Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 4

Magnitude- the size of a quantity

Time- the point or period when something occurs


Direction - which orientation of an object
Distance- how far an object travels
Speed- the rate at which someone or something is able to move or operate
Displacement- how far an object is away from a reference
Velocity- the rate at which an object changes its position
Scalar- quantities described by a magnitude
Vector-quantities described by magnitude and direction
Acceleration the rate at which a velocity changes in a time period

Speed is the rate of distance to time =>


Average speed is the rate of distance to time over an interval =>



Velocity is the rate of displacement to time =>


Average velocity is the rate of displacement to time over an interval =>

(slope)

Acceleration is the rate of velocity to time =>


Average acceleration is the rate of change in velocity to time over an interval =>


Rewritten,


Using variable manipulation, we find the first kinematics equation: that

(slope
intercept form)


Time t
Distance x
Speed s
Displacement d
Velocity v
Acceleration a
Subscript a average
Subscript f final
Subscript i initial
Subscript x- in the x direction
Subscript y- in the y direction


Displacement is the area under the curve of acceleration. If the curve is non-constant and linear, then
the area will simply be that of a right triangle

=>


To get the second kinematics equation, we manipulate the equation for velocity from the
equation for acceleration,

=>


Now we use substitution with the equations:

=>


After this, the question of what if the object is already moving is brought up. Simply add the original
displacement to the newly derived equation: ,

=>



To find the third kinematics equation we take the mean of the initial and final velocities to get average velocity ,
and rearrange the average acceleration equation, and substitute them into a rearranged velocity formula

=>

=>

=>



To derive projectile equations, we rename some variables and substitute others from the kinematics equations.
In the case of horizontal motion, there is no acceleration, so to find velocity we start with

=>

, (because acceleration will equal 0), =>

, because we are focused


on the horizontal motion.

To find the horizontal displacement of a projectile we start with the displacement formula, and rename the
variables to specify our situation, and for the case of a present distance, add an initial distance.
=> =>

=>




Vertical equations are similar to horizontal in the sense that the acceleration is set. It is set to negative nine
point eight meters per second per second (gravity)

=>

=>



A velocity equation without time as a variable is derived from the same kind of equation.

=>

=>



Using basic trig function we find more equations for velocities.

=>

=>

=>

=>