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OurChildren

About
Supplement to The Jewish Standard November2014
Giving Thanks
Diabetes in Children
Crafting with Leaves
Useful Information for the Next Generation of Jewish Families
2
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
First breath. First smile. First steps.
Treasured moments begin here.
The MotherBaby Center at Chilton Medical Center.
Whether you are planning to start a family or adding to one, Chilton Medical Center invites you to
begin this exciting journey with us. Our MotherBaby Center encourages moms-to-be to personalize
their birthing experience in a way that makes it memorable for the entire family. We offer private
rooms with personalized visiting hours, hydrotherapy for labor, a celebratory gourmet dinner and
a Moms spa. For special care, theres a Level II Nursery with board certied neonatologists and
pediatricians available 24/7. And with caring nurses, expert medical staff, and our seamless
connection to Morristown Medical Center, its no wonder why so many women choose to have
their babies here with us, close to home.
For more information about parent education classes, please call 973-831-5475.
For a referral to a Chilton Obstetrician
or Certied Nurse Midwife,
call 1-888-4AH-DOCS
or visit atlantichealth.org/chilton
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November 2014
Useful, Current, Accurate Information for Jewish Families
All the Worlds a Stage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Giving your children a love for the theater arts
Treasures from the Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Using leaves to make crafts and for activities
Generation G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Hitting the zoos with grandpa
Achieving Calm Parenting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
The simple and not-so-simple path
Winter Traveling with the Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Tips to making the getaway easier
Thanksgiving? Shabbat? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
When the world learns about the weekly meal ritual
November is Diabetes Awareness Month. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Expert doctor gives a primer on the condition
Getting Respect from Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
How to be the authority figure in your home
Simchas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Life cycle events that celebrate our children
Special Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Big Apple Circles holds autism-friendly show
bergenPAC Performing Arts School unveils special needs program
Thanksgiving Sweets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Desserts that cap off the family feast
Top Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Great picks for November
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Fun things to do in November
OurChildren
About
3
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
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Air Cannon Alley
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Giant indoor inatables
Private bounce and party rooms
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Field Trips
Class and Team Parties
Fundraisers and more!
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FIRST
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ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
AOC-4
4
T
hree mothers. There was mine, of course.
And then there were Tinas and Scotts.
Tinas mother, affectionately and respectfully re-
ferred to by me as Mrs. Fineberg well into my adult years,
came into my life early on, when I frst visited Tina for lunch
during the school day. Tina lived a block away from our el-
ementary school and with permission we were allowed to
go home for lunch. Since my house was much farther away,
Tinas house was a cool invite. I not only got to go out of the
school building, but I also got to trade my bagged cold lunch
of a soggy tuna sandwich for Mrs. Finebergs hot spaghetti
and cheese.
My friendship with Tina deepened through the years. So
did my friendship with Mrs. Fineberg.
Sometimes I would call Tina. If Mrs. Fineberg answered
the phone before Tina could pick up the extension in her bed-
room, I would wind up in a deep and long conversation with
Mrs. Fineberg much to Tinas chagrin.
On other occasions, when I visited Tina and her mother
was home and available, I would sit in the living room and
talk, and talk and talk to Mrs. Fineberg again, much to Ti-
nas chagrin.
Mrs. Fineberg was warm, funny, open, nonjudgmental
and she was not my mother. So when I would speak to Mrs.
Fineberg, I could get a mothers perspective without the oth-
er mother part.
Scotts mother, whom I called by her shortened name,
Lynn, for Carolyn, was geographically closer to me. Scott
lived down the block from us and we too became friends in
school. In high school, I used to go down the block and visit
with Scott, hang out in his downstairs rec room, which I re-
member was decorated with a geometrically patterned funky
carpet.
As my friendship with Scott deepened, so too did my
friendship with Lynn.
I remember sitting in her kitchen, decorated with a wet-
look foral design (very chic back in the day), talking to her
about any and everything.
Lynn was warm, funny, open, nonjudgmental, and again
not my mother. So, like with Mrs. Fineberg, when I would
speak to Lynn, I could get a mothers perspective without the
other mother part.
Both women were also new world and American-born,
in sharp contrast to my Polish-born mother, whose life was
shaped by her past in Europe and experience during the
Shoah.
Little did I know that what I had, in addition to my moth-
er, whom I loved very dearly to whom I was very close, were
two bonus mothers.
When I think about my bonus mothers I feel lucky. Lucky,
that in addition to my mother, I had the input and infuence
of these wonderful women, of blessed memory.
Whats more, it makes sense that they were my bonus
mothers because I still share a deep friendship with both
Tina and Scott and feel in some ways that they are like a sis-
ter and brother to me.
Of course, with my own children, I would love to be an
uber-mother, both original and bonus version, but I know
thats not possible.
I know that it takes a village.
Cheers,
musings from the editor
Dont Miss About Our Children in December
Published on November 28, 2014
Natalie Jay
Advertising Director
Peggy Elias
George Kroll
Karen Nathanson
Janice Rosen
Brenda Sutcliffe
Account Executives
About Our Children is published 11 times a year by the New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group,
1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666; telephone: 201-837-8818; fax: 201-833-4959.;
e-mail: AboutOC@aol.com.
OurChildren
About
Emuna Braverman
Rachel Harkham
Ed Silberfarb
Denise Morrison Yearian
Contributing Writers
MissionStatement
About Our Children is designed to help Jewish families in our area live healthy, positive lives that make the most of
the resources available to them. By providing useful, current, accurate information, the publication aims to guide par-
ents to essential information on faith, education, the arts, events, and child-raising in short, everything that todays
Jewish family, babies to grandparents, needs to live life to the fullest in northern New Jersey and Rockland County.
James L. Janoff
Publisher
Robert Chananie
Business Manager
Heidi Mae Bratt
Editor
Deborah Herman
Art Director
AdvisoryBoard
Dr. Annette Berger, Psy.D.
Psychologist, Teaneck
Michelle Brauntuch, MS,CCLS
Child Life Specialist, Englewood Hospital, Englewood
Hope Eliasof
Marriage and Family Therapist, Midland Park
Howard Prager, DC, DACBSP
Holistic Chiropractor, Oakland
Jane Calem Rosen
Marketing and Communications Specialist
Barry Weissman, MD
Pediatrician, Hackensack and Wyckoff
Cheryl Wylen
Director of Adult Programs and Cultural Arts
YM-YWHA of North Jersey, Wayne
OurChildren
About
5
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
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englewoodhospital.com
Oh, baby!
21 private maternity rooms
as new as me!
Healthgrades

5-Star rating, 2003-2013


I didnt think anything could impress mom as much as me.
But 21 new, private maternity rooms really made her smile.
(Apparently, your own huge bathroom is a really big deal when
youre not in a diaper.) Theres even a sleeper sofa for dad.
As for me, I am drooling over the new hospital nursery.
It gets my stamp of approval, with fancy equipment to
help keep me safe and sound.
Call to schedule a free tour: 201.894.3727
AOC-6
6
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
Fostering a Love
for Theater, Music and Dance in Children
DE NI S E MOR R I S ON Y E A R I A N
L
ive theatre, music and
dance performances have
taken center stage with
families. To begin fostering a
love for the performing arts,
experts suggest parents start
early and plan ahead.
Theres no set age to
begin taking children to live
performances, says enter-
tainment venue director and
educator Mark Fields. Whats
important is to start with age-
appropriate programming that
caters to childrens interests
and attention spans and build
from there.
Thats what Ann Hobbs did.
Around age 3, we started tak-
ing our younger two to the chil-
drens theater, says Hobbs of
Mary, now 17, David 12 and Nat-
alie 8. From there we checked
out other family programs, high
school productions and eventu-
ally shows with more detailed
plots.
Jennifer Abramczyk wasted
no time getting her daughters
acclimated to the stage either.
And by age 4 her youngest was
ready to see her frst Broadway
production, Beauty and the
Beast. At that point both girls
knew the storyline, but we still
prepped them by reading the
book and listening to the mu-
sic on tape before going, says
Abramczyk of Raley now 11 and
Annie 8. Since then they have
gone to a number of music, the-
atre and dance performances
in New York, Chicago, Philadel-
phia and other big cities.
Experts agree it is a good
idea to start with programs
based on familiar stories and
characters.
Read the parallel book and
listen to the songs on CD so
your child can make the con-
nection, says Marie Swajeski,
childrens theater educator and
program director. But dont
discount unfamiliar programs
if the content is interesting and
engaging.
Abramczyk didnt. Sev-
eral years ago the local sym-
phony had an organization
come that featured the story
of Beethovens life and music,
she says. Although my kids
werent acquainted with this
composer, they were mesmer-
ized by the performance and re-
tained what they had learned.
Before purchasing tickets,
inquire about audience partici-
pation and other activities as-
sociated with the program.
Some musical venues
hold an instrument petting
zoo before family concerts,
says Holly Grasso, education
and entertainment programs
coordinator. They bring in an
array of instruments, have vari-
ous stations where musicians
demonstrate how to play the
instruments and then invite the
children to test them out. The
families love it!
Also ask about backstage
passes as this can enhance the
experience or you can wait by
the stage door to see the actors
exit and then get autographs.
This is a ritual for some theater
lovers, especially those who
have been to several perfor-
mances of the same show.
Once the performance is
over, share impressions.
This is a great way to con-
nect with your kids and increas-
es the likelihood they will retain
the experience, says Fields.
Ask open-ended questions:
What was your favorite part?
What characters did and didnt
you like? Why? What did that
song remind you of?
Swajeski agrees. Parents
can glean a lot from this and
fnd out what their children did
and didnt understand about
the show, she says. It may
also initiate conversation about
other topics. For example,
many childrens shows have a
moral, so this is a good time to
talk it over and reinforce what
your child learned.
Abramczyk does this.
When the girls were younger
we would go around and each
person would say what we
liked about the performance
mainly about the characters,
music and outfts. Now theyve
become more discerning view-
ers and were discussing things
like sets and choreography: If
you were the director, would
you have changed anything?
Would you have put that move-
ment in?
Hobbs kids have fne-tuned
their viewing skills too. And
now they are getting in on the
act. After seeing Annie, Mary
thought shed like to start au-
ditioning for shows and landed
roles at a couple of community
theatres, her high school pro-
duction and All-State Theatres
Les Miserables, says Hobbs.
Natalie has done a few things
with childrens theater too and
really enjoys it. But what she
really thinks is cool is after the
performance when the chil-
dren come up and ask for her
autograph.
Denise Morrison Yearian is the
former editor of two parenting
magazines and the mother of three
children.
OurChildren
About
7
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
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SAT NOV 8
NOV 16
SAT NOV 29
NOV 30
DEC 6 & 7
DEC 21
JAN 25
FRI
JAN 30
2 & 5 PM
1 & 5 PM
7:30 PM
8 PM
1 & 4 pm
1 & 4 pm
1 & 4 pm
1 & 4 pm
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8
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
Amtrak and Enjoy the journey are service marks of the National Railroad Passenger Corporation.
Be transported in more ways than one.
Book your trip today at Amtrak.com or call 1-800-USA-RAIL
POINT A
Yes, a real live train
A sleepy little boy in my lap
Exploring different cars
Eggs or French toast?
Not one Are we there yet?
Trying on conductors hat
POINT BE
Leaf Crafting Turns Treasures
from the Trees Into Fun
DE NI S E MOR R I S ON Y E A R I A N
A
utumn is the time when leaves
transform into vibrant colors and
fall to the ground. Before the pal-
ette of hues fade, take a walk and pick
up an assortment of leaves, then enjoy
this hodgepodge of leaf-inspired activi-
ties and crafts.
Speckled Leaf Suncatcher
Items needed:
Large maple leaf
Black construction paper
Pencil
Ruler
Scissors
Two paper clips
Waxed paper
Crayon shavings
Warm iron
Glue
Hole punch
Yarn
How to do it:
1. Measure and cut two 6-inch squares from
black construction paper.
2. Temporarily paper clip the two squares
together then place paper on the table.
Center the maple leaf over the top black
square and trace around it with a pencil.
3. Use scissors to cut out the leaf pattern
you drew, making sure you cut through
both sheets of construction paper to form
a hollowed-out leaf frame. Remove paper
clips and set aside.
4. Place crayon shavings between two
sheets of waxed paper and iron until the
shavings melt. Measure and cut the waxed
paper design to a 5 -inch square.
5. Place the multicolored design between
the two black squares to create a stained-
glass leaf picture and frame. Glue design in
place.
6. Punch a hole at the top of the frame,
loop yarn through the hole and tie in a knot.
Hang picture in a sunny window.
Flaming Foliage
Items needed
Small, clear glass jar (jelly, pickle, salsa, etc.)
Small multicolored leaves, attened between
heavy books
White and yellow tissue paper
Thinned glue
Paintbrush
Votive or candle
How to do it:
1. Tear tissue paper into 1-inch pieces.
2. Cover the outside of the jar with thinned
glue using a paintbrush. Scatter leaves ran-
domly over the glued jar, pressing down to
mold them to the glass.
3. Apply glue over the leaves then place
small bits of tissue paper over the leaves
and entire jar until it is completely covered.
Let dry.
4. Place a small candle into the jar, light and
watch it glow!
OurChildren
About


LEARN TO SKATE
INTRODUCTION
TO SYNCHRONIZED SKATING

6 WEEKS
12 SESSIONS FOR $225.00
CLASSES START: SAT. NOV. 8
TH
DEC 20
TH

NO CLASS: 11/29
CLASSES MEET 2 TIMES A WEEK
MONDAYS 4:45
SATURDAY 11:00
The Basic Skills Program synchronized skating curriculum is a fun introduction to the five basic elements:
Circle
Line
Block
Intersection
Wheel
The Basic Skills Synchronized Skating Class meets twice weekly on Monday at 4:45pm and Saturday at
11:00am. A group can consist of six or more skaters to get started. The purpose of this curriculum is to
introduce skaters to synchronized skating, familiarize them with elementary holds, elements and transitions, and
continue to work on skating skills. Skaters must have passed Basic 2 to participate.
For further information, please contact Karen Cohen-Prosnitz at ext. 123.

10 NEVINS RD. WAYNE NJ 07470. 973-628-1500
WWW.ICEVAULT.COM


LEARN TO SKATE
INTRODUCTION
TO SYNCHRONIZED SKATING

6 WEEKS
12 SESSIONS FOR $225.00
CLASSES START: SAT. NOV. 8
TH
DEC 20
TH

NO CLASS: 11/29
CLASSES MEET 2 TIMES A WEEK
MONDAYS 4:45
SATURDAY 11:00
The Basic Skills Program synchronized skating curriculum is a fun introduction to the five basic elements:
Circle
Line
Block
Intersection
Wheel
The Basic Skills Synchronized Skating Class meets twice weekly on Monday at 4:45pm and Saturday at
11:00am. A group can consist of six or more skaters to get started. The purpose of this curriculum is to
introduce skaters to synchronized skating, familiarize them with elementary holds, elements and transitions, and
continue to work on skating skills. Skaters must have passed Basic 2 to participate.
For further information, please contact Karen Cohen-Prosnitz at ext. 123.

10 NEVINS RD. WAYNE NJ 07470. 973-628-1500
WWW.ICEVAULT.COM


LEARN TO SKATE
INTRODUCTION
TO SYNCHRONIZED SKATING

6 WEEKS
12 SESSIONS FOR $225.00
CLASSES START: SAT. NOV. 8
TH
DEC 20
TH

NO CLASS: 11/29
CLASSES MEET 2 TIMES A WEEK
MONDAYS 4:45
SATURDAY 11:00
The Basic Skills Program synchronized skating curriculum is a fun introduction to the five basic elements:
Circle
Line
Block
Intersection
Wheel
The Basic Skills Synchronized Skating Class meets twice weekly on Monday at 4:45pm and Saturday at
11:00am. A group can consist of six or more skaters to get started. The purpose of this curriculum is to
introduce skaters to synchronized skating, familiarize them with elementary holds, elements and transitions, and
continue to work on skating skills. Skaters must have passed Basic 2 to participate.
For further information, please contact Karen Cohen-Prosnitz at ext. 123.

10 NEVINS RD. WAYNE NJ 07470. 973-628-1500
WWW.ICEVAULT.COM
Leaf Preservation
Items needed:
12- to 18-Inch branch with leaves still on it
Liquid glycerin
Tall jar
Mallet
Newspaper
Spoon
How to do it:
1. Lay a branch that still has leaves on it
between several layers of newspaper.
2. Lightly tap the end of the stem with a
mallet until it breaks apart.
3. Fill the jar with 1 cup warm water and
cup liquid glycerin; stir.
3. Place stem in the jar. Within several days
the leaves will become thicker and their
color will change but not fade for several
weeks.
Denise Morrison Yearian is the former editor
of two parenting magazines and the mother
of three children.
9
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
AOC-9
Amtrak and Enjoy the journey are service marks of the National Railroad Passenger Corporation.
Be transported in more ways than one.
Book your trip today at Amtrak.com or call 1-800-USA-RAIL
POINT A
Yes, a real live train
A sleepy little boy in my lap
Exploring different cars
Eggs or French toast?
Not one Are we there yet?
Trying on conductors hat
POINT BE
Fall Pageantry Placement
Items needed:
Large piece of white paper (approximately
13- by 17-inches)
Variety of leaves
Tempera paints (fall colors)
Paintbrushes
Clear contact paper
How to do it:
1. Lay a sheet of large white paper on the
table and place a leaf on top of it.
2. Dip paintbrush into one color of tempera
paint. Hold the leaf in place with one hand
while brushing paint from the middle of the
leaf to just over its edge and onto the paper.
Carefully remove the leaf to reveal the sil-
houette.
3. Repeat step 2 with different shaped
leaves and paint colors until the paper is
lled; let dry.
4. Cover with contact paper.
My Family Tree
Items Needed:
Leaves, twigs, grass and other nature items
Large construction paper
Glue
How to do it:
1. Glue one twig onto construction paper.
2. Draw a head at the top of the stem to
create a face for one member of your family
or glue on a photograph.
4. Repeat for each family member.
OurChildren
About
AOC-10
10
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
Animal House
Exploring Three Zoos in Four Days
E D S I L B E R F A R B
W
hats your favorite Afri-
can reptile?
Mmm, I hadnt re-
ally thought about it. Mentally sorting
through my limited list of snakes, turtles
and lizards, I realize the cobra is in India,
the alligator is in Florida, Crocodile, I
guess. That seems to satisfy.
Nine-year-old Elis interest in ani-
mals is not just academic, but emotional
as well. In no particular order, he likes
snow monkeys, alpacas and most dogs,
in fact all creatures great and small.
Hes spending a week with us and
we consider the entertainment options:
bike riding, kayaking on the Hudson
River, a museum, a movie. The zoo, he
says.
Normally that would mean the 265-
acre Bronx Zoo, one of the biggest in
the country with over 6,000 specimens.
Hes been there, of course, and wants to
go again, but he knows there is a zoo in
every one of New Yorks fve boroughs,
and he would like to hit them all. He re-
cently visited the Central Park Zoo and
exhausted its possibilities for the time
being, although its snow monkeys never
seem to lose their appeal. We decide on
a day each in Brooklyns Prospect Park,
the Bronx Zoo, a day of rest, and a cli-
mactic day in Flushing Meadow for the
Queens Zoo. Staten Island will have to
wait for another time.
Brooklyns Prospect Park is frst, to
be followed by a visit to his six-year-old
cousin, Alina, and her four cats in nearby
Park Slope. We board the N train and I
realize after 20 minutes it wont take us
to Prospect Park. I panic, but correct the
mistake at Atlantic Avenue, perhaps the
most complex station in the subway sys-
tem. We scurry through passageways,
up and down stairways, fnally reaching
the Q train bound for Prospect Park.
There we rush past the carousel
with its exquisitely carved horses and
the 18th century Lefferts farmhouse,
Brooklyns oldest. Eli heads for the Zoos
Discovery Trail, sticks his head in the
plastic bubble looking at the prairie dog
village, and checks out the dingo, red
panda and river otter. I note the placard
describing the fightless Australian emu
that states it can run 30 miles an hour.
Thirty one, corrects Eli, The chee-
tah is faster, but it tires out.
Eli likes simians of all sorts, and ex-
plains the difference between apes and
monkeys, and between old world and
new world monkeys, and the character-
istics of baboons, mandrills and lemurs.
He doesnt spend much time at each
exhibit. A quick look at the animal will
suffce. He reads the information card
hurriedly to make sure it indicates the
animals correct range and diet, tells
me to take a picture, and moves on. A
troop of baboons of various ages holds
his interest longer, and he is surprised
and delighted to fnd tamarins and
marmosets.
In the barn, we buy a fstful of animal
food, which Eli distributes generously
among sheep and goats, but is frustrat-
ed because his favorite, the alpaca, is
closed off in an inaccessible pen. Come
back in an hour, says one of the keep-
ers. Well be moving him.
We look at bats, meerkats and cich-
lids, and return for Elis reunion with the
alpaca.
Hiking through the park from the
zoo to the Park Slope neighborhood is a
frustration like Dantes who had strayed
into a dark forest and the right path ap-
peared not anywhere.
We fnally do emerge and Alina was
waiting to introduce Eli to a new kitten.
We end the day at Park Slopes only ko-
sher restaurant.
The vastness of the Bronx Zoo re-
quires a battle plan. Our mission was to
fnd the Komodo dragon in a new exhibit
of animals from Indonesia. We had tried
twice before. Each time the dragon was
nowhere to be seen. He had retreated
indoors from his outdoor habitat. Inside
he found refuge in a cave. We were told
his shyness was caused by the strange
new surroundings. Suddenly there he
was, the worlds largest lizard, a carni-
vore that can take down a goat, deer or
sheep. He seemed sullen in an anthropo-
morphic way, ignoring the onlookers as
he slunk back into his cave.
On the other hand, the water moni-
tor, another Indonesian lizard, was all
GENERATION G
Eli having a grand time feeding an alpaca.
Animal continued on page 23
AOC-11
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
11
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, December 6
11:00 a.m.
Engaged Learning. For Life.
The Elisabeth Morrow
School
Register Today.
Call 201.568.5566 x7212 or
admissions@elisabethmorrow.org.
435 Lydecker Street Englewood, NJ 07631
www.elisabethmorrow.org
EMS_OpenHouse-JewishStd_10-20.indd 1 10/20/14 2:17 PM
The Not-So-Simple
but Simple Path
to Calm Parenting
E MUNA B RAV E R MA N
F
rom helicopter parenting to the latest hyper-par-
enting, from Dr. Spock to Dr. Brazelton and beyond,
from the permissive parenting of the 1960s to the
tiger moms, there have always been trends in parenting.
And most of these trends share two important
similarities.
1. They are frequently taken to extremes and done
to excess, often crippling the child emotionally and just
plain exhausting the parents.
2. They are often the products of or play to the de-
sire for magical thinking.
If I can fnd the right, the only, the true, the best
parenting strategy, then my children will turn out per-
fect in character, in obedience, in school grades and
college acceptance, in fulflling their (my?) career as-
pirations and in marrying well and raising my dream
grandchildren.
We may not give voice to it but this is what many of
us imagine. This is what motivates us to fnd the newest
parenting class, book, CD or seminar, the desire to fnd
a parenting guru at whose feet we can sit, whose words
we can absorb, and whose strategy we can successfully
employ.
Now Im not suggesting there is no point to any par-
enting classes or books. We could all use some tools to
cope with the sleepless nights, tantrums, toilet training,
frst day of school (and all those that follow!) and that
bugbear known as adolescence.
But we need to remember that these are tools only,
not magic potions.
There is no magic formula and so much is out of our
control. Heres the secret: There is no perfect parenting
strategy that will ensure that everything we want for
our children will materialize in exactly the way we want
it to. We cant protect them from lifes challenges and
disappointments and we often shouldnt rescue them
even when we can. Anyone who tells you otherwise is
a charlatan.
But the truth is that accepting this reality can, be-
lieve it or not, be freeing and can actually enhance our
parenting rather than diminish it. We stop obsessing
over areas where we have no control (basically all of
them!). We stop micromanaging. We let go. We accept.
We may even relax (am I carrying it too far?!). We are
more fun for our children to be around. We spend more
downtime together, are less task-oriented.
But how do we accomplish this? The frst step is
awareness, acknowledging our limited control. And the
second step is to make peace with this. I recently saw
an article on this topic by Pamela Druckerman where
she references what is supposedly a Buddhist-inspired
approach to parenting: Total commitment to the pro-
cess, total equanimity about the outcome.
I know nothing about Buddhism but this philoso-
phy certainly refects the Jewish approach. I would just
deepen it by reminding us that the equanimity is due
to the fact that the outcome is in the Almightys hands.
Hes in charge.
Once we recognize this, we no longer need that
magic parenting book or pill just prayer and accep-
tance. We can change hyper-parenting to calm parent-
ing. That is the one thing we can control.
Reprinted with permission of Aish.com.
Socially Minded Teens Can Win $36,000
The Helen Diller Family Foundation is now accept-
ing nominations for the 2015 Diller Teen Tikkun Olam
Awards, a program that recognizes up to 15 Jewish
teens annually with $36,000 each for exceptional lead-
ership and impact in volunteer projects that make the
world a better place. Up to 5 teens from California and
10 from other communities across the United States
will be acknowledged for their philanthropic efforts.
Anyone interested in nominating a teen, or any teen
who is interested in self-nominating, should visit www.
dillerteenawards.org to begin the nomination process.
The deadline for nominations is December 14, 2014.
Bay Area philanthropist Helen Diller created the
Diller Teen Tikkun Olam Awards in 2007 as a way to
recognize the next generation of socially committed
leaders whose dedication to volunteerism exempli-
fes the spirit of tikkun olam. To qualify, teens may be
nominated by any community member who knows
the value of their project except a family mem-
ber or may self-nominate. Each candidate must be
a U.S. resident aged 13 to 19 years old at the time of
nomination, and must self-identify as Jewish. Com-
munity service projects may beneft the general or
Jewish community, with impact locally, nationally, or
worldwide.
Teens work must be as volunteers without
compensation for their services. To nominate, com-
plete the simple online form at www.dillerteenawards.
org. For more information, email dillerteenawards@
sfjcf.org or call 415-512-6432.
OurChildren
About
AOC-12
12
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
FEATURING THE INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED DONETSK BALLET FROM UKRAINE
AND BALLET STUDENTS OF MISS PATTIS SCHOOL OF DANCE
WITH LIVE ORCHESTRA (ADELPHI ORCHESTRA)
Net proceeds to benet Pediatric Cancer Research Care & Treatment
IN 16 YEARS JULIE DANCE HAS RAISED $430,000 FOR THIS IMPORTANT CAUSE
Paramus Catholic High School, 425 Paramus Road, Paramus, New Jersey
ALL PERFORMANCES $40 & $45 SEATS
Group rates available. Call for tickets & information
201.670.4422
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THIS IS A FUNDRAISING EVENT. ALL PROCEEDS ABOVE PRODUCTION GO TO PEDIATRIC CANCER RESEARCH CARE & TREATMENT
FRIDAY
DECEMBER 12TH
7:30PM
SATURDAY
DECEMBER 13TH
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SUNDAY
DECEMBER 14th
1PM & 5PM
Travel Tips for a Winning Winter Vacation
DE NI S E MOR R I S ON Y E A R I A N
W
hen it gets cold I get a fever
cabin fever, that is. The cure?
Take the family on a winter
vacation. Before seasonal blues get you
down, round up a winning winter get-
away that will not break the bank.
Following are a few tips to get you
started.
Establish a Budget
The frst step to planning a winter va-
cation is to determine how much you
can spend. While drawing up your bud-
get, ask yourself a series of questions
to help you decide the kind of vacation
you can afford. Will you be able to fy to
your destination, or will you drive? Can
you budget for a rental car and gas?
Should you stay in an all-inclusive re-
sort, or opt for a hotel, condo, or rental
property? How much can you budget
for activities? What about meals, can
you afford to dine out the entire time,
or will you need to bring food to eat in
the room? Answering these and other
questions will lay the groundwork for
an affordable vacation without wallet
worries.
Create a Family Wish List
Choosing a destination that will appeal
to everyone in your family is a seem-
ingly impossible task. But a corporate
wish list is a good place to start. Ask
each family member to write down two
or three destinations he would like to go
to, based on what your budget will allow.
When everyone is fnished, look over the
lists carefully to see if the destinations
coincide. Is there any common ground?
If so work from there.
If family members start grumbling
because their destination was not the
popular vote, remind them that nearly
every location offers alternative activi-
ties. For example, a ski resort normally
has ice-skating, snow tubing, snow-
boarding, swimming, and indoor games.
A cruise ship may offer sightseeing, hik-
ing, rock climbing, and shopping. The
point is to fnd a location everyone will
enjoy, even if it isnt his frst choice.
Before the fnal decision is made,
consider the ages and interests of your
children, particularly if they are young. If
you are looking at a vacation site where
babysitting is required for older family
members to participate in activity, will
be there day camps or childrens pro-
grams for the younger set?
Research Activities and Amenities
When children help plan vacations, they
feel as if their opinions are valued. It also
teaches them how to research informa-
tion when it is needed. Go online with
your children and search out activities
in and around your vacation site. Nearly
every place has its own website today,
and most have links to popular attrac-
tions. Make a list of several activities,
along with hours of operation and cost
for admission. If you prefer to fnd this
information offine, go to the library or
a bookstore and pick out a few related
travel books.
If you are traveling by car, look for
places to stop en route museums, sci-
ence centers, factory tours. This will
break up the trip. Seek out places that
are family friendly to ensure the exhibits
and activities cater to children.
In your research, take advantage
of savings opportunities two-for-one
packages, fight specials, frequent fyer
miles, off-season traveling, kids stay
free, early-bird dining specials, etc. If
you visit a major city or attraction, stay
on the outskirts of town as lodging may
cost less. Rent a condominium or a room
with a kitchen and you can save money
on meals.
Compromise and Flexibility
Sometime before the trip, discuss ac-
tivity options with your family. Agree
on what everyone will do together, but
leave room for compromise. Allow ev-
eryone the freedom to do what he or she
wants while on vacation. For example,
the girls may want to go shopping while
the guys attend a sporting event.
If you are a traveling with infants and
toddlers, be fexible. If, for example, you
are visiting an attraction and your child
starts to get cranky, be prepared to wind
down the activity quickly. Since children
thrive on routine, try to keep their meals
and bedtimes consistent with those at
home.
Above all, remember that rounding
up a winter vacation beats the seasonal
blues. So before cabin fever sets in, bal-
ance your budget, decide on a destina-
tion, assess the activities, and call a
compromise. The go and chill out.
Denise Morrison Yearian is the former editor
of two parenting magazines and the mother of
three children.
OurChildren
About
13
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
AOC-13
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Thanksgiving Every Week
When America Learns What its Like to Make Shabbat
J E SS I C A L E V I NE KUP F E R B E R G
T
hanksgiving? Shabbat? Where
am I?? Fed up after watching yet
another how-to-make-the-perfect-
stuffng demo, I posted as my Facebook
status, Thanksgiving. The holiday
where the rest of Americans learn what
its like to make Shabbat every week.
I must have struck a chord with my
cadre of Facebook friends. A chorus of
likes rapidly appeared on my post.
My fellow Shabbat-celebrating moms
and I enjoyed a virtual chuckle at all the
Thanksgiving fuss, when we know that
almost every week, we plan intricate
menus, invite hordes of guests, and fuss
over every detail from the place settings
to the fowers. And we often do it twice(!),
investing that level of preparation into
TWO meals on the same weekend in-
stead of just one since we have Friday
night dinner as well as Saturday lunch
to worry about. And somehow we man-
age this, without every single talk show
host and magazine article giving us step-
by-step how-tos and handholding along
the way. So forgive us if we cant help but
feel that all the stress about cooking the
perfect turducken or green bean casse-
role is a little overblown.
My Facebook status did get me
thinking about the connection between
Thanksgiving and Shabbat. In fact, I
have found the Thanksgiving analogy
very helpful when trying to introduce
Shabbat to those who are new to the
concept. For instance, a few years back,
when our local grocery store installed a
kosher deli and bakery, I reassured the
supermarket bigwigs at the grand open-
ing that the kosher department was
destined to be a fnancial success. I ex-
plained, You see, its like my friends and
I shop and cook for Thanksgiving dinner
every week. Twice. While they peered
at me skeptically at the time, I have no
doubt the stores profts in the years
since have proved me right.
But is there more to the Shabbat-
Thanksgiving connection than copious
amounts of food and laborious prepa-
rations? Digging a little deeper, while
Thanksgiving provides Americans with a
chance to bond each November, Shabbat
provides us with a weekly opportunity
for quality time. An observant Shabbat
dinner is the ultimate portal to connect-
edness and has the distinct advantage of
focus no football game on in the back-
ground, no teens texting under the table
and no early-black-Friday sales at Best
Buy to distract us from connecting.
Our familys Shabbat table feels a lot
like a Thanksgiving feast each week, and
you will fnd a mix of faces there our
children bursting with stories about the
weeks Torah portion or about what hap-
pened at school; the comfortable faces
of close friends who feel like family; the
new faces of people who recently ar-
rived in our community; the fresh faces
of college students seeking refuge from
cafeteria food, or the weary faces of busi-
ness travelers looking for a little taste
of home. At the Shabbat table, we have
a chance to talk, sing and get to know
each other better, savoring the sweet-
ness (and often the sweets) that Shab-
bat brings. The warmth and connection
help me to enjoy instead of resent all the
work that it takes to make Shabbat.
Yet perhaps the most important nex-
us between Thanksgiving and Shabbat
is the concept of thankfulness. Shabbat
is a gift to a harried mom. For me, keep-
ing Shabbat is a time and a means to
give thanks for the blessings in my life,
and the escape from the madness of the
weeks errands, carpools and homework
with fve kids is the perfect opportunity
for refection and gratitude. Shabbat is
the ultimate Thank You card, and we
get to sign it every week.
Now, please dont get me wrong; I
am not the Grinch Who Stole Thanks-
giving. I adore Thanksgiving dinner and
feel blessed to be going to my Bubbes
for some turkey, stuffng and even a little
potato kugel to give it a Jewish twist. As I
write this, my pumpkin, apple and choc-
olate chip pies are cooling on the kitchen
counter and I will happily brave traffc to
visit with the family a couple of hours
away. But I am grateful that I dont have
to wait a whole year for that Thanksgiv-
ing feeling and that each week, we can
stuff ourselves on Shabbats beauty, and
never get too full.
Reprinted with permission of Kveller.com,
the website of Jewish parenting.
OurChildren
About
AOC-14
14
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
Learn Today and Every Day
November is Diabetes Awareness Month
HE I DI MA E B RAT T
N
ovember is American Diabetes Month, which
each year dedicates the month to raising aware-
ness and understanding of diabetes, its conse-
quences, management and prevention.
To that end, About Our Children has enlisted the
help of Dr. Paul Pelavin, chief of pediatric endocrinol-
ogy at the Valley Medical Group to give us a primer on
diabetes.
About Our Children: What is the similarities
and differences between Type 1 diabetes and Type 2
diabetes?
Dr. Paul Pelavin: First of all, these diseases are
similar, as both present with high blood sugar, which
can be associated with excess thirst, excess urination,
and increased appetite with unintentional weight loss.
However, they differ in their cause and treatment. Type
1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune attack against
the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, and a per-
son with Type 1 diabetes has a near-absence of insulin
in their body. Type 1 diabetes, which is not a prevent-
able disease, can only be treated with insulin injections,
although diet and exercise are important aspects of
treating this condition. In contrast, Type 2 diabetes is
typically caused by excess weight due to inactivity and
excessive caloric intake, and although there is insulin
in the body, the excess weight causes the body to be
resistant to insulin. Type 2 diabetes is usually prevent-
able, and can be treated with exercise and diet along
with oral medications. However, some patients with
advanced Type 2 diabetes require insulin injections as
part of their treatment.
Q: Are we seeing more Type 2 diabetes in children?
If so why?
A: We are seeing more Type 2 diabetes in children
as the rates of obesity, which is the primary driver of
Type 2 diabetes, have increased markedly over the last
few decades.
Q: What are the risk factors for Type 2 diabetes in
children?
A: The risk factors include obesity, non-Caucasian
ethnicity, a history of gestational diabetes in the moth-
er of the child, and a family history of Type 2 diabetes.
Although most Jews of Ashkenazi and Sephardic heri-
tage, from my experience, are not at high risk for Type
2 diabetes in children, many Jews develop Type 2 dia-
betes as adults. It is also notable that the rates of obe-
sity in Jewish children, at least per one study done in
2006 in Chicago, are actually higher than national rates
of obesity. The Jewish families studied in Chicago were
primarily upper-middle class orthodox families.
Q: What are the risk factors for Type 1 diabetes in
children?
A: The risk factors for Type 1 diabetes include Cau-
casian ethnicity, especially northern European heritage,
and a family history of endocrine autoimmune disease,
such as hypothyroidism. It is notable that the rates of
Type 1 diabetes in Caucasian patients (approximately
1 in 400) are much higher than that of Type 2 diabetes
(approximately 1 in 5,000).
Q: How does Type 1 diabetes present?
A: Type 1 diabetes will present with excess thirst,
excess urination, increased appetite, and unintentional
weight loss. If a child has any of these conditions, they
should be brought to their pediatrician, who should
then test the child for Type 1 diabetes. If a child is found
to have Type 1 diabetes, a pediatric endocrinologist
will then manage their care.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our Children
Diabetes Superfoods
E
ver see the top 10 lists for foods ev-
eryone should eat to superpower
your diet? Ever wonder which will
mesh with your diabetes meal plan?
Wonder no more. Your list of the top
10 diabetes superfoods has arrived. As
with all foods, you need to work the dia-
betes superfoods into your individual-
ized meal plan in appropriate portions.
All of the foods in our list have a low
glycemic index or GI and provide key
nutrients that are lacking in the typical
western diet such as: calcium, potassi-
um, fber, magnesium, vitamins A (as ca-
rotenoids), C, and E. There isnt research
that clearly points to supplementation,
so always think frst about getting your
nutrients from foods. Below is our list of
superfoods to include in your diet.
Beans
Whether you prefer kidney, pinto, navy,
or black beans, you cant fnd better
nutrition than that provided by beans.
They are very high in fber, giving you
about 1/3 of your daily requirement in
just a 1/2 cup, and are also good sources
of magnesium and potassium.
They are considered starchy veg-
etables, but 1/3 cup provides as much
protein as an ounce of meat without the
saturated fat. To save time you can use
canned beans, but be sure to drain and
rinse them to get rid of as much sodium
as possible.
Dark Green Leafy Vegetables
Spinach, collards and kale are power-
house foods are so low in calories and
carbohydrate. You cant eat too much.
Citrus Fruit
Grapefruit, oranges, lemons and limes.
Pick your favorites and get part of your
daily dose of soluble fber and vitamin C.
Sweet Potatoes
A starchy vegetable packed full of vita-
min A and fber. Try in place of regular
potatoes for a lower GI alternative.
Berries
Which are your favorites: blueberries,
strawberries or another variety? Regard-
less, they are all packed with antioxi-
dants, vitamins and fber. Make a parfait
alternating the fruit with light, non-fat
yogurt for a new favorite dessert. Try
our Superfood Smoothie recipe.
Tomatoes
An old standby where everyone can fnd
a favorite. The good news is that no mat-
ter how you like your tomatoes, pureed,
raw, or in a sauce, youre eating vital nu-
trients like vitamin C, iron, vitamin E.
Fish High in Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Salmon is a favorite in this category. Stay
away from the breaded and deep fat fried
variety... they dont count in your goal of
6-9 ounces of fsh per week.
Whole Grains
Its the germ and bran of the whole grain
youre after. It contains all the nutrients a
grain product has to offer. When you pur-
chase processed grains like bread made
from enriched wheat four, you dont get
these. A few more of the nutrients these
foods offer are magnesium, chromium,
omega 3 fatty acids and folate.
Pearled barley and oatmeal are a
source of fber and potassium.
Nuts
An ounce of nuts can go a long way in
providing key healthy fats along with
hunger management. Other benefts are
a dose of magnesium and fber.
Some nuts and seeds, such as wal-
nuts and fax seeds, also contain ome-
ga-3 fatty acids.
Fat-free Milk and Yogurt
Everyone knows dairy can help build
strong bones and teeth. In addition to
calcium, many fortifed dairy products
are a good source of vitamin D. More
research is emerging on the connection
between vitamin D and good health.
Source: American Diabetes Association.
www.diabetes.org
OurChildren
About
15
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
AOC-15
Te Abraham Joshua Heschel School
Nursery-12th Grade
30 West End Avenue, New York, NY 10023
Marsha Feris, Director of Admissions
marsha@heschel.org
212 595 7087
Ariela Dubler, Head of School
Opening minds,
bridging differences,
living Jewish values
Learn Today and Every Day
November is Diabetes Awareness Month
ethnicity, a history of gestational diabetes in the moth-
er of the child, and a family history of Type 2 diabetes.
Although most Jews of Ashkenazi and Sephardic heri-
tage, from my experience, are not at high risk for Type
2 diabetes in children, many Jews develop Type 2 dia-
betes as adults. It is also notable that the rates of obe-
sity in Jewish children, at least per one study done in
2006 in Chicago, are actually higher than national rates
of obesity. The Jewish families studied in Chicago were
primarily upper-middle class orthodox families.
Q: What are the risk factors for Type 1 diabetes in
children?
A: The risk factors for Type 1 diabetes include Cau-
casian ethnicity, especially northern European heritage,
and a family history of endocrine autoimmune disease,
such as hypothyroidism. It is notable that the rates of
Type 1 diabetes in Caucasian patients (approximately
1 in 400) are much higher than that of Type 2 diabetes
(approximately 1 in 5,000).
Q: How does Type 1 diabetes present?
A: Type 1 diabetes will present with excess thirst,
excess urination, increased appetite, and unintentional
weight loss. If a child has any of these conditions, they
should be brought to their pediatrician, who should
then test the child for Type 1 diabetes. If a child is found
to have Type 1 diabetes, a pediatric endocrinologist
will then manage their care.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our Children
Diabetes Superfoods
youre after. It contains all the nutrients a
grain product has to offer. When you pur-
chase processed grains like bread made
from enriched wheat four, you dont get
these. A few more of the nutrients these
foods offer are magnesium, chromium,
omega 3 fatty acids and folate.
Pearled barley and oatmeal are a
source of fber and potassium.
Nuts
An ounce of nuts can go a long way in
providing key healthy fats along with
hunger management. Other benefts are
a dose of magnesium and fber.
Some nuts and seeds, such as wal-
nuts and fax seeds, also contain ome-
ga-3 fatty acids.
Fat-free Milk and Yogurt
Everyone knows dairy can help build
strong bones and teeth. In addition to
calcium, many fortifed dairy products
are a good source of vitamin D. More
research is emerging on the connection
between vitamin D and good health.
Source: American Diabetes Association.
www.diabetes.org
Food and Fun
with Diabetes
Diabetes doesnt mean doing without your fam-
ilys traditional holiday treats, birthday parties or
outings to your favorite restaurant. With a little
planning, a good time can still be had by all.
Planning Ahead
Talk to the team. Ask your childs healthcare team
how to best cover extra carbs with extra insulin on
special occasions.
Recruit help. If you arent planning to be at the
event, make sure your child has your phone num-
ber and be sure to recruit an adult who knows how
to care for a child with diabetes to help out.
Ask frst. Teach your child to ask, Whats in
this food? If they are not sure whats being served.
Look it up. Give your child a handy carb-
counting guide to take with her.
Check it out. Your childs blood glucose (blood
sugar) levels should be checked more frequently
when off the regular schedule or eating unfamiliar
foods.
Burn it down. Sometimes exercise helps your
body use up glucose so a walk or run can help
burn off extra carbs.
Parties
Fill them in. Tell the host parents that your child
has diabetes. Provide emergency phone numbers
for you and your childs healthcare team in case
of an emergency. Help them to understand what
it means to manage diabetes so that they are not
shocked when your child takes out his meter or
insulin pen.
Pass it on. Help your child and your host by
sharing a healthy treat that your child enjoys and
fts within your his meal plan.
Volunteer. If your child is young, ask your host
if they would like your help. They will appreci-
ate the extra hands and youll be there to moni-
tor your childs diabetes. Just remember: Its your
childs fun time with friends, so try not to hover.
Holidays
Slim it down. Chances are holiday recipes can be
slim-lined. For example, use skim instead of whole
milk, or artifcial sweetener instead of sugar. If
you do it quietly, your family and friends may not
taste the difference, and theyll appreciate fewer
calories.
One-up the candy man. Fill goodie bags with
magic tricks, yo-yos, temporary tattoos, beach
balls and dribble glasses.
See the bigger picture. Focus on holiday activi-
ties rather than foods. Games and conversation
and new gadgets to share, instead of sugar-laden
treats.
Restaurants
Plan ahead. Many restaurants post their menu on
their websites. Check the nutrition information
and make it a fun activity to plan what youre go-
ing to eat before you go.
Check the portions. Many restaurants give you
more than what you usually eat. Ask the waiter for
a box at the beginning of your meal, and eyeball
the portion that your child will eat for that meal.
Take home the rest for another meal.
Source: American Diabetes Association,
www.diabetes.org
www.jstandard.com
OurChildren
About
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AOC-16
16
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
R-E-S-P-E-C-T
How to Establish
Authority in Our Homes
A DI NA S OC L OF
C
hildren need to learn how to be respectful. It
seems to be an outdated value but teaching chil-
dren to respect their parents helps them feel se-
cure. They do not want to be in charge. Children will
often fght and push the limits just to see that their
parents mean what they say. They want parents to fol-
low through will the rules that they have set. They want
parents to maintain their status as authority fgures. Re-
spect is also a fundamental Jewish principle that forms
the basis of the Jewish home.
How can we teach our children to be respectful and
establish our authority in our homes?
1. Live it:
It always starts with our behavior. We need to make
sure that we are role modeling respectful speech. Our
children watch our every move. We need to speak re-
spectfully to our spouses most of all. We also need to
check the way we speak to our parents, our siblings
and the washing machine repairmen.
It seems silly but we need to speak respectfully to
our children. They will not learn to be respectful to us
if we are not respectful to them. One way to do that is
If we are angry at our children we can say: Lets take
a break right now and cool off until we can talk civilly
to each other. Nothing good is going to come from our
discussion with the disrespectful way that we are talk-
ing to each other.
2. Maintain a united front:
When your child is being disrespectful to your spouse
you can and should defend your spouse, Hey, you
cant talk to Mommy/Daddy that way.
Even if you disagree with your spouse you can to
say to your child, Daddy said you cant go then you
cant go, you need to listen to Daddy. You can also
throw in Daddy and I are a team, we make decisions
together.
If you do speak disrespectfully to your spouse,
apologize in front of your child, Im sorry that was
disrespectful
3. Teach respectful language:
It is helpful to teach kids how to be respectful. They
dont know how to do this naturally. For younger chil-
dren you can gently let them know what they did wrong,
I didnt like the way you just asked me for orange juice,
can you use your respectful voice to do that You can
then model for them how you would like to be asked: I
like to be asked with a please, like this, Mom, could you
please get me a glass of juice.
4. Use humor:
Humor is often the best way to teach anything of
importance to kids. When you are modeling how
to speak respectfully to children you can say, This
is how I like to be asked, Mommy dear, who I love
so much, youre the best mother in the whole wide
world, while you are up anyway, can you grab the or-
ange juice for me please?
5. Write a letter:
Newly married, there was a moment I was angry with
my husband. I decided to write him a letter. (I made
sure that it was not too accusatory). He then wrote me
back. We resolved everything through the letter writing
and I thought it was one of the best arguments we ever
had because it was silent. We have used this technique
a few times over the years and fnd it to be very effec-
tive. You can also do this with your children.
If you fnd you cant speak to your child respect-
fully, take a break and try writing a letter, I didnt think
I would be able to say this respectfully in person, so I
am going to try writing it to you in a letter.
6. Tell them what disrespect looks like:
If you watch T.V. with your children it is the perfect time
to discuss the different ways that people talk to one an-
other (its rare to fnd respectful family relationships on
T.V.). You can point out whether the characters on T.V.
are being respectful to each other:
Sam sounds pretty disrespectfulwhat he said
could really hurt someones feelings.
Instead of making negative comments, which can
annoy children and turn them off, you can say in an off-
hand way, Those people are really being nasty to each
other; I am so glad in this house we try to be respectful
to one another.
7. Problem solve:
Many times families go through stressful periods where
no one is on their best behavior and there can be a lot
of arguing. When things get calm it is helpful to remind
kids that this is not the way you want to your family to
talk to each other.
You can say: Ive been hearing a lot of disrespectful
language in this house. What can we do as a family to
improve?
8. Acknowledge your childs respectful behavior:
It is also always helpful to point out the times people
in our families are being respectful. Positive reinforce-
ment is a powerful teaching tool.
You knocked on my door instead of just coming in.
Thats called being respectful.
You asked with a please. That is called being
respectful.
It is up to parents to teach children how to be re-
spectful. Children want and need you to be respect-
fully authoritative in your home. It gives them the feel-
ing of security that they crave. Children want to do
the right thing they just need us to teach them how
to do it.
Adina Soclof is the Director of Parent Outreach for A+
Solutions, facilitating How to Talk so Kids will Listen
and Listen so Kids will Talk workshops as well as work-
shops based on Siblings Without Rivalry. She also runs
ParentingSimply.com.
OurChildren
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REGISTER NOW FOR FALL!
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students welcome.
Musical Theater, age 4 - teens
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age 5 - teens
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AOC-17
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
17
Simchas
Birth
MICHAEL KOSTANTINOS
JACOBS
Michael Kostantinos Jacobs, son
of Joshua and Kathy Jacobs of
Hillsborough, and sister of Sophia,
was born on September 13, 2014.
He weighed 6 pounds 4 ounces, and
was 18 1/2 inches long. Michael
is the grandson of Ellen and Marc
Jacobs of Fair Lawn and Helen and
Ted Siliverdis of Raritan; nephew of
Jerry Siliverdis of Point Pleasant,
and Rachel (Jacobs) and Philip
Blumenthal of Springeld, Va., and
cousin of Seth and Maya Blumenthal.
Bnai mitzvah
ALYSSA ADLER
Alyssa Adler, daughter of Stacy
and Jonathan Adler of Haworth,
celebrated becoming a bat mitzvah
on October 18 at Temple Beth El of
Northern Valley in Closter.
MAX ALBUM
Max Album, son of Kelly and Michael
Album of Tenay, celebrated becom-
ing a bar mitzvah on October 25 at
Temple Sinai of Bergen County in
Tenay.
ROBERT BAKAL
Robert Bakal, son of Miriam and
Todd Bakal of Upper Saddle River,
celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah
on October 25 at Temple Israel
and Jewish Community Center in
Ridgewood.
ROBERT BENVENISTI
Robert Benvenisti, son of Dawn
and Steven Benvenisti of Upper
Saddle River and brother of Laura,
celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah
on October 18 at Temple Beth Or in
Washington Township.
DANA BIRKE
Dana Birke, daughter of Sharon and
Steven Birke of Closter, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on October
11 at Temple Beth El of Northern
Valley in Closter.
SARAH BROWN
Sarah Brown, daughter of Laura
and Douglas Brown of Tenay, and
sister of David and Richard, cel-
ebrated becoming a bat mitzvah
on September 6 at Temple Sinai of
Bergen County in Tenay. As a mitz-
vah project, she helped deliver for
Pascack Valley Meals on Wheels and
prepared additional treats for the
recipients.
AJ CHRISTIAN
AJ Christian, son of Pam Christian
of Ridgewood, twin brother of
Michael, and brother of Jessica,
celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah
on September 13 at Temple Beth
Rishon in Wyckoff.
MICHAEL CHRISTIAN
Michael Christian, son of Pam
Christian of Ridgewood, twin brother
of AJ, and brother of Jessica, cel-
ebrated becoming a bar mitzvah
on September 13 at Temple Beth
Rishon in Wyckoff.
JAKE COSGROVE
Jake Cosgrove, son of Beth Lerner
and George Cosgrove of River Vale,
celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah
on October 25 at Temple Beth El of
Northern Valley in Closter.
PEYTON DABBY
Peyton Dabby, daughter of Shari and
Jordan Dabby of Tenay, and sister
of Wyatt and Eli, celebrated becom-
ing a bat mitzvah on September 13
at Temple Sinai of Bergen County
in Tenay. As a mitzvah project, she
raised funds to buy fun band aids
for children undergoing treatment
at Englewood Hospital & Medical
Center.
GEORGIA ROSE DANZGER
Georgia Rose Danzger, daughter of
Sharon and Neil Danzger of Tenay,
and sister of Ben, Adam, and Daniel,
celebrated becoming a bat mitzvah
on October 11 at Temple Emanu-El
of Closter. She attends the Solomon
Schechter Day School of Bergen
County.
JAKE GARBAR
Jake Garbar, son of Desiree of
Allendale, and Marc (Robyn) of
Ramsey, celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on October 18 at Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack Valley in
Woodcliff Lake.
SAMANTHA GARSON
Samantha Garson, daughter of
Stacey and James Garson of Tenay
and sister of Marshall, Tyler, and
Dylan, celebrated becoming a bat
mitzvah on September 20 at Temple
Sinai of Bergen County in Tenay.
As a mitzvah project, she volun-
teered at the Bergen Family Center
and the Animal Rescue Fund of the
Hamptons.
LUCAS GOLDMAN
Lucas Goldman, son of Shari and
Jeffrey Goldman of Tenay, and
brother of Nicole and Kelsey, cel-
ebrated becoming a bar mitzvah
on October 11 at Temple Sinai of
Bergen County in Tenay. As a bar
mitzvah project, he volunteered with
Challenger basketball and soccer
programs for special needs children.
NEVIN GULER
Nevin Guler, daughter of Helen and
Aydin Guler of Westwood and sister
of Ilay, celebrated becoming a bat
mitzvah on October 25 at Temple
Beth Or in Washington Township.
AIDAN HARMER
Aidan Harmer, son of Lea and Brian
Harmer of Hawthorne and brother
of Jayson, 10, and Logan, 7, cel-
ebrated becoming a bar mitzvah on
September 13 at Barnert Temple in
Franklin Lakes.
TALYA KNOPF
Talya Knopf, daughter of Rachelle
and Andrew Knopf of Woodcliff
Lake and sister of Aaron, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on October
25 at Temple Emanuel of the
Pascack Valley in Woodcliff Lake.
MAYA KOMINSKY
Maya Kominsky, daughter of Edna
and Adam Kominsky of Tenay
and sister of Matthew, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on October
18 at Temple Sinai of Bergen County
in Tenay.
ALLISON KRAMER
Allison Celia Kramer, daughter of
Rachel and Marc Kramer and sister
of Jacob, celebrated becoming a bat
mitzvah on October 25 at Temple
Beth Sholom in Fair Lawn. Her
grandparents are Vivian and David
Kramer and Bronya and Arkadi
Tauber. Helen Blatstein and Sara and
Joseph Tauber are her great- grand-
parents.
BENJAMIN MARINACCIO
Benjamin Marinaccio, son of Dina
Marinaccio of Closter, celebrated
becoming a bar mitzvah on October
25 at Temple Beth El of Northern
Valley in Closter.
JACK NAIDRICH
Jack Naidrich, son of Shari and
Steven Naidrich of Tenay and
brother of Danielle and Lauren,
celebrated becoming a bar mitzvah
on October 25 at Temple Sinai of
Bergen County in Tenay. As a mitz-
vah project, he organized a clean-
up day of a portion of the Tenakill
Brook.
NOAH RANDMAN
Noah Randman, son of Elyssa
and Gary Randman of Fair Lawn
and brother of Joshua, celebrated
becoming a bar mitzvah on October
25 at the Fair Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai Israel.
SABRINA SADLER
Sabrina Sadler, daughter of Stacey
and Michael Sadler of Tenay,
and sister of Gabrielle, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on October
18 at Temple Sinai of Bergen County
in Tenay. As a mitzvah project, she
is raising awareness for Parkinsons
disease.
JULIA SCHWARTZ
Julia Schwartz, daughter of Lauren
and Jamie Schwartz of Woodcliff
Lake and sister of Matthew, cel-
ebrated becoming a bat mitzvah on
September 20 at Temple Beth Or in
Washington Township.
MOLLY SHULTZ
Molly Shultz, daughter of Jennifer
and Ronald Shultz of Tenay, and
sister of Sarah and Ruby, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on October
11 at Temple Sinai of Bergen County
in Tenay. As a mitzvah project, she
worked on Tenay Skate Night to
support the Todd Ouida Childrens
Foundation and the Tenay
Education Fund.
JAYME SILVER
Jayme Ilana Silver, daughter of Leslie
and Michael Silver of Woodcliff
Lake and brother of Jack, 10, cel-
ebrated becoming a bat mitzvah on
October 18 at Temple Emanuel of
the Pascack Valley in Woodcliff Lake.
Her grandparents are Dr. Richard
and Fran Winters of Paramus, and
Dr. Scott and Cathy Silver of Naples,
Fla. Her great-grandparents are Dr.
Selma and the late Stanley Mitchel of
Paramus.
JESSICA SONKIN
Jessica Sonkin, daughter of Lisa and
Scott Sonkin of West New York and
sister of Brooke, celebrated becom-
ing a bat mitzvah on September 13
at Temple Sinai of Bergen County in
Tenay.
JULIA TAUB
Julia Taub, daughter of Shelley
and Ira Taub of Alpine and sister of
Sydney and Alex, celebrated becom-
ing a bat mitzvah on September 27
at Temple Sinai of Bergen County
in Tenay. She has been volunteer-
ing at the Bergen Family Center in
Englewood as part of her mitzvah
project.
BENJAMIN ZATZ
Benjamin Zatz, son of Katherine and
David Zatz of Teaneck and brother
of Zoe, celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on October 18 at Temple
Emeth in Teaneck.
17
AOC-18
18
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
Rockland
Pediatric Dental P.C.
Ralph L. Berk, DDS, FAAPD
Dorit Hermann-Chasen, DMD
Anne Chaly, DDS Karan Estwick, DDS
Dentistry, Infancy thru Adolescence and Special Needs
George Pliakas, DDS, MS and
Eleni Michailidis, DDS, MS
Orthodontics for Children and Adults
238 N. Main St., New City, NY 845-634-8900
www.rocklandpediatricdental.com
COMPLIMENTARY ORTHODONTIC EVALUATION
FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN
Big Apple Circus
Adapts Show for Audience
on the Autism Spectrum
HE I DI MA E B RAT T
T
o be so close to the extraordinary
action under the Big Top is one of
the selling points of the popular
Big Apple Circus, now playing at Lincoln
Center in Manhattan. To learn that the
non-proft organization founded in 1977
has a portfolio of do-good programs
such as Care Clown, the original hospi-
tal clowning program, is another selling
point.
Add another white feather to their
clown cap.
For the frst time this year, Big Apple
Circus is working with autism spectrum
disorder experts to adapt its latest show,
Metamorphosis, for families with mem-
bers on the autism spectrum. The au-
tism adapted show is scheduled for Nov.
18 at 6:30 p.m. (An earlier show took
place on Oct. 24.)
We really wanted to create a show
that could be enjoyed by all members
of the family and for them to come to-
gether as a family, says Dina Paul-Parks,
vice president of community programs
for Big Apple Circus.
Working closely with the Autism
Speaks and TDF Autism Theatre Initia-
tive, the show has been adapted, but will
include the same world-class artistry that
makes the Big Apple Circus what it is.
For instance, the adapted show will
have a shorter running time, 75-minutes
with no intermission, as opposed to two
hours with a 15-minute intermission.
Also, the lighting and sound will be ad-
justed to prevent extremes. The house
lights will be half up and there will be no
strobes or loud noises. There will also
be pictorial social narratives to help the
audience.
There will also be calming centers
away from the ring where children can
have quiet time if needed. The calming
centers will be equipped with fdgets
and manipulatives and beanbag chairs
for relaxation. And the staff, including
ushers, will be trained to become famil-
iar with the needs of the population.
Tickets for the autism-adapted show
are 50 percent of regular prices. To pur-
chase tickets online, http://tinyurl.com/
oprrsqt
Big Apple Circus also runs several
other community programs, including
Circus of the Senses, which provides
free performances to children with hear-
ing and vision impairments and other
disabilities along with their teachers,
families and caregivers. This produc-
tion uses American Sign Language in-
terpreters; live play-by-play audio via
wireless headsets; Braille and large-print
progrms and post-show touch sessions
with the artists.
In addition, its Vaudeville Caravan
brings classical circus to the elderly liv-
ing in residential care facilities. And its
Circus After School works in partner-
ship with schools and community-based
agencies, teaching circus arts to at-risk
children.
Heidi Mae Bratt is the editor of About Our
Children.
SPECIAL NEEDS
Special education uniquely integrated within Jewish Day Schools
Individualization Educational excellence
Meeting each childs academic, social, and emotional needs
Elementary Schools n High Schools n Adult Day Habilitation
www.sinaischools.org/JS1 855-315-7616
YOUR CHILD needs special education.
You want her to have a Jewish education.
You want him to be included.
INCLUSION by DESIGN

SERVING CHILDREN WITH A BROAD RANGE OF SPECIAL NEEDS


AOC-19
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
19
ART
Lessons
Art of Excellence Studio
Unlock your Creativity with Classes in
Drawing and Watercolor
Structured Lessons - Relaxed Atmosphere
Fabulous Results!
Age 7 to Adult - All levels of ability
Art Portfolio Preparation Available
Artist, Rina Goldhagen 201-248-4779
www.artofexcellencestudio.com
Convenient Morning, Evening & Sunday Hours
Richard S. Gertler, DMD, FAGD
Michelle Bloch, DDS
Ari Frohlich, DMD
100 State Street Teaneck, NJ
201.837.3000
www.teaneckdentist.com
A Reason to Smile
TEANECK DENTIST
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We put the Care
into Dental Care!
A HAPPY FAMILY HAS
HEALTHY TEETH
bergenPAC Performing Arts School
Unveils Program for Special Needs
HE I DI MA E B RAT T
b
ergenPAC Performing Arts School in Englewood
has unveiled Limitless Arts, a new program of
classes in dance, music and drama for children
and teens, ages 2 to 18 and older, with special needs.
The classes will be run in collaboration with Renee Red-
ding-Jones of The Center for Life and Learning.
Classes are taught by trained and experienced pro-
fessionals and offer small class sizes. Classes began in
October and will continue into mid June. Registration is
being accepted throughout the year.
Katelyn Diekhaus, the education outreach manager
for bergenPAC Performing Arts School, said that the
program is intended to make available performing arts
for everyone.
We realized that this was an untapped space, says
Diekhaus, who adds that there are many venues that
teach youngsters life skills or varying therapies, but a
dearth of this kind of creative art educational facilities.
Our classes are open to children of every ability,
she says. We dont want to turn anyone away.
Alexander Roland Diaz, director of education said
that the new program was a source of pride. This per-
fectly supports and refects our mission to make the
performing arts accessible to everyone.
The program will offer three sessions, but students
can join any time and for as long as they want with as
many classes as they want.
At the programs helm is Renee Redding-Jones, the
executive director of The Center for Life and Learning,
which offers therapies and complementary therapies
for special needs individuals.
Of the marriage between bergenPAC and her spe-
cialties, in the arts and in special needs, Redding-Jones
says that the Limitless Arts program is really going
through the enrichment door to achieve the same
goals for participants.
Sometimes, she explains, individuals have diffculty
with full self expression due to speech or other delays.
This program, she hopes, will enable participants to
fnd a way to self-expression without the pressure of
an academic situation, but rather through music or
movement or theater play.
My hope for the program is that parents will be
able to see and have the opportunity to see that light in
the eyes of their children, Redding Jones says.
At the programs helm is Renee Redding-Jones,
the executive director of The Center for Life and
Learning. Redding-Jones has worked in academia for
more 20 years in various capacities, most recently as
an Assistant Arts Professor at NYU/Tisch School of
the Arts in the Dance department. She spent six years
as Master Teaching Artist for NJPACs Arts Education
division and has taught and performed all over the
country and abroad. Renee currently teaches move-
ment for actors at The Atlantic Theater Company Act-
ing School.
As a dancer, Renee was a featured performer in the
companies of Ronald K. Brown and David Rousseve. In
1995 she received a New York Dance and Performance
Bessie Award for performance with Browns compa-
ny, Evidence.
Recognizing the need for a forum for parents of chil-
dren with special needs to express the concerns and
issues, 10 years ago Renee co-founded Special Parents
of Teaneck (SPOT) a district-wide support and resource
group for families and children with special needs and
continues her work with the organization and the
community-at-large.
For more information, bergenpac.org/limitlessarts
or 201-816-8160, kdiekhaus@bergenpac.org.
OurChildren
About
SPECIAL NEEDS
A Trio of Princesses Do Good
Tara Maier, Dominique Otto and Brielle Lumia have
been lifelong friends.
They met more than a dozen years ago at Pali-
sades Country Day, and even though they hail from
different Bergen County communities, they became
a solid trio even as pre-schoolers. They were insepa-
rable: Girl Scouts, ice-skating, dancing and now do-
gooding for an organization that helps children strick-
en with cancer.
For the last fve years, the girls have been work-
ing with the St. Jude Bergen/Rockland chapter, Angels
for Hope annual event. It was there that they met and
fell in love with youngsters who were struggling with
cancer.
Now in high school, the young women have orga-
nized Princesses for Hope, a fundraising team in the
hopes of raising money. While none of them are run-
ners, they have registered to run the half marathon
princess race in Walt Disney World on Feb. 22, 2015.
Mothers Sheila Maier, Danielle Otto and Donna Lum-
nia and sisters Kayleigh and Sierra Lumia are also on
board to help the cause. They have committed to raising
150 hours of chemotherapy for the patients of St. Jude.
Since each hour costs $125, they are hoping to raise
$18,750. They got a great start as PRIMERICA (Otto and
Associates) in Englewood sponsored the event.
The girls will travel to Memphis, Tenn. on
Nov. 6 to tour the main hospital at St. Judes
as they thought it important to meet the doc-
tors and staff that treat these children. For more
information,fundraising.stjude.org/site/TR/Heroes/
Heroes?team_id=101846&pg=team&fr_id=22050.
From left, Tara Maier, Brielle Lumia, and Dominique Otto
Like us on
Facebook.
facebook.com/jewishstandard
AOC-20
20
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
RAC HE L HA R K HA M
P
repared and cooked for Rosh Hasha-
nah. Fasted and contemplated for Yom
Kippur. Constructed and cooked for
Succot. Celebrated and cooked for Shmini
Atzeret and Simchat Torah. You defnitely
will not be judged for wanting to curl up in
a ball to enjoy a few quiet moments of the
seasons mellow climate and rich colors. But you know
what is coming next.
Thinking about Thanksgiving is my way of focusing
on the last days of autumn. The Jewish holidays cel-
ebrate early fall. Thanksgiving is celebrated later in the
season when the trees are almost bare and deposits of
dried-out leaves lie in crunchy heaps. Late autumns
fruits and vegetables have a sturdier texture and the
food, in general, is prepared in a hardier manner.
Thanksgiving is a great holiday, which is meant to
be celebrated over a great big feast shared with fam-
ily and friends. Television is often part of
the festivities, so are last-minute runs to the
supermarket. Thanksgiving is a holiday that
stands alone.
Focusing on desserts is a sweet and
low-stress way to settle into Thanksgiving
preparations and contemplate the season, if
your Thanksgiving offerings include dessert.
Or if youre lucky enough to be a guest, des-
sert is perfect if you dont want to come to the feast
empty-handed.
The following three recipes will be sure to fll the
need for a little something sweet and seasonal at the
end of the meal.
Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Loaf is a subtly sweet, au-
tumnally spiced pareve dessert. Perfect for Thanksgiv-
ing because of its generous measurements of pumpkin
puree and pumpkin spice. We all know that chocolate
makes everything better. The texture of this loaf falls
somewhere between a dense pound cake and a whole-
some nut bread.
The Caramel Nut Tart is what you get when you
cross baklava or other nut-flled pastries with a pie. The
caramel can be made with honey, or in keeping with the
season, maple syrup. You can use frozen pre-made pie
dough, or use the recipe included. It is crunchy, sweet,
nutty, toasty and just the right amount of gooey. Sprin-
kle with a few grains of coarse salt before serving for a
really enjoyable salty-sweet contrast. Leftovers can be
taken over-the-top with a scoop of ice cream.
Pear-Cranberry Pop Tarts, are adorable ambro-
sial hand-held treats. Crunchy diced pears and hard
sour whole fresh cranberries take a hot bath in maple
syrup and cinnamon, until both fruits are soft, sweet,
and yielding. Heaping spoonfuls of the fruit jam are
wrapped in faky puff pastry dough. It is an elegant end-
ing to a wonderful meal and a spectacular season.
Rachel Harkham is a food writer and cookbook author. She
lives with her family in Rockland County. Visit her at www.
reciperachel.com.
Pear-Cranberry Pop Tarts
4 Bosc pears, peeled and
cut into a small dice
(about 4 cups)
1 cup whole fresh cranber-
ries
cup pure maple syrup
cup water
2 cinnamon sticks
1 package puff pastry (2
sheets)
1 recipe for egg wash
(above)
In a medium saucepan mix
together maple syrup and
water and cinnamon sticks,
cook over medium heat
until it begins to bubble. In
the meantime, add diced
pears and whole cranberries
to the maple syrup concoc-
tion. Allow to boil down and
soften. Reduce for 15 min-
utes. Remove from heat and
let cool.
In the meantime, preheat
oven to 350F. Bring puff
pastry to room temperature.
On oured pieces of parch-
ment paper roll out puff
pastry until 1/8-inch thick.
With a pizza cutter divide
each piece of dough into 8
roughly equal rectangles or
squares (16 in all).
Spoon a heaping spoon-
ful of the fruit lling in the
center of 8 rectangles and
spread, leaving a 1/2-inch
border at the edges. Lay a
remaining puff pastry rect-
angle over lling and seal
all around with the tines of
a fork. Brush tops liberally
with egg wash. Using the tip
of a sharp knife, cut a small
slit in the top of the pop tart
so that steam may escape.
Place pop tarts evenly
spaced over two baking
trays and bake in oven for
25 minutes or until the
hand tarts are golden.
Leave Room For Dessert
After Enjoying Thanksgiving Day Meal
Pumpkin Chocolate
Chip Loaf
2 cups all-purpose our
teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons pumpkin pie
spice
2 eggs
cup water
1 cups sugar
1 cup canned pumpkin
cup safower or canola oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup pareve chocolate
chips
Preheat oven to 350F. Coat
a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan with
baking spray. In a large bowl
whisk together our, baking
soda, pumpkin pie spice and
salt until well blended.
In a medium bowl, whisk
together eggs and water,
add sugar and mix well. Add
the canned pumpkin, veg-
etable oil, and vanilla, blend
together.
Add the pumpkin mixture
to the our mixture bowl
and stir until blended and
smooth. Fold in chocolate
chips. With a spatula scrape
the batter into loaf pan.
Bake for 50 to 60 minutes
until the loaf is rm to the
touch and when a toothpick
inserted into the center
comes out clean.
Caramel Nut Tart
Caramel Sauce:
cup sugar
cup maple syrup or honey
teaspoon salt
teaspoon cinnamon
cup full-fat coconut milk
1 tablespoons vanilla extract
Pie dough (store-bought or
homemade)
Optional egg-wash
1 egg yolk plus 1 table-
spoon water
In a medium heavy sauce-
pan over medium heat stir
together sugar and maple
syrup or honey. Cook until
it boils up and allow it to
continue boiling for 3 to 4
minutes so the color gets
deeper and the aroma gets
richer.
Remove briey from heat
carefully stir in salt and cin-
namon. Pour in coconut
milk and return to heat,
allow to froth up for a min-
ute or two. Mix in vanilla
extract and remove from
heat and let cool. Yields 1
cup caramel sauce.
Preheat oven to 350F. Flour
a sheet of parchment paper,
and roll out dough with a
rolling pin into a smooth at
disc shape.
Spread cup of cooled
caramel sauce over the sur-
face of the dough, leaving
a 2-inch border. Cover the
caramel layer with chopped
nuts. Fold dough over cara-
mel and nuts, folding and
tucking in edges and lightly
pressing down. Drizzle
cup caramel sauce over the
nut lling. If youd like a nice
toasty looking crust, brush
dough with egg wash. Place
in oven and bake for 30
minutes.
Homemade Pie Dough
1 cups all-purpose our
teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons cold coconut
oil spread
6 to 9 tablespoons ice cold
water
Combine our and salt
in a medium bowl. Cut in
coconut oil spread with
forks or a pastry blender
until the mixture is crumbly.
Tablespoon by tablespoon
drop in cold water, until
the dough comes together.
Collect in a ball and wrap in
plastic, and refrigerate for at
least 30 minutes.
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
21
OurChildren
About
Out of this World
With The Voca People
Jimmy Fallon called The Voca Peoples performance the Coolest show EVER! This
internationally acclaimed, dynamic group of performers, originally from Israel, infuses
beatbox, a capella, comedy and audience participation to create an out-of-this-world
experience that is fun for audience members of all ages. The Voca People will be per-
forming at the Wayne Ys Rosen Performing Arts Center on Sunday, Nov. 2 at 7 p.m.
Tickets are $50 and can be purchased on line at www.wayneymca.org or by calling
the Ys Welcome Center, 973-595-0100. The Y is located at 1 Pike Drive in Wayne.
It is Balloon!
Watch them Inflate
Each year, the day before Thanksgiving, the giant balloons for the Macys
Thanksgiving Day Parade come to life as they are inated. Its exciting to see the
likes of SpongeBob, Big Bird and Gareld and other familiar characters ll up with
helium on the streets of Manhattan as giant nets hold them down. The latest addi-
tions include; Snoopy & Gareld, Hello Kitty, Shrek and Abby Cadabby. The bal-
loons can be viewed from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. at 77 and 81 Streets, between Central
Park West and Columbus Avenue. Mass transit is your best bet. Take the B or C
train to the 81st St/American Museum of Natural History station.
TopChoices
N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 4
Natures Fury The
Science of Natural Disasters
From earthquakes
and volcanoes to hur-
ricanes and tornadoes,
natures forces shape
our dynamic planet and
affect people around the
world. Natures Fury, a
new exhibition opening
Nov. 15 at the American
Museum of Natural
History, will uncover the
causes of these natural
disasters, explore the risks to humans and examine how people cope and
adapt in their aftermath. Interactive displays and animations will help visitors
understand how natural phenomena work. By monitoring earthquakes around
the world in real time, manipulating an earthquake fault, generating a virtual
volcano, standing within the center of a roaring tornado, and recognizing the
power of Hurricane Sandy via an interactive map of New York City, visitors will
learn how scientists are helping to make better predictions, plan responses,
and prepare for future. American Museum of Natural History, Central Park
West and 79 St., Manhattan.
Fun with the FunkeyMonkeys
The FunkeyMonkeys return to the Jewish Museum with two concerts for families on Sunday,
Nov. 16 at 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Described as Seinfeld meets the Wiggles, this uniquely
hip eight-member band incorporates funny sketches and improvised bits, along with their
special brand of funky childrens music, ranging from driving afrobeat to ethereal ballads.
The performance will feature tunes from their albums Mustache, Tastes Like Chicken,
Sing Dance Underpants, and Jewish FunkeyMonkeys. This concert is for children ages 2
to 6. Adults are asked to accompany their children. The Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave.,
Manhattan. 212-423-3337, www.thejewishmuseum.org.
COMP I L E D BY HE I DI MA E B RAT T
AOC-21
To Our Readers: To Our Readers: This calendar is a day-by-day schedule of events. Although all information is as timely as we can make it, its a
good idea to call to verify details before you go.
To Add Your Event to Our Calendar
Send it to:
Calendar Editor
About Our Children
New Jersey/Rockland Jewish Media Group
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 0766 AboutOCaol.com
or fax it to: 201-833-4959
Deadline for December issue (published November 28):
Tuesday, November 25
Saturday, November 1
Tot Shabbat at Temple Israel & JCC: Cantor
Caitlin Bromberg leads age-appropriate services
from 11 to 11:45 a.m. Singing, prayers, stuffed
Torahs and a story. Youngsters join their fami-
lies in the main sanctuary to conclude and for
Kiddush lunch. Located at 475 Grove Street,
Ridgewood. 201-444-9320.
Sunday, November 2
Fun With Cooking for Shabbat: Ellen Finkelstein
will teach a class about Shabbat for 4 to 7
year olds. Free, kosher and nut free. The Jewish
Community Center of Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah, 304 E. Midland Ave., Paramus. To
RSVP, Marcia Kagedan, 201-262-7733. Or edu-
director@jccparamus.org.
The Voca People: Out-of-this-world a capella
group, the Voca People will perform at Waynes
YMCA Rosen Performing Arts Center at 7 p.m.
The group, originally from Israel, infuses beatbox,
a capella and comedy in their show. $50 tickets
purchased online, www.www.wayneymca.org or
calling 973-595-0100. The Y is located at 1
Pike Drive, Wayne.
Open House: Rosenbaum Yeshiva of North
Jersey (RYNJ) invites prospective parents to an
open house at 7 p.m. Experience the atmosphere
of Torah scholarship, academic excellence and
middot tovot. Registration, www.RYNJ.org or call
Tamar Kahn at 201-986-1414 x338.
Mitzvah Day: The Chabad Center of Passaic
County will help collect winter coats and acces-
sories to be distributed. Items can be dropped
at The Chabad Center, 194 Ratzer Road, Wayne.
973-694-6274.
Tuesday, November 4
Teen Tuesday at the Library: Video games,
board games and laptops. Free for students in
grades 7 to 12. Johnson Public Library, 274 Main
St., Hackensack. 201-343-4169.
Teachers Convention Vacation Camp: Children
can come to the Y and enjoy a day of arts and
crafts, archery, swimming, cooking and more.
$55/$70. Y is located at 1 Pike Drive, Wayne.
973-595-0100.
Wednesday, November 5
Teachers Convention Vacation Camp: Children
can come to the Y and enjoy a day of arts and
crafts, archery, swimming, cooking and more.
$55/$70. Y is located at 1 Pike Drive, Wayne.
973-595-0100.
Thursday, November 6
Teachers Convention Vacation Camp: Children
can come to the Y and enjoy a day of arts and
crafts, archery, swimming, cooking and more.
$55/$70. Y is located at 1 Pike Drive, Wayne.
973-595-0100.
Lubavitch on the Palisades Toddler Program
Open House: At 9:30 a.m. Lubavitch on the
Palisades School, 11 Harold St., Tenay. 201-
871-1152, www.lpsnj.org. RSVP to LPS@chabad-
lubavitch.org.
Friday, November 7
Family Shabbat Services at Temple Emeth:
Join in with all the members of your family for
services that begin at 7:30 p.m. Temple Emeth,
1666 Windsor Road, Teaneck. 201-833-1322,
www.emeth.org.
Family Services at Temple Israel & JCC: Cantor
Caitlin Bromberg leads services for families with
children of all ages, especially 413. Services at
7 p.m. Oneg Shabbat dessert reception follows.
Located at 475 Grove Street, Ridgewood. 201-
444-9320.
Shabbat in River Edge: Temple Avodat Shalom
offers a host of options, Tot Shabbat at 6 p.m.,
Shabbat Chinese dinner, Family service and alter-
native service and more. Temple Avodat Shalom,
385 Howland Ave., River Edge. 201-489-2463,
or email administrator@avodatshalom.net.
Parents Night Out: Parents can bring children 4
to 12 to the Wayne YMCA from 6 to 10 p.m. where
their children will be engaged and active in activi-
ties. $20 for members, $25 non-members. Y is
located at 1 Pike Drive, Wayne, 973-595-0100.
Saturday, November 8
Saturday Night Live!: Friendship Circle hosts a
program of Mad Science and pizza. Leave the
children here and have a date night out. From
6:45 to 8:15 p.m. $10 a family. Siblings welcome.
RSVP email fcpassaiccounty@yahoo, or www.
fcpassaiccounty.com, 973-694-6274.
Sunday, November 9
Squirrel Stole My Underpants: In this silly puppet/
human adventure tale for families, Sylvie is sent to
the backyard to hang up the laundry. The moment
her back is turned, a mischievous squirrel steals
her favorite piece of clothing and runs off. 11 a.m.
Leonard Nimoy Thalia at Symphony Space, 2537
Broadway, Manhattan. 212-864-5400.
Film Screening for Kristallnacht
Commemoration: Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
presents Return of the Violin as part of its
annual Kristallnacht commemoration. 7 to 9 p.m.
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton Ave.,
Tenay. www.jccotp.org., 201-569-7900.
Family Bird Walk: Fall Birding: Naturalist Gabriel
Willow shares his vast knowledge as birders 6
and older (with an adult) check out the skies on
a family-friendly walk through the gardens and
woodlands. Meet at Perkins Visitors Center 1 p.m.
Wave Hill, W. 249 Street, Bronx, NY. 718-549-
3200, www.wavehill.org.
Tuesday, November 11
Teen Tuesday at the Library: Video games,
board games, laptops. Free for students in grades
7 to 12. Johnson Public Library, 274 Main St.,
Hackensack. 201-343-4169.
Wednesday, November 12
Authors Speak: Author Lev Golinkin, author of
the new A Backpack, a Bear and Eight Crates
of Vodka in conversation with A.J. Jacobs (The
Year of Living Biblically). 7 p.m. At Museum of
Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Place, Manhattan.
www.92Y.org.
Beautiful Skin for All Ages: The Valley Hospital
hosts a skin care program with Tamar Zapolanski,
a dermatologist. From 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the
Bergen County YJCC, 605 Pascack Road,
Township of Washington. 800-825-5391, www.
valleyhealth.com.
DaybyDay
AOC-22
OurChildren
About
NOVEMBER
The Good Life With Kids
22
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
Anxiety in Children and Teens: Full day confer-
ence for professionals, family members and advo-
cates. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Baruch College Conference
Center, 55 Lexington Ave., 14th oor. Featuring Paul
Foxman, author of The Worried Child. Registration
www.ohelfamily.org, 877-338-6435.
Lubavitch on the Palisades Middle School Open
House: At 7:30 p.m. Lubavitch on the Palisades
School, 11 Harold St., Tenay. 201-871-1152, www.
lpsnj.org. RSVP to LPS@chabadlubavitch.org.
Thursday, November 13
Lubavitch on the Palisades Nursery Program
Open House: At 9:30 a.m. Lubavitch on the
Palisades School, 11 Harold St., Tenay. 201-
871-1152, www.lpsnj.org. RSVP to LPS@chabad-
lubavitch.org.
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the
Formula: MoMath presents a night of laughs
as stand-up comedian and mathematician Matt
Parker shows the world of math through humor.
7 p.m. Registration required. MoMath, 11 E. 26 St.,
Manhattan. 212-542-0566, www.momath.org.
Friday, November 14
Hess Toy Truck Mobile Museum: Hess is cel-
ebrating the 50th anniversary of the Hess Toy
Truck with a rst-ever mobile museum. Fans
and collectors will delight. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Hess
Express, 2137 State Route 35, Oakhurst. www.
hesstoytruck.com.
Saturday, November 15
Bergen Youth Orchestra: The BYO opens its
46th season with a performance at 7:30 p.m.
at Bergeneld High School auditorium, 80 S.
Prospect St., Bergeneld. The concert will feature
excerpts from Tschaikovskys Swan Lake, the
Mendelssohn Octet in E-Flat Major, arranged by
Yoon Jae Lee, and Glinkas Ruslan and Ludmilla
Overture. Tickets $10, $5 students and seniors.
Sunday, November 16
Jewish Federation of Northern New Jerseys
Early Childhood Education Fair: Providing
access to a variety of different programs. At
Windsor Hall World of Wings, 1775 Windsor
Road, Teaneck. The fair is free and open to the
public. Bring the children. All families attend-
ing the fair will receive 50 percent off admission
at the World of Wings Buttery Exhibit. Please
contact Ellen for information, ellenf@jfnnj.org or
201-820-3917.
Club Katan: Temple Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley hosts a program for children entering
kindergarten in September 2015. Stories, crafts,
songs, games and more. 10:15 to 11:45 a.m.
Free. Temple Emanuel of the Pascack Valley, 87
Overlook Drive, Woodcliff Lake, 201-391-0801.
Kids In Action: The Chabad Center of Passaic
County will host Kids In Action at 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Visit Africa and enjoy the jungle with hands-on
presentation by a reptile and animal show. $10
includes a light lunch. The Chabad Center, 194
Ratzer Road, contact Chani at chanig@optonline.
net or 973-694-6274.
FunkeyMonkeys at Jewish Museum: Get out
your balloon tails and dancing shoes for the
hilarious antics and soulful sounds of this band
described as Seinfeld meets the Wiggles.
Concerts 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. The Jewish
Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave., Manhattan, 212-234-
3337, www.thejewishmuseum.org.
Puss in High Tops-The Musical: JCC on the
Palisades presents Puss in high-Tops as part of
its Professional Childrens Theater Series. A great
introduction to live theater for children 3 and older.
2 to 3 p.m. JCC on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton
Ave., Tenay, 201-408-1493, www.jccotp.org.
Pinkalicious The Musical: Pinkalicious takes pink
to its ultimate extreme. Shows at 1 and 4 p.m.
bergenPAC, 30 North Van Brunt St., Englewood.
201-227-1030, www.bergenpac.org.
Fall Boutique: Early Childhood Department at
the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades will be hold-
ing their annual Fall Boutique, featuring a wide
selection of jewelry, womens fashions, belts,
sunglasses, childrens clothing and accessories,
decorative home furnishing, gift items, tabletop
accessories and more from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. JCC
on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenay. 201-
408-1435.
Monday, November 17
Fall Boutique: Early Childhood Department at
the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades will be hold-
ing their annual Fall Boutique, featuring a wide
selection of jewelry, womens fashions, belts,
sunglasses, childrens clothing and accessories,
decorative home furnishing, gift items, tabletop
accessories and more from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. JCC
on the Palisades, 411 E. Clinton Ave., Tenay. 201-
408-1435.
WeBop Family Jazz Party, See Sunday, November 23
FYI
23
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
AOC-23
PARTY
973-661-9368
Mini Scribblers
Parenting
Center Class
If you give a child a crayon and stamps
and glue and other fun materials, who
knows what masterpieces will be cre-
ated? Mini-Scribblers mommy and me
class at the Bergen County YJCC for
children 18 months to two-year-olds
invites parents to guide their toddlers
through the exploration of materials
perfectly suited to their innate abilities
and interests. Mini-Scribblers will meet
on Fridays from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m., Nov.
7 through January 23. The fee is $250 for
YJCC members, $300 for non-members
The YJCC is located at 605 Pascack
Road, 201-666-6610. www.yjcc.org.
Baby and Me Yoga
The Valley Hospitals Center for Family
Education is offering Baby & Me Yoga
for mothers and their babies, approxi-
mately 6 weeks-1 year on Nov. 3, 10, 17
and 24 from noon 1 p.m. Topics cov-
ered include postpartum conditions
such as back strain, weak abdominal
wall and pelvic foor, tight shoulders,
sleeplessness, and stress. This pro-
gram will be held at the Destination
Maternitys Learning Studio, 35 Plaza on
Westbound Route 4, Paramus To regis-
ter online, visit www.ValleyHealth.com/
FamilyEducation. 201-291-6151.
Open Houses at JCC
Nursery School
The Leonard & Syril Rubin Nursery
School at the Kaplen JCC on the Pali-
sades will hold open houses on Nov.
14 and later on Dec. 9, Jan. 21 at 9:30 to
10:30 a.m.
The Leonard and Syril Rubin Nurs-
ery School at the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades offers a warm, child-centered
environment rooted in Jewish tradition,
where children can become confdent,
responsible and successful learners.
The school offers programs for toddlers
through kindergarteners with options
of extended days as well. The Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades is located at 411
E. Clinton Ave., Tenafy. For information
contact early childhood director, Jo So-
hinki at jsohinki@jccotp.org or 201-408-
1430, or the registrar, Elissa Yurowitz at
eyurowitz@jccotp.org or 201-408-1436.
Tuesday, November 18
Teen Tuesday at the Library: Video games,
board games, laptops. Free for students in grades
7 to 12. Johnson Public Library, 274 Main St.,
Hackensack. 201-343-4169.
Wednesday, November 19
After-School with Chabad: Chabad Center of
Passaic County presents a story and crafts hour
at 4:30 at the Wayne Public Library, 461 Valley
Road. Ages 2 to 8. Siblings welcome. For more
information Chani at chanig@optonline.net or call
973- 694 6274.
Parenting Workshop: The Orangetown Jewish
Center presents a meeting at 7 p.m. on Learning
to Handle Mistakes and Misbehaviors in a Calm
and Constructive Way. Orangetown Jewish Center,
8 Independence Ave., Orangeburg, N.Y. 845-359-
5920.
Thursday, November 20
Lubavitch on the Palisades Pre-K and
Kindergarten Open House: At 9:30 a.m.
Lubavitch on the Palisades School, 11 Harold St.,
Tenay. 201-871-1152, www.lpsnj.org. RSVP to
LPS@chabadlubavitch.org.
Friday, November 21
Shabbat Yachad: Temple Emanuel of the Pascack
Valleys Cantor Mark Biddelman presents Shabbat
Yachad, a unique service of togetherness at
8 p.m. Temple Emanuel of the Pascack Valley, 87
Overlook Drive, Woodcliff Lake, 201-391-0801.
Tot Shabbat in Franklin Lakes: Shabbat services
and pizza dinner at 5:30 p.m. Barnert Temple,
747 Route 208 South, Franklin Lakes. 201-848-
1800. www.barnerttemple.org.
Sunday, November 23
Jazz at Lincoln Centers WeBop Family Jazz
Party: Painted Beats, presented by the Jewish
Museum, will take place 2:30 p.m. Parents can
spark creativity and musicality for their children
ages 3 to 8 years. Attendees will join the WeBop!
Family Band for this interactive jazz party explor-
ing the connections between jazz and the art
works of Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis. The
Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave., Manhattan. 212-
423-3337, www.thejewishmuseum.org.
Teen Talk with Rabbi Shull: Temple Emanuel of
the Pascack Valley hosts a drash and nosh from
11:15 a.m. to noon. Bagel breakfast included.
Email Margie@tepv.org for information and regis-
tration. Temple Emanuel of the Pascack Valley, 87
Overlook Drive, Woodcliff Lake, 201-391-0801.
Tuesday, November 25
Teen Tuesday at the Library: Video games,
board games, and laptops. Free for students in
grades 7 to 12. Johnson Public Library, 274 Main
St., Hackensack. 201-343-4169.
Wednesday, November 26
Inating the Balloons: Each year, the day before
Thanksgiving the giant balloons come to life. To
watch them inate, they can be viewed from 3
p.m. to 10 p.m. at 77 and 81 Streets, between
Central Park West and Columbus Avenue in
Manhattan. Mass transit is your best bet. Take the
B or C train to the 81st St/American Museum of
Natural History station.
Thursday, November 27
Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade: See the sig-
nature giant helium character balloons, fantasy-
lled oats, marching bands and more as they go
from 77th and Central Park West to Macys at 34
Street in Manhattan. Best locations for viewing,
from Central Park West: the west side of the street
from 70th Street to Columbus Circle and on the
east side of the street from 70th to 65th Street
Columbus Circle: the west side of the street. 6th
Avenue: between 59th and 34th. Spectators
arrive as early as 6:30am.
motion, darting and swimming, a per-
formance to compensate for the disap-
pointing display of the dragon.
Another disappointment was the
childrens zoo, which was closed for
renovation, so there would be no al-
paca to feed and pet.
A visit to the Queens Zoo trans-
ports one decades back in time be-
cause it is adjacent to the site of two
Worlds Fairs, 1939-40 and 1963-64. Its
an exhausting hike from the nearest
subway station, but its beautiful land-
scaping makes the trip worthwhile.
And, oh yes, there are animals. A sign
notes, The coyote is not on display,
but no matter, the lynx and the puma
make up for it.
Eli is especially pleased at seeing
a pudu, a tiny deer about the size of
a spaniel. Its the smallest of all ungu-
lates. Theres also a couple of pecca-
ries that must be photographed, and
an Andean bear, Latin Americas only
bear.
Then to the barnyard animals:
sheep, goats, horses, pigs, cows,
ducks, chickens, and, yes, alpacas.
By the way, Eli, how can you tell
the difference between the llama and
the alpaca?
The length of the snout he says
with such conviction we dont ques-
tion him further. Hes busy distributing
animal food to the sheep and goats,
but the alpaca remains a distance from
the fence, and wont come within feed-
ing range. A keeper arrives leading a
school group and Eli follows, thinking
they might have more infuence on the
alpaca, but no.
Its getting late. Eli pleads for more
time. Maybe the alpaca will wander by,
but some experiences must remain in-
complete. And so it is with the alpaca
visit. Theres always a next time.
Ed Silberfarb was a reporter for the Bergen
Record in New Jersey, then the New
York Herald Tribune where he was City
Hall bureau chief. Later, he was a public
information ofcer for the New York City
Transit Authority and editor of one of its
employee publications.
Animal continued from page 10
Thanks-Giving in Rockland
Rockland Jewish Academy celebrates
Thanksgiving by giving. Bring gently
used shoes, sneakers and a canned or
non-perishable item to donate.
Rockland Jewish Academy, 450 W.
Nyack Road, West Nyack. Call Judy
Klein, 845-627-0010 ext. 104.
AOC-24
24
ABOUT OUR CHI LDRE N NOVEMBER 2014
99
%
Patient Satisfaction
Last year, Valley ranked in the 98th percentile nationally for overall patient
satisfaction, and in the 99th percentile in New Jersey the highest
patient satisfaction for emergency care in all of Bergen County
*
.
To learn more about Valleys award-winning care,
please visit www.ValleyHealth.com/Awards.
MAKE THE VALLEY HOSPI TAL
YOUR HOSPI TAL
www.ValleyHealth.com
* Source: Fourth Quarter, 2013, Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction
Valleys Pediatric Emergency Room only
treats children and teenagers, providing
specialized care for the youngest members
of your family. Our pediatric ER is open
24/7 and is staffed with full-time, pediatric
specialists and subspecialists.
Here when
you need it!
Quality Emergency Care.
Quickly.
See an ER Doctor
in under 30 minutes.