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Ancestry World Tree Project; Diane Mahoney's Ancestors

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Diane Mahoney's Ancestors
Entries: 15300 Updated: Thu May 1 18:53:09 2003
Contact: Diane Mahoney da i Ii 11 i@aol .COm
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/Z); II1306
Name: Daniel NICHOLSON
Given Name:'DdimtX
Surname: Nicholson
Sex: M
. Birth: 27 NOV 1769 in NJ
Death: 8 SEP 1836 in Fall Creek,Madison Co.,IN
Father: George , Jr. NICHOLSON b: ABT 1720
Mother: Elizabeth STOCKTON b: 28 DEC 1729
Marriage 1 Elizabeth PEGG b: 7 FEB 1777 in Maryland
Married: 11 MAY 1801 in Rowan Co.,NC
Children
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Bathsheba Pegg NjCHOLSON b: 24 FEB 1802 in NC
Jesse NICHOLSON b: 24 OCX 1806 in Clinton Co.,OH
Valentine NICHOLSON b: 27 MAY 1809 in Clinton Co.,OH
Lydia NICHOLSON b: 2 JAN 1813 in OH
Elizabeth NICHOLSON b: 10 OCX 1815
George NICHOLSON b: 13 AUG 1817 in OH
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Diane Mahoney's Ancestors
Entries: 15300 Updated: ThuMay 1 18:53:09 2003
Contact: Diane Mahoney da Hill i@aol .COm
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/Z); II1310
Ma/we: Valentine NICHOLSON
Given Name: Valentine
Surname: Nicholson
Sex: M
Birth: 27 MAY 1809 in Clinton Co.,OH
Death: 24 MAR 1904 in Indianapolis,IN
Father: Daniel NICHOLSON b: 27 NOV 1769 in NJ
Mother: Elizabeth PEGG b: 7 FEB 1777 in Maryland
Marriage 1 Jane S. WALES b: 1 FEB 1806 in Iredale
Co.,NC
. Mmei/;30NOV1830
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Diane Mahoney's Ancestors
Entries: 15300 Updated: ThuMay 1 18:53:09 2003
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/D; 111316
. Name: Jane S. WALES
Given Name: Jane S.
LS'wrwawe; Wales ,.ii
. Birth: 1FEB 1806 in IredaleCo.,NC 'lo u Holiday
. Death: 9SEP 1906 in IN " Q Shopping
Marriage 1 X'alemine MCHOLSON b: 27 MAY 1809in
Clinton Co.,OH
. Married: 30 NOV 1830
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Ancestry World Tree Project: Porritt / Emericks / Heinz/BrantAVales/Sigler Family Tree Page 1 of 2
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Porritt / Emericks / Heinz/BrantAVales/Sigler Family Tree
Entries: 33150 Updated: Fri Aug2 08:55:27 2002
Contact: JohnL Porritt jporritt-triseal@email.msn.eom
This is a work in process file. Please contact me for changes
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/Z); 100783
Name: Valentine NICHOLSON
Sex: M
Birth: 27 MAY 1809 in Clinton or Warren City, OH
Death: 1904 in Indianapolis, IN
Reference Number: 1%'^
Note:
Hicksite Quaker Movement
Involved in the undergrounf railroad from
their home in Harveysburgh OH
Father: Daniel NICHOLSON b: 27NOV 1769 inMD
Mother: Elizabeth PEGG b: 7 FEE 1777 in MD
Marriage 1 Jane S. WALES b; 1 FEE 1806 in Iredale
City, NC
Married: 3 NOV 1830
Children
1. Ruth W. NICHOLSON b: 26 OCT 1831
2. Elizabeth NICHOLSON b: 10 DEC 1833
3. Eden Finley NICHOLSON b: 25 JAN 1836
4. Mary Ellen NICHOLSON b: 29 MAR 1829 in
Green City, OH
5. Manila Jane NICHOLSON b: 22 JUN 1842 in
OH
6. Louisa NICHOLSON b: 20 MAY 1844
7. Caroline M. NICHOLSON b: 12 AUG 1846
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CALDWELL/FARROW AND ALLIED FAMILIES
Entries: 18510 Updated: Thu Jan 9 19:18:11 2003
Contact: CharlesCaldwell caldw@msn.COm
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/D; 1512735762
Name: RUTH WALES NICHOLSON
G/venAa/we; RUTH WALES
Surname: NICHOLSON
Sex: F
S/W/7;26 0ctl831
Death: 26 Apr 1846
Father: VALLN lINii NICllOLSON b: 27 May 1809 in Clinton or Warren Co., OH
Mother: JANE S. WALES b: 1 Fob 1806 in Iradell Co., NC
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Entries: 18510 Updated: Thu Jan 9 19:18:11 2003
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/Z); 1512735763
. ELIZABETH NICHOLSON
Given Name: ELIZABETH
Surname: NICHOLSON
Sex: F
Birth: 10 Dec 1833
Death: 1846
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CALDWELL/FARROW AND ALLIED FAMILIES
Entries: 18510 Updated: Thu Jan9 19:18:11 2003
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Afl/we; EDEN FINLEY NICHOLSON
Given Name: EDEN FESfLEY
Surname: mCHOLSON
Sex: M
Birth: 25 Jan 1836
Death: 1 Jul 1838
Father: \ AI.HN flNt: NICHOLSON b: 27 May 1809 in
Clinton or Warren Co., OH
Mother: JANE S. WALES b: 1 Feb 1806 in Iradell Co.,
NC
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Entries: 18510 Updated: Thu Jan 9 19:18:11 2003
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/D; 1512735765 .
. MARY ELLEN NICHOLSON
. G/vewA/awe; MARY ELLEN
Surname: NICHOLSON
Sex: F
Birth: 29 Mar 1829 in Green Co., OH
Death: 9 Sep 1928 in WoofruffPIace, OH
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Father: \"AI,RNTINI-; MCHOLSON b: 27May 1809 in
Clinton or Warren Co., OH
Mother: JANE S. W.ALES b: 1 Feb 1806 in Iradell Co.,
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/D; 1512735766
MARTHA JANE NICHOLSON
Given Name: MARTHA JANE
Surname: NICHOLSON
-m
Sex' F r ^
. g/WA-22 Jun 1842inOhio ^ Holiday
Dea//i; 1934 in Indiana
Father: XALHNTiNC MCHOI.SON b: 27 May 1809 in
Clinton or Warren Co., OH
Mother: Ja\NE S. WALES b: 1 Feb 1806 in Iradell Co.,
NC
Marriage 1 HORACEMCKAY b: 1841 in Waynesville,
IN
. MimerL Mar 1855 ^ ^ Shopping;
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/); 1512735767
Aame; HORACE MCKAY
Given Name: HORACE
Surname: MCKAY
Sex: M
Birth: 1841 in Waynesville, IN
Marriage 1 MARTTiA JANE NICHOLSON b: 22 Jun
1842 in Ohio
Married: M.3.T \%55
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/D; 1512735768
Name: LOUISA NICHOLSON
Given Name: LOUISA
NICHOLSON
Sex: F
Birth: 20 May 1844
Death: Aug 1845
Father: \ ALiiN I INE NICHOLSON b: 27 May 1809 in
Clinton or Warren Co., OH
Mother: JANE S. WALES b: 1 Feb 1806 in Iradell Co.,
NC
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/D; 1512735769
Name: CAROLINE M. NICHOLSON
Given Name: CAROLINE M.
Surname: mCnOLSON
Sex: F
. Birth: 12Augl846
Death: 12 Jul 1858
Father: \ ALENTINF, NICHOLSON b: 27 May 1809 in Clinton or Warren Co., OH
Mother: J.ANE S. WALES b: 1 Feb 1806 in Iradell Co., NC
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Daniel NICHOLSON Page 1of 2
Date: Fri, 29 May 1998 22:00:34 -0700
From: BarbaraHuseby huseby'/7ieleport.com
IDaniel NICHOLSON b: November 27, 1769 inMDd: September 08, 1836in
Fall Creek?, Madison County, IN
. +ElizabethPEGG b: February 07, 1777in MD m: May 11, 1801 in Rowan
County, NC d: October 09, 1846in Fall Creek?, Madison, INFather:
Valentine PEGG Mother: Mary STAFFORD
2 Bathsheba PeggNICHOLSON b: February 24, 1802inNCd: in
Hamilton County, EN
.... +Caieb lEARVEYb: May 05, 1803 in Miami, Warren County, OH m:
November 06, 1823 in Clinton County, OH d: September 20, 1845 in Warren County,
OH Father: Joshua HARVEY Mother: Mary MOIGUSON
3 Asenath HARVEY b: August 20, 1824 in Clinton county, OH
3 [1] Amos Peasley HARVEYb: June 06,1826 in Clinton cty, OH d:November 30, 1907
. +Sunsanna RANDALL m: June 05, 1851
*2nd Wife of [1] Amos Peasley Harvey:
. +Teressa Margaret MEEK m: June 07, 1859
*3rd Wife of [1] Amos Peasley Harvey:
. +Susan Amanda CARPENTER m: March 21, 1877
3 Silas HARVEY b: February 07, 1830 in Clinton cty, OH d: 1916
. +Susan A. MEEK
3 Mary HARVEYb: Abt. 1832 in Clinton cty, OH d: 1916
3 George HARVEY b: Abt. 1834 in Clinton County, OH
2 Jesse NICHOLSON b: October 24, 1806 in Clinton county, OH d:
September 09, 1889 in Lynnville, Jasper, lA
+Mary D. DAVIS b: August 19, 1812 in Clearfield county, PA m:
MayOl, 1834d: September 02, 1888in Lynnville, Jasper, LA Father: Caleb
DAVIS Mother: Ann (DAVIS)
3 Charles T. NICHOLSON b: February 11, 1835 in Madison county,
IN d: May 04, 1915 in Medford, Jackson, OR
+Mary A. NORTON b: March 10, 1842 in Henry, IN m: May 09, 1861
d: March 08, 1909 in Medford, Jackson, OR Father: Dennis NORTON Mother;
Sarah BOWMAN
3 Amos L. NICHOLSON b: May 1837 in IN d: March 15, 1909 in
Jacksonville, Jackson, OR
+Abigail F. STANLEYb: January 07, 1843 in IN d: September II, 1919in Jackson cty,
OR
Father: Temple STANLEY Mother: Anna NORTON
3 Daniel W. NICHOLSON b: November 26, 1841 in IN
d: February 09, 1900
... 3 Alonzo L. NICHOLSON b: 1847 in IN d: August 06, 1923 in
Medford, Jackson, OR
3 Sarah E. NICHOLSON b: September 13, 1848 in IN d: August 04, 1920in
Central Point,Jackson county, OR
+John Hodge DOWNING b: July 24, 1848 in England d: December 31, 1915
in Central Point, Jackson, OR
Father: Joseph DOWNING Mother: Christian HODGE
... 3 Mary Susan NICHOLSON b: 1855-1857 in IN
+? WOOLMAN m: Aft. 1880
2 Valentine NICHOLSON b: May 27, 1809 in Clinton or Warren Cty, OH
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~lpproots/Nicholson/daniel_nicholson.htm 12/19/03
.Daniel NICHOLSON Page 2 of 2
d; 1904in Indianappolis, IN
+Jane S. WALES b: Febniary 01, 1806 in Iredale cty, NC m:
November 30, 1830 d: September 09, 1906 in IN Father: Isaac WALES
Mother: Ruth WELCH
... 3 Ruth W.NICHOLSON b: October 26, 1831 d: April 26, 1846
... 3 Elizabeth NICHOLSON b: December 10, 1833 d; 1946
... 3 Edna Finley NICHOLSONb: January 25, 1836d: July 07, 1838
... 3 Mary Ellen NICHOLSONb: March 29, 1839in Green Cty, OH d:
September 09, 1928in Woodruff Place, IN
... 3 Martha Jane NICHOLSON b: June 22, 1843mOHd: 1934inIN
+Horace MCKAY b: 1841 in Waynesville, IN m: 1866 d: 1914 Father:
Jonas MCKAY Mother: Matilda FERGUSON
... 3 Louisa NICHOLSON b: 1844 d: 1845
... 3 Caroline M. NICHOLSON b: 1846 d: 1858
2 Lydia NICHOLSON b: 1813
2 Elizabeth NICHOLSON b: 1815 d: Bef. 1892
.... +7ADAMS0N
2 George NICHOLSON b: 1817
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Ancestry.com - Cincinnati, OhioDirectory, 1890-91
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You are here: Search > Cincinnati, Ohio Directory, 1890-91 > Results
Cincinnati/ Ohio Directory, 1890-91 has 1 match for:
Valentine Nicholson In United States
List,oi.Matches
Personal Information
Name: Valentine Nicholson
Location 2: boards St. Paul's Hotel
Year: 1890, 1891
City: Cincinnati
State: OH
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About this database
Directory listing over 160,000 names for Cincir
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K/LEY r,,. CYOK PIJBJJC lESSAHY
WAYWE!:''/ILLE^ cH
513/857-4826
Description:
Located In the south western corner of the state, the county of Hamilton borders both Indiana and Kentucky
city of Cincinnati is the county seat of Hamilton County, which was formed In 1790. This database is a transc
of a city directory originally published In 1890. In addition to providing the resident's name, it provides their
address and occupational Information. It includes over 160,000 names, mostly heads of households. For the
researcher of ancestors from south western Ohio, this can be an extremely valuable collection.
Extended Description:
City directories are primarily useful for locating people in a particular place and time. They can tell you gene
where an ancestor lived and give an exact location for census years. They are also useful for linkage with so
other than censuses.
There are usually several parts to a city directory. The section of most Interest to the genealogist, of course,
alphabetical listing of names, for it is there that you may find your ancestor.
Whenever you use a directory, however, it is important to refer to the page showing abbreviations used in tl
alphabetical section of the directory, usually following the name in each entry. Some abbreviations are quite
common, such as h for home or r, indicating residence. There may even be a subtle distinction between r foi
residents who are related to the homeowner and b for boarders who are not related.
Some city directories list adult children who lived with their parents but were working or going to school. Lo(
persons of the same surname residing at the same address. If analyzed and interpreted properly, these anm
directories can tell you (by implication) which children belong to which household, when they married and st
families of their own, and when they established themselves in business. In cases where specific occupation
given, you can search records pertinent to that occupation.
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Ancestry.com - Cincinnati, Ohio Directory, 1890-91 Page 2 of 2
Once an ancestor has been found In a city directory, there are several ways the Information can be used to (
access to, or link with, such sources as censuses, death and probate records, church records, naturalization
records, and land records.
Taken from Chapter 11: Research in Directories, The Source: A Guidebook ofAmerican Genealogy by Gordo
Lewis Remington; edited by Loretto Dennis Szucs and Sandra Hargreaves Luebking (Salt Lake City, UT: Ano
Incorporated, 1997).
Source Information:
Ancestry.com Cincinnati, Ohio Directory, 1890-91. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Orlglnj
data: Cincinnati, OH: Williams & Co., 1890.
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Ancestry.com - Indianapolis, Indiana Directories, 1887-90
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Database: Indianapolis, Indiana Directories, 1887-90
Personal Information
Name: Jane Nicholson (widow Valentine)
City: Indianapolis
State: IN
Year: 1889
Location 2: 232 Broadway
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Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Indianapolis, Indiana Directories, 1887-90. Prove, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000.
Original data: Indianapolis City Directory, 1887. Indianapolis, IN: R.L. Polk and Co., 1887;
Indianapolis City Directory, 1888. Indianapolis, IN: R.L Polk and Co., 1888; Indianapolis City
Directory, 1889. Indianapolis, IN: R.L Poik and Co., 1889; Indianapolis City Directory, 1890.
Indianapolis, IN: R.L Polk and Co., 1890.
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Name: Jane Nicholson (widowValentine) ^ printer-friendly
City: Indianapolis
State: IN
Year; 1889
Location 2: 232 Broadway
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Description:
The county seat of Marlon County In central Indiana, Indianapolis was home to some 45,000 residents in 18-
This database Is a transcription of four city directories originally published between 1887 and 1890. In additi
providing the residents' names. It provides their addresses and occupation. This collection includes the name
more than 180,344 people, mostly heads of household.
Extended Description:
City directories are primarily useful for locating people in a particular place and time. They can tell you gene
where an ancestor lived and give an exact location for census years. They are also useful for linkage with so
other than censuses.
There are usually several parts to a city directory. The section of most Interest to the genealogist, of course,
alphabetical listing of names, for It is there that you may find your ancestor.
Whenever you use a directory, however. It is important to refer to the page showing abbreviations used in tl
alphabetical sectionof the directory, usually following the name In each entry. Some abbreviations are quite
common, such as h for home or r. Indicating residence. There may even be a subtle distinction between r foi
residents who are related to the homeowner and b for boarders who are not related.
Some city directories list adult children who lived with their parents but were working or going to school. Lo(
persons of the same surname residing at the same address. If analyzed and interpreted properly, these anni
directories can tell you (by implication) which children belong to which household, when they married and st
families of their own, and when they established themselves In business. In cases where specific occupation
given, you can search records pertinent to that occupation.
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Ancestry.com - Indianapolis, Indiana Directories, 1887-90 Page 2 of 2
Once an ancestor has been found in a city directory, there are several ways the information can be used to (
access to, or link with, such sources as censuses, death and probate records, church records, naturalization
records, and land records.
Taken from Chapter 11: Research in Directories, The Source: A Guidebook ofAmerican Genealogy by Gordo
Lewis Remington; edited by Loretto Dennis Szucs and Sandra Hargreaves Luebking (Salt Lake City, UT: Ano
Incorporated, 1997).
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Indianapolis, Indiana Directories, 1887-90. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original data:
Indianapolis City Directory, 1887. Indianapolis, IN: R.L. Polk and Co., 1887; Indianapolis City Directory, 188
Indianapolis, IN: R.L. Polk and Co., 1888; Indianapolis City Directory, 1889. Indianapolis, IN: R.L. Polk and <
1889; Indianapolis City Directory, 1890. Indianapolis, IN: R.L. Polk and Co., 1890.
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Thomas M. Wales
Page 1 of 2
Warren County Ohio GenWeb
Biographies with Warren County
Connections
Thomas M. Wales
Transcription: Contributed by Arne H Trclvik 14 Jul 2003
Source: Ihc i lisiorv tif Waireii Couiity Ohio, Part VI Biographical Sketches - MASSIE Township
Surnames: Butterworth, Fallis, Hendricks, Irvin, Nicholson, Sanders, Stevenson, Wales, Welch
Related Links:
Judge Amos Irvjn Letter
Mrs. Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson a Hundred \ ea^^ Oiu
k-'
C
L.
-w
-5?
Page
1019
THOMAS M. WALES, retired farmer; P. O. Harveysburg. The earliest
ancestor of the Wales family of whom wehaveanyknowledge was George Wales, a
native of Scotland, but who removedto Ireland in 1690. He had one brother who
never married andwas editorof a paper in Belfast, Ireland, and died there. Of the
children of George Wales, his son Thomas, emigrated from Ireland to America in 1735,
and of his children, George Wales wasthegrandfather of oursubject, and wasbomin
Pennsylvania; was married toJane Irvin, a daughter of Wm. Irvin, who came from
Irelandto America with Thomas Wales in 1735, and they settled together in Pennsylvania.
Theirdescendants emigrated toNorth Carolina, with a brother of JaneIrvin,
Samuel Irvin, whoremoved to Ohioin 1799, and settledsix miles southof Dayton,
Montgomery County, where hedied, leaving four sons and one daughter; theeldest son
became Judge Amos Irvin, all of whom have nowpassed away. Thegrandfather, Geo.
Wales, withhis family, emigrated from Pennsylvania to North Carolina in 1767. He
hada brother John, whospelled his name Weailes, whomoved to Alabama when
young, ofwhom noinformation hasever been received. Ofthechildren of Geo. Wales,
Isaac, thefather of oursubject, wasbomin North Carolina in 1778, emigrated to Ohio
in 1814, andsettled inHighland County, andin 1815 settled onthe west bankof
Caesar's Creek, right in the dense woods. In 1822, he erected a house onthe hill west
of his first cabin. Mr. Wales had one brother Samuel, who resided in North Carolina
until 1846, whenhe removed to Indiana, where he died in 1847, They had several
sisters who married and moved south, of whom but little has since been known. Mr.
Isaac Wales marriedRuth Welch, who was bom in Virginiain 1784, a daughter of
Samuel and Cloe Welch, who settledinNorth Carolina, thenceemigrated to Ohioin
1814. Of their children the youngest son, Samuel G. Welch, still resides in Harveysburg.
The grandfather Welch was of English and Scotch descent; he married a lady
whose maiden name was Hendricks, and whose parents came from Holland in the latter
part ofthe 17th century, and settled in Virginia, their descendants mostly emigrating
to the far south. Geo. Walesthe grandfather of our subject, emigrated to Ohioin
S
Page
1020
http;//www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Beers/1019_wales thomas-m.htm
12/19/03
Thomas M. Wales Page2 of 2
1816, andlivedwithhis son Isaac, till his deathin 1824, age 87 years. IsaacWales
died in September 1824, about twomonths after hisfather's death, aged 46 years.
His wife survived him and died in 1856. They had five children - Mary; Jane F.;
NancyJ.; Thomas M. and Caroline M.; the eldest and youngest deceased; Jane F.
marriedMr. Nicholson, has three daughters, and resides in Indianapolis, Ind.; Nancy
J., married HenryT. Butterworth, and resides at Foster's Crossing, this county. The
subject ofthis sketch, the only sonand fourth child of hisfather, was bominNorth
Carolina Aug. 17, 1812, and was about two years of age when brought to the dense
forests of Ohio, and here grewto manhood, fully inured to pioneerlife; he served two
years inthe tanning business, onein Harveysburg, andonenearMaineville. In 1833
he bought a part of his father's farm where hefirst settled, andentered ingoodeamest
upon agricultural pursuits, andhere hecontinued a very successful farming business till
1868, when he retiredfrom the farm and settled in Harveysburg, where he has since
resided (except eight months in the winter of 1873-74 spent in Southern Califomia).
In March 1836, Mr. Wales was married to Sarah G. Stevenson, youngest daughter of
Samuel and Rebecca Stevenson, natives of New Jersey. But this union was of short
duration, when she was taken from himby death. In November, 1839, he mamed
for his second wife, Harriet R. Fallis, who was bom July 27,1817, daughter of Richard
and Phebe Fallis, natives of Virginia. By his first wife he had one son, Isaac,
who died at six years old; and by his last wife he has one child, Richard F., bora Dec.
1, 1841, who married Caroline M. Sanders, adopted daughter of Rachel M. Sanders;
they haveone adopted daughter, HarrietR. Wales, bora in October, 1872. In
October, 1874, Mr. Wales was elected to represent his county in the 61st General
Assembly, andre-elected tothe 62nd and63d, serving in all fiveyears tothe general
satisfaction of his constituents. Mr. Wales is a gentleman of very reserved and
unpretentious
habits, but of a high moral and intellectual cast of mind - firmand resolute
in carryingout all his convictions of right andjustice, whichprinciple has fully
characterizedall his actions both in private and public life. This has given him a
prestige in his community, and won for him the confidence of a large circle of friends
and acquaintances.
FOOTNOTES; [a place to add additional information that you might want to submit]
This page updated 14 July, 2003
2003 ArneHTrelvik All rights reserved
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Beers/1019_wales thomas-m.htm 12/19/03
c
Mne Finley (Wales) Nicholson
/UfCHOkSoAJ FttB
Page 1 of 4
Warren County Ohio GenWeb
Biographies with Warren County
Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson
Transcription: Contributed by Kai l Bartlow on 14 July 2003
Source: Indianapolis, IN; unnamed newspaper, 1906. Image
Surnames: Blackwell, Butterworth, McKay, Nicholson, Sanbom, Steele, Wales, Welch
Related Links:
Thomas M. Wales biography from Beers History of Warren County
Valentine Nicholspii Collection, 1841-KM 5 at the Indiana Historical Society Library
MRS. JANE NICHOLSON A HUNDRED YEARS OLD
Gift to her from literary clubs and others
eo
IK
^ H
K. t
CO
3
LIFE OF UNUSUAL INTEREST
Mrs. Jane Wales Nicholson today celebrates herone-hundredth birthday anniversary at her home in
Broadway. Owing toMrs. Nicholson's delicate health, there was no special demonstration inhonor ofher day.
Afew familiar friends called during theafternoon and greeted herwhere shesat surrounded byloving
messages in the shape offlowers, gifts, and congratulatory notes. Mrs. Nicholson is a woman ofunusual
dainty and sweet personality.
Agift highly prized was a solid silver loving cup sent by the Indianapolis Woman's Club. Mrs. Nicholson was
a founder and charter member of this literary club, and has kepther interest in its members and programs. The
cup is plain um-shaped with three handles. At the base isengraved on one side the date 1806, on the other
1906, midway between on one side theclub monogram, opposite the name Jane Nicholson. The College
Comer Club is anotherin which Mrs. Nicholson has takena deepinterest, and clubmeetings havefrequently
been held at herhome, that she might enjoy thepapers. The Parlor Club holds aninterest as herdaughter, Miss
Elizabeth Nicholson wasfounder, and was president for many years. These club members delight to honor
Mrs. Nicholson.
Journey to Ohio Wilderness
Mrs. Nicholson's maiden name wasJane Finley Wales. Sheis the daughter of Isaac andRuth Welch Wales,
andwas bom inNorth Carolina Feb. 1, 1806. Adescendant of generations of Quakers, she was earlytaught to
"test all things by the Inward Light, and tolisten for the voice of conscience". She was the second child in a
family offive, four girls and one boy. When she was eight years old, her maternal grandfather, Samuel Welch
decided that he must remove his large family of twelve children from a slave state to a free state. Isaac Wales
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Bios/nicholsonJane_1906.htm
12/19/03
Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson 2of 4
had just completed anew house and planted afine orchard and disliked leaving his beautiful farm for an Ohio
wilderness, but his wife's extremely tender love for her father Samuel Welch turned the scale, and Isaac Wales
sold his farm at a great sacrifice.
They joined the Welch Colony. This was long before the day of carriages, but the grandfather and
grandmoAer rode in asmall two wheeled vehicle called agig, and regarded as luxurious compared with the
^eat white covered wagons drawn by four horses which conveyed the other families. The memory of this
journey from Carolina to Ohio is still vivid in Mrs. Nicholson's mind-the bells on the horses, the finding of
chestnuts on the way up Ae Blue Ridge Mountains, the wild beauty ofthe scenery. Her word pictures ofthis
trip have charmed her children and grandchildren for many an hour.
Samuel Welch settled in the Miami Valley in southern Ohio. He had bought 1,200 acres ofexceedingly rich
but heavily timbered land-enough for each child to have afarm. Here Isaac Wales began the heavy task of
clearing the land. Sometime his little daughter sawthe deer come out ofthe thick woods to asalt spring where
they drank. The Shawnee Indians had just left that part of Ohio and there were traces of their wigwams.
Quakers' Payment of "Muster Fine"
The second year sawaclearing sufficiently laige to raise afew bushels oflye. The children looked forward
anxiously to white bread, Mrs. Nicholson remembers seeing her mother help winnowthe lye which was then
put away until itcould be taken to adistant mill to be ground. In the mean time an Officer from the Ohio State
Militia came to collect the "muster fine". The Quakers protested against war and neither would drill for nor
countenance for so they were fined. These Officers took what they chose and made their own valuation. In this
case for afine ofperhaps $2.50, they took the whole crop ofrye leaving not agrain. The little children were
bitterly disappointed to see all the crop go but they heard no complaint from either father or mother. Itwas a
matter ofconscience and they believed it right tosuffer inthe good cause.
In 1830 Jane Finley Wales was married to Valentine Nicholson, since deceased, adescendant of early English
Quakers. Ayounger sister Nancy was married at the same time to Thomas Butterworth. The ceremony was
that ofthe Friends Church and the meeting house was ofhewn logs in the thick woods. Often in the past as
these sisters sat through the silent meetings they he^d the rare sweet note ofthe hermit thrush. In this house
Elias Hicks had on^ preached. His earnest conviction and his impassioned words had earlier divided the
Society ofFriends into Hicksites and Orthodox. The four young people in this double wedding were Hicksites.
"Underground Railway" work
Very early in their married life Mr. And Mrs. Nicholson were enlisted in the anti-slavery work. Their home
was one of achain ofhospitable homes stretching from the Ohio River tothelakes-stations on the
"underground railway" who's trains were mainly made up by the faithful Quakers. Anights ride from
Cincinnati it was afrequent occurance for Mrs. Nicholson's children to be awakened by the midnight arrival
of acarnage load of fugitive slaves. In addition to her own family cares Mrs. Nicholson must provide for these
fnghtened and always hungry men and women. Perhaps they must be concealed for atime from the zealous
executors ofthe fugitive slave law.
At this time the Anti-Slavery Society decided to hold one hundred conventions in the West. In the district
embracing southern Ohio, Mrs. Nicholson's home became Ihe headquarters for the noted anti-slavery lectures.
Mrs. Nicholson has given much study to slavery in all its aspects, reading every book and pamphlet
obtainable.
During her entire life there has not been one worthy reform without Mrs. Nicholson's sympathy and support.
This often meant to her husband and herself sacrifice and denial quite incomprehensible to the young or even
http.//www.rootsweb.com/~ohwamen/Bios/nicholsonJane_I906.htm 12/19/03
Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson Page 3 of 4
middle aged people of today.
Perhaps Mrs. Nicholson's Quaker heritage made her deeply sympathetic with the very earliest movement for
the rights of women. Homekeeping andhome loving, shewas ever ready to givethe support of her name and
influence to every movement for the welfare of humanity.
The years have taken from hercountless oldfriends and almost all hermany near relatives. Only twelve first
cousins remain and the sister who's wedding day washer own, Mrs. Butterworth, wasunable to takethelong
journey toobserve the century anniversary. Mrs. Butterworth at ninety-six still writes long and interesting
letters and enjoys life.
Sevenchildrenwere bom to Mr. AndMrs. Nicholson. Threeare livingin daily communication with Mrs.
NicholsonMrs. Horace McKay, Miss Elizabeth, and Miss Mary E. Nicholson. Two granddaughters are Mrs.
Brandt Steele, and MaryI. McKayand there are two great grand sonsHoraceMcKay Steele and Theodore
Steele.
Old Anti-Slavery Friends
Ofthose associated with her inheranti-slavery work only two remain. Extracts are given from two birthday
letters.
Boston, Mass. Jan. 30, 1906
Dear Mrs. Nicholson,
Intwo days you will have reached your centennial birthday. Let mecongratulate you and your daughters that
youhave lived solongandwell. When I knew youboth more than fifty years ago, I canhardly believe that I
amnearly eighty-one and that you will have passed your one-hundredthmilestone when this letter reaches
you.
The world has grown older and I hope better than it waswhen wewere fighting for free soil and free speech in
Ohio1850. Slavery is no longer an established institution. Thepeople havelargely outgrown their beliefin
avenging Godandan eternal hell andthat our work for humanity draws to a close. Younger hands andhearts
will take up and carry onthe reforms which still remain to befurthered. I am glad you have fought a good
fight andthat your daughters stand beside you . With warmest regards inwhich my dear wifeLucy Stone
wouldjoin if she were still with me, andwith kind regards of my daughter Alicebelieve me dear Mrs.
Nicholson ever your friend.
Henry Blackwell
Frank Sanbom of Concord write,
Andtoyour dearmother on her hundredth birthday saythat she haslived to seegreater changes in some ways
than we ever could have expected, even a half century ago. I hope the word is better than it was then. I know it
is better sofar as your mother and herfamily had the power to make it so. Each century and every generation
has its ownevils andits own blessings. We have done what we could, andperhaps we could have done more
if weall had been bomNorth Carolina Quakers. They seem to have accomplished more than the rest of us.
FOOTNOTES: [a place to add additional information that you might want to submit]
14Jul
2003
Karl Barllow My grx2 grandmother Emma Lavina (Pearl) Wales kept a daily diary
from the 1870s to after 1900 and mentions about some Ohio relatives
at that time. This area needs further research. Emma was the
grandaughter of Samuel Wales of N.C. removed to Indiana circa 1828
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Bios/nicholsonJane 1906.htm 12/19/03
Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson Page 4 of 4
|| II ||and brother of Isaac Wales mentioned in articles |
This page updated 18 July, 2003
2003 Arne H Treivik All rights reserved
Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson A/ ICHOLSOfJ F' Us ^
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Warren County Ohjo (^nWeb
Biographies with Warren County
Connections
I^ Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson
1'I
>4
^ Transcription: Contributed by Karl Bartlow on 14 July 2003
^ Source: Indianapolis, IN: unnamed newspaper, 1906. Image
Surnames: Blackwell, Butterworth, McKay, Nicholson, Sanbom, Steele, Wales, Welch
Related Links:
Thomas M. Wales biographyfrom Beers History of WarrenCounty
Valentine Nicholson Collection. 1841-1915 at the Indiana Historical Society Library
MRS. JANE NICHOLSON A HUNDRED YEARS OLD
Gift to her from literaiy clubs and others
LIFE OF UNUSUAL INTEREST
Mrs. Jane Wales Nicholson today celebrates her one-hundredth birthday anniversary at her home in
Broadway. Owing to Mrs. Nicholson's delicate health, there was no special demonstration inhonor of
herday. Afew familiar friends called during theafternoon and greeted her where shesat surrounded by
loving messages inthe shape offlowers, gifts, and congratulatory notes. Mrs. Nicholson is a woman of
unusual dainty and sweet personality.
Agifthighly prized was a solid silver loving cup sentbytheIndianapolis Woman's Club. Mrs.
Nicholsonwas a founder and charter member of this literary club, and h^ kept her interest in its
members and programs. The cup is plain um-shaped with three handles. Atthe base is engraved onone
side the date 1806, on the other 1906, midway betweenon one side the club monogram, opposite the
nameJane Nicholson. The College Comer Clubis anotherin whichMrs. Nicholson has takena deep
interest, andclubmeetings have frequently beenheldat her home, that shemight enjoy the papers. The
ParlorClub holdsan interestas her daughter. Miss Elizabeth Nicholson was foimder, andwas president
for manyyears. These clubmembers delight to honor Mrs. Nicholson.
Journey to Ohio Wilderness
Mrs. Nicholson's maidenname was Jane Finley Wales. She is the daughter of Isaac andRuth Welch
Wales, andwasbominNorthCarolina Feb. 1,1806. Adescendant of generations of Quakers, she was
early taught to "testall things bytheInward Light, and to listen for thevoice of conscience". She was
thesecond childin a family of five, four girls andone boy. When shewas eightyears old, her maternal
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwaiTen/Bios/nicholson_janel 906.htm 9/5/2003
Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson Page 2 of 4^
grandfather, Samuel Welch decided that he must remove his large family oftwelve children fn)m a
slave state to a fi^e state. Isaac Wales had just completed a new house and planted a fine orchard and
disliked leaving his beautiful farm for an Ohio wilderness, but his wife's extremely tender love for her
fether Samuel Welch turned the scale, and Isaac Wales sold his farm at a great sacrifice.
Theyjoined the WelchColony. This was long before the day of carriages, but the grandfatherand
grandmother rode in a small two wheeledvehicle called a gig, and regardedas luxuriouscomparedwith
die great white covered wagons drawn by four horses which conveyedthe other families. The memory
ofthisjourney fromCarolinato Ohiois still vivid in Mrs. Nicholson's mind-thebells on the horses, the
findingofchestnutson the way up the Blue Ridge Mountains, the wild beautyofthe scenery. Her word
pictures ofthis trip have charmed her children and grandchildrenfor many an hour.
Samuel Welch settled in the Miami Valley in southem Ohio. He had bought 1,200 acres of exceedingly
richbut heavilytimbered land-enough for eachchildto have a farm. Here Isaac Walesbeganthe heavy
task of clearingthe land. Sometimehis little daughter sawthe deer come out ofthe thick woods to a salt
springwherethey drank. The Shawnee Indianshadjust left that part of Ohioandthere weretraces of
their wigwams.
Quakers' Payment of ^Muster Fine"
The secondyear sawa clearingsufficiently large to raise a fewbushels ofrye. The children looked
forwardanxiouslyto white bread, Mrs. Nicholson remembers seeing her mother help winnowthe rye
whichwas thenput awayuntil it couldbe takento a distant mill to be ground. In the meantime an
Officer from the Ohio State Militia came to collect the "muster fine". The Quakers protested against war
and neither would drill for nor coimtenance for so they were fined. These Officers took what they chose
and made their own valuation. In this case for a fine ofperhaps $2.50, they took the whole crop ofrye
leavingnot a grain. The little childrenwere bitterlydisappointed to see all the crop go but they heard no
complaintfromeither father or mother. It was a matter of conscienceand they believedit right to suffer
in the good cause.
In 1830Jane Finley Wales was married to ValentineNicholson, since deceased, a descendant ofearly
English Quakers. A younger sister Nancy was married at the same time to Thomas Butterworth. The
ceremonywas that ofthe Friends Churchand the meetinghouse was of hewn logs in the thick woods.
Often in the past as these sisters sat through the silent meetings they heard the rare sweet note ofthe
hermit thrush. In this house Elias Hicks had once preached. His earnest conviction and his impassioned
words had earlier divided the Society ofFriends into Hicksites and Orthodox. The four young people in
this double wedding were Hicksites.
'^Underground Railway" work
Very early in their married life Mr. And Mrs. Nicholson were enlisted in the anti-slaverywork. Their
home was one ofa chain ofhospitable homes stretching from the Ohio River to the lakes-stations on
the "underground railway" who's trains were mainly made up by the faithful Quakers. A rughts ride
from Cincinnati it was a frequent occurance for Mrs. Nicholson's children to be awakened by the
midnight arrival ofa carriage load of fugitive slaves. In addition to her own family cares Mrs. Nicholson
must provide for these fiightened and always hungry men and women. Perhaps they must be concealed
for a time from the zealous executors ofthe fiigitive slave law.
At this time the Anti-Slavery Society decided to hold one hundred conventions in the West. In the
district embracingsouthem Ohio, Ms. Nicholson's home became the headquarters for the noted anti-
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Bios/nicholson jane 1906.htm 9/5/2003
Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson 3of4
slavery lectures. Mrs. Nicholson has given much study to slavery inall its aspects, reading every book
and pamphlet obtainable.
During her entire life there has not been one worthy reform without Mrs. Nicholson's sympaAy and
support. This often meant to her husband and herself sacrifice and denial quite incomprehensible to the
youngor evenmiddle agedpeopleof today.
Perhaps Mrs. Nicholson's Quaker heritage made her deeply sympathetic with the very earliest
movement for the rights ofwomen. Homekeeping and home loving, she was ever ready togive the
support ofhername and influence toevery movement for the welfare ofhumanity.
The years have taken firom her countless old fiiends and almost all her many near relatives. Only twelve
first cousins remain andthe sisterwho's wedding daywasher own,Mrs. Butterworth, wasunable to
take the longjourney toobserve the century anniversary. Mrs. Butterworth at ninety-six still writes long
and interesting letters and enjoys life.
Seven children were bom to Mr. And Mrs. Nicholson. Three are living in daily communicationwith
Mrs. NicholsonMrs. HoraceMcKay, Miss Elizabeth, andMiss Maiy E. Nicholson. Two
granddaughters are Mrs. Brandt Steele, and Maiy I. McKay and there are two great grand sons Horace
McKay Steele and Theodore Steele.
Old Anti-Slavery Friends
Of those associatedwith her in her anti-slaverywork only two remain. Extracts are given fixim two
birthday letters.
Boston, Mass. Jan. 30, 1906
Dear Mrs. Nicholson,
Intwo days youwill have reached your centennial birthday. Letmecongratulate youandyourdaughters
that you have lived solong and well. When I knewyou both more than fifty years ago, I can hardly
believe that I amnearly eighty-one andthat youwill have passed yourone-hundredth milestone when
this letter reaches you.
The world hasgrown older andI hope better than it was when wewere fighting for free soil andfiree
speech inOhio 1850. Slavery is nolonger anestablished institution. The people have largely outgrown
theirbeliefinavenging God andanetemalhellandthat ourworkfor humanity draws to a close.
Yoimger hands and hearts will take upandcarry onthereforms which still remain to befurthered. I am
glad you have fought a good fight and that your daughters stand beside you. With warmest regards in
which my dear wife Lucy Stone would joinif shewere still with me, andwith kind regards of my
daughter Alice believe medearMrs. Nicholson everyourfiiend.
Henry Blackwell
Frank Sanbom of Concord write.
And toyour dear mother onherhundredth birthday say that she has lived to seegreater changes in some
ways than we ever could have expected, even a halfcentury ago. I hope the word isbetter than it was
then. I knowit is betterso far as your motherandher family hadthe powerto makeit so. Eachcentury
and every generation has itsown evils and itsownblessings. We have done what we could, and perhaps
we could have done more ifwe all had been bom North Carolina Quakers. They seem to have
accomplished more than the rest of us.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Bios/nicholsonjane_1906.htm 9/5/2003
Jane Finley (Wales) Nicholson Page 4 of 4v
FOOTNOTES: [a place to add additional information that you might want to submit]
14Jul Karl Bartlow My grx2 grandmother Emma Lavina (Pearl) Wales kept a daily
diary from the 1870s to after 1900 and mentions about some Ohio
relatives at that time. This area needs further research. Emma was
the grandaughter of Samuel Wales of N.C. removed to Indiana
circa 1828 and brother ofIsaac Wales mentioned in articles
This page updated 18 July, 2003
2003 Ame H Trelvik All rights reserved

http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Bios/nicholson jane 1906.htm 9/5/2003


"THE LIBERATOR"
Abram Allen, noted Clinton County Ohio anti-slavery advocate and Underground Railroad
developer-operator, transported hundreds of runaway slaves to Washington, B.C. and
freedom in his covered wagon, "The Liberator:.
Allen, who lived near Oakland, Ohio in 1850 built this replica of "The Liberator"
for his friend and Harveysburg, Ohio's noted Underground Railroad conductor, Valentine
Nicholson. The original paint was restored and "The Steele Bros." added in 1918 by
Nicholson's daughter who gave the miniature wagon to her grandsons, the Steele brothers.
Nicholson's great-grandson, Theodore Steele of Indianapolis, Indiana, donated the wagon
to Mary L. Cook Public Library's Ohioana Room in 1985.
Abram Allen was a wagonmaker and inventor who developed a cyclometer for the "Liberator"
to measure the distances to and from freedom for his escaping slave cargo. He was also
a fine weaver. He built a fly-shuttle so he could x^reave coverlets full width and also
designed his own coverlet patterns.
For more information on Abram Allen, Valentine Nicholson and "The Liberator as well as
the Underground Railroad in this area, please see the files and records in our Ohioana
Room.
PLEASE TREAT THIS WAGON WITH THE RESPECT IT DESERVES. IT IS ARARE RELIC AND AUNIciUE
ARTIFACT OF OUR ANTIQUE HERITAGE.
VTBDNBSDAY SEPTEMBER 26 1906
^rs. Jane F. Nicholson
Closes a Long Life.:
In Failingr Health Since
Century Mark.
Passing.c
fProm The Indianapolis News, of Sept. 10.J ,
Mrs. Jane Finley Nicholson's long
and nsefnl life came to an end yes
terday afternoon about i o'clock.
Nicholson had been in failing,
bealth and nnable to see her friehdsl
I
eince the celebration of her one hu:.- ^
dreth birthday, February 1. Th6^^'
who saw her then recall the cheer-,
fulness and strength of spirit with <
which she entertained the friends,
gathered about her with remin' ' *-'-*^"
c<w of the historic movemef t'
crises in which she had taaen .ctive
part.
Mrs. Nicholson was born in Iredell
ciiunty. North Carolina, in Febru
ary, 1806, of Quaker parentage. At^
the age of eight, her parents moveda
t<> Warren county, Ohio, where she's
livtid until she came to Indianapo-^i
lis.in 1866. Her mother was from^
Campbell county, Virginia, and her,s
ancestors in the Old Dominion date s
from a remote period. Mrs. Nichol- :
son's father, Isaac Wales, was of n
j' Scotch-Irish parentage. ^
I Mrs. Nicholson is survived by''
i daughters, Misses Elizabeth
' ti(nd Mary Nicholson, Martha Nich-
; ulson HcEZay; two graud-daughters ,
Mary L. McKay and Helen McKay >
Steels, and two great' grandsons,'
HoraceMcE[ay and Theodore Steele.'
Active to the Last. '
I
Mrs. Nicholson's interest in the >
"nfe tuid thought was active until
within a few weeks of her death. As .
'She sat knitting by her fireside she '
weioomed with' the ^dor of the
t^holari)e'w8 of the latest scientific
developements and fresh thoughts
from the best books always on her
table. Her household was a center
where questions of human progress
and intellectnal.and spiritual en
lightenment found ample discus
sion. The three great causes-peace,
freedom of slaves and rights of
women-advocated by all liberal
Quakers, found in her a warm sup-
jiorter.
bhe had for her intimate fnends
those who were foremost in the
great philanthropic movements in
jthis country in the last century.
Her life presented a rare conibina-
tion of activity and contemplation.
Her serenity always caused her^ '
friends to panse and listen to the '
promptings of the-spirit. One friend
said of her: "Her life was all the
beatitudes in one."
Funeral Services.
A service for the relatives and a
few inUmate friends of Mrs. Jano:
Nicholson, who died Sunday, was!
held at her late home, yesterday/
afternoon, at 4 o'clock, The.' Rev;,
Frank Wioice, of All Souls' Unitar l
ian church, cuuducted the services. \
The hymns of Whittier and Long
fellow were snug by Mrs. Thomas
G. Whallon. Miss Edith Brown
played the "Largo" of Handel and
a lullaby on the violin. ]
As particularly portraying .
life and character the following
poems were read:
Our Mother.
"Broken and worn" for years wa^
saw her so; '
Dropping from strength, from thua^
detaching slow; :
And scarcely conld we know , , ?
Howearth's dark ebb was Heav^a:
bright overflow. /-v.-
jTifltb month 29, 1906.]
FRIENDS' INTELLIGENCER.
UAJ"DPRuJcroC>
ije last yeara of hia life. In speaking of the number of years
kg had Hyed there and the attachments formed, he said, " Yes,
jt has been long, but I am more than willing to leave it all."
One son, two daughters and a step-daughter had the privilege
inio'9^""g to him during those days when he was slowly
slipping awa-y.
j{e was kind and unassuming in manner, and his sterling
irortb ^ya3 recognized by his many friends. In the going out
jjis undemonstrative life we realize how much he will be
pjificd, but are cheered by the thought, There is rest for the
^ildren of God."
>1CH0LS0N.At her home in Indianapolis, Ind., Ninth
jaonth 9th, 1906, at the advanced age of 100 years, 7 months
aQj 8 days, Jane F. Nicholson, oldest member of Miami
iloathly Meeting, 0. Buried in Miami Cemetery, near
Wavnesville, 0. She was daughter of Isaac and Ruth
(Welch) Wales, of near Harveysburg, 0. She. possessed re
markable mental powers up to almost the close of her life. A
sister, Nancy (widow of Henry Thomas Butterworth), who is
<14 rears old, was able to attend the funeral. Three daughters
mourn the loss of this aged mother.
TAYLOR.At her late residence in Genoa, Neb., Ninth
month 19th, 1906, Rebecca J. Taylor, widow of the late Jona
than Taylor, aged 65 years and 3 months; a member of Genoa
Jlonthly Meeting of Friends. She was a native of Bucks
County, Pa., where she married her first husband, Barclay
Jones, who afterwards became miller at the Pawnee Indian
isency under Agent Troth, and later filled the same position at
the Santee Agency, under Agent Lightner.
UNDERWOOD.At his late home, near Harveysburg, O.,
Xinth month 10th, 1906, David W. Underwood, son of Charles
and Jane W. Underwood, aged nearly 65 years, a native of
Center County, Pa. A widow and eight children survive him,
also one brother and a sister. This dear one was always ready
to minister to others, ever forgetful of self.
URNER.On Ninth month 19th, 1900, at the Friends' Board
ing Home. West Chester, Pa., Ellen Urner, formerly Kendall,
inthe SSth year of her age. interment at Phoenixville, Pa.
NOTES AND ANNOUNOE^IENTS. '
The opening meeting of West Nottingham Young Friends'
Association for the fall and winter season will be held in Ris
ing Sun First-day afternoon, Tenth month 7th; subject for dis
cussion, Wealth and Religion."
A Friend in New York sends us the following extract from
a letter from John Asluvorth. of Manchester, England, who
so acceptably with us at the General Conference at Moun
tain Lake Park:'
"On the eve of leaving for the old country, I write to ex
press my appreciation of the kindness of all Friends, and trust
a greater chiscness will yet bo brought about amongst Friends
of all sections, both in Canada and England, with those in
America."
Louis N. Robinson, graduate of SwarthmoreCollege in lOOo, who
uthe Joshua il. Lip()incott Fellow for 1906-07, is in residence at
Ralle an der Saale and will enter tiie university there for graduate
*ork in political and social science. During the recent vacation he
^k an extentlcd bicycle trip soiulnvard, vi.siting Eisenach, Nurera-
wrg, Miiniciiand Berne.Simr/Ziinorean
Blue River Monthly Aleeting of Friends, at Highlands, near
Salem, Ind., have in the past month had the pleasure of a
^it from R. Barclay Spioer, of Philadelphia, and Jesse H.
Bolrnes. of Swarthmore. Pa., both of which were dulv appre-
<'ated. On Fifth day, the 14th, a morning and evening meet-
"ig were held, conducted by Jesse Holmes. A renewed sense
strength and encouragement was felt by all from the min-
^^ryof this Friend. The visits of these dear Friends, who wer?
enabled to meet with us in a social way in our homes, will
""S be remembered by this neighborhood.
SiDXET TrCXBLOOD.
Asubscriber who lives in Chicago writes us: "I send The
^Telltgexceb to ray mother, who lives at Salem, la., and is
^early 80 years old. She was brought up in the Orthodox
J ancb of Friends' Society. In a recent letter she expressed
8r Very deep interest in reading the paper, and her hope that
the time may come when all branches who really believe in the
' guidance of the Inner Light' may be brought onto a working
platform broad enough for all."
A Friend in Fresno, Cal., thus describes the religious unity
existing in that city: "All the English-speaking Protestant
ministers except the Episcopalian and one Japanese have united
and organized themselves as a ministers' council, and work
together as one man in promoting morality and religion, and
for the suppression of vice and intemperance. They are sus
tained by the press in their work. During the hot weather
the congregations and others meet in the Court House Park,
which occupies four squares in the heart of the city. The
city supplies benches and speakers* stands. They appoint one
of their number to preach every First-day evening from 6.30
to 8 o'clock, and they have very large audiences. The minis
ters are very earnest and advanced in their religious views, and
hold Quakerism in high estimation. They have invited me to
attend their ministerial meetings."
THE SOLEBURY CENTENNIi
CO
> cehftn-
at Ale-
Following is the program of the Solebury Mee0Eg
nial ceremonies, to be held Tenth month Cth, 19fflft
bury Meeting House, in Bucks County, Pa., at 10aiS:
(1) Historical Sketch of Solebury Meeting.
Eastburn Reeder, Sokl
(2) Poem Florence R. Kenderdine, Fhijd^
(3) The Solebury First-day School.
Sarah J. Reeder.
(4) Poem Thaddeus S. Kenderdine,
Ad,Journment from 12 to 2 for lunch and soci::^?r<^
(5) Recollections of Solebury Meeting and SchoSw.C^
Edward H. Magj^ N
(6) Address Matilda E. Janney, PlSBw
(7) Poem Ely J. Smith,
(8) A word as to the future.
Hugh B. Eastburn, I^JleSt
(9) Five-minutes speeches by any who may
anything to say.
Adjournment at 4 p.m.
Conveyances will meet trolleys and train at^^w E
and 10 a.m.; returning will leave the mectirjjjfcrbii
after adjournment to connect with trolleys Sj
p.m., and train for Philadelphia at 5.57 p.m.
Mtas
SWARTI-niORE COLLEGE NOTES.
" Swarthmore is a growing College." The tmth of this state
ment has been amply demonstrated to all Avho have watched
the opening week of the new term. Not only is the freshman
class the largest in the history of the college, but the new
faces among the faculty, and the two new buildings in process
of erection give .substantial signs of progress. The dormi
tories are filled to the limit of their capacity and about a
dozen students have been forced to seek temporary lodgings
in the village.
On Si.xth-day evening, the twenty-eighth. President Swain
and Airs. Swain will give a formal reception in Somerville
Hall to the students to meet Dean Aleeteer and Dr. and Airs.
Afiller. It has. however, not taken us this long to become
acquainted with our new instinictors and advisors, and the
sentiment seems to be universal among the student body that
the managers have been most fortunate in tbo filling of the
vacancies left by Dean Bond and Professor Cunningham.
On First-day Dr. Holmes announced that his Bible class this
year -will take up the study of the " Twentieth Century
Religion." All students are cordially invited.
On last Sixth-day evening, the twenty-first, President Swain
called together one of what are popularly known among the
students as " Prexie's meeting." These consist of informal
conferences between the young men and the president, in
which all matters of interest between them are brought up
and discussed. Tlie rules restricting smoking, and the system
of student government wore explained to the now men. The
question of instituting a strict honor system in examinations
was introduced and brought forth much discussion. The plan
proposed is similar to the one in operation at Princeton
University, under which, cheating of any sort in examinations
is dealt with by immediate expulsion from college. Each
student is bound on his honor to report any case he may
observe, to a student tribunal, which passes judgment and
sentence on the njatter. The sjibject was finally left for
sjja's
jjK -fs a- t; f ij-r iKF, ii' .1."^
^ t %
Jane F-Nldioison
jf 'i; dA;---
iU liaUiiisr H^]A( Pii$$iiia
;; .^Cej^iy
:|i^d liife came to iJb-
afteriKmQ at^i^*i p-^ppfe
Mt't^^ 'Ntoholaon bad l^n in faiiitig
rr:>-f.
dretb birthday^ Febrni^ 1.
aa^ tbeD^eoi^l^e
kireagthoi ^ttb;
}peai jof tbe biatorio movements and
oiifltes in.vNbti^ehe^baldbMcen active
1^4. ,
V Mm^Jfincbolwo was SbminIredeU
^mnty^ ISToctb Carolina,^ in Febrn*
lavvJ Of .Qoaker paventaga: At
tto fige bf aigbt, her parents moved
arren ooonty; ObiOt wbCreabe
|lsia '1H6&' Her mother was {rom
Campbell ooni^, Virginia, and- her
Mr* 4m;<^lajM . T^^mAmm-A.
mmvM!:.
mmm
V??tc *;v*S'
r^m::::m.
:"iiDPBnriS|i|^
broken,,
. 8hatj3E>rmgVmi^bt'l^ * S; ' -
wbJbb aj' gmnd'^'son^^^^ broke
^ tcward the light;;;
Bending its;
;!rhe calyx;|iii^fe migbt^l<i^e
Wbs^:t^ 1be--aran|
^e4n^k lower
bf iixe inid^
And so a bira not deatb-^e~.stand
,beside, - ^
Oar own fast gathering years come
* glorified:
And braver we abide,
That we have' seen Heaven^s great
' - door finng awjlde.
Voided Hands. '
i > n. '
''Pale withered hands that tnora
tban fivescore years i *
Had wroaght for otherS'^soothed.tlie
w&i
f*5'!S'4i
^T-'Cf"' ^ V;^"i^Vr^'A>*J
mm
der" -iJi^'^rbiii
famfij^.^and iii
left its^0rd;
^elovea^
a
the ^ferlot Ghil
^ . .. if--. .*-.
Her ijody ^
in the 'land':wb<
The ^'go^pyqrh
er meeting houi
Olson'wbri^ipp
early v^lomanhc
Ohio. / . ^ 4
I On ^^dnesd
of Iheirtbelovei
mwM
lUidin^
tlibiigltti was^jB^^jdye .xidtll^
-V4";S'0^^^ i;v->'^- o'v. ^^*:>rV"
.^\\;- .. fc-;
af|iaggaapi^Jlrtth Ow'ardor of^^ibe
iliivlfiSf '
.she
m
M
,!:,vttY<:--;i
^fi'V-T'vo
'7^-:
'on her
................-v.,
il'?/ lihtiuin pzpgress
kJYl',:^!':: ^ r-. - ar, .
'fe/::f;v'F.;
t i of of
Q^ by all libexal
Qiuikera, foimdin her a \vara sup-
^ ^, porter. ^v '"V " ^" .;/
^ ^ had for her ii^tinia|6 .fneSda
^ thoae who wei^(^|^rein^
hioyeihenls in.
' 'o this joonntxy In fhe last
^scus-
^mm
li
>
(: flar liWpresent^;a. rax^. pointd
^ ^oli ofaotiid^ and w
- .IH^ sere^ty* always cansedZher
friends to pcKTO and ^lisl^ to i^e
said of hw:, We wro
.beatitades in one.*V
Aservice. Ibr^le i^
.-ji^:-:;--^-V--l- -'v-..^.V.v Yv,...., , ,. .
Frohl the wbm brow the ;Uhes /of
As if an Ang^^s kiss the g^
. ''^ept; : '"';/Z^;^/ ': -:
g^hbac^^e^l^ of
boi^! ..
^ Oin^eSs on tbo^ U if she s{^id
''None ImowLife%.8 saW the
. C happy dead" \
Mid she Ues^ we feel
^-// thet;pain';''
^hdparMhg^ not cleaye hor sbh
Add'wei^^^siufe
vheciiSit.;' ,: '""' ' '''
lo tb^t dim woitll tbe
._, past. :
^bO'nevw'kn$v7't^did radwear^:
.. eytk\, .' .'' ^ - ." ' !
Bemembdring best'tbe maiden and
toe..brldpi^'0 -
ftve sprnngto greet ber with thd
.olden'^feeph^C' - -- ?
Tbb'dear dweet names no later, love
canveaoh ' .
And "Welcome Home" -tlfey cried
arid graspedhep hftjridi " m;
.f'Rfid^nrAlla rtTiv^.Wkri^.l^MvLr/M ^-ii^^^^ > .-i
hehie^i
sjfinnii
|net
s^iah;
t'li
|y!8o/^
a
lllter j
' t
iohg Itl
edher
Audi
to, thai
fh^o^
v..
i,^,
f: _
^SOOb
itsfe- :v
iinnl.'k
y^fj^-HT^'.'yj. iX^-ta,*
SS?^S%iSi^vJS
ffei?t^2;:'V;
'^mm
7-*^
SMiiffl
'< *. -< -"-Ptii-Jii 1^1-Tvy ^ " '%'.^ : *. V7[:'i.'i'''i .;'S /f- fi*. ^
'.'ij .'. l'',>*" la^S fc ' .
^So d^iiaf ourmothcir^
smd
vnibre-'V. ": '.. - ''" :
l^ptiie perfects'day; - ^ ^
She cannot fail of peace, who bore.
Snch j^acewith her away.
. . * * *'.
For still her holy living m'eiCnt.:
No duty left undone
The heayenly and the hpman. blent
Their kindred loves xh one.
>v-^>-\'\vs'^"/tv-.y
ri>/.
'^j: y'"-.
' u-^--
vn
&>
;0
k^iernooh, at 4 p'dook. The
l^iils*
and Lpiig*
aiuig by Mw. Thomae
iC.. ..lliniiUlipn^ Miss Bkiith Brown
^^^6dtbe ^I^i^'. ofJtondpl nd
a^lpllaby. oh tM ^oli^
CuV^
d.
-i;
!a-:'
O
u.r
^s^partionlarly portraying bbr Load's best interpreters
' ' - - - ' Are humble bhman souls ;
oharaotia ^e fallowing
pqiin^iwere r^:
: ' Our ilother.
^&rQjkbh and wdto** fi^ yeairs we
" 7 sawfiiBrep;
Gospel of a life like hers
Is more than books or scrolls'
From scheme and creed the light
goes out.
The saintly fact survives;
K^Vf Dropping fromatrength, from time imu^ survives ; ^
^ ^ -wJ. ' blesued Master nofle can donbt
d^ohing slow;
? iS :^dscareeiy ociuld we know
, bright d;yer^
Revealed in.holy lives.
Among the tributes from friends
the mliiisfeer read the fdilowing :
DAYTQN, O.
EstahHshed
46 ydM
-^Bppl-KEmJ^O ta^Ht onlv bv experiene^d tkchrrK^
3 ofSittitots to ^ftryq^lbite. T^wOerate; ^iSft
any tlto^ M ttraduites in July alon3?Sstdol7j^W
j^^?1^.ftns.:88UgSfc Pi W1IJ\ PreMdeiM! far fA. ^
g si .;; : SjS smajr hi>:idipd;^- td^ " '
':!;.. ':.,V- ..;...; '; :toji<iAforc;^ii..,. .,. ,-' .'i; > .; >;"
i. ; Wayneisvaie Oiradiiat^ ofthe Miaibi '
:-v;:-diiiiiiiimmimw'.
^^Saiii ah|[
by'frei^
; Boh^i
It^s your c
to Spi
' If ho^t
^personally
uesviile12^
of ihdii^t
yeai by.
woUldn^t^^l
remedydm
Cess with ji
4er, and th
mOfb-.cdnh
of ki^eilte
tobfehc^ 1^1
pf
tipu .^d S
Will phly u^
is
^d<>w^i|v-.pr';:e1
jj|i^
P^PIS
' pfch^^t ^*b,or<^ ; .
fr,n mprfe; -
3i|il^Hht iifet its^ shiiMDg gar*
^lent cl^^fs:"
r'' V* '<- ,.- *" ' .- **
o all its st^in of tpgrs -
w^ppeas ;4^^
brofenfi, we^^ ^
o-
I sotil b)^o
^ iig^
ag^li4'b^d4^ i]^^t; , :
it jnjlg^ si^iu^ m
btu8t tbal it migM Idpae

aw^t^P mat bat Isnp'
0f;^b^ Ibij^
'n|^ :' '
hi
o
so apt iara-ab^
'^0/'
f|8t cbpae
g|oi^i4; - > ; ^ '
te^ef;^'abld^^ >;:" ''>.'
Beayen's gipat
r^di^idtarir
c^<^<^a3^aii^ that more
tban-!fivp-soorp/^etra^^
tt^rapght; for pthers-sootbed tie
Irart of.tears,
mmxm
' ' * - - 1
''v;.'>'i:-iC
c^Jpe nppa-
i^jp^^soa*B pveatfni ao long, m
T^rs a^o "in
ij^^^once for
fbid^ fiar public workdid riot* bin-
|[er 1^ from
jp^bxnpn in tiie higbcPi sensp
nnfaiUngin: her^^^'# bejf!
and in her b^iui^ jto
guiB^. The haAid of dealh made
l^pnng an again, the'' face
.;where a hundred y^re of life had
left its record. . -
ekgressed itself in flowers. The
Woman's Clnbjbf whiph JSdiTs.^^
plspn was a bhartpr meiuber, and
the ftolor Clnb ^ntj^bntes ' * '
'"Her body a JiiBside
The spot Qverlppks the large Quak
er meeting house where Mrs- i^ich^
plson^orshipped in her youth and
ieaitly womahh^ at 'Waynesville,
Ohio.. / .4 '
i Qn Wednesday morning, SepJ;
121^ the family with the remains,
of'tlipir beloved mother arrived at
iC^ayhesvllle and after a, short but
impressiveservice at Miami Ceme';
^ _ .!_ .1 _ _ W ^ _-
teittiiiesiii
SVjX^g
^A:s>,ii:
1- -i4L^fje:ia:?>; ''V'^.
'90.y ^a^V^>-^'.-
-.t *1' '&i> :; yi'i '"t -7
Fogut^infpnairtipfr^^a^
jiBKir iSmt^ on 1
,let:^oxipU^ ipi
lateri^ i toe
* . / , ' ' '. ' "'
' fk . : '' '' .*' :'' '' ..
4l>H.rl^4UK1SK;- .i^r^P;...:^
. H *c,-
LoriSTfti^
The laxative .'effect
Iain's Stomaobaaud Lix
so agreeable ajpd sbna
hardly realise that;it is
a medicine. Th,ese\tabl
indigestion, ^ojrsaleb
warts
eber-^*^
mmm
n^m
wmsmw^
v3vj'?;^i
11
iiQfi^t )&ii AiHA>iBi.^Afv'Kw3 +'ii'- ^^3^0svil|6: Slid ifteiKH!.#ii&ijt>?^^
"5
wB-f(t^irair.^g arWa^^
/>.* !#'-.tJ!.i"v\'.^
;les^^ol^^ lite 3^^ A jsamhej^ df loti^time*
itfc-iii -*^-^' " 1''%/' * r _'* K'.-- "'* w":*. . ^.v
[teoe of Her
|LI;.;-)/;.!'^Z.;^--.''! '/"?^' .'* ' *
-tfaa
^:.ati.ai!^
^||^|i^i%l^s the while sho
) wri^les
i__ ^^
oh t|^{li]>s as i^she said
^owi Secret savethe
./ '. '
we: feel
JotfjMdn;'
jhsn not ol^veJi^ sonl
ii-iiu^-0ht thiy:i7|li^isa:W
0^6 at
of
of child-
h we oali the
^ni bes^ the maiden and
iiil| to^gieirt her iinth the
l^et^hahies ho later Ibve
grae^them with a smile
J^e I^ieh^^ was^^a^^fia ^
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jast toshow ho^ gl^oitecah^
The day ii done5.the feiryor of the
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c^aiges goldennay redder than
gbld^ in the Wesft making eyery'
ling look anspeakabljr heahtiful,
hrith 'the rich -e^algeace yrhieh it
^eds on everyside.,
86 -God permitted this dear ohe
long after the aUotted 4hyee score
!l^ears and httman life and
after her daty in this, world Was
done/to hang in the Westi, that we
might see how "^eantifhl she^^^ w
Yes, God was good to h^ . #ith
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ed her Hiis salvation.
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naratH^
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sxlvaula'-Vandal!
St.' iDodis.vW
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'Lines .iB'Ma t.Ftu
. t)i8 ^reat-'Worlilt!!
Tbe nuroau a<Mr
win; . Obto r In : el
'Soo!tt*v. bookie
boarding houaca.-
cao bu'obtained r)
able) iBfortnatlo
CxpoelUott.
Colonist Tlokc
wftatvTU P
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Califurala. tbe H
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'Eight hour<
ihoMo tireless
King's ITewIJ
always ftt^wor
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patSon, sloh hi
aoIi/HTer nn4;
plraf<iiQt, safi
Louis \/*% 1 :
OdlonWt iXiclt
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meaiaj>g. max oi wrwia in townm thtf
SabWth morning fomid:him on .,-uu
; ^ .-. . >. , ^ ^no personal knowlooge ot^tno mro
to this often silen gathering,
^1 'That hh) Caivanistic neighbors Cough Remedy. "Last; January,"
"""""^^LtBemad Ws pei^onal ,rth and aUe y^ ' my l>al^ tookad^d
K::^4yn^p^^ j 4 , ,, ' 4S oold and at one time I feared she
OTOer ^^vm^oos is givenin have pneumonia, bat oneof
disposal of ius master fines, myneighbors told me howthis rem
C ^ i 'Friend didnotallowtheir members dyhad cored?heri little boy and'I-
take part inpreparauonsfmr TOT. began givingto myl .baby at once
!r'Cenrt>.hoa8e settling.'Aozne. ^ . 'j" -i*' -4,. ii; '>' ii*'' -and it-soon -cnrod- her.O'I.heartily.
i, WheBtfaesmnmtmsoame" ' thanh tbemanofactnrors of Cham-
Uy T^vfr^ on to the other ^ imj>osod lirxea, berittin's Cough Cure Hemedy for
uTinff a widow and flva Nw^Ison^s neighbors were pliuang ^ great a cure wi^inmy ist;^ a wioow ana UTe ar 'och. 1 cannot recommend it too
itogrieyefor thedeported. offloers of the^iSa.--4aenOTieara jjj
ws of this death is a g^eat , Caiitttina i hoiatnll who read this^willtry it
to Langhead and gyi6 T^eir troop and:be oonvinoed as I was." For
fc as slacJtt2^:iaea&oif Mr.in a field in.front of the sale by Louis hiay.
For talcing no part in his
SUteVtoJuncfeon,ofin9w^impp^^
ftrt ^ tTpon his refo^l to; .pay . thc for>n
mea;m.aoa.iha{^niot -^--;^ . * " -v:-;i.-- ,...::^--/-'.-apaiiciai' .tuamng.^.'Xvswii^Mf^bofla^^
last SP^t sffyynvl offioera- who ,rOftm ::for ,caUeCM ^6idy >)uiar]r:oc ttaebi. pau^i'^eciEeaott
thev mitered the house, ejminiiied yiui an cxpeBw airec^^^^
nl woeiw: his handsome quMriont; Money adrancea: tor oxpensea
*r several^ artlcles then: w<mt: to the xiick*ei*aai^ea eoTeivjie.- fttanasext &tO'
^^^^^ :.' .',1'..' \''' jSiid^iv^ye*wayayonngheife^^^^^ ,C^^,BuiW|^/CMcaw. ;.i.;:-;:;:-y/;;^'-U8^
fibilh^itfbUdc,'*^^ aold:iiar'ataU?^oii,;JciE5^ . '
aStp^a^AodrliVfW of the fine c^;o> M TT^ AYTOW ^ OTTIO
^ii<)&-..xeoot^- is nepMsary. rest" ofthe: money.-. That-waa.the VJiXVf.
i i: : ^^ lastyWbie^ erer had from coUect Jffj ' {jfj r (IP fBB VK?
*^^5^ togofl^ersrsomeof hiagood neigh ^ " *" """"
(knewif ItVere done .byone or
IB-pH:::sfr} or ts to
: ; Ko:d^ her in average
Popalaticm. increasing at the
^ ASaVidWyilJ: ^Intetested in aU iphilanttirbpic ^hleannum. Thoi
Ep your nlVayWfe and pay>iovemTO^ he *^hed Jn the .^ti- third ^^y in Ohio In .volume of,
! .' Blttvery: oause. For twenty yiii>. nih^or^tare. 1
^VpOT cent interest on tern- *he home of Jane nnd yttientiue
^poVary [<iin] depOidU and'lficbolso the re>tmtf 'ptnce for ESTATE that wiU .don^e In^ v^
int ontimedeposh, j>tyi*ble:floelag; fagitivoai fr.>m liiird tasi Teer, or a nlc HOME cm
tnually. Qat. your mdo^-.masters in seuroh of liberty nnn ^sy^p^jments.
WE BUY. SELL AND TRADE
' day yon ^nt it
apitaU $1,000,000
jnow over 1500,000.000/
hrg&nized in Mav, ISSti
i to; date over t?, 000,000
See or write to
jolten bearing mark* <>f v^ip atd
ibrandihglron. It was not uausiiai: a nfiUion :doUar business
!for hischildren to.hear inthedead Send for Booklet v
jof night;a loud rap at the door and Ali: S. BENN.& CQ.,
;in reply to their father's inquiry, 8. . Cor. F^th dr JeSerson Streote
f^n, 3/J |"Whp is thererv hear/^Afriend;:*
iMVPDQ gf^- A |thenin response ^'Unload andcome
irlYciCf^* h>ecretajy. Xhere"vwuld be oommutlon
East Second Street, teloyr, a waft of oooking through
JT, ,v - - OHIO. *he house and in the morning they
jwould find on pallets 6a. parlor and
. hall fidors a, camp of curli^ heads
~ Iapd dusky brows. After, resting fm:
theday the next night would fi.ud.
' them on their way tothe next under,
ground station, tweaty'miles distant-
He volaed his tnombership in: thf
* Society of Friends ;un;^l the Yearly
Meeting diKOaraged it& taemberi-
from taking part in the agifcationhf
j slavery, .he withdrew .and
t devoted xnouy y^ears to anti slayers:
jmovementA-.:: i ""'
/t'{'(-//c/r- ' ' ;''Jc'-ci. / //IcW-dx SOif^'OV-
fetoMiahed 1828.
A2f SEEDS.
ireial [Fertilizer
[NDER TWINE.
DAYTON. OHIO.
DO YOU NEED
A clock:,
WATCH, BING, .
watch OaAIN,
CHABM. SET-' '
BILVEB FORKS, J
KNIVES OB
SPOONS ; OR AN .
ALARM CLOCK
or; anything in the
Jewelry line?
gOmetoMRand i wiLU
GIVE TOU THR BR8TUF
VJOOUS ARD PBIC^ .
impairing a; Spedalty.
S%hlt
:^,ug'8,Ne7Life^
ai'miyaa* work,;;
iug indigestion.:;
pation. sick henc
acli, lirer andbO
plea-^koit, safe, -l
iLome if'i 1 rdj
Colonist Ticket^
South-west via t
March 1st aod ir>.C
!i^tl class Qolunlsi-tte'
Indisuoi^rercUotles;^
. sas; I'ttxas:a-u<l<i Kew.^
Pnosylani;;i^lDt^
Tickci Agenb of these
It Rave
P. A, Dauforth
suffered for six n
ful rUUQlDg BOX
writes that Buct
wholly ourod it
ulocrs, J wounds;;
sal vein the worici
Only 25c. Sold 1
Sftvtd I
"Mywl!
moniawhi
and 1 bel
AND TAf
Coffee^ of
C
- *>
liliiipittflilisSii^fepi!^^ iii89iii'il#|pi
^Tr fc^l] dpote iS3p;Sa^iii!^li^1
ti^^fiposit^ 'or"a JTOxm''".^'' 5;
^aSty. 0S. yoc*' W^ paymepia. J
If^^cm want It gAf tve box, Sgia AJfD'lERAB
>italv SijOoOfOo'o^
(>w.:oyer t5oo,ooo:ooa
jaoized in H&v, X893
^ ^ttte over $2,000,000
- See or write to
',We do .a million.:: doUar. ImftlnMa;
ot;^'c^^ ta hoar in tliedead anpuaUy, Said for Booklet,
jctf ^ghtalondrap at thedoorsod M. S. BENN.& CO,,
theiriather'a inquiry, S. E. Cor, Fifth'&Jefferson Streets
j" Who is there?", bear *tA friend;"
UATTON, OHIO.
MVPI?<? "Unload and oojne'
. f a 1 wouMhe a"oommotion
Ast Second Street, Stelio^i. a::^ft of oooldng
[p i ;.,>;.r :. ? - , : OHIO. hpi^and inthe motnipg
[K^idljBhediSSS. ["wo^dfij^o^^^
iiiM^iw^^i^^M^^.-.^hali.floors^.a.' camp, of corl^ hea^
''" brows, After resria^ fo^-
lENTS
DO YOU NEED
A CLOCK.
WATCH. RING,
WAXOH CHAIN,
CHARH. SET
SILVER FORKS.
KNIVES OR
SPOONS; OR AN
ALARAt CLOCK
or anything in the
Jewelry line?
ooMBTOxiKand i will
GtyBTOu ruz brst os-
aooM A.sb paicjBs.
^puhring 9^ Sp^alty..
trBilCUSTER^
WaynesvUie, Ohio,
the day the next night would fiipd
;.'j; - ;. ''/i:-'-; ',y:^: $ham<ai-their,wny:tb;thehex'i
:';jV 'V Ij \ v.: k^^Qiidst^cnj.twehty.niB^
,-;:,Jr :. : ' ' ; ' ; Si^ty of:Friei^8/.|antii:the
i:.- '''.: . ^ ^eting/diaco;ura^d'-ltB^ membi2fi>.
t^ing pit in the agitotion of
6idl !FfertiiiZ6r iritharew ahd
rtco Wx/iKtd * deTOted manyye^ to anUslarery
Uck T^iNE. . mov^en'ta.' ', '
avoabout ^bree carloads need of a free town
j; at one time apparent to afew phil
anthiopic people at H^yc^sbtxr^
jT^ ' " Ohio. The chief doniributoiw it
vo on hands a veryla^e this. moyemenfe were Isaac Falii-
. i ' . and'Valentine Nicholson.- Thej
KENXS ^ built an aMdemy,; with aball ahovt ;
_; ! which they dedicated to free speech/
AND: AlAFJKERS in school and recitation roOms'he;
fcdeSi^atod best mat^ loWhere was to benodlstincttoab* j
St^macK
tot^iven^enttolcll The toiticm to
rite for fihe illnstrater! oompeiisatioppf the teacher, hfem. debUlty our jiali^
bb^g uianynewideas bere of the Society of Friends wer *;
s:ot prices very much the i^tmotora. The Ute X>r,
UoT,oi Tvi:, son Eohbe WAS the flrafc. thnn TV - In a H^tbv.fomirflr3L^
ip..i*v jprivrn very mucn \ r ' .7 "zf^.
QsnaL This will:,be sent firat, then Dr iomittih>.ciartbln^
on an Aontt- ^ O. W. Nxon: sud Ws bfother wa Atid reednshuciJya
donit fsU O. \^ton:a^
;anythingnin bar liae. the late fara^ only caxre irkiireaUon amdhaya^p^^: Hit ihtr
Tkylbr of Indiana^ The school ra ell sion^
*? r - 7;; pnp^whoav^edthem^elv^esbflfc *etciin^i;r , *
^ ' 7 -- ' ... Pnyi%w. bocamb lotding citizen'
^vbry,.d!^rij>tipn bf-bat, .i^-'Ob^nand Waahiagtoni/.;.; .';:
fch'-
mnifcI^e'W':iris*taeM'of'-<^n^
Bottiw,m^,....sr.oo:-s6s'4usafer2^^^^ ^7^
)./}!<!' y^cU Za,
liilMll
rtv._!.r,r.,:;%.lc.^.,.-.;
^xJ--'' v*-V
Cur.dofT.
"My deoghJe
. Junps. ^Ta ri ; lungs. Tc tri
She bta never
z: y.-'.*1MMM ? ^v'yy-i^".:
- "
id ^
,'1'
VAl&AjV.iJt A/iCHO^SdA^
Executor
Krtdarpod tb; Gcri^ dbd wtile wiMb
,t2kft.iuu}!|^ifl^ peom
liftvine *Mi^tej|^fti&si aaid^
JiriU he. aafiM vri^i by pjneeentitig
ftfta&ft io ^ WAbraa J. Kasos.
5sr^wwwwa!wvsaie!ffl
Beiose buyixigai|iqwex> or bu
COMSTOCK & SY]
S^Wavxxesvilla andvlcbiity ^i^fwayxxesvillfi andvicinity
irlilfall Hne ofnapairgw^l>c
'|9votfaaxjt' wavnenyilb
J. W, BARBiSAtJ g
BEjOiERB IN
FLOUR
Mills at Waynesville and Leb,
f f -^^ynesville people -sbonld <
No. 35. , All goods will be
promptly'.,.. : ,i ' IJi",
A CASE OF LA GRIPP.
. is iDOBi daUgerouft libitB after^
*; If yba tjQU^; if y<w lunga^re week; it your heart tr
your BtOTuich. and kidheyshre out of o^et; if youare we
ritabla, without Bppetlto^Oftnhot sleep or rest, you ore
the effect ol thlB aerye-wrecklng disease. ; Toay nerYOUJ
hftuftted, ss^ the organs of body are doing .their work* po<
To restore tbexu.to b^ib,, take
ai miles: NERVPB
^ It gOM to the wW of trouble abd boglas operatipna at ;o
up lbo nervous system^becauseit ia a nerve foodrUnorT<
^ves sta^g^ and vigor to every organ- of the body.;
"Nerrfnb never fttUa to reelcre perfect health. , ^
''I -wfl^ih'bed^ve weeks with, XiaQrippe^ my oonsti)
pletely Shattered. Doctor treoted me daily 'with
A Cooid;h6t:^v 8lP or g<rt any roat. I weighed 1
After43dhg Dr. Miles Nervine, and Nerve and Di"
.wn^i ^hjBd>I42 pounds and amfn perfect healtli
,WiDKEE;ei3!.7|^
Dr. Miles' Ne^ne lasold uoder a posittye gu&rai
Brat bottle does'adr^^liHsneflt. your druggist wilLretuTO: yoi
itrtandhftt^bfMteiraarwn ^
lu 4nv f mOK. PUBLIC lOTBAKY
WAOTSVUUS, OffiO.4S068
513/897-'i26.
3
- ^
H
iwni r H rK^e
|t
S4 ff>|N,
'" N
e
Ssgs
O^gw
;e&g
1 i
%
I
I
I
ii "3 Vu
s I
Ca -
5 5 $
^ ^ <j
w> ^
^1
/[jlCHOkSoiJ F(t^ _3_
IT MADE ME VERY DETERMINED THAT IF I GAVE MY CHILDREN NOTHING
FUSE THEY SHOULD HAVE AN EDUCATION.
When I was 20 my attention was called to the crime of suvery.
Then many slaves were helped to freedom by Abraham Allen^ Dr. and
Edward Brooks of Oakland^ 0. (5 mi. fr. Wilmington). My friends
were denouncing these men as SLAVE-STEALERSv and I NOT KNOWING ANY
letter joined in> thinking, them wrong and I said so to mother.
Mother said> "Esther thee does not know the crime of slavery &ought
NOT JUDGE THESE MEN." FrOM THAT TIME I WAS DRIVEN & INVESTIGATE
& READ, THAT I MIGHT KNOW MORE ABOUT SLAVERY.
Thomas Hibbon of Wilmington, 0. was a strong anti-slavery man,
SO I WOULD GO TO MID-WEEK QUAKER MEETING, THEN GO THRU TOWN TO GET
r
ALL I COULD READ FROM WEEK TO WEEK. "Jay'S InQUIRY"? CONVERTED ME
COMPLETELY TO BE ONE OF THE ANTI-SLAVERY &TO HEAR ALL 1 COULD &
TO HELP ON THE UNDER-GROUND RaIL-ROAD,, AS IT WAS TERMED THENj THIS
LED TO THE ACQUAINTANCE OF MEN & WOMEN LONGER IN THE WORK FOR
HUMANITY, I BECAME INTERESTED IN WoMAN'S RiGHTS,, DIETETIC REFORM^
THE CRUELTY &WRONG OF KILLING ANIMALS TO SATISFY OUR APPETITE AND
THE RIGHT OF THE MATTER.
The Friends were noted for the good table they could set. Our
I'ABLE HAD ROAST CHICKEN &ALL THAT GOES WITH IT. AYOUNG MAN COMING
TO DINE WITH US REFUSED THE ANIMAL PART OF THE MEAL AND WE WANTED
HIS REASONS FOR IT. He HAD LECTURED ON DIET^REFORM> AND HIS TALK
TOOK HOLD OF US, THO' NONE OF US. STOPPED EATING MEAT AT ONCE. HiS
REASONS FOR A VEGETABLE DIET WERE SO CLEAR &REASONABLE THAT TIME
BROUGHT US MORE &MORE TO THINK HE WAS RIGHT. FaTHER WAS AGOOD
PROVIDER &RAISED HIS OWN HOGS &BEEVES. He WAS IN THE HABIT OF
FATTING TEN YOUNG HOGS THAT WOULD WEIGH ABOUT 200 LBS. EACH, &
KILLING ONE BEEF FOR HIS FAMILY. ThIS YEAR MY SISTER LyDIA EmILY,
N
Od

^erj
p.
;eg
ts3<v5g
s s
9
brother David and I rid guts &tried out the lard^ while brother
7
0^. READ FROM Dr. GrAHAM's WORK^ ON THE UNWISDOM OF MEAT EATING.
He CALLED MEAT CARRION^ AND OTHER NAMES DISGUSTING TO THE THO'T
OF EATING MEAT^ SO FROM THAT DAY TO THIS I HAVE NOT TASTED MEAT.
Once after an illness 1 tho't it would taste good. Sister Susan
said; "This desire will pass if you wait." and it did.
When I met John 0. Wattles^ heard him on dietetic reform^ on
^Ioman's Rights and temperance as well as slavery I thot him a
great as well as a good man. Then came this terrible fever in our
family^ & HE WAS SO GOOD & SO HELPFUL WE FELT WE COULD &DID LOVE
E/CH OTHERv BUT WERE IN NO HASTE TO BE MARRIED. In MaY 1844 THE
TIME SEEMED RIPE FOR THE FULFILLMENT OF OUR DREAM. FiVE YEARS
LATER OUR FIRST BABY CAME. JoHN HAD BEEN 12 YEARS WITHOUT EATING
MEAT I SEVEN. So OUR CHILDREN WERE BORN WITH NO WISH FOR MEAT.
As CHILDREN THEY NEVER ASKED FOR IT. We DID NOT SAY "YOU MUST NOT
EAT meat/' but told THEM WHY IT WAS NOT GOOD FOR ANY OF US. SOME
DOCTORS IN LATER YEARS THOT THE GIRLS WOULD BE STRONGER IF THEY
ATE MEATy BUT ALL GAVE IT UP AFTER ATRIAL. NOT ONE LIKED IT OR
COULD TAKE IT EXCEPT AS A MEDICINE.
The children were given milk and cream^ but never butter. I
ONCE LEFT THE TWO OLDER GIRLS AT Dr. WeLCH'S FOR THE DAY^ WHILE
WE WENT TO Lafayette [Indiana] to do some trading. Mother Welch
BUTTERED THE TOAST &PUT IT ON THEIR PLATES. CeLESTIA WAS BOUT 5
yrs. old. She looked at her toast &then her sister's^ took both
PUSHED THEM TO ONE SIDE &ASKED FOR "CLEAN BREAD." ThE WeLCH's
NEVER TIRED OF THIS STORY.
eo
i^it
O SQi/5
Qd
>JQ
$
-5-
1babried John 0Wattles, May 3d 1MI|, whose one idea above
AU others has aCOHHUHITY life, and as fob he 1HEARTILY JOINED
nrn TILL WE HADE THE TRIAL IN H-OOAN, to. 0.1 THERE AL.RSE FARH
HAS BOUGHT AND OVER ONE HUNDRED GATHERED WHO THOT THEY WERE RE
POR COHHUHITY LIFE, BUT WERE, IN REALITY, FAR FROH IT. ThE SE FH
PAEHENT was FREDOHINANT in host OF THEN. HuSBAND COULD HOT SEE IT
AS 1DID. In SIX MONTHS THAT FARM WAS TAKEN BACK FOR WANT OF A
honest and true business-like bargain. The verbal agreement said
WHAT OUR PEOPLE COULD AND WOULD HAVE DONE. In DRAWING UP THE
writings in the bargain Mr. Hvm said "keep my creditors off Ma
WILL LUMP IT AND HAVE ITj SO MUCH DOWNa AND SO MUCH IN SO MAN
months." OUR FOLKS SAID NOa WE CANNOT PAY IT SOa BUT CAN ONL ^
VERBALLY AGREED TO. PyM HAD THE WRITING AND TOOK ADVANTAG
there were some hundred or MOREa and it was the beginning of
w R NO ONE CAN TELL ALL THE INCONVENIENCE AND SORROW IT COST
Tof'uS ISAW HOW LITTLE WE WERE PRBPARFD TO LIVE ACOMMUNITY
'''' ToHnTi TEirFROM THIS COMMUNITY TO CINCINNATI. He BECAME
,jrWITH HIRAM 0I.ORES WHO WAS ENGAGED IN -HIN. . ^
high school, he gave us encouragement that he could give
missionary work in Cincinnati among the colored peopl .
UoiES Anti-slavery Society uoined in and he was paid asmall
SALARY FOR HIS WORK. * WHOSE
HP ,J WAYTLESl FUBL.SHEB AF.RER^" FOR "0
VPRHB WERE -REAB AH. CRCULAYE.' AU.Y YEACWER . YFF ARV^
BPPARYHEHY fell ill, ah. I "AG ASKE. YO Y.KE HER
HOY reyurh, go I taughy hearly ywo yearg.
VALENTINENICHOLSON COLLECTION hltp://www.spcc.com/ihsw/oni299.htm
- . VALENTINE NICHOLSON COLLECTION,
1841-1915
lof5
CoDcction #s:
M641
OM 299
UAAtmAJuJ2
Table of Contents
User Information
Historical Back<2round
Scope and Content Note
Box and Folder Listing
Cataloging Information
Processed by:
Paul Brockman,
8 November 1993
USER INFORMATION
VOLUME OF COLLECTION: 5 manuscript boxes, 1oversize folder,(1.75 linear feet)
COLLECTION DATES; Inclusive 1841-1915, Bulk 1841-1890
PROVENANCE: Theodore L. Steele and Brandt F. Steele, 1001 W. 58th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208,
22 September 1993
RESTRICTIONS: None
REPRODUCTION RIGHTS: Permission toreproduce or publish material in this collection must be
obtained inwriting from theIndiana Historical Society.
RELATED HOLDINGS: Meredith Nicholson Papers (M 221), T. L. Steele Papers (M 263), Valentine
Nicholson Transcripts (M 642)
ACCESSION NUMBER: 93.0674
NOTES: Transcripts ofportions ofthis collection are contained in M642, Valentine Nicholson
Transcripts.
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
3/24/98 7:45 AM
VALENTINE NICHOLSON COLLECTION http://www.spcc.com/ihsw/om299.htm
. Valentine Nicholson (1809-1904), the son ofDaniel and Elizabeth Nicholson, was bom in Clinton
County, Ohio. Nicholson was a member ofthe Society ofFriends (Quaker) in his early life, but he
withdrew from the faith because ofhis ardent abolitionist feelings which were discouraged by the Friends.
His abolitionist work includedthe housing offleeingslaves from the south and the establishment of a free
town hall and academy in Harveysburg, Ohio. ValentineNicholson married Jane Wales and they
producedthree daughters, Elizabeth, MaryEllenandMartha Nicholson McKay, wife ofHorace McKay.
The Nicholsons also experimented in communalism with their establishment of "Prairie Home," a farm
near Urbana, Ohio that attracted "inmates" fromEurope, the east coast, and the middlewest. Nicholson
was also interested in "Spiritualism" and was involved in seances. Nicholson later lived in Wayne and
Marion counties in Indiana and died in his home on Broadway in Indianapolis.
Thecollection also contains a number of the papers ofNicholson's brother-in-law, Thomas N. Wales, fl.
1860s-1890s, who lived inHarveysburg, Warren County, Ohio, andwho served inthe Ohiostate
legislature.
Sources: Information in collection.
2 of 5
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE
The collection centers around the correspondence anddiaries of Valentine Nicholson andthe
correspondence ofNicholson's brother-in-law, Thomas N. Wales. Nicholson's papers include letters from
family, friends, and associates regarding his personal, political, spiritual, philanthropic endeavors, and
some legal and business matters, 1845-1892. Topics include Nicholson's involvement in the underground
railroad and abolitionism, his experiment incommunalism, and his involvement inspiritualism.
There also are personal letters to and from other members ofNicholson's family including his wife, Jane,
and daughters, Elizabeth (Libbie), Mary Ellen, and Martha in Harverysburg, Ohio and Indianapolis,
Indiana. These letters are chiefly family related in nature. There are a number ofletters of a personal
naturebetween Valentine andLibbie Nicholson. The collection alsocontains Nicholson's diaries, writings,
and newspaper clippings. The diaries include daily happenings, meetings attended, and views on subjects
of interest to him suchas spiritualism andreligion in general.
Also included are reminiscences ofValentine Nicholson and scrapbooks contaimng subjects suchas
abolitionism, literature, philosophy, and spiritualism, and an account by Martha N. McKay written in
1895 ofNicholson's trip east in 1843 to attend an abolitionist meeting. There isalso biographical and
genealogical information about Nicholson and his ancestors and hand copied articles from publications,
1844. Inaddition, there is a handwritten manuscript by Nicholson containing information about Prairie
Home including land information and names ofthose involved intheventure. Also included isa
composition book containing Valentine Nicholson's record ofseances he attended, n.d., and ascrapbook
kept by Martha N. McKay, 1880s-1910s.
The collection also contains correspondence ofrelatives including the Wales, McKay, Adams, and Fallis
families. Most of the letters involve correspondence to Thomas N. Wales, chiefly of Harveysburg, Warren
County, Ohio, and Columbus, Ohio, and mainly are ofa personal nature regarding family news, religious
views, and general information, 1850s-1890s.
3/24/98 7:45 AM
VALENTINE NICHOLSON COLLECTION
http://www.spcc.com/ihsw/oni299.htin
3 of 5
BOX AND FOLDER LISTING
BOX1: Correspondence and Papers. 1841-1915
FOLDER # and CONTENTS
1. Correspondence, 1841-1849
2. Correspondence, 1850-1859& n.d.
3. Correspondence and Papers, 1859-1865
4. Letter From Valentine to Libbie Nicholson, July 4,1881
5. Biographical Sketch of Valentine Nicholson, n.d.
6. Reminiscences, August 7, 1894
7. Nicholson Family Correspondence, 1854-1876
8. Nicholson FamilyCorrespondence, 1878-1915
9. NicholsonFamilyCorrespondence, n.d.
10. Nicholson Family Letters to ThomasN. Wales, 1868-1898
11. Wales Family Correspondence, 1854-1876
12. Wales FamilyCorrespondence, 1887- 1898
13. Wales Family, General Correspondence, A-E, 1857-1898
14. Wales Family, General Correspondence, F-N, 1849-1898
15. Wales Family, General Correspondence, P-W, 1855-1896
16. McKay Family Correspondence, 1864-1898
17. Adams FamilyCorrespondence, 1886-1898
18. FallisFamilyCorrespondence, 1850-1887
19. Hand Copied Excerpts FromPublications, 1844
20. (OM299)Prairie Home Information, n.d.
BOX2: Scranbooks. Spiri*"n"gni and Philosophy.n.d.
FOLDER # and CONTENTS
1. Spiritualism, n.d.
2. Spiritualism (2 scrapbooks), n.d.
3. Spiritualism, n.d.
4. Philosophy andLiterature, n.d.
BOX3: Scrapboote. 1880s-1910s
FOLDER # and CONTENTS
1. Orson S. MurrayObituaries &Life, 1885
2. Martha N. McKay Scrapbook, 1880s-1910s
3. Loose Copies ofClippings Removed From Martha McKay Scrapbook, 1880s-1910s
BOX 4: Diaries and Writings. 1879-1898 & n.d.
FOLDER # and CONTENTS
1. Diary, 1879-1881
2. Diary, 1879-1885
3/24/98 7:45 AM
VALENTINE NICHOLSON COLLECTION
4 of 5
3. Miscellaneous Pages From Diary, n.d
4. Martha N. McKay, Account of 1843 Journey, 1895
5. Poetry, n.d. (2 volumes)
6. Writings and Newsclippings, n.d.
BOX5: Diaries, 1866-189S; Composition BookfSeancesL n.d.
FOLDER # and CONTENTS
1. Diary, 1866-1871
2. Diary, 1876-1877,#]
3. Diaries(2), 1870-1895 (SpirituaUsm) & 1876- 1877, #2
4. CompositionBook (Seances), n.d.
5. Copies of Clippings Removed FromDiary, 1876-1877, #1
CATALOGUING INFORMATION
MAIN ENTRY: Nicholson, Valentine, 1809-1904
SUBJECT ENTRIES: Nicholson, Valentine, 1809-1904
Wales, Thomas N., fl. 1860-1890s
McKay, Martha Nicholson, 1843-1934
Nicholson family
McKay family
Adams family
Murray, Orson
Spiritualism Ohio
Underground railroadOhio
Slavery-United States Anti-slavery movements
Abolitionists Ohio
PhilanthropistsOhio
Collective settlementsOhio Urbana
Religious communitiesOhioUrbana
Diaires AuthorshipReligious aspects
Religious life
Poetry
RecipesOhio
Folk medicineOhio Formulae, receipts, prescriptions
HerbsOhioTherapeutic use
TravelersOhio
Voyages and travels
Fathers and daughtersOhio
Prairie Home (Urbana, Ohio)
Urbana (Ohio)
Harveysburg (Ohio)
http://www.spcc.com/ihsw/om299.htm
3/24/98 7:45 AM
VALENTINENICHOLSON COLLECTION hl1p://ww\v.spcc.coni/ihsw/om299.hlm
Click below to go to;
Historical Society home page
Library Division
Other IHS collection guides
Other archival collections are also available at the Indiana State Library and the Indiana State Archives.
Both of these state agencies as well as theIndiana Historical Society are housed inthe Indiana State
Library andHistorical Building at 315 West Ohio Street, Indianapolis, IN.
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