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Republic of the Philippines


AURORA STATE COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY
Zabali, Baler, Aurora
A COMPILATION
OF PRELIM REPORTS
PREPARED BY:
MR. RICHARD C. PARAGAS
PREPARED TO:
OSCAR T. VALLEJO Ph.D.
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Competency: DIFFERENTIATE TRADITIONAL AND AUTHENTIC
ASSESSMENT
Topic: DEFINITION & ESSENCE OF AUTHENTIC ASSESSMENT
!ep"!e# $y: Ric%"!# C& "!"'"(
$EED)*
O$+ECTI,ES:
At the end of the report, the listeners should be able to:
Define Authentic Assessment.
Describe the different essence and attributes of Authentic Assessment.
LESSON ROER:
Att!i-.te(/E((ence o0 A.t%entic A((e((ment
e!0o!min' " T"(1: authentic assessments ask students to demonstrate understanding
by performing a more complex task usually representative of more meaningful
application.
Re"2)2i0e: It is not very often in life outside of school that e are asked to select from
four alternatives to indicate our proficiency at something. !ests offer these contrived
means of assessment to increase the number of times you can be asked to demonstrate
proficiency in a short period of time. "ore commonly in life, as in authentic
assessments, e are asked to demonstrate proficiency by doing something.
Con(t!.ction o0 3no42e#'e: #ell$designed traditional assessments can effectively
determine hether or not students have ac%uired a body of knoledge. !hus, as
mentioned above, tests can serve as a nice complement to authentic assessments in a
teacher&s assessment portfolio. 'urthermore, e are often asked to recall or recogni(e
facts and ideas and propositions in life, so tests are somehat authentic in that sense.
)oever, the demonstration of recall and recognition on tests is typically much less
revealing about hat e really kno and can do than hen e are asked to construct a
product or performance out of facts, ideas and propositions. Authentic assessments often
ask students to analy(e, synthesi(e and apply hat they have learned in a substantial
manner, and students create ne meaning in the process as ell.
St.#ent)(t!.ct.!e#: #hen completing a traditional assessment, hat a student can and
ill demonstrate has been carefully structured by the person*s+ ho developed the test.
A student&s attention ill understandably be focused on and limited to hat is on the
test. In contrast, authentic assessments allo more student choice and construction in
Report No.
1
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determining hat is presented as evidence of proficiency. ,ven hen students cannot
choose their on topics or formats, there are usually multiple acceptable routes toards
constructing a product or performance. -bviously, assessments more carefully
controlled by the teachers offer advantages and disadvantages. .imilarly, more student$
structured tasks have strengths and eaknesses that must be considered hen choosing
and designing an assessment.
Di!ect E5i#ence: ,ven if a multiple$choice %uestion asks a student to analy(e or apply
facts to a ne situation rather than /ust recall the facts, and the student selects the
correct anser, hat do you no kno about that student0 Did that student get lucky
and pick the right anser0 #hat thinking led the student to pick that anser0 #e really
do not kno. At best, e can make some inferences about hat that student might kno
and might be able to do ith that knoledge. !he evidence is very indirect, particularly
for claims of meaningful application in complex, real$orld situations. Authentic
assessments, on the other hand, offer more direct evidence of application and
construction of knoledge. As in the golf example above, putting a golf student on the
golf course to play provides much more direct evidence of proficiency than giving the
student a ritten test. 1an a student effectively criti%ue the arguments someone else has
presented *an important skill often re%uired in the real orld+0 Asking a student to rite
a criti%ue should provide more direct evidence of that skill than asking the student a
series of multiple$choice, analytical %uestions about a passage, although both
assessments may be useful.
SUMMARY:
Authentic assessment is a form of assessment tool, this is the ne trend here this is an
assessment that occurs continually in the context of a meaningful learning environment in
hich students are asked to perform real$orld tasks that demonstrate meaningful application
of essential knoledge and skills. !here are five essence or attributes of this assessment, first is
the P,R'-R"I23 A !A.4, in authentic assessment e ask students to demonstrate
understanding by performing a more complex task of course it is an engaging task here the
learner applies knoledge and skills and perform it in a ne situation. .econd is the R,A5
5I',, learners are involve in a task that re%uire them to apply hat they learned in a real life
orld experience, through this it ill remind the students that sometimes school is not /ust
preparing us for the future because school is for doing real things, for real audience, for
ourselves right no. !hird the 1-2.!R61!I-2 -' 42-#5,D3,, no here hen the
students perform the task they have the capability to construct his on knoledge or learnings
based on hat the student perform. !he student can analy(e, synthesi(e and apply hat they
have learned and importantly students can create ne meaning in the process as ell. 'ourth
student structured, it allos students to choose and construct a certain product or performance
test determining hat is presented as evidence of proficiency. !he last attribute is the DIR,1!
,7ID,21, here it offers more direct evidence of application and construction of knoledge
for example your topic is basketball, if you put your students in a court and ask them to play, it
ill provide more direct evidence of proficiency than giving the student a ritten test.
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E,ALUATION:
Directions: Read each statement belo carefully. Place a ! on the line if you think a statement it
!R6,. Place an ' on the line if you think the statement is 'A5.,
888888888889. .tudents are typically given several choices hich of these match ith those
and asked to select the right anser.
88888888888:. Ask students to analy(e, synthesi(e and apply hat they have learned in a
substantial manner, and students create ne meaning in the process as ell.
88888888888;. #hen completing an Authentic Assessment, hat a student can and ill
demonstrate has been carefully structured by the person*s+ ho developed the test.
88888888888<. Authentic Assessment offer less direct evidence of application and construction
of knoledge.
88888888888=. In !raditional Assessment evidence is very direct, particularly for claims of
meaningful application in complex, real$orld situations.
REFERENCES:
$ >adger, ,. *9??:+."ore than !esting. Arithmetic !eacher, ;?*?+, @$99
$ 1hapman, 1. *9??A+ authentic riting assessment. ,D;:BCAC
$ >lack,P. D #illiam, D. *9??B+. Inside the >lack >ox: Raising .tandards through
1lassroom Assessment
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Competency: DIFFERENTIATE TRADITIONAL AND AUTHENTIC
ASSESSMENT
Topic: TRADITIONAL ASSESSMENT ,S& AUTHENTIC
ASSESSMENT
!ep"!e# $y: RICHARD C& ARAGAS
$EED)*
O$+ECTI,ES:
At the end of the report, the listeners should be able to:
Identify the to basic approaches of assessment
Define traditional assessment and authentic assessment
1ompare and contrast traditional assessment from authentic assessment
3ive examples of traditional assessment and authentic assessment.
LESSON ROER:
!raditional assessment is a form of assessment in hich students are re%uired to select or
supply the correct anser to %uestions hich the teacher asks. It usually employs paper E and E
pencil tests hich sample the knoledge, skills, or attitudes learned by the students. !he select E
type items are the completion type *fill in the blanks+ and enumeration.
Report No.
2
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Authentic assessment is a form of assessment in hich students are ask to Fperform real
orld tasks that demonstrate meaningful application of essential knoledge and skillsG *"ueller,
:AAC+. It employs performance test and portfolio assessment. It evaluates collective abilities of
students rather than a representative sample of their behaviorHknoledge.
!raditional and Authentic Assessment 1ompared and 1ontrasted
.imilarities and Differences:
!raditional Assessment Authentic Assessment
9. A schoolIs mission is to develop
productive citi(ens.
9. A schoolIs mission is to develop
productive citi(ens.
:. !o be a productive citi(en and
individual must possess a certain
body of knoledge and skills.
:. !o be a productive citi(en, an
individual must be capable of
performing meaningful task in the real
orld.
T!"#ition"2 A((e((ment A.t%entic A((e((ment
9. 5earning outcomes are measured and
evaluated.
9. 5earning outcomes are
measured and evaluated.
:. .tudents are asked to selectHsupply a
response.
:. .tudents are asked to perform a
task or construct their on
responses.
;. !ests are usually devised by the
teacher.
;. 'orms of assessment can be
devised by the teacher, or in
collaboration ith the student.
<. -nly one correct anser is encouraged
and accepted.
<. A variety of taskHstrategies is
encouraged and accepted.
=. 1ontrived set$up in testing is
employed.
=. Real$orld learning is
encouraged.
C. !he development of higher E order
thinking skills is limited.
C. !he development of higher$
order thinking skills is fostered
to a great extent.
@. !eacher evaluates studentIs output.
.tudents does not participate in the
process except to respond to %uestions.
@. .tudent is given opportunity to
evaluate hisHher on ork.
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;. !herefore, schools must teach this
body of knoledge and skills.
;. !herefore, schools must help students
become proficient at performing the
task they ill encounter hen they
graduate.
<. !o determine if it is successful,
the school must then test students
to see if they ac%uired the
knoledge and skills.
<. !o determine if it is successful, the
school must the ask students to
perform meaningful task that replicate
real orld challenges to see if students
are capable of doing so.
Defining Attributes:
!raditional Assessment Authentic Assessment
9. .electing a response
:. 1ontrived
;. RecallHrecognition
<. !eacher$structured
=. Indirect$,vidence
9. Performing a task
:. Real$life
;. 1onstructionHapplication
<. .tudent$structured
=. Direct$,vidence
>elo are examples of traditional assessment and authentic assessment.
!raditional Assessment Authentic Assessment
9. #here is the Philippines located0
a. America
b. Asia
c. ,urope
:. #hen e mix blue and yello,
hat color is produced0
a. Red
b. 7iolet
c. 3reen
;. #hat ill you do if your brother
sprained an ankle0
a. Apply a cold compress.
b. Raise his foot
c. 1all a physician
<. #hat do you use in tossing a ball
in volleyball0
a. 'ingers
9. 3et a orld map and point the location
of the Philippines.
:. 3et a scoop of yello and blue paint.
"ix them. !ell hat color is produced.
;. Pretend a brother has sprained his
ankle. Demonstrate the first aid
measure you ill do.
<. Demonstrate ho to toss ball in
volleyball. *teacher observes and uses
scoring guide to measure student
performance+
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b. 'eet
c. knee
SUMMARY:
!raditional assessment are the conventional methods of testing hich usually produce a ritten
document, such as %ui(, exam, or paper. !his kind of assessment is very routinely here the
student is alays in the process of classroom setting exams. !his type of assessment ill not
challenge the intellectual capacity as ell as the inner reflection of each student toard a certain
lesson because there are no time for them to communicate ith themselves and construct their
on learning. -n the other hand authentic assessment is performance$oriented, the thinking goes,
ith the assessment that aims to measure not only the correctness of the response, but also the
thought process involved in arriving at the response, and that encourage students to reflect their
on learning in both depth and breadth, the belief is that instruction ill be pushed into a more
thoughtful, more reflexive, richer mode as ell it also call upon the examinee to demonstrate
specific skills and competencies, that is, to apply the skills and knoledge they have mastered.
E,ALUATION:
DIR,1!I-2.: #rite on the space provided before the number hether the folloing items refer
to traditional or authentic assessment.
9. .tudents are given the leeay to select hat is to be presented as evidence of
mastery.
:. Assessment are more teacher$structured
;. Recall recognition of knoledge is asked of students.
<. .tudents are asked to demonstrate mastery by doing something.
=. .tudentIs attention is focused on hat is on the test.
C. !he evidence of proficiency is very indirect.
@. A rubric is utili(ed by hich student performance on the task is evaluated.
B. !eachers first identify the task that students ill do to demonstrate their mastery.
?. .tudents develop responses in multiple ays.
9A. .tudents are compared or ranked.
REFERENCES:
9.+ http:HHeducCA<Afall9A.ikispaces.comHAuthenticJAssessment
:.+ https:HH.google.com.phHurl0
saKtDrctK/D%KDesrcKsDsourceKebDcdK;DcadKr/aDuactKBDvedKA1DAL'/A1DurlK
httpM;AM:'M:'fatima:;.ikispaces.comM:'fileM:'vie
M:'Authentic8Assessment.ppt
M:':;9<<9<BBM:'Authentic8Assessment.pptDeiKNs#<6<@"ABfkBANf=O1A>LDu
sgKA'L/12,3CeBI/';m%"!5>$1<APa@mCu7rDbvmKbv.@A9;B=BB,d.d3c
;.+ https:HH.google.com.phHebhp0sourceidKchrome$instantDionK9DespvK:DieK6!'$
BP%KpptM:AaboutM:AauthenticM:AandM:AtraditionalM:Aassessment
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Competency: DIFFERENTIATE TRADITIONAL AND AUTHENTIC ASSESSMENT
Topic:
QUSING AUTHENTIC ASSESSMENT IN THE CLASSROOM6
!ep"!e# -y: RICHARD C& ARAGAS
$EED)*
O$+ECTI,ES:
At the end of the report, the listeners should be able to:
9. Define authentic assessment.
:. 4no the points of vie in using authentic assessment in the classroom.
;. ,numerate the = performance samples in using authentic assessment in the classroom.
LESSON ROER:
6sing Authentic Assessment in the 1lassroom
Authentic assessment aims to evaluate students& abilities in &real$orld& contexts. In other ords,
students learn ho to apply their skills to authentic tasks and pro/ects. Authentic assessment does not
encourage rote learning and passive test$taking. Instead, it focuses on students& analytical skillsR ability to
integrate hat they learnR creativityR ability to ork collaborativelyR and ritten and oral expression skills. It
values the learning process as much as the finished product.
Report No.
3
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Points of 7ie about 6sing Authentic Assessment in the 1lassroom
S Authentic Assessment are Direct "easures
In this section, students are able to use the ac%uired knoledge and skills in the real orld. !he assessment
that the teacher ill use ill also tell if the students can apply hat they have learned in authentic situations.
If student does ell on a test of knoledge e might infer that the student could also apply that knoledge.
In using authentic assessment in the classroom, the teacher must directly check for the ability to apply by
asking the student to use hat they have learned in something meaningful ay.
S Authentic Assessments 1apture 1onstructive 2ature of 5earning
In this section, assessment in the classroom cannot /ust ask students to repeat back information have
received. .tudents must also be asked to demonstrate hat they have accurately constructed meaning about
they have been taught. 'urthermore, students must be given the opportunity to engage in the construction of
meaning. Authentic tasks not only serve as assessments but also as vehicle for such learning.
S Authentic Assessments Integrate !eaching, 5earning and Assessment
Authentic assessment, in contrast to more traditional assessment, encourages the integration of teaching
learning and assessing. In the traditional assessment model, teaching and learning are often separated from
assessment. In the authentic assessment model, the same authentic task used to measure the studentIs ability
to apply the knoledge or skills is used as a vehicle for students learning.
S Authentic Assessments Provide "ultiple Paths to Demonstration
Regarding the traditional assessment model, ansering multiple choice %uestions does not allo for much
variability in ho students demonstrate the knoledge and skills they have ac%uired. -n the other hand, that
is strength of tests because it makes sure everyone is being compared on the same domains in the same
manner hich increases the consistency and comparability of the measure.
Authentic tasks tend to give the students more freedom in ho they ill demonstrate hat they have
learned. >y carefully identifying the criteria of good performance on the authentic task ahead of time,
the teacher can still make comparable /udgments of student performance even though student
performance might be expressed %uite differently from student to student.
6sing Authentic Assessment in the 1lassroom, students:
T do science experiments
T conduct social sciences research
T rite stories and reports
T read and interpret literature
Tsolve math problems that have real$orld applications
#hy !eachers must have to 6se Authentic Assessment "ethods in their 1lassroom0
"any teachers are dissatisfied ith only using traditional testing methods. !hey believe these methods
do not test many skills and abilities students need to be successful. .tudents are able to practice their higher
order thinking skills and critici(e tests hen the teacher uses authentic assessment in the classroom. In using
authentic assessment in the classroom, it utili(es = performances samples hich are performance assessment,
short investigations, open response %uestions, portfolios and self$assessment hich are the learning activities
that encourage students to use higher order thinking skills. "any teachers find that authentic assessment is
more successful hen students kno hat teachers expect. 'or this reason, teachers should alays clearly
define standards and expectation.
11 | P a g e
In using authentic assessment in the classroom, it tends to focus on contextuali(ed tasks, enable the
students to demonstrate their competency in a more authentic setting. ,xamples of authentic assessment
categories include performance of the skills, demonstrating use of a particular knoledge, simulations, role
plays, studio portfolios and strategically selecting items.
3uidelines in 6tili(ing Authentic Assessment in the 1lassroom
U #rite the assessment before the lesson plan
U -utline learning standards on rubrics to help to ensure rigor
U #arm students up to learning ith notecard exercises each morning
U 6se in$class pop %ui((es to assess student understanding and inform teaching
U 3ive %ualitative feedback
U Ask students to reflect and assess themselves
U 6se online or traditional tools to track a studentIs ork %uality over time
SUMMARY:
Authentic assessment is assessment that occurs continually in the context of meaningful learning
environment and reflects actual and orthhile learning experiences that can be documented through
observation, anecdotal records, /ournal, logs, ork samples, conferences, portfolios, riting discussions,
experiments, presentations, exhibits, pro/ects and other methods. !his assessment in the classroom include
individual as ell as group tasks hich emphasis on self$reflection, understanding, and groth rather than
on responses based only on the recall of isolated facts.
!he intent of this assessment inside the classroom is to involve the learners in tasks that re%uire them to
apply knoledge in real$life experiences it also has a personal intent, a reason to engage and a genuine
audience beyond the teacher.
E,ALUATION:
Directions: Read each statement belo carefully. #rite ' if the statement is false and ! if the statement is
true. #rite your anser on the space provided before each number.
888888888889. Authentic Assessment are in$direct measures.
88888888888:. Authentic Assessments provide multiple paths to demonstration.
88888888888;. Authentic Assessments integrate teaching, learning and assessment.
88888888888<. Authentic Assessments capture constructive nature of learning.
88888888888=. -ne of the guidelines in utili(ing authentic assessment in the classroom is rite first the
assessment before the lesson plan.
REFERENCES:
$ http:HH/fmueller.faculty.noctrl.eduHtoolboxHhydoit.htm
http:HH.flec.ednet.ns.caHstaffHP'IM:A:AA<$=HAuthenticM:AAssessment8Portfolio
M:A-vervie.pdf
http:HH.edutopia.orgHblogHsammamish$<$authentic$assessment$in$action$mark$ilbert
http:HHen.ikipedia.orgHikiHAuthentic8assessment
http:HHpareonline.netHpdfHv9@n:.pdf
https:HH.teachervision.comHteaching$methods$and$managementHeducational$testingH<?99.html
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Competency: DIFFERENTIATE TRADITIONAL AND AUTHENTIC
ASSESSMENT
Topic: CREATING AUTHENTIC ASSESSMENT
!ep"!e# $y :
RICHARD C& ARAGAS
$EED)I,
O-7ecti5e(:
1reate their on set of standard.
Provide a simple task and criteria to measure Authentic Assessment.
,numerate the steps on ho to create an authentic assessment.
Le((on !ope!
FOUR STES IN MA3ING AUTHENTIC ASSESSMENT
.!,P 9: Identify the .tandards
.tandards, like goals, are statements of hat students should kno
and be able to do. )oever, standards are typically narroer in
Report No.
4
13 | P a g e
scope and more amenable to assessment than goals.
F.tudents ill be able to add to$digit numbers correctly.G
.!,P :: .elect an Authentic !ask
'ind a ay students can demonstrate that they are fully capable of
meeting the standard. !he language of a ell$ritten standard can
spell out hat a task should ask students to do to demonstrate their
mastery of it.
.!,P ;: Identify the 1riteria for the !ask
#hat does good performance on this task look like0 -r )o ill I
kno they have done a good /ob on this task0
1riteria: Indicators of good performance on a task
1haracteristics of a 3ood 1riterion
o clearly stated
o brief
o observable
o statement of behavior
o ritten in a language students understand
.tandard
o !he student ill be able to divide to$digit numbers
correctly.
!ask
o 1alculate the given math problems ithout using the
calculator and anser it in the board. ,xplain their ansers.
1riteria
o !he proper use of the step$by$step process in solving the
problem. 1orrectness of the final anser. !he ay they
explain and deliver the reason of ho they arrive ith the
final anser.
.!,P <: 1reate the Rubric
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-nce you have identified the criteria you ant to look for as
indicators of good performance, you next decide hether to
consider the criteria analytically or holistically.
S.mm"!y:
In making an authentic assessment first thing to do is to find the standard to
understand hat is being asked of them and so to devise and undertake the
learning activities to produce evidence of their achievements. !hese
statements are also needed to assist students self$assess and to ask others,
peers and external experts, to observe, assess and verify their
performances.
!he next is to find an authentic task here e ill find authentic settings,
or learning environment in Freal orldG learning contexts to achieve a
higher chance of FriskG for both the student and those in the context ith
hom they ill interact. !hird is to identify the criteria, it re%uires
appropriate duty of care in terms of preparation and on$going management
of students under these circumstance so that biases cannot form and
reliability can achieve. 5ast is to create rubric that ill provide a
measurement system for specific tasks and are tailored to each assessment
tool, so as the test become more complex especially hen it is a
performance or through demonstration rubrics is very useful.
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E5"2."tion:
Direction: 1hoose the correct anser and rite the letter of it in the space
provided before the number.
8889. #hat is the step in creating
authentic assessment herein the
teacher uses this to evaluate ho
ell students completed the task
and thus ho ell they have met
the standards0
888:. It serves as an indicator of
good performance on a task.
888;. It is the last step in creating
authentic assessment that
measures the studentIs
performance on the task.
888<. 5imiting the number of
criteria means0
888=. Oou do not have to assess
everything on every task means0
a. 1riteria
b. Assessment ill be
more feasible if you
focus on the important
characteristics of the
task.
c. Identifying criteria
d. If you set a certain
criteria you do not have
to look for those criteria
in every task.
e. 1reating rubric
Re0e!ence(:
http:HH/fmueller.faculty.noctrl.eduHtoolboxHhydoit.htm
http:HHen.ikipedia.orgHikiHAuthentic8assessment
Competency: DIFFERENTIATE TRADITIONAL AND AUTHENTIC
ASSESSMENT
Topic: IDENTIFYING STANDARDS
!ep"!e# $y: RICHARD C& ARAGAS
$EED)I,
O-7ecti5e(: At the end of the lesson, the students should be able to:
Define .tandards
Report No.
5
1! | P a g e
Discuss the three steps process for riting standards
Discuss the guidelines for riting standards
Identify the three types of standard.
Le((on !ope!: 8%"t i( " St"n#"!#9
A .tandard is a published specification that establishes a common
language, and contains a technical specification or other precise criteria
and is designed to be used consistently, as a rule, a guideline, or a
definition.
.tandards are applied to many materials, products, methods and services.
!hey help to make life simpler, and increase the reliability and the
effectiveness of many goods and services e use.
.tandards are designed for voluntary use and do not impose any
regulations. )oever, las and regulations may refer to certain .tandards
making compliance ith them compulsory.
8%"t Do St"n#"!#( Loo1 Li1e9
.tandards are typically one$sentence statements of hat students should
kno and be able to do at a certain point. -ften a standard ill begin ith
a phrase such as Q.tudents ill be able to ...Q *.#>A!+.
THREE)STE ROCESS FOR 8RITING STANDARDS:
9. R,'5,1!
It is unnecessary to start from scratch. )oever, before you look at the
ork of others, hich can confine your thinking, I ould highly
recommend that you, as a teacher or school or district, take some time to
examine *or R,'5,1! upon+ hat you value. #hat do you really ant
your students to kno and be able to do hen they leave your grade or
school0As a result of this reflection, you might reach consensus on a fe
things you most value and agree should be included in the standards. Oou
might actually rite a fe standards. -r, you might produce a long list of
possible candidates for standards.
:. R,7I,#
!here are many, many good models of learning goals and standards
available to you. .o, before you start putting yours don on paper,
R,7I,# hat others have developed.
5ook at
your state goals and standards
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relevant national goals and standards
other state and local standards already created
o check out the site mentioned above $ Putnam
7alley
your existing goals and standards if you have any
other sources that may be relevant *e.g., hat employers
ant, hat colleges ant+
5ook for
descriptions and language that capture hat you said you
value in .tep 9 *R,'5,1!+
4noledge and skills not captured in the first step $$
should they be included0
ays to organi(e and connect the important knoledge
and skills
:& 8RITE
5ook to develop a good sense of the hole picture of hat you ant your
students to kno and to do identify for hich checkpoints *grades+ you
ant to rite standards
As you rite your standards, ask yourself and your colleagues guiding
questions such as
.o, tell me again, hy do e think this is important0
Realistically, are they ever going to have to kno thisHdo thisHuse
this0
)o does this knoledgeHskill relate to this standard over here0
#e don&t have a standard about NR is this really more important
than N0
1an e really assess this0 .hould e assess it0
Is this knoledge or skill essential for becoming a productive
citi(en0 )o0 #hy0
Is this knoledge or skill essential for college preparation0

1# | P a g e
G.i#e2ine( 0o! 8!itin' St"n#"!#(
GUIDELINE ;<: 'or a standard to be amenable to assessment, it must
be observable and measurable.
GUIDELINE ;=: A standard is typically narroer than a goal and
broader than an ob/ective.
GUIDELINE ;:: A standard should not include mention of the specific
task by hich students ill demonstrate hat they kno or are able to do.
GUIDELINE ;*: .tandards should be ritten clearly.
GUIDELINE ;>: .tandards should be ritten in language that students
and parents can understand.
TYES OF STANDARD
1ontent .tandards
I define content standards as statements that describe hat students
should kno or be able to do ithin the content of a specific discipline or
at the intersection of to or more disciplines. ,xamples ould include
.tudents ill classify ob/ects along to dimensions.
Describe effects of physical activity on the body.
Present employment$related information in the target language.
Process .tandards
I define process standards as statements that describe skills students
should develop to enhance the process of learning. Process standards are
not specific to a particular discipline, but are generic skills that are
applicable to any discipline. ,xamples ould include
.tudents ill set realistic goals for their performance.
.eriously consider the ideas of others.
'ind and evaluate relevant information.
7alue .tandards
1$ | P a g e
I define value standards as statements that describe attitudes teachers
ould like students to develop toards learning. ,xamples ould
include
.tudents ill value diversity of opinions or perspectives.
Persist on challenging tasks.
S.mm"!y: 3ood authentic assessment development begins ith identifying a set of
standards for your students. .tate and national efforts at standards$
riting have typically focused on the content of the disciplines. >ut hat
about critical thinking skills, problem solving abilities, collaborative
skills and personal development0 !hese highly valued skills are not easily
incorporated into content standards and, thus, are often omitted or given
insufficient attention. Oet, the standards should capture hat e most
value and most ant our students to learn. .o, e should consider
including these other skills in our standards. !o do so, it may be helpful to
distinguish content standards from other types. 3oals are typically
subdivided further to identify standards. #hereas goals are often ritten
broadly enough to cross grade levels and content areas, standards,
particularly those that are content$based, tend to be specific to one or a
fe grade levels and one content area, and may be ritten at the level of a
unit in curricular planning. )oever, many state and national 4$9:
standards are ritten ith the graduating senior in mind. !o provide
guidance for prior grades, benchmark standards are ritten hich
describe hat progress third or fifth or eighth graders should have made
toard a particular standard.
E5"2."tion: Direction: Anser the ff. %uestions.
9. #hat is a standard0
:. Discuss the three process for riting standards0
;. 3ive at least ; guidelines for rintg standards0
<. #hat is importance of identifying standards0
=. )o does standards lokk like0Dicuss it briefly, ith your
on ords.
Re0e!ence(: https:HH.google.com.phH0gfe8rdKcrDeiKv#1=6$
:tDI!(rLeAmo3o>ADgs8rdKsslP%KhatJisJstandards
https:HH.google.com.phH0
gfe8rdKcrDeiK8;e=6<1AAsNIrLf48O1L1LDgs8rdKsslP%KJidentifyi
ngJstandards
Report No.
6
2% | P a g e
Competency: Di00e!enti"te T!"#ition"2 "n# A.t%entic A((e((ment
Topic: SELECTING AN AUTHENTIC TAS3
!ep"!e# $y: RICHARD C& ARAGAS
$EED ? *
O-7ecti5e(: Define Authentic taskR
Identify and define different types of Authentic !askR
"ake an example of different Authentic !ask
Le((on !ope!: 8%"t i( A.t%entic T"(19
In general, an authentic task is one hich:
is purposeful and engaging
models ho people solve real problems in ork andHor communities
puts knoledge to ork
potentially demonstrates hat students kno and can do
supports multiple representations and solution strategies
offers opportunities for meaningful learning and higher order cognitive
thinking
results in some product, presentation or outcome as a result of the
deliberations of the group andHor individual.
Type( o0 A.t%entic T"(1
<& SELECTED)RESONSE
In response to a prompt, students select an anser from among those
given or from memory or from alloable study aids. !ypically, no ne
knoledge is constructedR students simply recall or recogni(e information
re%uired to select the appropriate response.
E@"mp2e(:
"ultiple$choice tests
!rue$false
21 | P a g e
"atching
'ill$in$the$blank
=& CONSTRUCTED RESONSE
In response to a prompt, students construct an anser out of old and ne
knoledge. .ince there is no one exact anser to these prompts, students are
constructing ne knoledge that likely differs slightly or significantly from that
constructed by other students. !ypically, constructed response prompts are
narroly conceived, delivered at or near the same time a response is expected
and are limited in length.
,xamples:
.hort$anser essay %uestions, ordering decimals, riting a topic sentence
etc.
:& RODUCT
In response to a prompt *assignment+ or series of prompts, students
construct a substantial, tangible product that reveals their understanding of
certain concepts and skills andHor their ability to apply, analy(e, synthesi(e or
evaluate those concepts and skills. It is similar to a constructed$response item in
that students are re%uired to construct ne knoledge and not /ust select a
response.
E@"mp2e(:
,ssay, stories or poems, ,xtended /ournal responses, Art exhibition or
portfolio and 2espapers.
*& ERFORMANCE
In response to a prompt *assignment+ or series of prompts, students
22 | P a g e
construct a performance that reveals their understanding of certain concepts and
skills andHor their ability to apply, analy(e, synthesi(e or evaluate those concepts
and skills. It is similar to a constructed$response item in that students are
re%uired to construct ne knoledge and not /ust select a response.
E@"mp2e(:
1onducting an experiment, Dance or dramatic performances and Athletic
competitions.
S.mm"!y .tudents, teachers and the community should see some real value in
orking on the task E that is, they ant to solve it and see that it is orth the
time spent on it. !he task should involve meetings or other activities that involve
negotiation, planning, action, reporting, evaluating and exploring of alternatives.
!he task should dra on a range of knoledge, skills and strategies from
different areas of the mathematics and school curriculum more generally as ell
as hat is knon about the local environment. All learners should be enabled to
make a start or contribute in some ay. )oever the task should also challenge
most learners at some level. 'or example, diagrams, stories, graphs, tables,
symbolic expressions, ritten arguments, explanations andHor /ustifications can
demonstrate multiple options. 6ltimately, there should be something tangible
that can be Vpointed toI as a result of the deliberations of the group andHor
individual.
E5"2."tion Anser the folloing %uestion.
9. #hat is authentic task0
:$;. 3ive at least : examples of constructed response.
<$=. 3ive at least : types of authentic task.
C$9A. "ake one example of authentic task and rite hat type of authentic
task is this.
Re0e!ence( file:HHH):HA.5HAuthenticM:A!asksM:A*AuthenticM:AAssessment
M:A!oolbox+.htm
file:HHH):HA.5H.tepM:A:M:AM:A1reateM:AtheM:AAuthenticM:A!ask
23 | P a g e
M:A*AuthenticM:AAssessmentM:A!oolbox+.htm
Report No.
7
24 | P a g e
Competency: CREATE RU$RICS
Topic: NATURE OF RU$RICS
!ep"!e# $y: RICHARD C& ARAGAS
$EED)*
O$+ECTI,ES:
At the end of the report, the listeners should be able to:
Define Rubric.
Analy(e the types and parts of Rubric.
Identify the different uses of Rubric.
Identify the different ays to involve students in rubric development.
LESSON ROER:
RU$RICS
A rubric is a multi$purpose scoring guide for assessing student products and performances. !his
tool orks in a number of different ays to advance student learning, and has great potential in
particular for non$traditional, first generation, and minority students. In addition, rubrics improve
teaching, contribute to sound assessment, and are an important source of information for program
improvement.
TYES OF RU$RICS
Rubrics can be holistic or analytic, general or task specific
)olistic vs. analytic
o )olistic rubrics provide a single score based on an overall impression of a studentIs
performance on a task.
Advantages: %uick scoring, provides overvie of student achievement
Disadvantages: does not provide detailed information, may be difficult to provide
one overall score
o Analytic rubrics provide specific feedback along several dimensions.
Advantages: more detailed feedback, scoring more consistent across students and
graders
Disadvantage: time consuming to score
3eneral vs. task specific
o 3eneral rubrics contain criteria that are general across tasks.
Advantage: can use the same rubric across different tasks
Disadvantage: feedback may not be specific enough
o !ask specific rubrics are uni%ue to a specific task.
Advantage: more reliable assessment of performance on the task
Disadvantage: difficult to construct rubrics for all specific tasks
THE ARTS OF A RU$RIC
2 | P a g e
Rubrics are composed of four basic parts *)aaii, :A9:+. In its simplest form, the rubric
includes:
9. A task description. !he outcome being assessed or instructions students received for an
assignment.
:. !he characteristics to be rated *ros+. !he skills, knoledge, andHor behavior to be
demonstrated.
;. 5evels of masteryHscale *columns+. 5abels used to describe the levels of mastery
should be tactful but clear. 1ommonly used labels include:
p ,xceeds expectations, meets expectations, near expectations, >elo
expectations
o ,xemplary, proficient, marginal, unacceptable o
"astery, proficient, developing, novice
o <, ;, :, 9
<. !he description of each characteristic at each level of masteryHscale *cells+.
8HAT TYE OF RU$RIC 8OR3S $EST FOR YOUR UROSES9
6se a holistic rubric hen:
Oou ant a %uick snapshot of achievement.
A single dimension is ade%uate to define %uality.
6se an analytic rubric hen:
Oou ant to see relative strengths and eaknesses.
Oou ant detailed feedback.
Oou ant to assess complicated skills or performance.
Oou ant students to self$assess their understanding or performance.
6se a general rubric hen:
Oou ant to assess reasoning, skills and products.
All students are not doing exactly the same task.
Oou ant to assess knoledge.
#hen consistency of scoring is extremely important.
HO8 CAN I IN,OL,E STUDENTS IN RU$RIC DE,ELOMENT9
U After clearly defining the assignment for the students, they can follo the guidelines
outlined above to create a rubric.
U Depending on your preference you may or may not ant to provide the students ith
the key components of the assignment and the type of rubric to create.
U .tudents can either ork in teams or as a hole class.
U If students ork in teams, you may ant to let the students use team based rubrics or
have a class discussion about the team rubrics to reach consensus on one rubric for all
2! | P a g e
students in the class.
U !o ease in the development process, provide students ith examples of rubrics, a
rubric template and previous examples of student ork if available.
U As an alternative to having students create a rubric, ask them to give feedback on or to
add more detail to existing rubrics.
)o do rubrics enhance student learning0
U #hen students are made aare of the rubrics prior to instruction and assessment,
they kno the level of performance expected and they are more motivated to reach those
standards.
U #hen students are involved in rubric construction, the assignment itself becomes
more meaningful to the students.
6sing rubrics for assessment
U If you are providing a rubric, share it ith students before they complete the
assignment. !his ill help them understand the performance standards.
U 6se rubrics for summative and formative evaluation.
U Rubrics can provide both a grade *summative+ and detailed feedback to improve
future performance *formative+.
U 6se rubrics to promote student self$assessment of their on learning and
performance.
SUMMARY:
A rubric is an evaluation tool that describes the criteria for performance at various levels using
demonstrative verbs. It is a performance$based assessment process that accurately reflects
content skills, process skills, ork habits, and learning results.
!here are generally to types of rubrics: holistic and analytic. It is important to analy(e the task,
activity or pro/ect being assessed and determine hich type of rubric is most appropriate to
apply. A holistic rubric describes a studentIs ork as a single score$$the report or pro/ect as a
hole is assigned a score. !herefore, holistic rubrics are best suited to tasks that can be
performed or evaluated as a hole andHor those that may not re%uire extensive feedback.
Analytic rubrics specify criteria to be assessed at each performance level, provide a separate
score for each criterion, and may include a composite score for overall performance. In some
cases, the composite score is eighted based on the importance of each dimension.
E,ALUATION:
Directions: Read each statement belo carefully. Place a ! on the line if you think a statement it
2" | P a g e
!R6,. Place an ' on the line if you think the statement is 'A5.,
888888888889. Rubrics canIt teach but can evaluate.
88888888888:. A rubric helps to anchor /udgments because it continually dras the revieerIs
attention to each of the key criteria.
88888888888;. Rubrics can provide both a grade *summative+ and detailed feedback to improve
future performance *formative+.
88888888888<. Rubrics can be holistic or analytic, general or task specific
88888888888=. Rubrics improve teaching, contribute to sound assessment, and are an important
source of information for program improvement.
REFERENCES:
9. Arter, W. *:AAA+. Rubrics, scoring guides, and performance criteria: 1lassroom tools for
assessing and improving student learning. Paper presented at the annual conference of the
American ,ducational Research Association, 2e -rleans.
:.2itko, A. W. *9??C+. ,ducational Assessment of .tudents, :nd ed. ,ngleood 1liffs, 2W:
Prentice$)all.
!aggart, 3. 5., Phifer, .. W., 2ixon, W. A., and #ood, ". *,ds.+ Rubrics: )andbook for
1onstruction and 6se. 5ancaster, PA: !echnomic Publishing 1o.
#iggins, 3. *9??B+. ,ducative Assessment. .an 'rancisco, 1A: Wossey$>ass Publishers.

X
Competency: CREATE RU$RICS
Report No.
8
2# | P a g e
Topic: USES OF RU$RICS
!ep"!e# $y: RICHARD C& ARAGAS
$EED)*
O$+ECTI,ES:
At the end of the report, the listeners should be able to:
Discuss the uses of Rubrics.
Identify the purposes of using Rubrics.
LESSON ROER:
8HY SHOULD RU$RICS $E USED9
6sing rubrics focuses both students and teachers on to essential %uestions:
U #hat do e ant students to kno and do0
U #hat ould exemplary demonstration of this learning look like0
.uggestions for use:
U )and out the rubric ith the assignment. Return the rubric ith the performance descriptors
circled.
U )ave students develop their on rubrics for a pro/ect.
U )ave students use the rubric for self$assessment or peer assessment.
8HY USE A RU$RIC9
)ere are some primary reasons to use rubrics *)aaii, :A9:+.
A rubric creates a common frameork and language for assessment.
1omplex products or behaviors can be examined efficiently.
#ell$trained revieers apply the same criteria and standards.
Rubrics are criterion$referenced, rather than norm$referenced. Raters ask, QDid the
student meet the criteria for level = of the rubric0Q rather than Q)o ell did this student
do compared to other students0Q
6sing rubrics can lead to substantive conversations among faculty.
#hen faculty members collaborate to develop a rubric, it promotes shared
expectations and grading practices.
UROSES OF RU$RICS IN THE ASSESSMENT ROCESS
1reating a common frameork and language for evaluation.
Providing students ith clear expectations about hat ill be assessed, as ell as
standards that should be met. .end messages about hat is most meaningful.
2$ | P a g e
Increasing the consistency and ob/ectivity of evaluating *especially scoring or rating+
performances, products, and understanding.
Providing students ith information about here they are in relation to here they need
to be for success.
Identifying hatIs most important to focus on in instruction.
3iving students guidance in evaluating and improving their ork. .tudents can learn
ho to think about evaluation.
SUMMARY:
6sing rubrics is a ay of ensuring that students, teachers, and parents alike kno the purpose of
the ork that students are being asked to do. !he use of rubrics as a tool for scoring ork has
the potential for giving students the poer and responsibility that goes ith knoing hat is
being asked of them and ho to achieve it. Rubrics are great for students: they let students
kno hat is expected of them, and demystify grades by clearly stating, in age$appropriate
vocabulary, the expectations for a pro/ect. !hey also help students see that learning is about
gaining specific skills *both in academic sub/ects and in problem$solving and life skills+, and
they give students the opportunity to do self$assessment to reflect on the learning process.
Rubrics also help teachers authentically monitor a student&s learning process and develop and
revise a lesson plan. !hey provide a ay for a student and a teacher to measure the %uality of a
body of ork. #hen a student&s assessment of his or her ork and a teacher&s assessment don&t
agree, they can schedule a conference to let the student explain his or her understanding of the
content and /ustify the method of presentation.
E,ALUATION:
Directions: Read each statement belo carefully. Place a ! on the line if you think a statement it
!R6,. Place an ' on the line if you think the statement is 'A5.,
888888888889Rubrics provide students ith communication about here they are in relation to
here they need to be for success.
88888888888:. A rubric give students guidance in evaluating and improving their ork.
88888888888;. Rubric creates a common frameork and language for evaluation.
88888888888<. !he use of rubrics as a tool for scoring ork has the potential for giving students
3% | P a g e
the poer and responsibility that goes ith knoing hat is being asked of them and ho to
achieve it.
88888888888=. Rubrics improve teaching, contribute to sound assessment, and are an important
source of information for program improvement.
REFERENCES:
Andrade, )., D Oing, D. *:AA=+. .tudent perspectives on rubric$referenced assessment. Practical
Assessment, Research D ,valuation, 9A*;+, 9$99. Arter, W. D "c!ighe, W. *:AA9+. .coring
Rubrics in the 1lassroom. !housand -aks, 1A: 1orin Press. Delpit. 5. *9?BB+. !he .ilenced
Dialogue: Poer and Pedagogy in ,ducating -ther Peo$ pleIs 1hildren. )arvard ,ducational
Revie, =B*;+, :BA$:?B. ,isner, ,. *9??9+. !he ,nlightened ,ye: Lualitative In%uiry and the
,nhancement of ,ducational Practice, 2e Oork: "acmillan.
Competency: CREATE RU$RICS
Report No.
9
31 | P a g e
Topic: HO8 TO MA3E INSTRUCTIONAL RU$RICS
!ep"!e# $y: RICHARD C& ARAGAS
$EED)*
O$+ECTI,ES:
At the end of the report, the listeners should be able to:
Identify the steps in creating Rubric.
Discuss the steps to take hen developing a rubric.
LESSON ROER:
)o to 1reate Rubrics
'ormat for a rubric:
task description
!ask Description:

descriptions
description of dimensions
A RU$RIC IN,OL,ES FOUR COMONENTS:
Part 1: Task Description
U Involves a FperformanceG of some sort by the student
U !he task can take the form of a specific assignmentR e.g., a paper, a poster, a presentation
U !he task can take the form of overall behaviorR e.g., participation, use of proper lab
protocols, behavioral expectations in the classroom
Part 2: Scale
U Describes ho ell or poorly any given task has been performed
U Positive terms hich may be used: F"asteryG, FPartial "asteryG, FProgressingG,
F,mergingG
S&a'e
32 | P a g e
U 2on/udgmental or noncompetitive language: F)igh levelG, F"iddle levelG, F>eginning
levelG
U 1ommonly used labels:
o .ophisticated, competent, partly competent, not yet competent
o ,xemplary, proficient, marginal, unacceptable
o Advanced, intermediate high, intermediate, novice
o Distinguished, proficient, intermediate, novice
o Accomplished, average, developing. >eginning
U ;$= levels are typically used
o the more levels there are, the more difficult it becomes to differentiate beteen
them and to articulate precisely hy one studentIs ork falls into the scale level
it does
o but, more specific levels make the task clearer for the student and they reduce the
professorIs time needed to furnish detailed grading notes
Part 3: Dimensions
U 5ay out the parts of the task simply and completely
U .hould actually represent the type of component skills students must combine in a
successful scholarly ork
U >reaking up the assignment into its distinct dimensions leads to a kind of task analysis
ith the components of the task clearly identified
Part 4: Description of te Dimensions
U A rubric should contain at the very least a description or the highest level of performance
in that dimension
U .coring 3uide Rubric K a rubric that contains only the description of the highest level of
performance
SUMMARY:
"aking rubrics can provide an excellent overvie of the potential advantages as a part of every
teacherIs assessment toolbox. ,ffective rubrics is a teaching tools that support student learning
and the development of sophisticated thinking skills. #hen used correctly, they serve the
purposes of learning as ell as of evaluation and accountability. 5ike other authentic
approaches to assessment, rubrics blur the distinction beteen instruction and assessment.
At their very best, rubrics reflect standards and student needs. !hey are ell$ritten and
33 | P a g e
provide concrete indicators of hat students should be orking toard. 'inally, time and
instruction are provided for students to learn ho to use rubrics effectively.
E,ALUATION:
Directions: "ake a Rubric regarding a certain drama presentation using the sic steps in
developing a Rubric.
REFERENCES:
Ca(()*ea+, R. -2%1%.. Connecting the Dots. De/01/, T2: Fa/&3 F14 P+5')&a0)1/6, I/&.
R1ge(6, G. -2%11, J+'3 1$.. Be60 7(a&0)&e6 )/ a66e66)/g 60+8e/0 'ea(/)/g. The institute on
quality enhancement and accreditation. F1(0 91(0h, Te4a6, :SA: S1+0he(/
A661&)a0)1/ 1; C1''ege6 a/8 S&h11'6 C1<<)66)1/ 1/ C1''ege6.
:/)*e(6)03 1; Ha=a)>). -2%12, A+g+60 22.. Assessment. Re0()e*e8 ;(1<
A66e66<e/0: h007:??===.<a/1a.ha=a)).e8+?a66e66<e/0?
Competency: CREATE RU$RICS
Topic: 8HAT TO DO AFTER CREATING A RU$RIC
!ep"!e# $y: RICHARD C& ARAGAS
$EED)*
Report No.
10
34 | P a g e
O$+ECTI,ES:
At the end of the report, the listeners should be able to:
Discuss the steps in developing a rubric.
Identify the direction of rubric calibration.

LESSON ROER:
HO8 TO DE,ELO A RU$RIC
.tep 9: Determine te type of rubric you !is to use " olistic or analytic *1arriveau, :A9A+#
.tep :: $%entify !at you !ant to assess# !hese form the criteria for the assessment. !hese are
usually part of the description of the assignment or task.
.tep ;: $%entify te caracteristics to be rate% &ro!s'#
.pecify the skills, knoledge, andHor behaviors that you ill be looking for.
5imit the characteristics to those that are most important to the assessment.
.tep <: $%entify te le(els of mastery)scale &columns'#
!ip: Aim for an even number *I recommend <+ because hen an odd number is used, the
middle tends to become the Qcatch$allQ category.
.tep =: Describe eac le(el of mastery for eac caracteristic &cells'#
Describe the best ork you could expect using these characteristics. !his
describes the top category.
Describe an unacceptable product. !his describes the loest category.
Develop descriptions of intermediate$level products for intermediate
categories. Important: ,ach description and each category should be mutually
exclusive.
'ocus your descriptions on the presence of the %uantity and %uality that you
expect, rather than on the absence of them. )oever, at the loest level, it ould
be appropriate to state that an element is FlackingG or FabsentG *1arriveau, :A9A+.
4eep the elements of the description parallel from performance level to
performance level. In other ords, if your descriptors include %uantity, clarity,
and details, make sure that each of these outcome expectations is included in
each performance level descriptor.
.tep =: Try out te rubric#
Apply the rubric to an assignment.
.hare ith colleagues.
!ip: 'aculty members often find it useful to establish the minimum score needed for the student
ork to be deemed passable. 'or example, faculty members may decide that a Q9Q or Q:Q on a <$
point scale *<Kexemplary, ;Kproficient, :Kmarginal, 9Kunacceptable+, does not meet the
minimum %uality expectations. !hey may set their criteria for success as ?AM of the students
3 | P a g e
must score ; or higher. If assessment study results fall short, action ill need to be taken.
.tep C: Discuss !it collea*ues# +e(ie! fee%back an% re(ise#
Important: #hen developing a rubric for program assessment, enlist the help of colleagues.
Rubrics promote shared expectations and grading practices hich benefit faculty members and
students in the program.
DIRECTIONS FOR RU$RIC CALI$RATION
>elo are directions for the rubric calibration process that are provided on the 6niversity of
)aaii at "anoa assessment ebsite *)aaii, :A9:+.
.uggested materials for a scoring session:
1opies of the rubric
1opies of the QanchorsQ: pieces of student ork that illustrate each level of
mastery. .uggestion: have C anchor pieces *: lo, : middle, : high+
.core sheets
,xtra pens, tape, post$its, paper clips, stapler, rubber bands, etc.
)old the scoring session in a room that:
Allos the scorers to spread out as they rate the student pieces
)as a chalk or hite board
Process:
9. Describe the purpose of the activity, stressing ho it fits into program assessment plans.
,xplain that the purpose is to assess the program, not individual students or faculty, and
describe ethical guidelines, including respect for confidentiality and privacy.
:. Describe the nature of the products that ill be revieed, briefly summari(ing ho they
ere obtained.
;. Describe the scoring rubric and its categories. ,xplain ho it as developed.
<. Analytic: ,xplain that readers should rate each dimension of an analytic rubric
separately, and they should apply the criteria ithout concern for ho often each score
*level of mastery+ is used. )olistic: ,xplain that readers should assign the score or
level of mastery that best describes the hole pieceR some aspects of the piece may not
appear in that score and that is okay. !hey should apply the criteria ithout concern for
ho often each score is used.
=. 3ive each scorer a copy of several student products that are exemplars of different
levels of performance. Ask each scorer to independently apply the rubric to each of
these products, riting their ratings on a scrap sheet of paper.
C. -nce everyone is done, collect everyone&s ratings and display them so everyone can see
the degree of agreement. !his is often done on a blackboard, ith each person in
turn announcing hisHher ratings as they are entered on the board. Alternatively, the
facilitator could ask raters to raise their hands hen their rating category is announced,
making the extent of agreement very clear to everyone and making it very easy to
identify raters ho routinely give unusually high or lo ratings.
@. 3uide the group in a discussion of their ratings. !here ill be differences. !his discussion
is important to establish standards. Attempt to reach consensus on the most appropriate
rating for each of the products being examined by inviting people ho gave different
3! | P a g e
ratings to explain their /udgments. Raters should be encouraged to explain by making
explicit references to the rubric. 6sually consensus is possible, but sometimes a split
decision is developed, e.g., the group may agree that a product is a Q;$<Q split because it
has elements of both categories. !his is usually not a problem. Oou might allo the group
to revise the rubric to clarify its use but avoid alloing the group to drift aay from the
rubric and learning outcome*s+ being assessed.
B. -nce the group is comfortable ith ho the rubric is applied, the rating begins.
,xplain ho to record ratings using the score sheet and explain the procedures.
Revieers begin scoring.
?. If you can %uickly summari(e the scores, present a summary to the group at the end of
the reading. Oou might end the meeting ith a discussion of five %uestions:
Are results sufficiently reliable0
#hat do the results mean0 Are e satisfied ith the extent of students&
learning0
#ho needs to kno the results0
#hat are the implications of the results for curriculum, pedagogy, or student
support services0
)o might the assessment process, itself, be improved0
TIS FOR DE,ELOING A RU$RIC
,in% an% a%apt an e-istin* rubric. It is rare to find a rubric that is exactly right for your
situation, but you can adapt an already existing rubric that has orked ell for others
and save a great deal of time. A faculty member in your program may already have a
good one.
/(aluate te rubric. Ask yourself:
o Does the rubric relate to the outcome*s+ being assessed0 o
Does it address anything extraneous0 *If yes, delete.+
o Is the rubric useful, feasible, manageable, and practical0 *If yes, find multiple
ays to use the rubric, such as for program assessment, assignment grading, peer
revie, student self$assessment+
Bencmarkin* 0 collect samples of stu%ent !ork tat e-emplify eac point on te scale
or le(el# A rubric ill not be meaningful to students or colleagues until the
anchorsHbenchmarksHexemplars are available.
Anticipate tat you !ill be re(isin* te rubric#
Sare effecti(e rubrics !it your collea*ues#
SUMMARY:
After making the rubric, hand out the rubric to your students along ith the assignment. Discuss
in class ho it ill be used. #hen students turn in their completed ork, grade it using the
rubric. *"ake copies of the rubric so that you are filling one out for each student.+ 1ircle
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appropriate items on the rubric hen grading, add comments if necessary, and add up the points.
"ake photocopies of the completed rubrics. .taple a completed *filled$out+ rubric to each
assignment and return the ork to students. Analy(e and reflect on the results. #ere there any
dimensionsHprimary traits that had lo overall scores0 'ocus your improvement efforts on those
aspects. Report on your results and the improvements made as a result of the assessment.
E,ALUATION:
Directions: Read each statement belo carefully. Place a ! on the line if you think a statement it
!R6,. Place an ' on the line if you think the statement is 'A5.,
888888888889. Rubrics do not promote shared expectations and grading practices hich benefit
teachers and students in the program.
88888888888:. #hen developing a rubric for program assessment, you should be the only one
responsible in developing it.
88888888888;. It is rare to find a rubric that is exactly right for your situation, but you can adapt
an already existing rubric that has orked ell for others and save a great deal of time.
88888888888<. In making group rubric alays attempt to reach consensus on the most
appropriate rating for each of the products being examined by inviting people ho gave different
ratings to explain their /udgments.
88888888888=. 3ive each scorer a copy of several student products that are exemplars of
different levels of performance.
REFERENCES:
Ca(()*ea+, R. -2%1%.. Connecting the Dots. De/01/, T2: Fa/&3 F14 P+5')&a0)1/6, I/&.
R1ge(6, G. -2%11, J+'3 1$.. Be60 7(a&0)&e6 )/ a66e66)/g 60+8e/0 'ea(/)/g. The institute on
quality enhancement and accreditation. F1(0 91(0h, Te4a6, :SA: S1+0he(/
A661&)a0)1/ 1; C1''ege6 a/8 S&h11'6 C1<<)66)1/ 1/ C1''ege6.
:/)*e(6)03 1; Ha=a)>). -2%12, A+g+60 22.. Assessment. Re0()e*e8 ;(1<
A66e66<e/0: h007:??===.<a/1a.ha=a)).e8+?a66e66<e/0?
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