??L; +
T%-!0 1G F1 1CC
INFERENCE:
The above table reveals the relationship between family size and
purchase of home made= foreign made home appliances. It is interesting to
note from the above table that irrespective of the size of the family more than
0=2
th
of respondents prefer to purchase only home made appliances for their
house.
CHART: 2.3.1G
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN FAMILY SIEE AND PURCHASE
OF FOREIGN5 HOME MADE APPLIANCES
63
TABLE: 2.3.2C
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN FAMILY SIEE AND SPOT
DECISIONS VS PRE PLANNED DECISIONS
F!.#0( ,#; S1%- D2#,#%" P) 10!""/ T%-!0
Cess than 3 28:8?L; 10:1(L; 6,
3 to ? ,?:16L; (0:82L; 01
ore than ? ,(:((L; ,8:8?L; +
T%-!0 59 29 1CC
INFERENCE:
It is clear from the above table that nearly ?,L of the respondents who
are having a family size of less than five are able to ta#e spot decisions to
purchase home appliances. In the case of respondents with big family they
cannot ta#e spot decision to purchase a particular home appliance because
money will always be a constraint for them.
CHART: 2.3.2C
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN FAMILY SIEE AND SPOT
DECISIONS VS PRE PLANNED DECISIONS
66
TABLE: 2.3.21
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND SAVING
HABITS
M%"-*0( I"2%.
S!+#"$ M%"( -%
P')2*!,
N% ,!+#"$ M%"( -%
1')2*!,
1elowG3,,, 0?:+0L; ,(:3L;
3,,1G1,,,, 13:83L; ,3:(3L;
1,,,1G13,,, 12:68L; ,8:00L;
&bove 13,,, 11:3?L; ,?:2(L;
T%-!0 9F 22
INFERENCE:
It is clear from the above table that more than +,L of those respondents
whose monthly income is less than *s.3,,, saves money to purchase home
appliances and it is 83L in the case of respondents having an income range of
*s.3,,1 to *s.1,,,,. it is $uite natural that people with low income cannot
purchase any thing at any time. Those respondents whose income level is
more than *s.1,,,, save comparatively less to purchase the home appliances.
CHART: 2.3.21
68
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND SAVING
HABITS
TABLE: 2.3.22
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND MODE
OF PURCHASE
M%"-*0( I"2%. C!,* P')2*!, C)/#- P')2*!,
1elowG3,,, (,:3,L; (,:3,L;
3,,1G1,,,, 13:83L; ,3:(3L;
1,,,1G13,,, 1?:?6L; ,0:12L;
&bove 13,,, 1?:+3L; ,1:3L;
T%-!0 91 2G
INFERENCE:
It is clear from the above table that those respondents whose income level is
less than *s.3,,, ma#e cash purchase and credit purchase e$ually. In the case
of respondents whose income level is between *s.3,,1 and *s.1,,,,, (3L
respondents ma#e cash purchase and another 83L ma#e credit purchase. It is
interesting that more than ?,L of those respondents whose income level is
more than *s.1,,,,, they ma#e only cash purchase of home appliances.
CHART: 2.3.22
6?
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND MODE
OF PURCHASE
TABLE: 2.3.23
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND
PURCHASE OF HOME APPLIANCES FOR PRESTIGE5 UTILITY
M%"-*0( I"2%. P),-#$ U-#0#-( T%-!0
1elowG3,,, ,(:,3L; 0?:+3L; 2,
3,,1G1,,,, ,3:(3L; 13:83L; (,
1,,,1G13,,, ,8:00L; 12:68L; (1
&bove 13,,, 16:?2L; ,0:16L; 1+
T%-!0 3C 9C 1CC
INFERENCE:
It is evident from the above table that more than 0=2
th
of those respondents,
whose income range is below *s.1,,,,, purchase home appliances for real
utility and not for prestige. 9hereas, in the case of those respondents whose
income level is more than *s.1,,,,, they purchase many home appliances not
for the purpose of real utility, but only for the sa#e of prestige.
CHART: 2.3.23
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND
PURCHASE OF HOME APPLIANCES FOR PRESTIGE5 UTILITY
6+
TABLE: 2.3.24
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND
PURCHASE OF IMPORTED5 INDIAN MADE HOME APPLIANCES
M%"-*0( I"2%. I.1%)-/ I"/#!" T%-!0
1elowG3,,, ,1:,0L; 0+:+8L; 2,
3,,1G1,,,, ,(:1,L; 1?:+,L; (,
1,,,1G13,,, ,2:12L; 18:?6L; (1
&bove 13,,, 10:6?L; ,6:0(L; 1+
T%-!0 1G F1 1CC
INFERENCE:
It is clear from the above table that more than ?3 percent of the
respondents whose income level is more than less than *s.13,,, prefer to buy
only Indian made home appliances. Anly the respondents whose income level
is more than *s.13,,, prefer to purchase foreign made home appliances.
CHART: 2.3.24
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND
PURCHASE OF IMPORTED5 INDIAN MADE HOME APPLIANCES
8,
TABLE: 2.3.25
TABLE SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND
SPOT5PREPLANNED PURCHASE
M%"-*0( I"2%. S1%- D2#,#%" :00 10!""/ T%-!0
1elowG3,,, (:3L; 0?:+3L; 4C
3,,1G1,,,, (:1,L; 1?:+,L; 2C
1,,,1G13,,, 2:1+L; 18:?1L; 21
&bove 13,,, 12:82L; 3:06L; 1G
T%-!0 22 9F 1CC
INFERENCE:
The above table reveals that more than ?,L of those respondents whose
income level is more than *s.13,,, prefer to purchase home appliances only
after careful preplanning. An the other hand, those respondents whose
monthly income is more than *s.13,,, say that they ta#e spot decision to
purchase the home appliances whenever there is a need.
CHART: 2.3.25
CHART SHO:ING RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND
SPOT5PREPLANNED PURCHASE
81
TABLE: 2.3.26
TABLE SHO:ING ELECTRONIC HOME APPLIANCES POSSESSED BY THE
RESPONDENTS
H%. A110#!"2
1)%/'2-,
N%. %& R,1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
'rinder 1,, 1,,
icro oven 6, 6,
ixie 1,, 1,,
Television 1,, 1,,
*efrigerator +8 +8
9ashing achine 86 86
&ir conditioner 32 32
INFERENCE:
The above table indicates the possession of various home appliances by
the respondents. It is clear from the above table that 1,,L of the respondents
are having TJ, mixie and grinder in their houses, +8L are having refrigerator
in their houses, 86L of the respondents are having washing machine, 6,L of
the respondents are having micro oven and 32L are having air conditioner.
CHART: 2.3.26
CHART SHO:ING ELECTRONIC HOME APPLIANCES POSSESSED BY
THE RESPONDENTS
8(
TABLE: 2.3.29
TABLE SHO:ING DECISION MA>ING AUTHORITY REGARDING
PURCHASE OF HOME APPLIANCES
D2#,#%" M!H) N%. %& R,1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
)usband 1, 1,
9ife 1? 1?
)usband= 9ife 28 28
&ny other (3 (3
T%-!0 1CC 1CC
INFERENCE:
The above table shows that nearly 3,L of the respondents say that
husband and wife together ta#e decision on purchase of household appliances.
AneGfourth of the respondents say that they consult others before ta#ing
decision on purchasing home appliances.
CHART: 2.3.29
CHART SHO:ING DECISION MA>ING AUTHORITY REGARDING
PURCHASE OF HOME APPLIANCES
80
TABLE: 2.3.2F
TABLE SHO:ING CONSULTATION :ITH OTHERS BEFORE PURCHASING
HOME APPLIANCES
C%",'0-!-#%" 4#-* N%. %& R,1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
5amily members B
*elatives, neighbors
0 1(
5riends 1( 2?
!eighbors 1, 0(
T%-!0 25 1CC
INFERENCE:
It is evident from the above table that nearly 3,L of the respondents
consult their friends before purchasing household appliancesI another 0(L
consult neighbors and only a meager amount of ?L respondents consult their
relatives regarding the purchase of home appliance.
CHART: 2.3.2F
CHART SHO:ING CONSULTATION :ITH OTHERS BEFORE PURCHASING
HOME APPLIANCES
82
TABLE: 2.3.2G
TABLE SHO:ING IMPORTANCE GIVEN TO OTHERS IN THE ACTUAL
PURCHASE
C%",'0-!-#%" 4#-* N%. %& R,1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
5amily members B
*elatives, neighbors
1 2
5riends 1( 2?
!eighbors 1( 2?
T%-!0 25 1CC
INFERENCE:
The above table reveals that nearly 3,L of the respondents give
preference to their friends and the same percentage of respondents give
preference to the neighbors at the time of actual purchase of household
appliances.
CHART: 2.3.2G
CHART SHO:ING IMPORTANCE GIVEN TO OTHERS IN THE ACTUAL
PURCHASE
83
TABLE: 2.3.3C
TABLE SHO:ING SOURCES THAT INFLUENCE CONSUMERS TO BUY
HOME APPLIANCES
S%')2, N%. %& ),1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
TJ 3? 3?
!ewspapers 10 10
agazines ? ?
Internet 13 13
)oardings 2 2
Hxhibitions=fares ( (
T%-!0 1CC 1CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that 3?L of the respondents said that
TJ is the major media that attracts consumer to buy home appliances, 13L of
them said it is internet, 10L of them said it is newspaper, ?3 of them said it is
newspaper, 2L of them said it is hoardings and only (L of them said it is
exhibition.
CHART: 2.3.3C
CHART SHO:ING SOURCES THAT INFLUENCE CONSUMERS TO BUY
HOME APPLIANCES
86
TABLE: 2.3.31
TABLE SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY TV
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that majority of the respondents
preferred picture $uality which is the major feature considered while buying
TJ, next sound effect, then size, followed by color, succeeding slimness
and eye protection .
CHART: 2.3.31
CHART SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY TV
F!-'), I II III IV V VI T%-!0
.icture $uality 3, 18 11 1, 8 3 1CC
%ound effect 1? 21 10 11 + ? 1CC
%limness of screen 6 6 + 18 2( (, 1CC
%ize :inches; 12 18 2( 1, 1, 8 1CC
"olor 8 1( 13 21 10 1( 1CC
Hye protection 3 8 1, 11 1+ 2? 1CC
T%-!0 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 6CC
88
TABLE: 2.3.32
TABLE SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY AC
8?
F!-'), I II III IV V VI T%-!0
"ooling system 2? 1+ 13 8 ? 0 1CC
%ize 6 8 10 3, 1( 1( 1CC
%leep function 3 ? ? 1( 23 (( 1CC
Hnergy efficiency (, 23 11 + ? 8 1CC
.ower consumption 1( 1( 20 12 + 1, 1CC
&uto turn off + + 1, ? 1? 26 1CC
T%-!0 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 6CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that majority of the respondents
preferred cooling system which is the major feature considered while buying
&", next energy efficiency, then power consumption, followed by size,
succeeding sleep function and auto turn off.
CHART: 2.3.32
CHART SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY AC
TABLE: 2.3.33
TABLE SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY REFRIGERATOR
8+
S%')2, I II III IV V VI T%-!0
"apacity 3 ? ? 1( 23 (( 1CC
.ower consumption (, 23 11 + ? 8 1CC
"olor + + 1, ? 1? 26 1CC
"ooling system 2? 1+ 13 8 ? 0 1CC
%torage place 1( 1( 20 12 + 1, 1CC
Hnergy efficiency 6 8 10 3, 1( 1( 1CC
T%-!0 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 6CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that majority of the respondents
preferred cooling system which is the major feature considered while buying
refrigerator, next power consumption, then storage place, followed by energy
consumption, succeeding capacity and color.
CHART: 2.3.33
CHART SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY REFRIGERATOR
TABLE: 2.3.34
TABLE SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY MIDI
?,
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that majority of the respondents
preferred fast grinding which is the major feature considered while buying
mixi, next energy efficiency, then power consumption, followed by number of
jars, succeeding noise and color.
CHART: 2.3.34
CHART SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY MIDI
TABLE: 2.3.35
TABLE SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY GRINDER
S%')2, I II III IV V VI T%-!0
.ower consumption 1( (( 0? 1, ? 1, 1CC
Hnergy efficiency (( 22 12 + 6 3 1CC
5ast grinding 3, 11 10 ? 6 1( 1CC
!oise 3 3 3 10 36 16 1CC
!o. of jars 8 ? (, 2, 10 1( 1CC
"olor 2 1, 1, (, 11 23 1CC
T%-!0 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 6CC
S%')2, I II III IV V VI T%-!0
.ower consumption 12 18 2( 1, 1, 8 1CC
Hnergy efficiency 1? 21 10 11 + ? 1CC
%tone model $uality 6 6 + 18 2( (, 1CC
5ast grinding 3, 18 11 1, 8 3 1CC
!oise 8 1( 13 21 10 1( 1CC
"ompact 3 8 1, 11 1+ 2? 1CC
T%-!0 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 6CC
?1
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that majority of the respondents
preferred fast grinding which is the major feature considered while buying
grinder, next energy efficiency, then power consumption, followed by noise,
succeeding stone model and compact.
CHART: 2.3.35
CHART SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY GRINDER
TABLE: 2.3.36
TABLE SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY :ASHING MACHINE
?(
S%')2, I II III IV V VI T%-!0
Hnergy efficiency 3 ? ? 1( 23 (( 1CC
.ower consumption (, 23 11 + ? 8 1CC
9ashing B %oa# time + + 1, ? 1? 26 1CC
Aptions B size 2? 1+ 13 8 ? 0 1CC
)ot, cold B Hconomic wash 1( 1( 20 12 + 1, 1CC
7rum $uality 6 8 10 3, 1( 1( 1CC
T%-!0 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 6CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that majority of the respondents
preferred options which is the major feature considered while buying washing
machine, next power consumption, then hot, cold and economic wash,
followed by drum $uality, succeeding energy efficiency and washing and soa#
time.
CHART: 2.3.36
CHART SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY :ASHING MACHINE
TABLE: 2.3.39
TABLE SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY MICRO OVEN
?0
F!-'), I II III IV V VI T%-!0
.ower consumption 1( (( 0? 1, ? 1, 1CC
Aptions (( 22 12 + 6 3 1CC
Zuic# coo# 3, 11 10 ? 6 1( 1CC
)ygiene 2 1, 1, (, 11 23 1CC
Hnergy consumption 8 ? (, 2, 10 1( 1CC
%pace 3 3 3 10 36 16 1CC
T%-!0 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 1CC 6CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that majority of the respondents
preferred $uic# coo# which is the major feature considered while buying
micro oven, next options, then power consumption, followed by energy
consumption, succeeding space and hygiene.
CHART: 2.3.39
CHART SHO:ING PREFERENCES OF THE FEATURES THAT :ILL BE
CONSIDERED BY THE CONSUMER :HEN THEY BUY MICRO OVEN
TABLE: 2.3.3F
TABLE SHO:ING FACTORS DO YOU CONSIDER :HEN YOU BUY
ELECTRONIC HOME APPLIANCES
F!2-%), N%. %& ),1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
B)!"/
(0 (0
P)#2
(1 (1
='!0#-( 06 06
?2
O&&), 5 /#,2%'"-,
10 10
U-#0#-(
8 8
S)+#2 3 3
T%-!0 1CC 1CC
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that 06L of the respondents said that
they consider $uality while buying home appliances, (0L of them said it is
brand, (1L of them said it is price, 10L of them said it is offers and
discounts, 8L of them said it is for utility and 3L of them said it is service.
CHART: 2.3.3F
CHART SHO:ING FACTORS DO YOU CONSIDER :HEN YOU BUY
ELECTRONIC HOME APPLIANCES
CHI S=UARE
AIM: TO FIND THE RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN INCOME LEVEL AND SPOT
DECISION5 PREPLANNED BUYING DECISION AMONG EMPLOYED AND
BUSINESS PEOPLE
N'00 *(1%-*,#, :H%B F There is no significant difference between
income level and spot decision= preplanned
buying decision among employed and
?3
business people
A0-)"!-#+ *(1%-*,#,? H1B F There is a significant difference between
income level and spot decision= preplanned
buying decision among employed and
business people
OBSERVED FRE=UENCY:
TABLE: 2.3.3G
D2#,#%"
I"2%.
S1%- /2#,#%"
:00 8 10!""/
/2#,#%"
T%-!0
B0%4-5CCC
( 0? 4C
5CC1-1CCCC
( 1? 2C
1CCC1-15CCC
2 18 21
A3%+ 15CCC
12 3 1G
T%-!0 22 9F 1CC
EDPECTED FRE=UENCY:
O3,)+/
&)<'"2(?OB
E712-/
&)<'"2(?EB
O-E ?O-EB
2
?O-EB
2
5E
( ?.06 G(.06 3.36+ ,.666
0? (2.0( 1.6? (.?(( ,.116
( (8.06 ,.62 ,.2,+ ,.,12
1? 13.+6 ,.,2 ,.,,16 ,.,,,1
2 (.62 (.06 3.36+ (.1,+
18 8.6? G1.6? (.?(( ,.068
?6
12 ?.62 G,.62 ,.2,+ ,.,28
3 3.,2 G,.,2 ,.,,16 ,.,,,0
TOTAL
3.31G4
D$) %& &)/%. N :rG1; :cG1;
N :2G1; :(G1;
N :0; :1;
I 3
T!30 +!0' ?C.C5B I 9.F15
C!02'0!-/ +!0' I 3.31G4
N 3.31G4 J 9.F15 ?C!02'0!-/ +!0' J T!30 +!0'B
INFERENCE:
%ince calculated value is lesser than table value, )o is rejected.
Therefore there is a significant difference between income level and spot
decision= preplanned buying decision among employed and business people.
CORRELATION
AIM: TO FIND THE RELATIONSHIP BET:EEN SOURCES THAT INFLUENCE
TO BUY ELECTRONIC HOME APPLIANCES AND FACTORS THAT IS
CONSIDERED BY THE RESPONDENTS :HILE BUYING HOME APPLIANCES
D N %ources that influence to buy electronic home appliances
Y N 5actors that is considered by the respondents while buying electronic
home appliances
TABLE: 2.3.4C
D Y D
2
Y
2
DY
?8
3? (0 0062 3(+ 1002
10 (1 16+ 221 (80
? 06 62 1(+6 (??
13 10 ((3 16+ 1+3
2 8 16 2+ (?
KD I 1CC KY I 1CC KD
2
I 3F3F KY
2
I 24F4 KDY I 211F
FORMULA:
!POM G :PO; :PM;
r N
Q!POT G :PO;
(
Q!PMT G :PM;
(
CALCULATION:
3 R (11? G 1,, R 1,,
r N
Q 3 R 0?0? 4 :1,,;
(
Q3 R (2?2 4 :1,,;
(
1,3+, G 1,,,,
N
Q 1+1+, 4 1,,,,

Q1(2(, 4 1,,,,
3+,
??
N
+3.?6 R 2+.1+0

3+,
N
2813.6
I C.13
INFERENCE:
)ence the correlation value is POSITIVEI it is found that there is a
relationship between the sources that influence to buy electronic home
appliances and factors that is considered by the respondents while buying
electronic home appliances.
CALCULATION OF CONFIDENCE LIMITS
INTERVAL ESTIMATION
AIM: TO FIND OUT THE A:ARENESS OF RESPONDENTS TO:ARDS
ELECTRONIC HOME APPLIANCES
TABLE: 2.3.41
L+0 %& ,#$"#&#2!"2 N%. %& ),1%"/"-, P)2"-!$
Mes 86 86L
!o (2 (2L
T%-!0 1CC 1CCL
Interval estimation for the population proportion at +3L confidence level
F%).'0!:
?+
. Y 1.+6 :standard error;, . G 1.+6 :standard error;, %tandard error N Qp$=n
C!02'0!-#%":
P I !o. of YES
= N !o. of NO
. N 86=1,, $ N 1Gp
N ,.86 N 1G,.86
N ,.(2
S-!"/!)/ ))%) I M1<5"
N Q :,.86 R ,.(2;=1,,
N ,.,2(
N ,.86 Y 1.+6:,.,2(8;
N :,.?206, ,.6860;
N :68.60L G ?2.06L;
INFERENCE:
&t +3L confidence interval, the respondents awareness of electronic
home appliances lies between :68.60L G ?2.06L;
:EIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD - TV
TABLE: 2.3.42
P!)-#2'0!),
R!"H :#$*-/
!+)!$
R!"H
I II III
IV V
VI
.icture $uality 3, 18 11 1, 8 3 444 I
%ound effect 1? 21 10 11 + ? 3GF II
%limness of screen 6 6 + 18 2( (, 2C1 IV
%ize :inches; 12 18 2( 1, 1, 8 264 III
"olor 8 1( 13 21 10 1( 21G V
+,
Hye protection 3 8 1, 11 1+ 2? 193 VI
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that the respondents
ran#ed first for the picture $uality feature which they li#e to consider while
buying TJ, second ran# is given to sound effect, ran#ed third for size, fourth
for slimness, fifth for color and last ran# is given to eye protection.
:EIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD 8 AC
TABLE: 2.3.43
P!)-#2'0!),
R!"H :#$*-/
!+)!$
R!"H
I II III
IV V
VI
"ooling system 2? 1+ 13 8 ? 0 49F I
%ize 6 8 10 3, 1( 1( 313 IV
%leep function 3 ? ? 1( 23 (( 291 V
Hnergy efficiency (, 23 11 + ? 8 416 II
.ower
consumption
1( 1( 20 12 + 1, 354 III
+1
&uto turn off + + 1, ? 1? 26 1G9 VI
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that the respondents
ran#ed first for the cooling system feature which they li#e to consider while
buying &", second ran# is given to energy efficiency, ran#ed third for power
consumption, fourth for size, fifth for sleep function and last ran# is given to
auto turn off.
:EIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD 8 REFRIGERATOR
TABLE: 2.3.44
P!)-#2'0!),
R!"H :#$*-/
!+)!$
R!"H
I II III
IV V
VI
"apacity 3 ? ? 1( 23 (( 2F5 V
.ower
consumption
(, 23 11 + ? 8 411 II
"olor + + 1, ? 1? 26 2C3 VI
"ooling system 2? 1+ 13 8 ? 0 463 I
%torage place 1( 1( 20 12 + 1, 3F1 III
+(
Hnergy efficiency 6 8 10 3, 1( 1( 344 IV
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that the respondents
ran#ed first for the cooling system feature which they li#e to consider while
buying *efrigerator, second ran# is given to power consumption, ran#ed third
for storage place, fourth for energy efficiency, fifth for capacity and last ran#
is given to color.
:EIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD 8 MIDI
TABLE: 2.3.45
P!)-#2'0!),
R!"H :#$*-/
!+)!$
R!"H
I II III
IV V
VI
.ower consumption 1( (( 0? 1, ? 1, 3FG III
Hnergy efficiency (( 22 12 + 6 3 455 II
5ast grinding 3, 11 10 ? 6 1( 4G9 I
!oise 3 3 3 10 36 16 296 V
!o. of jars 8 ? (, 2, 10 1( 316 IV
"olor 2 1, 1, (, 11 23 22C VI
+0
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that the respondents
ran#ed first for the fast grinding feature which they li#e to consider while
buying ixi, second ran# is given to energy efficiency, ran#ed third for power
consumption, fourth for number of jars, fifth for noise and last ran# is given to
color.
:EIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD 8 GRINDER
TABLE: 2.3.46
P!)-#2'0!),
R!"H :#$*-/
!+)!$
R!"H
I II III
IV V
VI
.ower consumption 12 18 2( 1, 1, 8 394 III
Hnergy efficiency 1? 21 10 11 + ? 423 II
%tone model B $uality 6 6 + 18 2( (, 29G V
5ast grinding 3, 18 11 1, 8 3 4F1 I
+2
!oise 8 1( 13 21 10 1( 315 IV
"ompact 3 8 1, 11 1+ 2? 245 VI
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that the respondents
ran#ed first for the fast grinding feature which they li#e to consider while
buying grinder, second ran# is given to energy efficiency, ran#ed third for
power consumption, fourth for noise, fifth for stone $uality and last ran# is
given to compact.
:EIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD 8 :ASHING MACHINE
TABLE: 2.3.49
P!)-#2'0!),
R!"H :#$*-/
!+)!$
R!"H
I II III
IV V
VI
Hnergy efficiency 3 ? ? 1( 23 (( 29F V
.ower consumption (, 23 11 + ? 8 456 II
9ashing B %oa# time + + 1, ? 1? 26 216 VI
Aptions Bsize 2? 1+ 13 8 ? 0 513 I
+3
)ot, cold B Hconomic
wash
1( 1( 20 12 + 1, 366 III
7rum $uality 6 8 10 3, 1( 1( 31C IV
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that the respondents
ran#ed first for the options and size feature which they li#e to consider while
buying washing machine, second ran# is given to power consumption, ran#ed
third for hot, cold and economic wash, fourth for washing and soa# time, fifth
for energy efficiency and last ran# is given to drum $uality.
:EIGHTED AVERAGE METHOD 8 MICRO OVEN
TABLE: 2.3.4F
P!)-#2'0!),
R!"H :#$*-/
!+)!$
R!"H
I II III
IV V
VI
.ower consumption 1( (( 0? 1, ? 1, 412 III
Aptions (( 22 12 + 6 3 4GF II
Zuic# coo# 3, 11 10 ? 6 1( 516 I
)ygiene 2 1, 1, (, 11 23 234 VI
+6
Hnergy consumption 8 ? (, 2, 10 1( 366 IV
%pace 3 3 3 10 36 16 2F5 V
INFERENCE:
5rom the above table, it is inferred that the respondents
ran#ed first for the $uic# coo# feature which they li#e to consider while
buying micro oven, second ran# is given to options, ran#ed third for power
consumption, fourth for energy efficiency, fifth for space and last ran# is
given to hygiene.
CHAPTER 8 III
3.1. FINDINGS
3,L of the respondents are male and 3,3 are female.
ajority :6,L; of the respondents are business people.
ajority :6,L; of the respondents family size is less than five.
ajority :2,L; of the respondents are earning a monthly income of less
than 3,,,.
+8
ajority :86L; of the respondents are aware of electronic home
appliances a
!early ?,L of the respondents save money to purchase house hold
appliances. It is also clear the table that both male and female e$ually
save to purchase the appliances. This is contrary to the belief that only
female will be very #een to save money in order to purchase any
household appliances. This is due to the fact that it is female who
usually loo# after the house and also most of the house hold items are
being ultimately used by the female in the house.
ajority of the respondents prefer to buy home appliances only by
paying cash. &ccording to these respondents, they can purchase the
home appliances at a comparatively lower price when they pay the cash
immediately. "redit purchase will ultimately lead to increase in the price
of the goods. &lso they will have to pay interest for the hire purchase
and installment purchase. It was also evident that only 6, percent of the
male respondents purchase the home appliances by paying immediate
cash. 9here as, in the case of female, more than 83 percent of the
respondents purchase home appliances by paying cash.
ajority :8,L; of the respondents buy home appliances for their
ultimate utility and only 0, percent respondents say that they purchase a
particular home appliance as a prestige issue.
ore than ?,L of the respondents prefer to buy only Indian made
appliances and only a little less than (,L respondent wish to buy
foreign made appliances. &ccording to the respondents the Indian made
articles are superior in all aspects when compared with foreign
appliances. &lso the availability of spare parts is another important
reason as to why consumers prefer Indian made articles.
+?
ajority :?,L; of the respondents, both male and female, purchase
home appliances my ma#ing a preplanning. &ccording to these
respondents, with limited income, they cannot ta#e spot decisions to
purchase home appliances just by visiting the shop. These respondents
say that they ma#e preplan as the purchase of a particular home
appliance and save the re$uired money and wait for the right time to
purchase the item.
ajority of the respondents both employed and business people save
money for the purpose of purchasing home appliances. &ccording to the
majority of the respondents, they save money for the purpose of buying
a specific home appliance. These respondents say that saving money
enables them to purchase the item without any difficulty.
ajority of the employed people purchases the home appliances just for
utility rather than as a prestige. An the other hand, in the case of
business people the story is entirely different. &ccording to the business
people their status is determined by the way they lead their life and the
usage of various home appliances in their house. %o they purchase a
particular home appliance just to show it to others that they are having
the particular item.
ore than ?1L of the respondents both employed and businessI prefer
to purchase only Indian made home appliances. There is a general
awareness among all sections of the people that the $uality of Indian
goods is e$ually good when compared with foreign made articles.
ajority :?,L; of the respondents both employed and business people
ma#e a through planning before purchasing home appliances.
+,L of the respondents who are having a family size of less than 3 are
able to save money for purchasing home appliances. It is $uite natural
that those with small family will find it very easy to save money when
++
compared with big family. This is the reason as to why many people
want to have a small family
ajority of respondents who are having a family size of less than 3,
purchase home appliance for cash. It is natural that when the family size
is low, they are having the possibility to go for cash purchases as they
have disposable income. 9ith the increase in the family size, they have
to spend a lot of money to satisfy the family needs which ultimately
leads to financial crunch most of the times.
&nother interesting finding of the study was that those with small family
purchase the particular home appliances just for the sa#e of prestige.
The reason is small family will generally have disposable money to
spare for purchasing various items. %o they spend the surplus money for
purchasing the articles even though they may not re$uire the particular
item for their house
The study also revealed that irrespective of the size of the family more
than 0=2
th
of respondents prefer to purchase only home made appliances
for their house. &ccording to most of the respondents Indian made goods
are having a world class $uality.
The study found that nearly ?,L of the respondents who are having a
family size of less than five are able to ta#e spot decisions to purchase
home appliances. The main reason for this is, as already discussedI those
with small family will usually have disposable income which they can
spend at any time. %o whenever they consider necessary for a particular
home appliance they will ma#e immediate purchases as money is not at
all a matter for them. In the case of respondents with big family they
cannot ta#e spot decision to purchase a particular home appliance
because money will always be a constraint for them.
1,,
The study also showed that more than +,L of those respondents whose
monthly income is less than *s.3,,, saves money to purchase home
appliances and it is 83L in the case of respondents having an income
range of *s.3,,1 to *s.1,,,,. It is $uite natural that people with low
income cannot purchase any thing at any time. Their income will not
permit them to do so. They will have to plan and consider various things
before purchasing a single item.
Those respondents whose income level is more than *s.1,,,, save
comparatively less to purchase the home appliances.
It is also found that those respondents whose income level is less than
*s.3,,, ma#e cash purchase and credit purchase e$ually. In the case of
respondents whose income level is between *s.3,,1 and *s.1,,,,, (3L
respondents ma#e cash purchase and another 83L ma#e credit purchase.
It is interesting to note that more than ?,L of those respondents whose
income level is more than *s.1,,,,, they ma#e only cash purchase of
home appliances
It is evident from the findings of the study that more than 0=2
th
of those
respondents, whose income range is below *s.1,,,,, purchase home
appliances for real utility and not for prestige. 9hereas, in the case of
those respondents whose income level is more than *s.1,,,,, they
purchase many home appliances not for the purpose of real utility, but
only for the sa#e of prestige.
It is also found that more than ?3 percent of the respondents whose
income level is more than less than *s.13,,, prefer to buy only Indian
made home appliances. Anly the respondents whose income level is
more than *s.13,,, prefer to purchase foreign made home appliances.
The findings showed that more than ?,L of those respondents whose
income level is more than *s.13,,, prefer to purchase home appliances
only after careful preplanning. &ccording to them they cannot ta#e spot
1,1
decision to purchase a home appliance as their financial position will not
permit them to do so. An the other hand, those respondents whose
monthly income is more than *s.13,,, say that they ta#e spot decision
to purchase the home appliances whenever there is a need.
&nother interesting finding of the study was that nearly 3,L of the
respondents say that husband and wife together ta#e decision on
purchase of electronic household appliances. AneGfourth of the
respondents say that they consult others before ta#ing decision on
purchasing home appliances
1,,L of the respondents are having TJ, mixi and grinder in their
houses, +8L are having refrigerator in their houses, 86L of the
respondents are having washing machine, 6,L of the respondents are
having micro oven and 32L are having air conditioner
!early 3,L of the respondents consult their friends before purchasing
household appliances.
!early 3,L of the respondents give preference to their friends and the
same percentage of respondents give preference to the neighbors at the
time of actual purchase of household appliances.
3?L of the respondents said that TJ is the major media that attracts
consumer to buy home appliances.
ajority of the respondents preferred picture $uality which is the major
feature considered while buying TJ.
ajority of the respondents preferred cooling system which is the
major feature considered while buying &".
ajority of the respondents preferred cooling system which is the
major feature considered while buying refrigerator.
ajority of the respondents preferred fast grinding which the major
feature is considered while buying mixi.
1,(
ajority of the respondents preferred fast grinding which the major
feature is considered while buying grinder.
ajority of the respondents preferred options which are the major
feature considered while buying washing machine.
ajority of the respondents preferred $uic# coo# which is the major
feature considered while buying micro oven.
06L of the respondents said that they consider $uality while buying
home appliances.
Therefore there is a significant difference between income level and spot
decision= preplanned buying decision among employed and business
people.
There is a relationship between the sources that influence to buy
electronic home appliances and factors that is considered by the
respondents while buying electronic home appliances.
The respondents awareness of electronic home appliances lies between
:68.60L G ?2.06L;.
*espondents ran#ed first for the picture $uality feature which they li#e
to consider while buying TJ.
The respondents ran#ed first for the cooling system feature which they
li#e to consider while buying &".
*espondents ran#ed first for the cooling system feature which they li#e
to consider while buying *efrigerator.
*espondents ran#ed first for the fast grinding feature which they li#e to
consider while buying ixi.
*espondents ran#ed first for the fast grinding feature which they li#e to
consider while buying grinder.
1,0
*espondents ran#ed first for the options and size feature which they li#e
to consider while buying washing machine.
*espondents ran#ed first for the $uic# coo# feature which they li#e to
consider while buying micro oven.
3.2. SUGGESSIONS:
The dealers should try to inform potential customers to various
media li#e newspaper and local cable channel to increase the sale of
product.
%pecial festival gifts and offers should be offered by retailers.
The companies should mainly focus on prices and maintain reasonable
prices to combat competition.
7eveloping product according to consumer choices will lead to
increase in mar#et share
3.3. CONCLUSION
1uyer 1ehaviorF ["ulture[ is a oney a#ing %cam. Todays mar#et is
characterized by highly competitive organizations which are all competing for
consumers loyalty. %trategies are carefully planned and executed by the firms
to improve the buying behavior of consumers towards electronic home
1,2
appliances. It is important to identify the uni$ue attributes and advantages of
the firms offer to the mar#etplace, while developing a strategy to leverage the
firm\s strengths and opportunities
The field of consumer research regarding buying behavior is mainly
focus on two $uestions i.e. how consumer is ta#ing decision and what factors
that influence consumer to buy electronic home appliances. &ccording to this
study it is found that consumer buying behaviour towards electronic home
appliances is probing the mar#et.
The reason for this is rising income levels and increasing affordability,
fuelling consumerism and growth in demand for inspirational goods, change
in perception of consumer goods as basic necessities as opposed to
luxuries largely driven by increased awareness and advertising, rationalizing
of prices by #ey players due to a conductive tariff policy the government
and increasing demand for technology driven replacement of consumer
goods and household appliance.
The mar#eting concept that the firm must adapt to upsurge the sale of
their product should be focused on the customers needs and buying behaviour
of them before developing the productI aligning all functions of the company
to focus on those needsI realizing a profit by successfully satisfying customer
needs over the longGterm.
The researcher after an exhaustive analysis of the study made
recommendations to the firm to how to improve the sales by understating the
buying behaviour of consumers