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The Waynesville Gazette

QktuAiLes
ANNA MARY NULL DOYLE SPRINGBORO'S OLDEST
NATIVE DIES AT 100 IN WAYNESVILLE
Anna Mary Null Doyle, 100 year-old descendant of 18th century Virginia
Quaker settlers at Springboro died peacefully in her sleep at Quaker Heights
Nursing Home at 3:50 p.m. on Tuesday,March 25.
Mrs. Doyle, the widow of Ira B. "Dutch" Doyle, an engineer for the Farquhar
Furnace Company at Wilmington, had been a resident of Quaker Heights since
late February after suffering a sudden illness at the historic Victorian Springboro
home that she had occupied since 1906. She spent her lifetime within five miles
of her birthplace, a two story brick rural farmhouse built by her grandfather Jacob
Null in 1833.
She was a direct descendant of Virginia Quakers who helped organize
Summerton Friends Meeting in the 17th century. Her maternal kin worshiped at
Summerton Friends Meeting House until 1870 when they, the Hare family, moved
to Springboro and transferred their membership to the Village's Orthodox Friends
Meeting worship there until the Meeting was laid down.
Mrs. Doyle's mother, the former Frances Anna Hare, married Springboro
native, William A. Null, in. 1885. Null's father, Jacob, helped found the
Springboro Methodist Church in 1836. Frances Null joined the church February
18, 1903.
Her paternal great-great-grandfather, Henry Null, sent his sons, Charles and
Christian, to Springboro in 1798 for presettlement. Mrs. Doyle's great-grandfa
ther, Charles and Christian, her great-great-uncle, an American Revolution veter
an, built a two story log house which has been preserved at Springboro's
Heatherwood Golf Course. Mrs. Doyle had visited the log house restored by the
Springboro Historical Society, via a horse drawn carriage last August 4 on her
100th birthday. . . '
Mrs. Doyle lived a quiet, peaceful, dignified life. Her entire life was the love
and care of her family and her house. She managed her home and five members
of her family'until their deaths.
In addition to a lifetime of homemaking, Mrs. Doyle was a news correspon- i
dent for 52 years for the Middletown Journal.
Survivors include one niece, Mrs. Paul (Janet) Kuhn of Kettering, a cousin's
widowand lifetimefriend, Mrs. Emma Jane HestonNull of Springboro and a few
area cousins.
, Closed casket graveside services will be held at Springboro Cemetery at
11:00 a.m. on Friday,. March 28. Unglesby Funeral Home at Franklin handled -
funeral arrangements.' ,
' The Waynesville Gazette
QUt UAliiS
ANNA MARY NULL DOYLE SPRINGBORO'S OLDEST '
NATIVE DIES AT 100 IN WAYNESVILLE
Anna Mary Null Doyle, 100 year-old descendant of 18th century Virginia
Quaker settlers at Springboro died peacefully in her sleep at Quaker Heights .
Nursing Home at 3:50 p.m. onTuesday,-March 25.
Mrs. Doyle, the widow of Ira B. "Dutch" Doyle, an engineer for the Farquhar '
Furnace Company at Wilmington, had been aresident of Quaker Heights since
late February after suffering asudden illness at the historic Victorian Spnngboro
home that she had occupied since 1906. She spent her lifetirhe within five pules
of her birthplace, atwo story brick rural farmhouse built by her grandfather Jacob
Null in 1833. ^ , u u i a
She was a direct descendant of Virginia Quakers who helped orgamze.
Summerton Friends Meeting in the 17th century. Her maternal kin worshiped at
Summerton Friends Meeting House until 1870 when they, the Hare family, moved
to Springboro and transferred their membership to the Village's Orthodox Friends
Meeting worship there until the Meeting was laid down. . . n *u
Mrs. Doyle's mother, the former Frances Anna Hare, mamed Spnngboro
native William A. Null, in 1885. Null's father, Jacob, helped found the
Springboro Methodist Church in 1836. Frances Null joined the church February
18, 1903. *
' Her paternal great-great-grandfather, Henry Null, sent his sons, Charles and
Christian to Springboro in 1798 for presettlement. Mrs. Doyle's great-grandfa
ther Charles and Christian, her great-great-uncle, an Amencan Revolution veter
an 'built a two story log house which has been preserved at Spnngboro s
Heatherwood Golf Course. Mrs. Doyle had visited the log house restored by the ,
Springboro Historical Society, via ahorse drawn carriage last August 4on her
100th birthday. . '
- Mrs. Doyle lived aquiet, peaceful, dignified life. Her entire life was the love
and care of her family and her house. She managed her home and five members
of her family"until their deaths.
In addition to a lifedme of homemaking, Mrs. Doyle was a news correspon- <
dent for 52 years for the Middletown Journal.
Survivors include one niece, Mrs. Paul (Janet) Kuhn of Kettenng, a cousin s
widow and lifetime friend, Mrs. Emma Jane Heston Null ofSpringboro and afew
area cousins. *
Closed casket graveside services will be held at Spnngboro Cemetery at-
: 11:00 a.m. on Friday.,March 28. Unglesby Funeral Home at Franklin handled -:
funeral arrangements. . :
National cemetery
to be resting place
for 18th century vet
By Benjamin Kline
STAFF WRITER
There willbeone last muster Saturday for a
veteran of the Revolutionary Army whocame
out to Ohio and ended up in a neglected but
not-quite-forgotten grave. '
Members of theRichard Montgomery Chap
ter of the Sons of the American Revolution
plan to disinter the remains of Christian Null at
his family plot in Warren County's Clearcreek
Twp., then rebury him with honors atthe Day
tonNational Cemetery, 4100 W.ThirdSt.
Ralph C. Reed of Dayton, one of the chap-^
ter's 95 members, said they want to have a
soldier from the Revolution among the28,000
buried at the national cemetery frorn other
wars, including the War of 1812, Civil War,
Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II
and the Korea and Vietnam conflicts. This
wouldbethe first Continentalthere.
They found Null's name on aroster of veter
ans who came to Ohio, as many did when a
cash-short Congress gave veterans grants of
land instead ofpayment for their services.
According to government records held by
Lyle Norby, director of the national cemetery,
Christian Null was born in 1770. In 1782, he
joined the Revolutionary Army and served
three enlistments under Col. Alexander L(^
rey and Capt. David McQueen in Co. 4, 7th
Batallion of the Lancaster County, Pa., Militia.
While British Gen. Charles Cornwallis sur-
BILLSHEPHERD/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Grave ofveteran Christian Null
rendered inOctober 1781, Britain the indepen
dent colonies did not apeace treaty until 1783.
Null died in 1832 and was buried in what
was then a family plot on his own farm in
Clearcreek Twp.,southof Springboro.
Acollateral descendant and SAR chapter of
ficer, Paul Swartzel of Kettering, smd he
"wasn't too keen on the idea" of disturbing the
veteran's rest and still has "reservations about
it." But a year of research did not turn up any
direct descendants still inthis area, he said.
SEE GRAVE/7
||,j?'iri^,sT.o,u-r.na
GONTINUEDFROM/1
"Apparently his wife was not buried
with him, but went over to Jackson-
burg, Ind., with some of his children,
Swartzel said. He and Reed also found
traces of Null's descendants, but no liv
ing ones, at Nulltown, Ind.
Reed said aWarren County genealo
gist helped to locate Null's grave, but
they are not sure what lies Inside it.
Prellminaiy tests have shown it con
tains abrick vaulting, which was alin-
Dayton Daily News/The Jou
Saturday, December 6, 1'98
erused before concrete vaults.
"That must mean he had money
when he died," Reed said. "We are hop-
ing tofind an iron coffin with a mum-
my in it. That would be beautiful.
!w Italso would be extraordinary for an
1832 grave in rural Ohio. If they find
>alo- nothing but dust. Reed said, aquantity
' but of that would be removed for storap at
ie it the Martin Funeral Home, Northridge,
con- and then reburial atthe national ceme-
ilin- tery inafewweeks.
irnal Herald
! 6
"We're mainly trying to catch, up
with the DAR (Daughters of the Ameri
can Revolution). They've done so much
with cemeteries," Reed said. j
Norby said a new grave is being re
served near the traffic circle and monu
ment at the national .cemetery. Burial
there is free to veterins, and the SAR
has covered other expenses.
Reed said the plan is to conduct a
memorial service for Null on Armed
ForcesDay,May16.
National cemetery
' . H
to be resting place
for 18th century vet
By Beniamiii Kline
STAFF WRITER
Therewill beonelast musterSaturday for a
veteran of the Revolutionary Army whocame
out to Ohio and ended up in a neglected but
not-quite-forgotten grave.
Members of the Richard Montgomery Chap
ter of the Sons of the American Revolution
plan to disinter the remains of Christian Null at
his family plot in Warren County's Clearcreek
Twp., then rebury him with honors atthe Day
tonNational Cemetery, 4100 W.Third St.
Ralph C. Reed of Dayton, one of the chap-^
ter's 95 members, said they want to have a
soldier from theRevolution among the 28,000
buried at the national cemetery from other
wars, including the War of 1812, Civil War,
Spanish-American War, World Wars I and H
and the Korea and Vietnam conflicts. This
wouldbethe first Continental there.
They found Null's name on aroster of veter
ans who came to Ohio, as many did when a
cash-short Congress gave veterans grants of
land instead ofpayment fortheirservices.
According to government records held by
Lvle Norby, director of the national cemetery,
Christian Null was born in 1770. In 1782, he
joined the Revolutionary Army and served
three enlistments under Col. Alexander Low-
rey and Capt. David McQueen in Co. 4, 7th
Batallion of the Lancaster County, Pa., Militia.
While British Gen. Charles Cornwallis sur-
BILLSHEPHERD/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Grave ofveteranChristian Null
rendered inOctober 1781,Britain the indepen
dent colonies did not apeace treaty until 1783.
Null died in 1832 and was buried in what
was then a family plot on his own farm in
Clearcreek Twp., south ofSpringboro.
Acollateral descendant and SAR chapter of
ficer, Paul Swartzel of Kettering, s^d he
"wasn't too keen on the idea" of disturbing the
veteran's rest and still has "reservations about
it."But a year of research did not turn up any
direct descendants still inthis area, he said.
^ SEEGRAVE/7
Dayton Dally News/The Journal Herald
Saturday, December 6, 1986
"Apparently his wife was not buried
with him, but went over to Jacjcson-
burg, Ind., with some of his children,
Swartzel said. He and Reed also found
traces of Null's descendants, but no liv
ing ones, at Nulltown, Ind.
Reed said aWarren County genealo
gist helped to locate Null's grave, but
they are not sure what lies inside it.
Preliminaiy tests have shown it con
tains abrick vaulting, which was alin
erused before concrete vaults.
"That must mean he had money
when he died," Reed said. "We are hop
ing to find an iron coffin with a mum
my in it. That would be beautiful.
It also would be extraordinary for an
1832 grave in rural Ohio. If they find
nothing but dust. Reed said, aquantity
of that would be removed for storage at
the Martin Funeral Home, Northridge,
and then reburial at the national ceme
tery inafew weeks.
"We're mainly trying to catch, up
with the DAR (Daughters of the Ameri
can Revolution). They've done so much
withcemeteries," Reed said.
Norby said anew grave is being re
served near the traffic circle and raonu- |
ment at the national .cemetery. Burial
there is free toveterkns, and the SAR
has covered other expenses.
Reed said the plan is to conduct a
memorial service for Null on Armed
Forces Day, May16.
rOONTHt-V
A/&WSLerre(\ y
OF THE
sprinqforo
^ r ^area r
historical
society
Textiles and Awards Will Highlight Meeting
The April General Meeting will be
April 10 at 7:30 pm at the Old Stone
Church at 300 South Main.
Jan Thomas, the curator of textiles
for the Warren County Historical
Museum, will present the program. She
will bring several historical items of
special interest, and she will be
available after the program to advise,
and evaluate any historical textile
items you might wish to bring to the
meeting.
Another feature of the April
meeting will be the presentation of
awards m various categories. There
are six categories this year. Our
annual Awards Program honors both
^on-inembers who have made
substantial contributions to the
Society and to the promotion of local
history.
They Madk History
Anna Mary Doyle; Chapter in Area History Ends
Anna Mary Doyle was a special
Springboro story.
Born Anna Mary Null on August 4,
1896, she spent her entire life in
Springboro.
For years she was the Society
correspondent for both the Franklin
and Middletown newspapers.
Her home at 155 West Central was
and is the historical gem of the
area.
Last August on her 100th birth
day, she was treated to a carriage
ride through Springboro, which
culminated with a visit to her child
hood home on Red Lion Road. According
to those close to her, she recalled
that day fondly up until the end of
her life, March 26.
Her legacy is more than just the
fact that she was the city's oldest
citizen. She had attained a status
as the area's matriarch; one only
had to use her first two names
Anna Mary-- for instant identifica
tion.
Although she remained mostly out
of sight for the past 15 years,
one could not suppress the thought
as he passed that magnificent house
that there was a remarkable lady
inside, one who had seen Springboro
grow from 430 persons to almost
10,000...one who remembered when
the post office was at 200 South
Main...one who had participated in
the village's Centennial... one who
remembered the first automobile
and the last horse-drawn wagon...
one who remembered Coates Kinney
and William Venable and Seth Ellis
and the old Quaker Meeting House.
Anna Mary Null Doyle (1896-1997) is
shown during the carriage ride on
her 100th birthday, August 4, 1996.
Her life and memories-- which
were clear even in the last months
of her life spanned countless
social, economic, and cultural
changes. Fortunately some of that
was captured in oral history
interviews.
A simple graveside ceremony
was held on March 28. Her long
time friend Dennis Dalton
delivered an eloquent and
appropriate eulogy.
Society Take Role In Summer Events
The plans for 1997 Community/Mar-
Ket Days are developing rapidly.
One of the operative concepts is
for a local group to take over a
summer Wednesday by selecting a
theme, and then supervising that
day's activities.
We have decided to host a salute
to Springboro-area history for oiir
Wednesday, sometime in July.
Museiim Work To Begin
Museum Committee Chair Harry
Hall is developing a timeline for
exterior work on the museum.
The Trustees voted to begin
repair and aesthetic work this spring
The project will be completed
by early summer.
Additionally, we will open the
museum and conduct tours on the other
Wednesdays. On some of those days,
we will also sell Society items on
South Main.
MEMORIAL GIFTS
MEMORIAL DONATIONS
For From
Lawrence Coates
Anna Mary Doyle
Bob & Betty Zech
Don & Michele Ross
Harry & Jessie Hall
Don Sc Michele Ross
(Ed. Note; This edition went to
press on March 29. Obviously there
were more Memorial Donations after
that date. They will be included in
the next newsletter.)
SAHS To Plant Doyle Tree MEMBER
WELCOME
Ann McCray
The Society will plant a tree in
memory of Anna Mary Doyle on Arbor
Day, April 25.
The tree will become one of the
first two planted in the city's new
Me'morial Tree Program.
The other tree planted that day
will be sponsored by the city to
honor Charlie Reedy.
Springboro
Details Of Field Trip
Charlie Logan will explain the
particulars of a combined "field
trip" with the Middletown Historical
Society at the April General Meeting
The trip will occur on May 7.
Null Signs Are Ordered Nike Parking In June
Signage fpr the Null House at
He:ath^rw0^e^'ha^beeh~i5Ttliered~^
the Smith-Cornell Company of Maumee.
They have promised delivery by
June.
The Bc&t Gk>cs On**.**
Some ongoing projects:
*Charlie Logan is making pressed tin
candle holders for the Null House.
*Rob Strawser continues work on his
miniature Springborough, circa 1840.
*Janie Perkins is working on crafted
models of historical buildings for
sale.
*Suzanne Booth has ordered Null House
paperweights for sale in her shop. j
*We still have 9 openings for the
Virginia Adventure Tour.
Springboro Area Historical Society
Box 114 '
Springboro Ohio 45066
eyNii ke^oif
Tournament dates are June 9-15.
The Society will again be in
charge of the parking areas.
Donations To Be Noted
Jan Thomas and Helen Sproat have
given many items to the Society in
the past two months.
Harry Hall is chronicling all do
nations for the past four years.
These will be put on our computer.
UPCOMING MEETINGS
Museum Committee: April 8, 7pm
General Meeting: April 10, 7:30 pm
Historical Commission: April 21, 7pm
Trustees Meeting: April 27, 7:30pm
BULK RATE
U.8. POSTAGE
PAID
^PRmQBORO.OH
PERMIT NO. 43
Dennis Daiton
277 S Main St
Waynesville. OH45068
W i l l W I W I I W W M I M
A ' i ^ ' & ' S ^ l i . i i
H ' S k - t V . ' ^ - . - . ' , '
& . < i s V )
T l i e C i n c i n n a t i E n q u i r e r / K e v i n J . M I y a z a k i
P l a y e r s a t t h e H e a t h e r w o o d e G o l f C l u b p a s s b e f o r e a l o g c a b i n , b u i l t I n t h e 1 7 8 0 s , t h a t S p r i n g b o r o I s c o n s i d e r i n g m o v i n g .
F a t e o f l o g c a b i n , b a m a t s t a k e
B Y R A N D Y M c N U T T
T h e C i n c i n n a t i E n q u i r e r
T h e c i t y o f S p r i n g b o r o , o n e o f t h e
f a s t e s t g r o w i n g s u b u r b a n a r e a s i n W a r r e n
C o u n t y , i s a n u n l i k e l y p l a c e f o r a h i s t o r i c
l o g c a b i n a n d b a r n .
S o i s H e a t h e r w o o d e G o l f C l u b o n O h i o
7 4 1 , w h e r e t h e o l d b u i l d i n g s s i t n e a r t h e
1 7 t h h o l e o n t h e s o u t h s i d e o f t o w n .
B u t i f t h e S p r i n g b o r o A r e a H i s t o r i c a l
S o c i e t y h a s i t s w a y , t h e t w o b u i l d i n g s w i l l
s t a y t h e r e a n d e v e n t u a l l y b e a d d e d t o t h e
N a t i o n a l R e g i s t e r o f H i s t o r i c P l a r e s ,
" T h e p a s t i s i - c i l l i d i n g w i t h i h o i i r r ' s -
e n i . " s a i d T o m S p r o a t , t h e . s o c i c i y ' s v i c e
p r e s i d e n t .
T h e c a b i n w a s b u i l t i n t h e 1 7 8 0 s a n d
t h e b a r n i n t h e 1 8 7 0 s . H e s a i d t h e y w e r e
p a r t o f a f a r m f o r d e c a d e s , u n t i l t h e c i t y
b o u g h t t h e l a n d i n 1 9 8 8 . S p r i n g b o r o t h e n
l e a s e d i t t o a g o l f c o u r s e c o m p a n y , a n d a
d e v e l o p e r s t a r t e d b u i l d i n g u p s c a l e h o u s e s
a r o u n d t h e g o l f c o u r s e , S p r o a t s a i d .
" T h e d e v e l o p e r s a r e s e l l i n g o f f t h e l o t s ,
a n d t h e c i t y a d m i n i s t r a t i o n i s c o n s i d e r i n g
m o v i n g t h e c a b i n a n d b a r n t o a n o t h e r
l o c a t i o n , " S p r o a t s a i d . " T o g e t o n t h e
n a t i o n a l r e g i s t e r , a b u i l d i n g m u s t b e o n i t s
o r i g i n a l s i t e , a n d o u r u l t i m a t e g o a l i s t o
g e t t h e s e b u i l d i n g s o n t h e r e g i s t e r . "
T h e s o c i e t y h a s o b t a i n e d m o r e t h a n
1 . 0 0 0 s i g n a t u r e s n n p e t i t i o n s t h a t a s k t h e
c i t y t o k e e p t h e c a b i n a n d b a r n w h e r e t h e y
a r e , h e s a i d . S o c i e t y m e m b e r s w i l l m e e t
w i t h c o u n c i l m e m b e r s a t 7 p . m . T h u r s d a y
t o d i s c u s s t h e m a t t e r , h e s a i d .
" C i t y m a n a g e m e n t h a s w a n t e d t o r e
m o v e t h e b a r n a n d c a b i n , " S p r o a t s a i d .
" T h e r e ' s n o w a y y o u c o u l d r e l o c a t e t h e m
a n d r e s t o r e l i i c m a s t h e y a r e n o w , M l t h e
h t o n e s ( i f I h f I n c p l a c i ' , f o r i n s t a n c e , a r e
h e l d l o g c i h c T b y c l a y , n o t m a s o n r y .
" W e ' d l i k e t o k e e p s o m e l a n d a r o u n d
t h e b u i l d i n g s a n d p l a n t a n a t u r a l p r a i r i e
t h e r e t o g i v e p e o p l e a n i d e a o f w h a t a
p i o n e e r f a r m w a s l i k e . "
M a y o r C a r l W i ! s t s a i d h e w i l l p r e s e n t a
p l a n T h u r s d a y t h a t c a l l s f o r a s t r u c t u r a l
a n a l y s i s o f t h e b u i l d i n g s , c o n t a c t i n g s t a t e
a n d f e d e r a l a u t h o r i t i e s a b o u t t h e h i s t o r i c a l
s i g n i f i c a n c e o f t h e b u i l d i n g s , a n d l o o k i n g
f o r w a y s t o f i n a n c e a r e f u r b i s h i n g o f t h e
b u i l d i n g s .
" T h e y a r e a n i m p o r t a n t p a r t o f o u r
h e r i t a g e a n d t r a d i t i o n , " h e s a i d . " B u t I
d o n ' t t h i n k a n y b o d y w o u l d d i s a g r e e t h a t
t h e y w o u l d b e e x p e n s i v e t o r e n o v a t e i n
t h e s e t i m e s , S o w e a r e n o t g o i n g t o d o
a n y t h i n g f a s t . W e ' l l c h e c k i n t o e v e r y t h i n g
a n d c o m e u p w i t h a p l a n . "
A t H e a t h e r w o o d e , e m p l o y e e D a v e H a l l
s a i d , g o l f e r s s o m e t i m e s a s k w h a t S p r i n g
b o r o w i l l d o w i t h t h e o l d b u i l d i n g s , w h i c h
a r e n o w b o a r d e d u p t o p r e v e n t v a n d a l i s m .
" I t d o e s n ' t m a t t e r t o u s w h a t t h e y d o
w i t h t h e b u i l d i n g s , " h e s a i d . " B u t w h e n a l l
t h e s e $ 3 5 0 , 0 0 0 h o u s e s a r e b u i l t a l l o v e r
t h e p l a c e , a c a b i n a n d b a r n w o n ' t l o o k t o o
g o o d . "
T h e t h r e e - s t o r y b a r n i s i n t e r e s t i n g ,
S p r o a t s a i d , b e c a u s e i t w a s b u i l t t o h o l d
t o b a c c o , e q u i p m e n t a n d l i v e s t o c k . I n a d d i
t i o n , i t s a l l - r o c k f o u n d a i i o i i c o n t a i n s f o s s i l
b e d s .
" N o w w e ' v e g o t n e w h o m e s g o i n g i n a l l
a r o u n d t h e t w o o l d b u i l d i n g s , " h e s a i d .
" T h e n e w o n e s a r e i m p r e s s i v e e n o u g h ,
b u t t h e y a r e e n c r o a c h i n g o n t h e p a s t . "
- '"2i
01
a>
CO
1
Null cabin to
be dedicated ^
August 18... ^
Continued from
page 1-A
in Warren County,
occurred as the result r
of a partnership ^
between the city, the
Springboro Area
Historical Society, and
the city's historical
cofhmission.
Two local men,
Charlie Logan and Gil
Morris, headed a
contingent of over 70
area volunteers in the
renovation process.
The two completed
most of the
complicated and
intricate phases of the
reclamation
themselves.
"It wouldn't have
happened without
Charlie, Gil, and their
'lieutenant,' Paul
Travasano. Their
expertise and
leadership have been
notable," city manager
EdDoczy explained.
Plans call for the ^
facility, which was a
stop on Springboro s
famed Underground
Railroad, to be a
casual museum and
educational resource.
"It's a wonderful 1
addition to the ^ ,
historical presentation , ^)
of the Springboro 4^:]
area, and a monument ; ;
to the skills of both the
original builders and
the renovators,"
Springboro Mayor
Ray Wellbrock said.
The public is
invited to the
dedicationcelebration.
Access to the site is ^
gravel easement on the
!g"theastern end
J
/

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