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KIM MARIE M.

ROQUE


China-Japan Conflict

Although leaders in the international sphere seem to talk about China-japan conflict as if
violent war is just around the corner, I more see it as a clash of Asia's two largest economy.
It all started when China declared air defense identification zone over a chain of island in
the east line sea that the countries have disputed claims over. The tension was further
intensified when Prime Minister Abe visited Yakusumi Shrine where Japanese war dead are
commemorated. With all of these, I see deterioration of the business climate as a lingering
effect between the two countries, to wit:

Drop in trade volume between japan and China
Drop in Japanese direct Investment in China
Negative effects on 23,000 Japanese owned companies situated in China, employing 10
million Chinese workers
Shifting of Japanese investments to Southeast Asia

All in all, this tension between the two tigers in international economy will surely have a
huge negative impact on international sphere eventually.

Tension in Syria

Series of conference have been made by the international leaders regarding the conflict in
Syria. But for these conferences to be viable, Geneva conferences should set realistic goals
that would not only encourage but will create a compelling tone of adherence among the
involved countries. First, the conference should enable a stable ceasefire, although doing so
will be immensely difficult since in-fighting has erupted between armed opposition forces.
Second, the conference must find a way to halt the progression of jihadist groups. Achieving
this aim will require that countries and organizations stop supplying jihadist groups with
weapons. Finally, the conference should draft an emergency plan to gradually restore
normalcy in the country. It should address how to satisfy the basic health, food, housing,
and education needs of the Syrian population. These goals are difficult to achieve after so
much ruthless violence and so much wanton destruction by the regime, all with full Russian
backing. In addition, some existing structures and practices of the Assad regime, such as the
massive Baath Party apparatus and the widespread habit of cronyism, will not have a place
in a pacified Syria, where the primary objectives will be restoring civil peace and rebuilding
the country.