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D&T DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK

Update SEPTEMBER 2014

2014

Design &
Technology
Department
Handbook

UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2014


PHIL ANDREWS

D&T DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK


Update SEPTEMBER 2014

CONTENTS: (nb those marked * are work in progress and may not be complete at time
of publication)
D&T Department Staffing, Ethos and Aims

Key stage 3 overall plan & Schemes of Work*

Key stage 4 overall plan & Scheme of Work* *

11

Classroom Expectations/ Behavioural Policy/Monitoring*

27

Assessment/Measuring & Tracking Pupil Progress

31

Target Setting/Marking/Literacy/Tests & Exams/Peer/Self -assessment

Working with Parents/Reporting and Communication/Website*

44

Inclusion Differentiation, SEND, Most Able, GAP groups, Setting*

45

Use of ICT in D&T/BYOD/Website/VLE

57

Homework/Independent Learning Policy*

58

Monitoring teaching and learning: Quality Assurance


Work Scrutiny/Learning Walks/Student Reviews/Department Meetings/CPD/interventions

62

Appraisal/SchoolIP*

67

Health and Safety

69

Use of Resources and Ordering System

72

Absence of Teaching Staff and cover

77

External Links/Competitions/School Visits

79

Department Development Plan (DDP)

appendix 1

Department Self Evaluation (DepSEF)

appendix 2

D&T DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK


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Staffing
Mr P Andrews
Mr M Mavin
Mr G Wales
Mr T Brand-Barker
Mrs C Hannah
Mrs C Sessford

Head of Department GCSE Graphic Products


Chef GCSE Catering
GCSE Resistant Materials
GCSE Resistant Materials
Sous Chef HLTA/Technician - Food
HTLA/Technician Workshop

D&T Department Ethos

The Department aims to create the environment and the opportunity for
all students at Key Stage 3 and 4 to develop their creative skills and
manufacturing skills in a wide range of media and materials. They
should be able to communicate their ideas and designs and to learn
practical and skilful ways in which to manufacture their concepts. The
study of influential designers, traditional materials and manufacturing
techniques as well as new Smart and Modern materials and new
technologies will be an integral part of the student experience. The
social and moral issues of design and manufacture along with the
environmental impact of design will be studied alongside the use of biomimicry, electronics, CAD/CAM, CNC and robotic control. The D&T
scheme of work will allow all students to appreciate what is around them
and the diversity of the roles and functions that D&T has. All projects will
ensure that success is achievable by all yet outcomes can be
personalised according to each students ability and aptitude. All
projects will allow all students to stretch, develop and challenge
themselves to become independent learners. Students will be
challenged to experiment and try ideas that do not always guarantee
success but embed a culture of learning from mistakes being more
valuable than not stretching oneself beyond knowledge already attained
and of being afraid to make a mistake. All students will be encouraged to
take part in competitions and to be as active as possible in the
workshops, D&T Clubs and revision sessions*. (*area for development).
The D&T Department aims to be a place where every child has the opportunity
to achieve to the best of their ability and learn, develop and explore their
ability in designing and making.

D&T DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK


Update SEPTEMBER 2014

Department Policy
The aim of the Design & Technology Department at St Josephs Catholic High School is
to offer equal opportunities to all students. We aim to achieve this by offering a broad
balanced curriculum, which allows students of both sexes to achieve their maximum
potential. Programmes of study are to be translated into differentiated schemes of
work to match the ability, attitude and developmental level of individual pupils.
We strive to stimulate a lasting interest in learning through problem solving and
technological activities. We attempt to help students to develop their imaginations,
sensitivity and creative responses to a wide range of aesthetic experiences.
Design & Technology has an important part to play in helping all students to acquire
the knowledge and skills that will be needed for them to take an active role in future a
The study of Design & Technology fosters a wide range of desirable qualities, which we
value. Pupils need to co-operate with one another and have a responsible attitude for
health and safety. Students should develop lively, enquiring minds, the ability to
question and argue rationally and to apply themselves to tasks and physical skills, both
on their own and in groups.
As a department we aim to promote high standards of academic achievements
through designing, making and evaluating results. We aim to work together as an
enthusiastic team and promote an environment where all students develop personal
responsibility and self-motivation but consider the needs and achievements of others.
As appropriate, the aims and objectives of the Design and Technology Department
relate directly, to those of the School, and to the requirements of the revised 2014
National Curriculum.
Aims
Central
Through problem solving and technological activities the pupils should build up their
skills and confidence to enable them to approach a man-made world as active
participants in future developments whilst still showing care and sensitivity for the
environment.
Major
To give all pupils of both sexes the opportunity and confidence to tackle and solve
problems which are related to the needs of individuals.
To encourage the pupils to question the world about them as well as being able to
constructively evaluate their own and other peoples work.
To create a learning environment where the attributes of creativity, equality,
cooperation and resourcefulness are developed and the pupil are interested and
actively participate in the project work.

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To build where possible on the different backgrounds of the individuals in a group and
where possible relate work to relevant cultural information.
For the pupils to develop an understanding of how they can control products and
systems and how the products can be developed further to improve them.
To encourage and make pupils aware of the similarities and differences between
school and the world of work.
To encourage an open minded and investigative approach when tackling problems.
To encourage clear communication techniques whether oral, written or in a graphical
form.
To encourage co-operation and the social skills needed when working in a team in a
problem solving activity. The pupils should be able to work as individuals when the
need arises.
To build and establish good working practices and an understanding of technical
concepts and systems and their safe application.
To foster appropriate cross - curricular links where possible.
To encourage the use of I.C.T as a means of communication, learning and as a design
tool.
Collectively, these courses work towards achieving the following aims:
1.
To stimulate and/or maintain student interest, enjoyment, curiosity and
concern about, technological aspects of their environment, both local and
otherwise in Design and Technology.
2.
To enable students to be familiar with a relevant body of knowledge, skills,
principles and vocabulary, e.g. students should become competent and
confident in:
i.
conceiving, designing, and producing a range of technological products
'of good quality';
ii.
evaluating and improving upon their own technological products and
those designed by others. The student's criticism should be by means of
reasoned arguments.
3.
To enable students to perceive Design and Technology as:
i.
a major cultural feature;
ii.
part of a wider body of knowledge and skills, e.g. to be able to work
both independently and co-operatively.
4.
To employ teaching methods and resources that allow all students (irrespective
of their gender, ethnic origin, academic ability, etc.) to have equal access to
Design and Technology and to experience success and enjoyment in their work.
5.
To develop an awareness in students of:
i.
the implications of Design and Technology (past and present) for the
individual and the local, national and international communities.
Students should understand the role of Design and Technology as a

D&T DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK


Update SEPTEMBER 2014

6.

critical factor in human, social, economic, cultural and environmental


well-being and development.
ii.
the significance of Design and Technology and to value it as an
important, pleasurable and fundamental realm of human experience.
iii.
some of the effects, beneficial or detrimental, that technology has had
or may have on human society and the environment. This should help
develop an awareness of technical, aesthetic, moral, economic, social,
cultural, and environmental considerations that can make conflicting
demands on designers and manufacturers.
To support the implementation of the statement on 'Shared Values' and to
enable pupils to develop a range of desirable personal qualities such as safety
awareness, politeness, perseverance, concern for others, initiative and
independence.

Design Technology Objectives - Pupils


The objectives listed below are not in any order of importance. All pupils should have
covered them by the end of year 11 although there maybe differences due to pupils
specialising at key stage 4.
Design
To know about the design process.
To be able to individually identify a problem situation.
To be able to research an area then sifts through all available information from a
variety of sources and applies relevant data to the problem.
Having developed an understanding of a problem a pupil should be able to draw up a
brief or specification based upon all the information available and taking into account
any constraints.
To be able to produce and record suggestions that may lead to a solution.
To be able to plan out in advance how the problem will be tackled and manage time
to suit.
To be able to design realistic and relevant solutions.
To be able to relate scientific and technological information to the design process.
Graphics
To be able to use a variety of graphic techniques in order to convey their proposals
to include 3D and orthographic techniques and rendering.
To be able to select the most appropriate method for the job in hand.
To know the importance of layout in creating a quality image.
Materials
After researching a need, to be able to select the most suitable material from those
available.
To know and understand the terminology associated with the properties of materials
and to be able to use them in the correct context.
To be able to identify the basic materials.
Structures

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To know the basic elements of a structure and to be able to name them.


To know the scientific principles associated with structures and to apply them.
To know how the structure of materials can be altered to create new materials and
how they can be used.
To identify different forces and how they act on a structure.
Manufacturing
To be familiar with industrial practices and to know how these practices can be
reproduced in the school environment.
To understand the impact of mass production upon society and the environment.
Energy
To know the energy sources available and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
To know the method of converting the energy source into useable power and the
problems and cost of doing this.
To be able to relate the theoretical principles of energy and its consumption to their
everyday lives.
Evaluation
To be able to assess the resources available and to decide what is practical within any
given constraints such as time, costs and facilities.
To be able to identify any weakness or fault during the design and make process and
find an appropriate solution, record it and overcome the problem.
To be able to design their own criteria on which to constructively assess their own
and other peoples work.
Control
To know the principles of mechanical movement and mechanisms and to be able to
apply them to problem solving activities.
To know that computers can control other devices.
To know and be able to use a variety of mechanical and electronic control devices
within their practical work including CAD and CAM.

Making
To be able to use a variety of machines and hand tools safely and correctly on a
variety of materials and with different technological components.
To check the product during all stages of manufacture against the original brief and
make changes if and when required.
To be able to work safely and ensure that the product is safe to use.
To have a good working knowledge of finishing techniques and to be able to apply
them in a variety of situations.

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Electronics
To possess a basic understanding of how to create an electronic circuit.
To have a good working knowledge of variety of components and to be able to decide
where and when they are suitable to integrated into a circuit
To understand how important electronics is to the society we live in and depend
upon.
To understand how electronic circuitry can control movement.
Society
To be able to identify the impact technology has on society.
To be able to identify the social, moral, ethical and environmental issues of design
and technology.
To see that new technology has forced big changes on industry and its working
practices.
To know that there is a cost to society, good or bad to every new advance.
That technology can greatly improve peoples living standards.

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Schemes of Work
All current projects are being reviewed to ensure that all areas of 2014 Programme of Study
are covered. Many current projects do not have written, lesson by lesson, Schemes of
Work. At present all projects have workbooks to provide consistency of content delivery
and SofW guidance. This does not guarantee consistency and is a noted concern. The
current system has allowed each teacher flexibility to teach in their own style but ensures a
minimum of content. Ideally all lessons will ensure content beyond minimum requirements
is covered and stretch and challenge all pupils. Regular sharing good practice and cross
department meetings help ensure consistency across the department. Use of Realsmart
and Google Docs to compile and share all resources is a step towards developing further
consistency of delivery. Any existing projects that remain in new KS3 Programme of Study
will have a written Scheme of Work as soon as practicable.
All members of the department will follow an agreed curriculum for Key Stage 3. Schemes
of work will be developed which will take into account the National Curriculum, school
aims, teacher strengths and weaknesses, CCT and the facilities available. All members of the
department will have a full copy of the syllabus and be involved in the review and revision
of its contents on an on-going basis. *September 2014 regular, anonymous pupil reviews
of projects to be completed after each project.
The department syllabus is meant to create a support structure for the department, which
still allows flexibility but ensures the maximum coverage of the National Curriculum.
It is essential that all S of W include reference to Cross Curricular Themes (CCT) as and
where appropriate.
The CCT are:
Enteprise Capability

PSHE Spirituality

Numeracy

Careers

ICT Literacy

D&T DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK


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Key Stage 3
During Key Stage 3 Students will have the opportunity to work with many different
materials and they will experience many different projects.
Basic themes and techniques will be adapted and changed each year, but the overall
themes and techniques to be taught are as follows:
Workshop
Year 7: an introduction to designing and making through a series of projects incorporating
designing, making, planning, evaluating, ECT, CAD, Graphics and new materials.
Year 8: builds on and develops year 7 skills whilst introducing new ones. This year focusses
on the Technology side of the subject with projects based on ECT, CAD/CAM, Robotics,
mechanisms, Systems and Control, structures and mechanisms and the work of existing
designers especially Alessi.
Year 9: is a taster of the GCSE options with students spending a term studying each GCSE
option. Projects are aimed at stretching the students and ensuring they are well prepared
for the GCSE course. Work in Graphics is currently assessed using GCSE criteria and grades
which is then converted to levels. It is the expectation that this will be across the
department from October 2014.
The current scheme of work is under development to ensure complete coverage of the new
programme of study issued in 2014. With the appointment of Mr Wales in September 2014
the department has the opportunity to radically change our current delivery model and
content. It was decided that the current scheme of work was carried over from 2013-2014
to provide a working framework for Mr Wales to teach from and for whole department to
develop. This work is ongoing from September 2014.
Year 9 Resistant Materials: Pupils are introduced to completing a range of projects in a GCSE
format. In Resistant Materials, pupils covers a series of issues including sustainability, ecology
and industrial manufacture. Pupils draw upon their designing skills from key stage 3 and work
to a specific design brief to produce a completed portfolio and a high quality manufactured
product. Pupils complete a small design and make task using plastics. They explore a brief
history of plastics and how it has become a widely used material in industry. Pupils create a
design portfolio for a novelty USB pen drive. They manufacture their ideas using industrial
techniques in the CAD/CAM studio. Pupils will also learn the importance of recording their
progress and working to a GCSE specification.
Year 9 Graphic Products: Students complete a set of essential GCSE graphic skills FPTs using
drawing boards to develop accuracy and presentation in both 2D and 3D. This will include
isometric and perspective drawing. Students will also complete a team competition
referencing Industrial manufacture and rendering exercises. Students will then complete a
mini GCSE project based on promotion of a pop group through the research, analysis,
design and manufacture of a logo and promotional packaging. This will be completed using
CAD/CAM and develop CNC skills on plotter cutter (laser). They manufacture their ideas
using industrial techniques in the CAD/CAM studio. Pupils will also learn the importance of
recording their progress and working to a GCSE specification. All work marked to GCSE
criteria and converted to levels.

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Food Technology/Catering
YEAR 7 OVERVIEW
The pupils have an introduction to the food technology department and are introduced to
rules safety, basic food hygiene and personal hygiene issues. From there knife safety and
use of knives are shown and instructed on using them safely. Food recipes are developed
to build of basic culinary skillsfrom soup to pastry making meat dishes and are all based
around the implantation of healthy eating and nutrition. 2 challenges are introduced
where pupils research design and evaluate their own dishes. Basic skills work towards year
8.
YEAR 8 OVERVIEW
Year 8 the pupils build on the skills learned from year 7. Knife skills and vegetable cuts are
developed further with more complex dishes being made and completed. These stretch
the pupils ability. Nutrition is also progressed and pupils analyse their own products with
sharing results between each other. Healthy eating is extended further and temperature
recording becomes the normall skills needed for the GCSE course so natural progression
is accomplished. Further 2 challenges in year 8 to extend research and planning of their
dish/product choice. More intense evaluation required form pupils. HASAWA 1974 (health
and safety at work act), HACCP (hazard analysis of critical control points) are topics of
some theory lessons. This is continual planning towards GCSE.
YEAR 9 OVERVIEW
A short year, but more development towards year 10 GCSE. A further 2 challenges are
included in year 9 these are generally aimed at extending skills with the inclusion of
planning and self-evaluation. More skills are expected from pupils looking at how to
complete products with the presentation being more apparent. COSHH (control of
substances hazardous to health) included in the year. This again is overall planning towards
year 10.
Whole Department Aims
Through each of these separate areas of Workshop and Food the projects delivered will
ensure that the formal elements of D&T will be taught. Every project will allow students
to explore and develop their ideas and will encourage them to evaluate and develop their
work. The knowledge which they gain each year will be built upon the following year. As a
part of each project students will be encouraged to think creatively and work
independently.
Time Allocation
Each student will get a double lesson of Design and Technology Workshop each week
equalling 1 hour 40 minutes and a double lesson of Design and Technology Food every
other week equalling 1 hour 40 minutes.

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Plan of Key Stage 3 Scheme of Work overview


Plan of Key Stage 3 Scheme of Work overview Workshop

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Plan of Key Stage 3 Scheme of Work overview Food


Breakdown of some of the lesson topics in KS3
Year 7
Year 8
Leek and potato soup
Ratatouille
Pizza challenge
Christmas mince pies
Quiche
Chicken curry
Burgers
Beef and vegetable bolognaise
Fresh fruit salad
Crumble challenge
Wholemeal savoury scones
Mini carrot buns
Nutrition
Business and enterprise

Pasta challenge
Sweet red potato and mushroom
curry
Spicy pork and chilli pepper goulash
Christmas muffins
Chicken tagine
Chilli-con-carni
Spanish recipe
Flap jack challenge
German bread
Business and enterprise
Nutrition
HASAWA 1974-HACCP

Year 9
Mince challenge
Christmas fruit cake
Marzipan/icing/decorating
Potato challenge
Bread making
Sticky toffee pudding
BUSINESS AND ENTERPRISE
PUPIL PRESENTATIONS
COSHH

Food Practical lessons - Term breakdown KS3


Year
7

Term 1
Leek and potato soup
Ratatouille
Pizza challenge
Christmas mince pies

Term 2
Quiche
Chicken curry
Burgers
Beef and vegetable
bolognese

Pasta challenge
Sweet red potato and mushroom curry
Spicy pork and chilli pepper goulash
Christmas muffins
Mince challenge
Christmas fruit cake
Marzipan/icing/decorating

Chicken tagine
Chilli-con-carne
Spanish recipe

B/E
Flap jack challenge
German bread
B/E

Potato challenge
Bread making
B/E

Sticky toffee pudding


PUPIL PRESENTATIONS
COSHH

Term 3
Fresh fruit salad
Crumble challenge
Wholemeal savoury scones
Mini carrot buns

D&T DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK


Update SEPTEMBER 2014

Plan of Key Stage 4


We are following the AQA GCSE Design & Technology Resistant Materials and Graphic
Products syllabi and the WJEC GCSE Catering syllabus* September 2014 All current GSCE
options and courses are to be reviewed and opportunities to offer alternative
qualifications to be considered. We are aware of the Govt.s intention to consolidate Food
and Catering GCSEs in 2017.
The AQA GCSE consists of 60% coursework and 40% exam. The students are given a series
of projects which will ensure that the Programme of Study is covered for each syllabus.
Each project will develop the skills, knowledge and understanding necessary to complete
the final Controlled Assessment task and written examination. Students will be guided
through the projects with a series of workshops, tasks and introductions. All students are
expected to work independently and the opportunity to use the after school sessions as a
route to improve their work and grade.
Time Allocation
All students get three, 50 minute lessons a week, one double and one single and are
encouraged to attend lunchtime and after school sessions. It is recommended practice for
each teacher to use the double period for Coursework themed lessons and the single
period for theory and exam practice. This will be up to each teachers individual
preference.
Mentoring
Year 11 students from Sept 2014 - All students will have an individual mentoring session
with their teacher in the beginning of year 11. This will give them a set of individual targets
and advice which they are advised to follow in order to achieve at least their potential
grade. Advice will be aimed at getting each student to achieve beyond their target grade.
Specific targets for GAP group and Most Able students is also to be recorded on
Intervention Proforma.

D&T DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK


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AQA Resistant Materials and Graphic Products


All projects and previous exams are available on RealSmart or subject specific in-house
websites. For example, Graphics has a specific, Weebly based, website:designmragraphicproductsgcse.weebly.com
There are also links to the exam board to help students progress through the topics. Digital
galleries of previous work and links to our revision theory website is displayed on the
Department website. http://www.rlsmart.net/rweb.php?item_id=12394383&share_id=261853
At the end of the two years students work will be exhibited in conjunction with the Art
Departments end of year show.
At Easter in year 10 the students start preparation for their GCSE coursework. Until that
point all classwork and homework completed is used as practice towards the Controlled
Assessment.

WJEC Catering
The course that we administer at the school, is to prepare any student wanting to enter
the catering industry. Taught be industry experienced staff, the students get first-hand
knowledge and experience from the staff because of this. The students are trained to a
level accepted by the industry. We also administer the food hygiene level 2 qualification.
This is valid for 3 years and allows the students to get a part time job within the catering
sector eg cafs, pubs and restaurants, whilst still at school. During KS3 the students gain
knowledge required for the course, but also many life skills that will benefit them for their
future, hygiene issues, food safety, food storage, recipes, healthy eating, COSHH, HACCP,
HASAWA 1974 to name a few.
Students will have 2 controlled assessments (1 in year 10 1 in year 11) with a theory exam
at the end of year 11. These marks are collated to produce a final grade. These controlled
assessments allow the student to research 1 from a bank of 3 options their choice of
option and produce dishes/recipes from their choice. This is marked internally. Then both
assessments are invigilated externally. Students are required to work out costings and
nutritional elements of the dishes/recipes they complete. (Nutritional element in year 11
only). Students evaluate their own work from the assessments, before being marked.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Key Stage 4 Overall plan and project layout.


Graphic Products Overview:
This is course teaches students to follow the design process by undertaking design and make
projects throughout Y10, in preparation for the major project in Y11.
Creativity and originality are encouraged, while using a range of materials and techniques. A
working knowledge of graphic design technique, printing and industrial manufacture is built up
during the course. Students will also learn about good design and how to communicate ideas
through drawing, modelling and Computer Aided Design (CAD).
What will students learn?
Graphic design comes in where words and visual images are used to convey ideas and
information. Graphic design features in lots of different areas including advertising, publishing,
signage, packaging, corporate identity (a companys image and logo) and multimedia.
Graphic design is concerned with both visual imagery and the production of 3 dimensional
outcomes.
You will be expected to demonstrate a wide range of graphic techniques to create, develop and
communicate solutions to problems. The solutions will be modelled in compliant materials
(paper, card and similar) to convey 3 dimensional concepts to others.
In addition to drawing skills, the course will cover advertising, typographic design, print
technology, illustration, new media and computer aided design and manufacture.
How will students be assessed?
Design and Technology is a practical subject but has a demand for theoretical knowledge and
understanding of the processes used. These are all tested in a final examination in year 11. Year
11 also sees the pupils working on a Major Project that allows them to demonstrate their
Designing and Making skills. The Major Project accounts for a maximum of 60% of final GCSE
grade with the final examination accounting for a maximum of 40% of the final GCSE grade.
How are students taught?
From year 9 through to year 10 students will be completing a range of projects that develop in
more detail your existing skills whilst allowing them to experience and practice new advanced
techniques in making, designing, CAD, CAM and presentation skills. The aim for year 10 is to
allow students to identify their strengths and skills and preferred materials. Not all Year 10 work
counts towards the final GCSE grades but allows students to learn the skills and processes to
enable them to choose a major project for study that best suits their strengths and skills.
From Easter in Year 10 to February half term in Year 11 lessons are spent designing and creating
a product suitable for industrial manufacture. Past examples have been pop group promotion,
interior design, party packs for childrens parties and internet and film promotion. In line with
new Controlled Assessment guidelines, the design briefs are set by the AQA examination
board. The teacher will choose a design brief that will allow students to achieve their best based
upon the experience and resources available. In practice pupils have a large degree of freedom
in their designing and it is common for them to be pushing the limits of the techniques and
processes used in the workshop to create their designs.
From March of Year 11 class work is focussed on preparation for the 2 hour final exam in June of
the final year.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Year 9
Summer
Term

Foundation
Graphics skills

Course introduction time plan, target setting, course outline


Drawing techniques
3rd angle orthographic projection scale, conventions, dimensions
Perspective drawing constructed, sketched
Isometric drawing constructed, sketched, use of crate, underlay, grids,
etc.
Opportunities can be taken here to develop skills and knowledge in:
colour rendering, line enhancement, shadowing, texturing
the use of CAD

Year 9
Summer
term

Product Analysis

Product disassembly and analysis students to disassemble an existing


commercial package and carry out a reasoned analysis with reference to
the
following criteria:
materials used
method of manufacture batch, printing, finish
method of construction crash bottom, tabs, locking methods
colours used colour language
environmental/social issues sustainability/planned obsolescence/the 6
Rs.
statutory requirements
QA checks registration marks, colour bars
imagery used
CAD/CAM
function, form, fitness for purpose
client/market
health and safety
systems at work.
The opportunity can be taken here for the student to:
create a flow chart to illustrate how ICT could be used in industry to
create
their chosen product
access commercial websites, databases, CD ROMs to obtain product
information.

Year 10
Autumn
term

Pop Up Promotion

Year 10
Autumn
Term

Chart this
FPT

Candidates to consolidate skills and knowledge by researching and


modelling a
range of dynamic cards/displays.
Opportunities can be taken here to develop skills and knowledge in:
the types and use of dynamic mechanisms linkages, levers, folding
methods,
AV programmable ICs
use of appropriate materials
commercial methods of manufacture
modelling
techniques
Information
drawing
2D and
and equipment
3D bar charts, pie charts, line graphs,

planning
of
making
pictographs,
QA and QC
ideograms.
creativity.
Students
to create a variety of illustrated graphs to encourage interest in a
topic,
eg road safety, recycling.
Opportunities can be taken here to develop skills and knowledge in:
illustrative techniques

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Year 10
Autumn
Term

Cosmetic
Packaging
Design make
Assessment

Candidates to consolidate skills and knowledge of existing commercial


products
types of packaging (primary and secondary), point of sale displays, CD,
DVD
cases, blister packs, etc.
Opportunities can be taken here to develop skills and knowledge in:
properties and uses of materials board, thermoplastics, foam board,
smart/modern materials, virgin materials, recyclable, reusable,
sustainability,
managed resources
commercial sizes and thicknesses
different types of construction for different purposes flat pack, crash
bottom,
gluing tabs, gusset folds, envelope bottoms, locking tabs, etc (nets)
methods of using thermoplastics vacuum forming, injection moulding,
blow
moulding
the manufacture of card/paper models to explore types of commercial
packaging
the use of databases and commercial web sites
use a range of materials and appropriate modelling tools.

Year 10
Spring
Term

Business Identity
Design make
Assessment

Students to design a logo, based on the work of a named designer as part


of a
promotion of that designers work.
Opportunities can be taken here to develop skills and knowledge in:
research techniques, access to and types of source material
analyzing information
writing a specification
sketching and colour techniques
the language of colour
commercial printing methods
the use of CAD software to create a logo
methods of recording the use of CAD to create a logo-screenshots,
digital evidence
evaluation of outcome (market research)
exploration of possible application of logo to promotional products.
Making students could then take the opportunity to apply their logo to
an
existing package (database), stationary, point of sale thereby allowing prac

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Year 10
Summer
Term

Controlled
Assessment
task

Students to complete Criteria 1 Research and Analysis

Year 11
Autumn
Term

Controlled
Assessment
task

Students to complete Criteria 2 Designing of logo and CD Packaging

Year 11
Controlled
Spring
Assessment
Term
task
until Feb
half term

Year 11
Feb half
term to
May half
term

Pupils begin to create a design brief for their design context. Research
target user profile, existing products, Smart and Modern materials,
analysis and criteria created.

Exploring design ideas and modelling ideas using a range of modelling


materials.

Students to complete Criteria 3 Making of CD Packaging

Final designs chosen, plan of manufacture complete. Quality control


and quality assurance points recognised. Production of final chosen
design. Finished product evaluation.
Students to complete Criteria 4 - Evaluation

Students to go through theory, revision and exam practice in all lessons.


Concentrated
exam preparation Pupils take all the knowledge that they have learned through their
controlled assessment. Past papers and revision material. Revision
classes.

Key Skills Covered in GCSE Graphic Products


Design skills

Making skills

Recognising clients needs

Planning stage of manufacture

Research and Analysis

Working with materials to produce an end


product

Drawing up specifications

Evaluation of completed product

Generation and development of ideas

ICT in technology CAD/CAM

Evaluation ideas

Industrial applications

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Resistant Materials Overview:


This is course teaches students to follow the design process by undertaking design and make
projects throughout Y10, in preparation for the major project in Y11.
Creativity and originality are encouraged, while using a range of materials and techniques. A
working knowledge of woods, metals, plastics and composite materials is built up during the
course. Students will also learn about good design and how to communicate ideas through
drawing, modelling and Computer Aided Design (CAD).
Students will complete a range of design and make exercises using wood, metal and plastic.
The tasks are designed to build upon the practical skills developed in Years 7 9 and include the
introduction to new tools, equipment and techniques.
From Easter onwards
This will start your major GCSE project. It is worth 60% of the final GCSE.
Choosing from a list from the examination board, students design and make a product of their
choice.
They will need to
produce a portfolio of evidence, approximately 25 sheets of A3, including
Research, Design Specification, Ideas and an Evaluation
make the product to the Design Specification from their portfolio
Examination
There will be a 2hr examination in June of Yr11. The exam focuses upon the design process and
subject knowledge.
A preparation sheet for this exam will be given to you in March of Year 11
Year 10 GCSE RM (AQA)

Year 11 GCSE RM (AQA)

Term 1
(Autumn)

Retro Storage Box (Wood Project)


Students look at the different
properties of woods and manufactured
boards. They extend their previous
knowledge of permanent and semipermanent wood joints and look at
different finishing techniques.

Controlled Assessment
Pupils begin to create a design brief for
their design context. Research /
Anthropometrics / Ergonomic data.
Exploring design ideas and modelling
ideas using a range of modelling
materials.

Term 2
(Spring)

Sustainability / Biomimicry
Pupils explore a range of task which
include looking at how design is taken
from nature and biology.
Pupils also look at wider issues in design
technology to give them an overview of
social, moral and cultural issues in
design technology.

Controlled Assessment
Final designs chosen, plan of
manufacture complete. Quality control
and quality assurance points
recognised. Production of final chosen
design. Finished product evaluation.

Term 3

GCSE Prep

Exam Revision

Design & Technology Department Handbook

(Summer) Preparation for GCSE controlled


assessment begins. Progress on
students controlled assessment begins.
Assessment criteria and design brief is
shared with the class.

Pupils take all the knowledge that they


have learned through their controlled
assessment. Past papers and revision
material. Revision classes.

Key Skills Covered in GCSE RM


Design skills

Making skills

Recognising clients needs

Planning stage of manufacture

Research and Analysis

Working with materials to produce an end product

Drawing up specifications

Evaluation of completed product

Generation and development of ideas

ICT in technology CAD/CAM

Evaluation ideas

Industrial applications

Design & Technology Department Handbook

GCSE CATERING
The course allows the student to extend the knowledge already gained through KS3 within the
Food Technology classroom and will enable the student to apply their skills and knowledge of
the catering industry within a variety of contexts.
It will enable students to extend their capability in order to meet needs and opportunities which
will have direct implications on lifestyle and the environment of all people.
The course will provide skills in 6 key areas and their capability for imaginative, innovative
thinking, creativity and independence relating to their personal interest.
The specification provides progression opportunities both directly into employment and to
further learning opportunities within employment, or to further study.
The qualification will enable the student to develop their critical thinking to manage a range of
resources in order to develop products which are suited to the needs of the individual and of the
catering industry.
The course reflects the view that GCSE Catering should provide a variety of experiences whilst
focusing on concepts, themes and issues relevant to the subject content.
It will concentrate on the main areas of food production and food service to the catering
industry.
Students will be provided with an industrial work experience within the catering industry during
year 10.
As an extra qualification, the students undertake the level 2 food hygiene. This qualification is
looked upon as a requirement from the catering industry employers. This is administered by CH.
Subject knowledge
1.
An awareness of the structure of the catering industry and an introduction to career
opportunities and further study.
2.
The effective organisation and management of resources in relation to the needs of
prospective clients in a multicultural society.
3.
An awareness of relevant mandatory and necessary health and safety requirements.
4.
A basic knowledge of nutrition and an understanding of the relationship between diet
and health.
5.
An ability to adapt to advances in technology and scientific knowledge in the catering
industry.
6.
An appreciation of the consumer situation and an understanding of the importance of
cost effectiveness within the catering industry.
7.
Provide opportunities to work both individually and as a member of a team.
8.
A basic understanding of the food and beverage industry and the communication and
social skills required within it.
9.
The development of the qualities of sensitivity, creativity and aesthetic appreciation.
10.
An interest in and enjoyment of food preparation, presentation and service.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

The students are also expected to use ICT in ways which are appropriate to the needs of the
subject.
Students will also cover a number of catering related topics these are as follows,
Health and hygiene
Food poisoning
Working practices
Nutrition
Menu planning
Commodities
Costings
Terminology
Food preparation
Food presentation
Food and beverage service
Kitchen design
Equipment
Food processing
Packaging
Labelling
Computer application
Awarding
There is an 8 point awarding scale from G to A*
Outline Scheme for GCSE Catering
Term Outline Theory Practicals
June Oct term
Introduction to GCSE Catering
Basic Practical skills
Food safety and Hygiene inc Food Safety in Catering level 2 certificate
Health and Safety
Introduction to GCSE Catering.
Course outline/assessment.
Knives and knife safety.
Kitchen uniform and personal hygiene inc reporting sickness.
Importance of food hygiene. Food contamination and food poisoning. Temperature control. Food Storage.
Food hygiene laws
Accidents in the workplace
Fire Safety
Fire extinguishers
Safety signs
First Aid
Carrying heavy loads / slips and falls
Health and Safety at Work Act
Kitchen Safety (ppt summary)
Catering terminology. (In recipe book)
Soups: Range of vegetable cuts.
Sauces- bchamel parsley sauce) (Meatballs Main course dishes with chicken: Chicken chasseur
Desserts: Cheesecake, gateau and profiteroles.
Oct term-Christmas
Menu planning
Types of menu
Catering Industry: Types of establishments/ Jobs
Menu planning: Points to consider, basic menu plans.
Types of menu: Table dhote, a la carte, themed.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Types of catering establishments.


Jobs in the Catering: Kitchen and restaurant brigade: Management, Chefs, Food and drink service.
Careers locally, nationally and internationally
Restaurant comparison including booking and ordering systems (Use of ICT).
Customer service and dealing with complaints (Fawlty Towers!!)
Range of pastry making
Portion control and costing
Shortcrust pastry:
Sugar pastry: Bakewell Tart
made puff pastry: Sausage pin wheels.
Christmas Cookery: Mince pies, Swiss roll choc log.
Christmas Feb term
Catering Industry cont:
Types of Service
Healthy eating and nutrition
Types of service: Self service, fast food, cafeteria, take-away, buffet, plated, family, wait service, gueridon, vending,
travel service.
Balance of Good Health
Nutrition: Protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, fibre, water.
Afternoon tea: Scones, biscuits, sandwich cakes. Hot beverages.
Finger buffet: Spring rolls, brochette, canaps, blinis
Nutritionally balanced meals
Feb term - Easter
Year 10 exam
Food Commodities
Practical Task 1 Investigation work
Past papers and revision on Learning Platform
Writing menus
Food commodities: Selection, storage, functions, nutritional value and preparation of:
Fruit and vegetables, cereals, eggs.
(Encourage fruit and veg task)
Fruit and veg dishes
Easter May term
Practical task 1
Planning/ Menu Choice
Time Plans
Practical
Evaluation including acceptability and costing
(8 sides of A4 written work)
Menu Planning revision
The customer their needs and wants and points to consider in menu planning
Costing and portion control
Skills to show
Timeplan- sequencing/ dovetailing recipes
Equipment to save time and improve quality
Ingredients- availability
Balance of nutrition, hot and cold, colour and texture
Students will investigate, prepare, plan and complete practical task 1. (3 hours investigation, 3 hour prepare and
plan, 3 hours practical to make 4 dishes (inc mis en place and clear up), 5 hours to evaluate)
Dishes showing use of:
Commodity chosen for practical task 1
Dovetailing multiple recipes
Practical task 1 trials and exam Year 10

Design & Technology Department Handbook

May term - Summer


Convenience foods
Additives
Packaging and labelling
Environmental considerations
Work experience
Convenience foods and additives(Inc packaging and labelling)
Convenience foods/ Packaging and the environment (Reduce, re-use, recycle).
Conservation of energy and water during food preparation.
Sustainability in catering industry.
Food Allergies and intolerances especially nuts, wheat, lactose
Wise use of convenience foods. allergy meals
Year 11
Sept Oct term
Seasonal cooking and preservation.
Seasonal foods and food miles
Preservation: drying, additives, heat treatment.
Cook chill, cook freeze, sous vide.
Special dietary needs.
Multicultural influences.
Use of seasonal foods
Menus and preparation of meals for specific groups.. healthier option, elderly, children, vegetarians, vegans, ethnic
groups.
Oct term Dec
Food Commodities
Mock exams
Including:
ICT in Catering: dietary analysis, excel costing and stock control, word processing and DTP to produce orders and
menus, etc.
Food commodities: Selection, storage, functions, nutritional value and preparation of:
Meat, fish, poultry, dairy, potatoes.
Mock exam revision and exams.
Hot and cold main dishes, accompaniments (Potato accompaniments) and desserts
Jan Feb term
Planning practical test 2
Investigation and preparation for practical task 2.
(20 sides A4 written work for practical task 2 including investigation, planning and timeplan)
More advanced dishes using meat, fish and poultry.
Practice practical task 2 dishes: Starters, Main courses, Desserts.
Feb term - Easter
Practical tests.
Easter school revision session
Kitchen design
Kitchen equipment
Evaluation of practical exam including acceptability, nutrition, costing and profit margins)
Kitchen design
The work triangle
Waste disposal
Cleaning and sanitising (record keeping)
Large and small equipment (safe use and heat transference)
Students will carry out their practical test.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Easter Summer
Preparation for theory paper.
Complete outstanding theory
Students will prepare for their written exam and revise all the theory work from
years 11.
Outstanding theory:
Careers and training for catering industry
Contract catering

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Classroom Expectations & Behaviour policy including Low Level Disruption (LLD) policy
Each member of staff is expected to clearly outline their expectations about behaviour and
routines to their class at an early opportunity. The school low level disruption policy will be
followed thoroughly. Staff should make it clear that they expect:

Instructions to be carried out quickly, and without being challenged


Appropriate equipment to be brought to lessons
Pupils should not prevent the progress of others, either by distracting other
pupils or the member of staff, and that persistent disruptors will be removed from
that lesson, rather than the lesson being stopped

That every individual is spoken to with respect and that every ones work and
ideas are to be valued.

That work is completed, and that pupils may be expected to remain behind until
work is complete

That the D&T room should be cleared completely after practical work before a
class leaves
The whole school report system clearly outlines pupil actions that will lead to
detentions in school, however, pupils can be removed from class in emergency
situations, or where disruption needs to be minimised. However, persistent problems
that are exhausting most strategies in the classroom are expected to be referred to
the Head of Department as soon as possible. Detailed classroom expectations with
respect to safety issues are dealt with in the Health & Safety policy. Each member of
staff is expected to, and fully supported in, making adjustments to activities as a result
of experiment risk assessments for individual groups.
The Design Technology Department fully supports and follows the school disciplinary
procedures as stated in the Pastoral Handbook. The management structure for disciplinary
problems for the department are as follows: Classroom Teacher
Head of Department
SLT link
Head Teacher
Pupils are expected to behave in a safe manner at all times or suitable action will be taken.
Pupils create a set of Health and Safety rules as part of their Year 7 Health and Safety Project
Introduction to D&T.
Pupils may be required to remain in school until 3.25pm if their behaviour is unacceptable
without the need to give parents 24 hour notice.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

For more serious incidents pupils the Head of Department needs to be alerted. Any serious
incidents should be recorded in writing and a copy of the report is to be filed in the INCIDENT
REPORT file in the department office. Ensure pupil names and date are recorded.
At the beginning of the detention pupils are informed of the appropriate behaviour that is
expected of them. If they do not comply with this code they may receive another detention.
Throughout the detention pupils are required to write a letter of apology to the teacher
concerned. They are also required to write out the school rules in complete silence. Other
suitable materials can be provided by PA (HoD).
Low Level Disruption Policy
Our LLD policy addresses many of these very practical issues, but there will always be room for
staff to exercise some discretion provided it is not undermining the policy.
Classroom practices and routines.
You need to establish these for your classroom and then stick to them.

You need to decide whether pupils line up outside your classroom or come straight in
(this sometimes depends upon the available space outside your classroom).
Do you want pupils to stand behind chairs and wait for you to tell them to sit, after
welcoming them?
Do you want pupils to stand behind their chairs at the end of the lesson-this allows for
final checks that all equipment has been handed in and it also allows for an ordered
departure from the class.
Dont allow pupils to open and close windows or blinds. They will askbut politely reply
and say that you will do it. This approach helps to keep the pupils in their seats and
minimises the likely damage to windows/blinds.
Limit the need for pupils to leave their seats.have equipment ready on their desks.
Make clear that leaving the room to go to the toilet is a rarity.
Aim to finish your teaching 3/4/ minutes before the bell. This allows for tidying
up/handing in equipment and ensuring your room is tidy and prompt dismissal. You
may even get a couple minutes of rest before your next class arrives!

Remember if you do not establish the rules the pupils will and that is unacceptable.
Q
What constitutes low-level disruption?
A
This is not a definitive list-but when we have one, a poster will go up in all classrooms.
Arriving without a pen and pencil and then expecting to be given one.
Arriving in class without books.
Talking when the teacher is addressing the class
Shouting out questions/answers after being told to put your hand up.
Making noises or comments with the intention of breaking the concentration of others
Arriving late for a lesson without good reason and then expecting the teacher to repeat
instructions already given.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Being cheeky to a teacher and answering back.


We know from past experience that key to the success of school-wide policies is
consistency. Therefore these rules must be enforced by all staff:

Basic stationary will be sold by the Office, before school, during break and during lunch
time.
Pupils should never be sent out of lesson to buy equipment.
Form Tutors should get the pupils to check their equipment during registration.
Teachers should not be involved in selling stationary.
Teachers should never give out pens.
The only pupils allowed to write in pencil will be those identified by Learning Support
and those given a pencil by a teacher as a last resort(they will also be given a detention
because of this)

Sanctions:

Verbal warning
Sent out for 2 mins max (this time should be kept to an absolute minimum because of
the dangers involved in leaving a class or a pupil un-supervised).
Arrangement with colleagues for a pupil to work in another room
teacher detention- please ensure this is logged on SIMs. This allows the Form Tutor to
be kept in the loop.
HOD detention- when given, these should be logged on SIMS
Contacting parents
If a pupil does not bring their Ex Book, they must do work on paper and then copy it
into their books-in effect doing the work twice! They must also be placed in a 20minute
department detention.

What ifs
Q
A

What happens if a pupil does not have money to buy a pen or pencil?
They will be given one by the Office and then have to repay the money.

Q
What happens if a pupil arrives in your class without a pen?
A
If they are unable to borrow one, then in these circumstances you may give them paper
and a pencil. They should be told to do the work on paper and it should then be written up in
ink in their exercise book. A 20 minute detention should then be issued.
Try to avoid keeping pupils back at the end of a lesson-this normally leads them disrupting their
next lesson by arriving late! If it is absolutely necessary, give them a green slip to explain their
lateness.
When chastising a pupil the following points should be made:

Why should you be allowed to disrupt the learning of others?

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Why should you demand more of my attention than anyone else?


Your actions are selfish
When you are out of the classroom every other person benefits!
Make reference to the importance of good manners and respect.
The expectation that you arrive prepared to work and with the correct equipment is not
new- but now it will be enforced.
Disruptions during lessons prevent other pupils from learning
We are also preparing you for life- people lose jobs because they are late or have a poor
attitude.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Assessment & Measuring Pupil Progress.

Within the Department we recognise the theory that in order to move on, you need to know where
you are. Understanding and monitoring our students progression aids the successful planning and
preparation of differentiated projects and lessons, resulting in more effective learning. The
department recognises the need and value of assessment as an aid to raising standards. Assessment
is recognised as a valuable tool in evaluating the quality of teaching and learning that takes place
within the department. It is believed that feedback to pupils enables them to take some
responsibility for improving their own performance and their final attainment. It also provides the
basis for review and modification of schemes of work and the effectiveness of teaching styles.
In line with school policy we use Formative assessment as our main method and we are further
developing our AfL procedures.
By assessing pupils accurately and consistently and recording key information we:
build a clear picture of each pupils skills, knowledge, understanding and
approaches to learning;
identify each pupils strengths and the priority areas for their future learning;
identify an appropriate curriculum for each pupil;
identify next steps for each pupil and express these as clear learning objectives;
identify the progress made in individual lessons or series of lessons;
evaluate the progress that each pupil is making over time;
evaluate and improve the teaching strategies used with each pupil;
support pupils, where appropriate, to monitor their own learning;
identify, celebrate and share achievement.
Our pupils progress is not always linear and teachers need to use their professional judgement in
analysing the outcomes of any assessment, particularly one that depends on a published tool or on an
observation made on only one occasion.
The assessment cycle
We gather assessment data on a daily and periodic basis.
Day to day assessment is based on learning and teaching strategies, which the teacher has identified
for a specific lesson or series of lessons. During lessons the classroom teacher (involving pupils as
appropriate) identifies the progress being made. The teacher uses this information to judge how far
the learning objectives have been met and whether the strategies used were effective.
Periodic assessment involves a broader view of progress, typically at the end of a
term or a series of lessons. Each pupils progress is assessed against the curriculum, using the relevant
Programmes of Study and Schemes of Work and taking national standards into account where
relevant. The data from these assessments are formally collected 6 times a year. They also make an
important contribution to the schools self-evaluation.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Key Stage 3 Assessment and Tracking


We have a successful tracking system for key stage 3 which records levels achieved in projects for
designing, making and evaluation. It is an aim to develop the current system further to also record
attitude and effort. The system uses Google Docs to enable shared, live data recording. Data can be
entered from any input device and is also shared with our Slink.
Data is entered at the end of each project, building up an over view of the childs progress. It
begins with the teacher assessed entry level. It also tracks their progress throughout the year,
with Key Assessed Projects testing each pupils full D,M,E skill at least twice a year. The data
tracking records whole department assessment of tasks and end of project levels, 3a, 4b etc.
The tracker also identifies indicators such as SEN, G&T, FSM and PP, MAb and Ability level
which may prove relevant to a pupils progress.
In line with school policy we transfer data to SIMS six times a year for Data Trawls. The school
reporting system details pupils progress at the end of the Christmas, Easter and Summer term.
Pupils progress, classwork, behaviour and homework is assessed, recorded and monitored by
HOD at which point interventions can be made when necessary.
Each child in key stage 3 has their own an attainment level target sheet in their project wallets.
Here, they record their own levels that have been awarded by their teacher. (Levels are
awarded for 3 different objectives- Designing, Making and Evaluation) Students know which
objective they need to improve in order to achieve a higher level.
The project worksheets sheets also clearly identify must, should, could and challenging levels
for each task. This is work that is still being developed. These tasks are frequently referred to in
the lesson objectives to give context to the lesson tasks and encourage pupils to be aware of
how they progress.
Project worksheets and other work are marked regularly in line with the D&T level
descriptors. The levels are subdivided into a, b, c to further record progress within levels.
These sublevels are recorded on our Departmental online data tracker.
On entry to year 7 all pupils are assessed in a Department wide activity to establish a baseline
level for that pupil.
Informal assessment is continual and informs class tasks at all times.
Our assessment and tracking is designed to give the students ownership of their progress.
Pupils understand our high expectations, they recognise that the attainment level sheet they
get in year 7 is continued through to year 8 and 9 and that it is possible to achieve high levels at
all times during key stage 3. They are encouraged to see the progression route through key
stage 3.
The department recognises the need and value of assessment as an aid to raising standards.
Assessment is recognised as a valuable tool in evaluating the quality of teaching and learning that
takes place within the department. It is believed that feedback to pupils enables them to take some

Design & Technology Department Handbook

responsibility for improving their own performance and their final attainment. It also provides the
basis for review and modification of schemes of work and the effectiveness of teaching styles.
In line with school policy we use Formative assessment as our main method and we are further
developing our AfL procedures.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Assessment at KS3
Each project has a set of worksheets. The inside front cover is the NC attainment Level sheet that
gives level descriptors for each level and Attainment focus. See box 2. Each teacher will record the
attained level evidenced by each pupil, see box3. This page also includes teacher comments to
provide formative assessment and feedback for each pupil, see box5, and an average attainment
level for the project. See box4
The assessment is split into three headings of
Designing,
Making and
Evaluating
These link to the broad headings for the Attainment Level descriptors of
1.
Developing, Planning and Communicating Ideas
2.
Working with tools and equipment
3.
Evaluating processes and products.

3
6

5
Page 3 outlines the key tasks and assessment objectives for the project.
It provides the design brief but also expectations and targets in the form of you must. You
should. You could..
There are also generic teacher targets and individual targets set by the student based on feedback
from the previous project.
A target is to add a clear pupil review section to page 3 where students can write down their
progress on the targets set.
Each project task is given a relative Attainment Level expectation if relevant.
At the end of the project, or ideally throughout the project, the pupils self-assess their work based
on the Assessment description on the Assessment page. They can colour in the box if they consider
they have achieved this.(see 6) If a pupil has not fulfilled the requirement then the teacher will
indicate using a cross or % mark i.e. if the pupil has done of a task correctly then 75% can be
entered instead of a tick.
In line with the GCSE grading a holistic approach is used when determining whether a pupil has fully
achieved a complete attainment level.
The attainment level achieved is then written in the assessment box (see 4). This will include sublevels a,b,c.
This is transferred on to the relevant Year groups all data tracking sheet on Google Docs. This is a
shared document shared by all dept team, SLink, Deputy Head and Head Teacher. All teaching
team will be able to edit and record data.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Data is recorded numerically to allow clear identification of progress.


LEVEL
Numeric Value
Example level 5
A
0.7
5a
5.7
B
0.4
5b
5.4
C
0.0
5c
5.0
Pupils will also record this on their Pupil Record sheets that they keep in their personal document
folder.

Front

Reverse

Data Tracking
The attainment level achieved is recorded and must include sub-levels a,b,c.
This is transferred on to the relevant Year groups all data tracking sheet on Google Docs. As
previously said, this is a shared document shared by all dept team, SLink, Deputy Head and Head
Teacher. All teaching team will be able to edit and record data.
Data is recorded numerically to allow clear identification of progress.
Teachers will be given an A3 desktop copy of the data every half term which records the previous
latest data at the start of each half term. It is acknowledged that this data may be 6 weeks out of
date so it is advised to record all updates to Google Docs data tracking spread sheets asap after
assessment and use the A3 sheets for reference only but the Google Docs for current values.
Summative Assessment/SISRA/Data Trawls/Interventions
We will record summative scores in the form of NC levels only. See above for levels and sub levels.
Six times a year each teacher will complete a data trawl of their classes and import this data onto
SIMS for whole school addition to SISRA. Analysis of this will result in a dialogue with HOD and
inform the creation of any Intervention Strategies for any students showing significant cause for
concern. Any interventions to be recorded on Google Doc and shared with HOD. Google doc based
on Whole School proforma.
Assessment for Learning AFL
We have built into our projects the use of AfL to allow students to self assess their work and to set
targets. There are laminated AfL sheets available on each table (when applicable) for students to
refer too. They are also integral to many projects but this is work in progress. They will be in all
projects that are classified as full DMA projects that form the basis of key assessment project for
each year. This to be across the whole department including Food. To be further developed.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Recording
The attainment level is to be recorded in the assessment box on page 2 of student worksheets.
This is transferred in to the appropriate Google Doc Data tracking spread sheet. This data will be
updated to SIMS half termly 6 times a year by the class teacher. The score to be inputted on to
SIMS will be the average AT score from the all-data spreadsheet. This SIMS data is to be entered in
discussion with HoD. Analysis of this will result in a dialogue with HOD and inform the creation of
any Intervention Strategies for any students showing significant cause for concern. Any
interventions to be recorded on Google Doc and shared with HOD. Google doc based on Whole
School proforma.
Pupils will also record this on their Pupil Progress Record sheets kept in their personal work folder.
The 6 times a year record is to recorded by each pupil on their individual graph see below:-

This graph will record deviation from expected AT level based on FFT.
All pupils are expected to make 2 levels of progress across the Keystage and 2 sub-levels per year.
This is indicated on the graph by the dashed lines. Each student will line in their personal target at
the start of year 7 and see a linear expectation of progress based on FFT predictions. HoD to be
notified of any significantdeviations to expectations both positive and negative.
Marking
We do not need to pour over every written word by students, but instead we need one that
recognises the importance of formative written and spoken feedback with a view to what is
reasonable to expect.
Objectives
To achieve this aim, there must be a uniform approach across the school.
Students should all be aware of:
Their level/grade, for the work;
Their successes with the work;

Design & Technology Department Handbook

How to improve the work. (Recent evidence confirms that this is the most important aspect of
this work)
THE MARKING PROCESS
FREQUENCY OF BOOK MARKING

Wherever possible, this should take place at least 3 times per half term -once at the beginning,
once in the middle and once at the end in all subjects.
Students should be given appropriate opportunities to self or peer-assess.
Target Level
All exercise books should have the target level/grade/%, clearly written on the front inside cover.
HOW THE BOOKS SHOULD BE MARKED
Strengths + Targets + Next Steps
At the end of each section of work that is marked, teachers need to give:
1. A level or grade. At Key Stages 3, wherever possible, this should be in the form of a sub-level. At
KS4 it could be in a GCSE grade or %.
2. Strengths/Weaknesses of the piece of work. (EBI and WWW)
3. Next steps strategies for progress
4. References to targets
SPG- Follow the schools literacy policy
All pages to be assessed and to include a clear, written formative comment. Ticks only to be used
in identifiable tests or calculations. Ticks for creative, extended written tasks eg evaluation to be
used only to identify that it has been read or seen but there must be written formative comment at
the identifiable end of each section.
No alphanumeric scores to be given except numeric scores for tests.
In skills based tasks which are not AT level compatible then E for expert I for Intermediate and B for
Beginner scores can be used eg sketching skills.
There is an acceptance that: there will be some ' flick and tick' marking which basically is there to acknowledge that the work
has been seen by the teacher.
that the main marking will be conducted differently and for a different purpose and that this
marking will have a specified focus. Teacher comments will be diagnostic and formative.
time will be allocated for pupils to read through the teachers comments.
there will be an expectation that the pupil acts upon the advice and direction.
it is good practice for the teacher to refer back to their earlier comments and comment on how
the pupil has responded, because seeing that a pupil has responded demonstrates ' progress'
whereas seeing that a pupil continues to repeat errors demonstrates that progress has not been
made and your work has been ineffective. (1)

Design & Technology Department Handbook

(1)from TR presentation July 2012)


Feedback
We aim to give pupils oral feedback and assessment throughout their work whilst they are engaged
in their tasks.
Oral feedback is also given, when possible, to pupils after handing back of their folders after
assessment. This shall ideally be a time to give targets to each student.
there will be some ' flick and tick' marking which basically is there to acknowledge that the work
has been seen by the teacher.
that the main marking will be conducted differently and for a different purpose and that this
marking will have a specified focus. Teacher comments will be diagnostic and formative.
time will be allocated for pupils to read through the teachers comments.
there will be an expectation that the pupil acts upon the advice and direction.
it is good practice for the teacher to refer back to their earlier comments and comment on how
the pupil has responded, because seeing that a pupil has responded demonstrates 'progress'
whereas seeing that a pupil continues to repeat errors demonstrates that progress has not been
made and your work has been ineffective.
Use of phrases such as I especially like how you. And It is good to see that you
improved your work by. is seen as good practice.

SIT Stickers
The use of SIT stickers is recommended especially on worksheets that are not pre-printed with
assessment criteria. SIT(Strengths: Improvements: Targets:) can be created for most activities and
printed out. The teacher will use a highlighter to enhance the desired comments. It is good
practice to also add written formative comments to supplement the SIT sticker.

Peer/Self-Assessment
Built into our projects are opportunities for pupils to self-assess their work and to assess/give
comments about other pupils work.
AfL sheets on tables and integral to some projects are available for self-assessment.
There will be an expectation that the pupil acts upon the advice and direction.
It is good practice for the teacher to refer back to their earlier comments and comment on how the
pupil has responded, because seeing that a pupil has responded demonstrates ' progress' whereas
seeing that a pupil continues to repeat errors demonstrates that progress has not been made and
your work has been ineffective

Design & Technology Department Handbook

An aim is to build into the projects more self-assessment. A target is to add a clear pupil review
section to page 3 where students can write down their progress on the targets set.
Tests/Examinations
At present testing is done through Plenaries at end of lesson. This is at present not formalised.
An aim is to build a better structure to tests by introducing end of project exams. Some examples
have been collated by PA from AQA product design text book. Some testing takes place in
Electronics and Structures projects.
All new projects are to incorporate end of project tests. Aim to add to all existing projects.
These maybe in written form, multiple choice, practical exercise or oral and use Daydream
Education package.
Use of Boardworks Interactive and Daydream Education to be consolidated and put into more
regular use. Regular use of on-line testing using Flubaroo, Kahoot, Socrative to be encouraged and
to be used in lessons (BYOD opportunity) and as homework tasks.
Assessment at Key Stage 4
Key Stage 4 Assessment and Tracking
During key stage 4 we use a tracking system which records students level at the end of key stage 3
as well as the predicted grade from FFT.
This tracker charts each students progress and allows us to see if the child is making the required
progress and if they are working to their potential. It records their grades (A-G) awarded for each
project, alongside the Departments own end of KS4 GCSE prediction, which then provides a
baseline target grade to monitor pupil progress. The FFT target for each pupil is also included in the
Department tracker as well as all the data stated earlier.
There is a Department intervention tracker and any child who is thought to be underachieving,
below their predicted target or whom the class teacher has a concern over, is entered onto the
tracker. Concerns and actions are recorded, whether it is contacting parents, monitoring work or
giving of additional support amongst the many strategies we employ.
During year 11 pupils will each have a formal mentor meeting in which their coursework is
evaluated; moderated and individual targets are set. The aim is to work with the pupils to set goals,
identify areas of strengths and weakness and set deadlines to complete coursework. If deemed
appropriate, the notes from this mentor meeting are sent home, asking for parents support in the
improvement and completion of the tasks.
During key stage 4, coursework projects are assessed according to the objectives set by the exam
board. This happens as each project is completed. Again the grades are recorded for the benefit of
the individual and the teacher. The same mark sheets are used for assessing the projects internally
and externally, encouraging the students to get used to the exam boards system and assessment
requirements.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Copies of these mark sheets are kept by the teacher and also given to the student. These sheets
show the students which areas of work they need to work on.
Controlled assessment.
Year 10
Formative assessment is our main feedback to pupils.
Comments are written on project cover sheets or directly onto the pupils worksheets.
In skills based tasks which are not AT level compatible then E for expert I for Intermediate and B for
Beginner scores can be used eg sketching skills.
Guidance and relevance to AQA assessment is also to be recommended.
Progress Sheets for each GCSE subject is also kept by each pupil in each pupils work folder.
Procedures as for KS3 except chart is not in use at present.
Any data tracking sheets to be on Google Docs. This to be a shared document shared subject
teacher, SLink, Deputy Head and Head Teacher. Subject teacher and HoD to be able to edit and
record data.

Year 11
All assessments are in line with AQA and WJEC controlled assessment criteria.
Any data tracking sheets to be on Google Docs. This to be a shared document shared subject
teacher, SLink, Deputy Head and Head Teacher. Subject teacher and HoD to be able to edit and
record data.
All pupils are given a copy of exam board assessment criteria and a record sheet charting their
individual progress.
Regular feedback is given.
For both Year 10 and 11
All pupils assessment grades and targets/predictions are recorded in SIMS and Google Docs.
Individual subject teachers are responsible for updating data and sharing data and concerns to
HoD.
All data for KS4 to be recorded 6 times a year onto SIMS as per KS3. This SIMS data is to be entered
in discussion with HoD.
SIT Stickers
The use of SIT stickers is recommended especially on worksheets that are not pre-printed with
assessment criteria. SIT(Strengths: Improvements: Targets:) can be created for most activities and
printed out. The teacher will use a highlighter to enhance the desired comments. It is good
practice to also add written formative comments to supplement the SIT sticker.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

All years
RESPONSIBILITIES
Class Teacher
It is the responsibility of each class teacher to mark work on a regular basis as each task is
completed. It is not acceptable to leave individual one lesson tasks to marked at the end of the
project. Regular assessment and feedback is required.
KS3 - At project completion each class teacher is to:
Record AT levels on relevant all-data google doc
Insert any comments on relevant all-datagoogle doc ( in name column this will create a
corner flag indicating comment inserted) if major concerns also email HoD.
Ensure each student records AT levels achieved on their Pupil Progress sheet
Ensure each student plots progress on Progress Chart
Ensure each student records levels and targets in new work booklets at start of each project
At start of each academic year targets for the year are set and recorded on Pupil Progress
Sheet
At mid academic year targets for the year are set and recorded on Pupil Progress Sheet
At end of each academic year targets for the year are set and recorded on Pupil Progress
Sheet
6 times a year average AT level is recorded on SIMS (in consultation with HoD)
Any deviations from projected FFT target are highlighted directly to HoD.
To attend any moderation sessions as required
To allow time within lessons to read, reflect, assess and make comments on teacher targets
and their own progress on page 3.
Head of Dept
It is the responsibility of the HoD to ensure all of the above procedures are carried out and
quality of assessment is consistent across dept through moderation and discussion.
HoD will implement procedures to ensure consistency as required.
HoD will review all-data sheets regularly to keep abreast of individual student progress. QC
and QA checks to be implemented as required and support as needed.
To review AT levels in discussion with class teacher prior to input on SIMS at 6 times a year
intervals.
FOLDERS and PROFORMA

Design & Technology Department Handbook

For associated proforma see the basic proforma on the D&T Staff Department Info rweb on
realsmart PROFORMAS on school website link. File is named Y7/Y8/Y9 pupil record sheet.
The proforma are in each pupils work folder. These are stored in a central area and accessed by
each class teacher for workshop and food. This is to ensure continuity and coherence of
assessment across the department.
At the end of each project marking should be prompt and use formative assessment to allow pupils
a framework to base their personal targets.
Targets are set at the start of each project. These concentrate on Designing (i.e. Folder work) and
Making (i.e. practical work). These are written on to the Assessment page of their new project
worksheets (page 3) and ideally on their Pupil Progress sheet. At the end of each project pupils
review the success of meeting their targets. They also add the new AT level grades to their
progress proforma and to page 3 of their work booklets. At the start of the academic year targets
are based on School Report and last years levels attained. These are to be reviewed mid-year and
end of academic year. Updates of AT levels and grades to be completed frequently minimum of
end of project/6 times a year.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Literacy Marking

All staff need to ensure that:


marking is regular and thorough enough to spot errors and inaccuracies;
marking is fully integrated with the system of rewards, e.g. merits or commendations are
awarded when appropriate;
particularly in the early years marking needs to be simple, positive and pupil friendly. This can
be helped by the use of merits and commendations;
written comments and oral feedback communicate clearly to individual pupils and their
parents the pupil's strengths/weaknesses, level of performance, suggested strategies for
improving their knowledge, understanding and skills, and goals to be achieved. This can help
parents who take an active role in their child's education;
they do not readily accept inaccurate or inadequate responses to written or practical tasks;
steps are taken to act on missing, incomplete or poorly presented work - see table on next
page;
work is returned promptly to pupils;
corrections are carried out by the pupil. Parents may take an active role in this activity;
the marking/recording process allows for an easy transfer of marks from the pupils' work, to
their National Curriculum records;
they use, as far as is possible, the following symbols and comments in addition to
merits/commendations, to promote:
i.
consistency within department;
ii.
clarity in our marking for the pupils;
iii.
clarity in our marking for parents.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Literacy
Whole school policy on literacy marking annotation is below.
In Margin

CL

Sp

Meaning

Guidance

Circle missed capital

Write CL in margin

Capital letter

In reflection time:

missing or used

Students correct by writing over the error

incorrectly

Students check rest of work

Circle the part of the word that is incorrect

Write Sp in margin

Focus firstly on subject specific vocabulary / basic errors

Depending on the complexity of the words, then.

Spelling mistake

For less confident students:

Staff write the correct spelling above the

For more confident students:


In reflection time:

incorrect word
In reflection time:

Student finds the correct spelling

Student writes correctly at bottom of work

Student writes above word and writes

Meaning not

Underline the part of any sentence which doesnt read well or is not grammatically correct

clear / sentence

correctly at bottom of work

??

NSE

muddled

Non-standard

Student writes an improved version of the sentence once at the bottom of the work

Underline the word

Write NSE in the margin

English

Write ?? in the margin


In reflection time:

Write standard English alternative above the word e.g. friend instead of mate
In reflection time:

Student writes the correct word at bottom of work

Circle the mis-used or missing punctuation

Punctuation

Write P in the margin

missed or used

incorrectly

Correct or add the appropriate piece of punctuation


In reflection time:

Student checks the rest of the work for similar errors

Write the symbol where the word has been missed


In reflection time:

Word missing

Student inserts the missing word(s)

Write the symbol at the point in the text where the new paragraph should have been taken

//

New Paragraph

NP

Aims /future plans

Write NP in the margin


In reflection time:
Student checks the rest of the work for any similar errors and indicates with same symbols

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Start project planning from perspective of learning objectives and assessment objectives.
Include more opportunities for pupil/peer self assessment
Develop end of project tests for all projects that remain in KS 3 S of W
Continued development of AfL procedures and documentation.
Use of RAG
Embedding of AfL across all full DMA projects
Regular moderation to ensure quality of assessment across keystage 3.
To allow time within lessons to read, reflect, assess and make comments on teacher targets
and their own progress on page 3.
To add section page 3 of student workbooks to allow students to write review of their
progress.
Whole department use of SIT stickers as part of feedback process.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Engaging with parents to ensure they are fully involved


Parents are informed as to their childs progress within D&T. We have achievement postcards
which are sent home when appropriate.
At the end of the GCSE course we have an open evening where all parents are invited into the
Department to see the exhibition of their childs work. This is in conjunction with the Art
Department.
D&T work is displayed in the D&T corridor display cabinet, allowing any parent, visitors to the
school and the students the opportunity to commend their children/peers.
Parents are informed if we have concerns about their childs D&T progress.
At the start of their GCSE course the parents of all Graphics students are sent a resource/help
guide (see below). It is the intention to do this for all GCSE option courses.

Engaging with parents to ensure they are fully involved Reporting to Parents
In line with whole school policy. This subject to whole school review.
Engaging with children so that they are involved in their own learning.
During the GCSE course students have individual mentoring sessions with their class teacher,
they are encouraged to set their own deadlines and targets with regards to their work. During
their course we have sessions on peer assessment when they are invited to mark some of the
previous years GCSE work using the same criteria as their teachers. They then have to discuss
why they awarded the marks they did.
During key stage 3 students are encouraged to work in their own time.
From September we plan to develop our extra-curricular classes for G&T and MAb students.
We have a Challenge site, http://dtchallenge.weebly.com/, where our G&T, MAb and
enthusiasts are encouraged to complete their own projects and bring them in for extra credit.
All KS3 students have a yellow Challenge book in their folders in which to complete class
challenges as well as record spellings, tests and to re-do work if required. The Challenge books
also include QR codes to the Challenge and Department website

Design & Technology Department Handbook

INCLUSION
Differentiation and Setting
The atmosphere which we strive to create in D&T plays a large role in personalised learning.
Students are encouraged to have a voice. To do this they need to have a safe environment
where they can question without fear of being ridiculed or criticised. In both Key Stages we
have a flexible approach to projects within D&T. We try to tailor projects to the students
interests and encourage them to personalize their own work.
Gifted and Talented/More Able
The Department aims to support and challenge School appointed More Able (MAb) pupils, and
Department recognised gifted and talented. Registers of these students are kept on the Data tracking
document (Google Sheets), for staff information within the Department, and our pupils are made
aware of this when appropriate. This is in line with school policy.
D&T G & T pupils are identified using a combination of the following indicators:

The professional judgement of members of the Department


Continuous High level of achievement and progress.

Schemes of work suggest alternative activities for G&T and MAb pupils. (work in progress Sept
2014). These activities may be in addition to, or instead of the activities that the rest of the
class will complete. It is expected that these different activities could be offered to the whole
class, so that many pupils who are not on the G&T register may also complete some of the
higher level activities. Some G & T pupils may need to be encouraged to attempt the higher
level activities. It is recognised within the D&T Department that Challenge for all children is a
must, however, we often find that the MAb /G&T students take longer to complete their work
due to the nature of the subject and their desire for perfection and completion.
Resources have been developed and continue to be rolled out across all projects, in which
extension activities are available to all pupils. It is expected that this approach to teaching will
raise standards even further for all pupils. By providing more challenging alternative activities,
and allowing others not on the register to take part in them, it is hoped that a culture of high
aspirations will continue to develop.
At key stage 4 G&T/MAb pupils are also supported through specific tasks and the expectations
of individualised targets set in mentoring sessions.
All pupils are encouraged and supported in personalising their GCSE course.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Equal Opportunities
As a department we are committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all. At all stages within the
planning, delivery and evaluation of project work we attempt to ensure that the needs of the students
are met, irrespective of the gender, ethnic origin, disabilities, specific ability or social background.
The Design Technology team have developed some projects and will continue to develop project
contexts and briefs which ensure breadth of subject matter whilst excluding any form of prejudice.
Central to Technology is the development of self -motivated individuals who are able to identify needs
within a chosen theme and develop 2 and 3D solutions. Solutions may take many forms but all pass
through the stages of the design process. Pupils are to be encouraged to apply their own background
and experiences to any task formulating their own value judgment whilst at the same time respecting
the observations of others.
The Design Technology Department supports the school aims of: Raising awareness of equal opportunities issues.
Treat all pupils with equal respect.
Enable all pupils' equal access to all areas of the curriculum.
To combat any form of prejudice and / or discrimination within the school

Equality of Access
At Key Stage 3 the department is committed to every pupil having equal access to the curriculum and
to have the same opportunities to achieve success. Within this provision there is flexibility for the
extension work for those pupils who are capable of dealing with it.
There are also minimum standards that all pupils are expected to achieve.
At Key Stage 4 all pupils have equal access to a Design & Technology option but it is strongly suggested
that pupils think about their choice seriously as it is very difficult for us as a department to relocate
them once the courses have begun. In all relevant respects, the Design and Technology Department's
'Inclusion Policy' is governed by, and therefore reflects, that of the School. The Department's overall
policy is embraces school policies on differentiation, multicultural education and gender. In addition
to these constituent policies there are several other areas of Design and Technology education that
need to be separately mentioned in a comprehensive policy on Inclusion, i.e.
1.
Setting/mixed ability;
2.
Teaching styles;
3.
Entitlement of access to the whole course of study;
4.
Progression within the course of study.
5.
Special Educational Needs.
1.

Setting/mixed ability.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Ways need to be found of catering for the needs of students of all abilities which will fully challenge
the most able students, and encourage those of average abilities and below to higher levels of
achievement. Teachers should exercise very considerable care in devising tasks and activities, the
nature, features and requirements of which, will enable them to be accessible to students across the
ability range concerned. This means that, when both devising and implementing tasks for specific
groups of students, teachers pay careful attention to a wide range of factors - see later for the policy
on Differentiation.
Setting arrangements for 2014-2015

2.
Teaching styles.
The following extract is taken from the Department's 'Aims and Objectives'.
"Students should experience a variety of experiences/activities during a course of study and during a
lesson if possible. There should be opportunities for individual and/or group activities. Staff should
encourage students to pursue a piece of work over a period of time e.g. project work and practical
investigations, where research is carried out - possibly using a library".
The department staff should regularly exchange their experiences of the Scheme of Work at
department meetings - the successes and failures of different strategies are a key part of this

Design & Technology Department Handbook

exchange. For further details on the variety of teaching styles see the policies on Differentiation and
the individual project Scheme of Work.
3.
Entitlement of access to the whole course.
At Key stage 3 all students within a Year group follow the same Scheme of Work. Some individuals,
groups or classes may work at a faster pace and/or study more extension work than others. In recent
years the higher SEN of some pupils has led to a modified curriculum especially at KS3. They follow
same framework but some special projects have been used to cater for less theory but more
vocational element.
4.
Progression within the course of study.
There is an implication in the way that the National Curriculum is set out, in the apparent hierarchy of
levels, that students learn fundamental concepts in a linear fashion. This is not necessarily the case
and much care needs to be exercised in the construction of a scheme of work. We accept that some
students make what appears to be erratic progress through the levels. For this reason our Scheme of
Work for Key Stage 3 is a spiral/progressive system that allows, in as much as is possible, for concepts
to be revisited.
The current scheme of work is always under review. Any new S of W needs to satisfy the needs of
students of all abilities. It must also be sufficiently demanding to test the most able students to the
full, and encourages those of average abilities and below to new levels of achievement. The levels of
the bulk of the work experienced in each of the year groups is shown in the following table:
Year

Levels experienced

7
8
9

3 -6
4-7
5-E

Update
AfL built into most worksheets
Specific assessment targets on most sheets
Student assessment record form for whole of KS3 in each students folders
Individual targets given in each project folder.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

S.E.N.D.
Classes are grouped according to ability and evidence in D&T. In year 7 classes are set according to
KS2 SATs data, 8 and 9 pupils are grouped into three pools, with an upper, middle and nurture set in
each year. This is all in accordance with the whole school policy. Throughout the year teachers
monitor the childs progress and will approach the HOD when they believe a child should move set.
It is the responsibility of each member of the teaching team to be aware of any pupils they teach that
have S.E.N.D. It is the responsibility of each member to update their personal S.E.N.D. file. On the
Google Docs class lists spread sheets this data is to be highlighted as per SIMS data. Also G&T
students to be highlighted.
We adopt the Special Needs Policy documentation and are in direct contact with the Learning Support
coordinator.
If a student experiences difficulties in class, or makes little progress the Head of Department may
become involved.
In our Teaching Planners and on Google Docs all members of the department should have a record of
the special needs codes. These codes may be placed next to particular children's names in the mark
book. On the shared Google spreadsheet, any SEND students are identified by having their surnames
highlighted in yellow. When their names are hovered over, a comment box will open that lists their
SEND requirement.
All members of the department record special learning difficulties of individual children and as a
department we should discuss the achievements of individuals and any strategies adopted.
We are striving to collect data on all the children in the school which includes C.A.T scores, S.A.T
scores, reading ages, literacy difficulties, examination results, National Curriculum Levels and physical
disabilities. This will allow us to set work, which is suitable to the children's needs. We intend to work
with the Learning Support Department in order to develop our project hand-outs to cater for all
abilities (see Differentiation).
The departments method of assessing and recording progress may help with identifying problems,
which can be acted upon. It is quite common that children who experience difficulties with written
work can produce practical work of a very high standard and these pupils can develop greater self confidence, which can positively influence his/her attitude to work. If it is beneficial the parents of
certain children will be contacted by the childs classroom teacher.
For Design and Technology teachers working with identified Special Educational Needs, the policy on
differentiation which is concerned with devising tasks, teaching in relation to those tasks, and
assessing students' responses to them, are equally applicable. Sometimes necessary changes
engendered by the idiosyncrasies of an individual case or situation will need to be made to the
teacher's normal tasks, resources, responses, support or group structure. To ensure that students
who have been designated as 'More Able (MAb)' are appropriately challenged, teachers should
frequently modify the scale and/or the extent of the tasks with which they are presented.
For the less able, tasks are usually presented or re-presented in several different ways. Teachers tend
to afford these students more time, provide them with additional support by way of explanations and
extra resources, and, as appropriate, allow them to complete their tasks at a relatively slower pace.

Design & Technology Department Handbook

Actions regarding any students who have some sensory impairment, communication problem or
physical handicap, are taken only after consultation with those in the School who have specific
responsibility for their welfare and support. The School and the Department encourages any such
students to use their normal aids to speaking, listening, reading or writing. In striving to meet
individual needs, teachers should make substantial and increasing efforts to provide any
recommended technological aids and computers in order to adapt work spaces, existing tools,
equipment or furniture.
Differentiation
The department is working towards providing greater differentiation within the schemes of work and
the resource materials provided. All members of the department should be aware of the need for
differentiation and to use their professional judgment in applying it within their own classroom.
Department members should look to.
Be aware of the objectives for the tasks set.
Whenever possible help the pupil to reach a desired outcome.
To identify problems and give students support.
To provide suitable resources.
To use positive praise.
To be aware of learning disabilities.
We are aiding differentiation through the monitoring and correlating such data as reading ages,
physical disabilities, genders and the result of tests.
To be able to manage differentiation we are using the above data to develop materials through which;
The task
The outcome
The support given will allow there to be a minimum required standard for all and allow for extension
work where possible and required.
Differentiation occurs when there is planned intervention by the teacher with the intention of
maximising the achievements of students based on their differing individual needs. Differentiation can
be described as having five main components i.e.
1. Resources

2. Tasks

3. Response

4. Support

5. Group Structure

Each of the five components of differentiation are explored in detail below. The most important
prerequisite of good differentiation is good and accurate knowledge of the students.
1.
Resources should:
a).
aim to have an appropriate readability level and/or be easily understood.
We provide a word list for each topic - this aids whole school language development. Staff should aim
to use familiar language and everyday examples in discussions with the students.
b).

be easy to use.

Worksheets are to be word processed. Instructions are to be clear to understand and to carry out.
c).
be well designed.
We provide students with attractive full colour text books and D.T.P. quality worksheets/booklets. We
use our own and published materials.
d).
be in many different forms.
Cookers, lathes, drills, hand tools, texts (departmental and library), worksheets, booklets, P.C., C.D.
ROM, Video recording, posters, etc.
Teachers must consider the extent to which, and the means by which, students with strong
preferences for particular learning styles can be accommodated. More specifically, they consider how
they might cater for students who prefer to learn from visual sources (reading from books or viewing
slides), those who prefer to learn from auditory sources (listening to a lecture), and those who prefer
to be physically involved (engaging in role play).
e).

have a scheme of work that indicates a planned use of available resources and that shows
progression and continuity within the course.

f).
be kept in well managed storage/retrieval systems.
Our resources are well managed and ordered. Our aim is for our worksheets to be kept in boxes
clearly labelled with their contents. Videos, texts and computer programmes are centrally stored and
filed in the Dept office or stores. Individual dept, staff are responsible for collation of resources for
their classes.
g).
build study skills into the Scheme of Work.
We work in the library when appropriate. A dept. aim is for end of project/unit tests and as a
consequnce students may have to revise for tests - these are perceived by the students and parents as
important. We will go over specific questions from the tests so as to clarify the finer points of
'examination technique'.
2.
Tasks
N.B. When both devising and implementing tasks for specific groups of students, teachers pay careful
attention to a wide range of factors, including:
the language in which the briefs for the tasks are presented and explained;
the way that those briefs and explanations are constructed;
the kinds of key terms and concepts involved;
the students' abilities to engage in research and to study independently;
the students' technical, organisational and other pertinent competences;
the nature and relative demands and hazards of the materials, tools, techniques and resources
to be used.
In some instances, teachers may come to the conclusion that, for the most able or gifted students in a
group, they need to devise some related and appropriate extended task(s). On the other hand, they
may frequently find that the 'less able' students in a group need tasks to be broken down into
component parts, require more instruction, and need additional aids and support of one kind or
another. Teachers need to consider how they might cater for students who prefer to learn from visual
sources (reading from books or viewing slides), those who prefer to learn from auditory sources

(listening to a lecture), and those who prefer to be physically involved eg engaging in role play, making
a product.
Tasks should:
a).
show variety throughout a topic and within a lesson if possible.
b).
be suitable for the abilities of the students.
We have a variety of texts and worksheets that can be used to match resources/tasks with student
ability. We make a particular point of starting from a position of existing knowledge in a familiar
context and then moving on to new locations and scales. Both written and spoken
questions/vocabulary should be structured to enable students of all abilities to understand and
respond.
c).
have a structure that enables the student to stay on task.
Lists of the tasks can be written on the board. We can leave additional source material for students to
refer to.
d).
identify possible outcomes.
Work done by other students can be used to illustrate possible outcomes and to inform and motivate
students. Project work should be accompanied by a brief to illustrate the areas that must be covered
and to show the types of outcome that might arise, e.g. a painting, a model, a report, a presentation, a
play, a game, a magazine.
e).
match the students' interests.
We review and assimilate the responses that students make on their project review survey sheets
regarding the work that they 'enjoyed' or 'did not.
f).
allow the teacher to build a learning route through a study topic.
The scheme of work is designed to allow for continuity and progression. The teacher can pick his/her
own route through the topic.
3. The Response should:
a).
make project objectives clear to students.
Each project has a clear contents list in the form of an assessment front cover and individual pages
that details the tasks studied in each project.
b).
make assessment criteria clear to the students.
We involve students in their own achievements in the National Curriculum by 'user friendly' level
descriptions. The project assessment sheets have a system for making it clear to students if they are
working towards or have achieved a statement in the National Curriculum for Design and Technology.
c).
create an atmosphere where students discuss their own and each other's work.
We encourage students to comment on and discuss each other's work in positive ways. An idea is that
effective pieces of work may be read out or shown to the class as an example and comments invited.
d).

be given to students in small groups.

During class work students may work individually or in small groups of two, three or four. The
formation of small groups allows students to discuss matters and problems. It allows staff more
personal contact with students and greater opportunities to build confidence and direct students.
e).
allow for individual action plans to be built for the students.
The self assessment sheets allow the students to review their own work and to set targets for
themselves. There is insufficient time for staff to effectively work with students in formulating targets
but suggestions should be made in the Targets/Comments box on Assessment sheets.
f).
reflect what the student has achieved and consider the student's previous achievements.
We endeavour to use constructive criticism and advice at all pertinent opportunities.
4.
a).

Support can be:


from other adults and students.

b).
from the teacher.
This can occur during a lesson or often in staff's own time e.g. at break times and lunch times. Indeed
staff sometimes support students after school on a mutually agreed basis.
c).
from appropriate resources.
Machines, tools, cookers, texts (departmental and library), worksheets, booklets, P.C., C.D. ROM,
Video recording are all well integrated into the scheme of work.
d).
by celebrating achievement.
We celebrate achievement in many different ways especially through the merit and Report Form
commendation system-. We regularly display student's work in the teaching rooms, the Dept.
entrance and School Foyer.
e).
by teaching co-operatively.
Some rooms allow for classes to be combined. Product Design in KS4 and Y9 clock project enable
collaborative teaching. There is scope for further development in this area.
5.
Group Structure can support differentiation if:
a).
we examine structure of the teaching groups.
Y7 is based on SATS from feeder schools and reviewed at Oct half term. Year 8 and Y9 is in
consultation with Art/Music/ICT dept.
b).
we teach students in small groups.
During some class work students work in small groups of two, three or four students. This helps to
support the co-operation between the students and one hopes build up the confidence of the less
confident student. The need to express their thoughts to others often helps students to prepare for
project work and the more open ended tasks.
c).

we are flexible within the group when setting the task and responding to individual's needs.

d).

we allow individual work.

Cultural
1.
Teachers should ensure that the Design and Technology Department complies to any
multicultural considerations.
2.

Teachers should use all appropriate opportunities to challenge prejudice as it arises


and a consistent approach to dealing with racist incidents.

3.

Teachers help students to acquire the knowledge, and to develop the skills and
attitudes that are necessary to engender an understanding of, and a respect and
support for, cultural differences, and thereby, helping to further cultural and racial
harmony and social cohesion in a multicultural society. Along with playing its part in
the realisation of these general aspirations, the Department seeks to promote a
greater understanding of the nature and significance of Design and Technology,
whatever and wherever its origins. More specifically, a Department aim is to devise
courses that will help students to gain some understanding of and interest in:
ways in which the beliefs, ideas and values of different cultures are embodied in
and conveyed by the designs and products that are typical of those cultures;
the variety of sources of the images and symbols to be found in the technological
products of different cultures;
the significance of the technological products of a culture for the people native to
that culture;
the variety of criteria by which the technological products of different cultures can
be compared and appraised.

4.

Teachers should seek to avoid ethnocentrism, and to maintain an appropriate balance


between attention to and concern with designs and products from Western European
culture and those from some other cultures. Teachers should aim to, whenever
appropriate and feasible:
refer, and help their students to respond, to examples from a diverse range or
cultures, and in particular, to those that are represented in the
community/student group;
draw upon the relevant 'first-hand' knowledge, understanding and experiences of
the students in a group who, typically, are of diverse cultural origins;
devise tasks that provide all students with opportunities to design and make
products in which they can employ skills and techniques, and concern themselves
with beliefs, ideas and values that, on different occasions, are:
a.
characteristic of their own culture,
b.
characteristic of some other culture.

5.

Teachers are encouraged to visit exhibitions with their students, and to import visiting
speakers variously concerned with designing and working with wood, metal, food or
suitable media. The speakers may provide exemplars, expertise and insights pertinent
to a culturally diverse range of designs and products.

6.
Members of the Department, when developing their resources should strive to
ensure that:
a.
b.
c.

d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
7.

they portray a world view as seen from different cultural perspectives and
thereby communicate how it feels to be of another ethnic or cultural group;
they are factually accurate and use up-to-date text and illustrations;
they do not:
stereotype individuals or groups;
equate the white man with "civilisation";
use paternalistic approaches to other peoples or cultures;
reduce all non-western societies to the exotic, picturesque and
primitive;
they show the achievements and attributes of different societies, both past
and present, e.g. African civilisations before colonisation;
they show children of different ethnic groups involved in the activities;
they positively and realistically portray children from a variety of ethnic and
cultural groups and class backgrounds;
they have illustrations that avoid caricature;
they accurately reflect the population of Britain today.

Teachers should draw attention to ways in which evidence can be misused to assert a
point of view.

8.
The teachers can, by careful use of language, also avoid reinforcing stereotypical
views of society.

Gender
1.
The Department rejects the view that any aspect of Design and Technology is the preserve of,
or more suited to, either gender.
2.
The Department aims to provide Inclusion for students within a broad, balanced curriculum,
which does not discriminate against them because of gender. Members of the Department,
when devising and implementing their courses, strive to ensure:
that what they teach and how they teach it promotes the conception of Design and
Technology as an important and valued realm of human activity (potentially) of concern to
all people;
that, via sensible discussion and argument, they seek to counter any gender oriented bias
towards or away from the subject or any aspect of it;
that no student is denied access to any of the courses provided, nor, under normal
circumstances, is excluded from any of the activities involved;
that, normally and overall, equal demands are made on all students (regarding, say, the
distribution of teachers' questions); and equal value is placed on the contributions of all
students (regarding, say, their responses to teachers' questions or their comments within a
discussion);
that stereotyping or bias by any individual, regarding the expected achievements of a
certain gender, are avoided;
that, in the Design and Technology rooms, there is no other form of discrimination against
any particular individual or group.
3.
Members of the Department, when developing their resources, strive to ensure that:
i.
they portray a world view as seen from male and female perspectives and thereby
communicate how it may feel to be of another gender;
ii.
they are factually accurate and use up-to-date text and illustrations;
iii.
they do not:
a)
stereotype individuals or groups;
b)
equate men with being the dominant gender or women the subservient gender.
However, such views, together with issues like that of the stereotypical attitudes
apparent in certain designs, should be recognised, and may be worthy of serious
discussion;
iv.
they show the achievements and attributes of both genders, both past and present;
v.
they show children of both sexes involved in the activities described;
vi.
they have illustrations that avoid caricature.
4.
In order to appeal to all students' teachers must:
i.
emphasise that Design and Technology is concerned with human activity, culture and
achievement;
ii.
provide opportunities for students to use personal, expressive language, in work such
as projects, reports and posters and of course classroom discussion;
iii.
provide students with opportunities to discuss and explore opinions on social issues;
iv.
demonstrate the importance of Design and Technology for everyone, showing its
importance in a wide range of careers and everyday life.

Use of ICT in D&T

All pupils have access to the D&Ts computers as part of their projects. Whole class groups can
be booked into the school IT suites, in line with school booking requirements. A timetable
exists to allow all classes an opportunity but this should be used when appropriate and where
ICT can enhance learning.
The D&T Department is also taking every advantage of the new school initiative to develop a
virtual learning platform which enables pupils to access resources both in school and at home
through subject specific websites, Challenge website and use of on-line assessment eg
Flubaroo and Google Classroom.
We have rolled out a wide range of coursework resources at KS4, which are integral to lessons
and a key element to developing learning at home.
We encourage the use of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) at all age groups. It is recommended
that a Red Amber Green procedure is used to ensure safe and appropriate usage of students
own devices. Work should not be set that requires BYOD in order to not exclude those without
access to BYOD.

Homework Policy/Independent Learning


PRINCIPLES
The Design and Technology Department believes in the principle of homework to support and
reinforce the education of our pupils. We believe that when homework is set it should be
based on the following principles:
Homework should:

Develop the skills of independent learning.

Support and re enforce classroom based learning.

Develop the skills of perseverance.

Broaden the use of research skills and use of sources.

Build the skills necessary and prepare pupils for the demands of KS4 extended project
work.

Bring a variety of tasks and increased challenge to pupils as they mature.

Be achievable by all and matched to the individuals ability.


Homework should not be:

Finishing off work that was not completed in class.

Contrived purely for the sake of doing homework.

Irrelevant to current project class work.


Essentially the use of homework will be to support and compliment school based
work. However the nature of the type of work we do affects the way in which we allocate
homework tasks. In an effort to make the tasks relevant to the pupils current project there
will be sometimes of the year when the demands are greater than others. Also many of our
pupils are involved in a carousel arrangement where the subjects may swap during the
year. For these reasons a rigid timetable is not adhered to. However the tasks set will not
place unreasonable demands upon pupils. Below is an outline of what can be expected.
The School is strongly encouraging the use of Independent Learning Challenges
(ILCs). (New idea for 2014/15)
Each ILC could be tasks set over an extended period up to half a term. They should
be designed to promote independent study, to extend classroom learning, to
encourage students to reflect on the quality of their work and have clear ideas of
how to move on and improve their learning. ILCs should have regular deadlines built
in to encourage students to meet the final deadline.
(All ILCs can be uploaded into parents section of the school website. This is to allow
parents and carers to support students in the completion of homework tasks. )
Homework should be seen as a means of developing students abilities and skills,
not merely as an opportunity to finish off work started in class, although there will
be times when this is the most appropriate homework to set. It is the teachers
responsibility to ensure that the homework is accessible for all students and it
should be differentiated according to student needs. It should also provide a
stimulating reinforcement for learning or be a strand of learning in its own right.
The most effective HW tasks will be those that encourage students to understand
their own learning exploring and analysing what they do well and what they still
need to learn in order to improve and may include:

Reviewing and evaluating learning and progress (including revision tasks)


Pre-learning to be done before a lesson
Reading fiction or non-fiction
Researching a topic including wider reading
Memorising, e.g. spellings, essential facts, and key vocabulary
Creating success criteria or mark schemes for specific questions
Self and peer assessment
Planning drafting and re-drafting written tasks or planning and creating
practical tasks
Making notes and summarising
Extended projects

Homework requiring ICT resources


If a student does not have access to a computer, alternative work should be
provided. However, students should be encouraged to make use of the LRC and
other ICT facilities wherever possible.
Organisation
It is good practice to set homework well before the end of the lesson. Teachers
must ensure that the homework is explained clearly with a date given for its
completion, and that details of the task are written in the planners by the students
whether or not it is a written, ICT based or non-written assignment.
Responsibilities
The role of the pupil
1. To listen to homework instructions in class.
2. To write down instructions for the task and deadline date into their planner.
3. To ensure that homework is completed and handed in to meet the deadline.
4. To attempt all work and give their best.
5. To inform the class teacher of any difficulties.
The role of the Class Teacher
The class teacher controls the direction of homework and the nature of tasks
undertaken.
The teacher will:
1. Set appropriate homework
2. Give full and comprehensive instructions.
3. Set deadlines for completed work and ensure that they are met.
4. Mark and return all homework promptly
5. Provide help and support.
6. To make good use of incentives whenever possible or carry out sanctions
when appropriate.

The role of the Head of Department


1. To ensure that homework is clearly identified in the schemes of work.
2. To quality assure the homework set by sampling across all year groups.
3. To monitor and evaluate the homework policy within their curriculum area
as part of the quality assurance process (each half term)and report on this in
the Department SEF.
KS3 years 7 to 9
Homework may take the form of short tasks or extended project work building up the
experience for KS4 style coursework.
Many of the homework tasks will involve collecting and finding out information to help with
their design work in school. Pupils will be expected to use books, libraries, the internet, etc. to
help with these tasks. If it is not possible to carry out these tasks at home through lack of
facilities then the use of facilities within school where they are normally available at lunch
times or after school will be expected.
In Food Technology the homework will often require pupils to complete evaluations of the
work created in the lessons including parental feedback. Research tasks into related themes
to develop cultural understanding of the products they manufacture will also be given. There
will be opportunities to use the school workshops and facilities for completion and extension
work but this will be optional and not compulsory and will be arranged as and when needed
by the class teacher.
KS3 Quantity/Frequency
Each student should be doing approximately 1 hour of independent learning per
subject per week on average. Each subject has flexibility to set this work over a
longer period, as is appropriate, to meet the needs of the subject. Teachers should
set a deadline with a minimum of two days notice whenever possible.
KS4 years 10 and 11
In the preparation for GCSE homework plays a crucial role in determining success or failure.
Pupils will be expected to carry out the same tasks as in KS3 but to greater depth. The
ongoing nature of the coursework element of GCSE means that pupils will always be expected
to continue working on their design folder each week. Once again this can be done in school
where a greater range of facilities are available if required.
In addition to this there will be more specific tasks set on a regular basis to prepare pupils for
the written papers at the end of the course.
KS4 Quantity/Frequency
When applicable each student should be doing at least 1 hour of independent
learning per subject per week on average. Each subject has flexibility to set this
work over a longer period, as is appropriate, to meet the needs of the subject.
Teachers should set a deadline with a minimum of two days notice whenever
possible.

MONITORING HOMEWORK
Staff are to set homework in accordance to the PRINCIPLES.
Staff should ensure that pupils enter the details of the homework into their HOMEWORK
JOURNALS.
Staff should ensure that homework set is clear and understood by the individual.
It is recommended that clear deadlines for completion and handing in are given.
The Head of Department has prime responsibility for monitoring the nature and quality of
homework.
MARKING HOMEWORK
The main principle for homework is that it is relevant to the current project. If it is relevant it
should be used in the lesson set for handing in or it needs to be assessed by the teacher as
soon as possible. A delay or failure to mark homework can be demoralising for a pupil who
has spent a lot of time and effort completing a homework task.
Homework will need to marked in line with the department assessment policy.

SANCTIONS for the non-completion of homework


It is important to be consistent in this area.
All homework should be handed in on time as specified when issued to the pupils.
Unless reasons for not handing in homework are due to technical reasons in school or
supported by a Parental/Guardian letter then sanctions are to be issued.
For any sanction use SIMS and issue a 20 minute detention for first offence. It is
recommended that a record of homework completion is kept.
If a pattern develops of non-completion of homework then further sanctions will need to be
enforced.
Please inform Form Tutor and Head of Department if a pattern of non-completion of
homework develops.
Any contact with parents/guardians should inform of any issues.
MEDIA
It is the aim of the department to use a variety of media in homework tasks including the
department Realsmart website, subject websites, external websites, on line testing using
Google Forms and Flubaroo, Kahoot, Socrative,Google Classroom, BBC Bitesize, our
Challenge website and traditional media.
DEVELOPMENT
September 2014 onwards as part of the DDP we will focus again this year on developing a
program of homework tasks that are differentiated. Examples seen such as the UNHomework, examples of a Nandos style grading system and ideas from the Geography
department are to be assessed and implemented across the whole dept. A borrowed idea is
to set homework on a points score system where students choose their home works of
differing difficulty and scores with the expectation that they have to complete a set of
homework that reaches a minimum score/difficulty. They could choose one high scoring

challenge homework worth 100 points or 3 lower scoring homeworks worth 50, 30 and 20
points.
The overall aim is to have a homework board in the central corridor that is used by all
department and year groups.
A copy of the letter to Parents outlining our policy is below.
Design and Technology Department Homework Policy
Dear Parents,
The Design and Technology Department believes in the principle of homework to support and reinforce the education of our
pupils. We believe that when homework is set it should be based on the following principles:
Homework should:

Develop the skills of independent learning.

Support and re enforce classroom based learning.

Develop the skills of perseverance.

Broaden the use of research skills and use of sources.

Build the skills necessary and prepare pupils for the demands of KS4 extended
project work.

Bring a variety of tasks and increased challenge to pupils as they mature.

Be achievable by all and matched to the individuals ability.


Homework should not be:

Finishing off work that was not completed in class.

Contrived purely for the sake of doing homework.

Irrelevant to current project class work.


Essentially the use of homework will be to support and compliment school based work. However the nature of the type of
work we do affects the way in which we allocate homework tasks. In an effort to make the tasks relevant to the pupils current
project there will be sometimes of the year when the demands are greater than others. Also many of our pupils are involved in
a carousel arrangement where the subjects may swap during the year. For these reasons a rigid timetable is not adhered to.
However the tasks set will not place unreasonable demands upon pupils. Below is an outline of what can be expected.
KS3 years 7 to 9. Homework may take the form of short tasks or extended project work building up the experience for KS4
style coursework.
Many of the homework tasks will involve collecting and finding out information to help with their design work in school.
Pupils will be expected to use books, libraries, the internet, etc. to help with these tasks. If it is not possible to carry out these
tasks at home through lack of facilities then the use of facilities within school where they are normally available at lunch times
or after school will be expected In Food Technology the homework will often require pupils to complete evaluations of the
work created in the lessons including parental feedback. Research tasks into related themes to develop cultural
understanding of the products they manufacture will also be given. There will be opportunities to use the school workshops
and facilities for completion and extension work but this will be optional and not compulsory and will be arranged as and
when needed by the class teacher.
KS4 years 10 and 11
In their preparation for GCSE homework plays a crucial role in determining success or failure.
Pupils will be expected to carry out the same tasks as in KS3 but to greater depth. The ongoing nature of the coursework
element of GCSE means that pupils will always be expected to continue working on their design folder each week. Once again
this can be done in school where a greater range of facilities are available if required. In addition to this there will be more
specific tasks set on a regular basis to prepare pupils for the written papers at the end of the course.
TIME ALLOCATION Each homework task will differ in its nature and content. The key issue is not to set more able pupils
longer homework than less able pupils. The homework should be set according to challenge and ability. The length of time
for a homework task will depend on the task and type but a recommendation is that for KS3 no task should take more than 30
minutes and for KS4 approximately 1 hour. Frequency of setting these tasks is dependent upon the principles outlined above.
Yours sincerely,
P M Andrews
Head of Design and Technology

Monitoring of teaching and learning. Quality Assurance


In the D&T Department, we strive for outstanding teaching and learning, so regularly
evaluate and analyse our teaching. In order to successfully do this, the following strategies
are used. Our Department monitoring is in line with the school Appraisal cycles and is
designed to be as unobtrusive to lessons and teaching as possible.
Every teacher will have 3 formal lesson observations every year in line with the school
performance management cycle. The observation will be used to inform teaching and
Appraisal target setting and will form the basis for teacher/HOD/SLT Department discussion.
School IP
All lesson observation data will be recorded on School IP as per school policy.
The D&T Department prides itself on being an open Department, where our teachers are
encouraged to walk between classrooms, and look at students work, adding encouragement
where appropriate. Many resources are shared between the two workshops, so students
also are encouraged to utilise both rooms and discuss/show their work with all D&T
teachers.
We believe in celebrating our students successes so will commend students work between
the D&T staff and SLT
We standardize our work through the moderation of work at GCSE and Key Stage 3.
Work Scrutiny
The HOD will sample pupils work, looking at quality of work and assessment, and all our
teachers are encouraged to use each others sketchbooks as exemplar.
From Whole school policy doc.
The purpose
To inform the appraisal process by assisting the line manager/HOD to arrive at an overall
judgement on a member of staffs performance and the overall judgement on the quality of
teaching across the department. To inform SLT of the practises across departments in order
to ensure school policies are being adhered to.
This exercise will allow HOD to see first-hand evidence of the learning which will have taken
place and recorded in pupils exercise books/portfolios/practical work/online work.
It will also allow HOD/line manager to see how conscientiously and successfully the teacher
has implemented school and department policies.
What will exactly happen?

A sample of books will be submitted to the HOD three times a year in line with an agreed
dept calendar, individual feedback to be given by HOD to include www and ebi. Examples of
best practise to be shared amongst the department.
A sample of books will be submitted to SLT three times a year in line with an agreed school
calendar. Department feedback to be given to HOD and then filtered down to individuals.
Evidence of best practise to be shared across departments.
What will the HOD/SLT be looking to see?
This exercise will allow HOD to see first-hand evidence of the learning which will have taken
place and recorded in pupils exercise books/portfolios/practical work/online work.
It will also allow your HOD/line manager to see how conscientiously and successfully a
teacher has implemented school and department policies.
The following are examples of what will be look at although not exhaustive:
Literacy policy followed
Presentation of pupils work
Homework
Scheme of work coverage
Evidence of pupil progression
Evidence of differentiation and appropriate challenge
AFL- targets, next steps for improvement, peer assessment, independent work
Student responses to teacher marking
Evidence of reward policy
That exercise books marked in line with dept policy, evidence of AFL; evidence of how pupils
have responded to feedback; evidence of how agreed school approaches being followed
e.g. literacy marking, presentation of pupils work.

Learning Walks
The HoD will complete regular Learning Walks as per whole school policy.
The purpose
To inform the appraisal process by assisting the line manager in arriving at an overall
judgement on a member of staffs performance and the overall judgement on the quality of
teaching across the department.
Frequency
There will be no formal timetable. However, it is expected that visits will take place every
fortnight.
What will the HOD/Observers be looking to see?
HODs may look to see an engaging learning environment; pupils engaged in their learning;
presentation of pupils work; appropriate support for literacy and numeracy; teaching skills
including questioning; progress and what is typical of your teaching. The Head of
Department may well also use this is an opportunity to identify examples of good practice
to share with the department or with the school.
How the information gathered will help inform the HOD in reaching a holistic judgement of
the teacher which is required as part of the appraisal process as well as contributing to their
overall judgement on the quality of teaching across the department
This type of activity allows the line manger to see first-hand and on a regular basis, how
effectively a colleague is performing. It should be followed by regular and on-going
feedback. This is the opportunity to tweak a colleagues performance and identify and
share best practice.
Over the period of a school year, a substantial knowledge of a teachers performance will
have been gathered. This should assist both the line manager and member of staff to
review their performance and demonstrate the teaching standards criteria.
Information from Learning Walks will be recorded on a Google doc (whole school proforma)
and shared between Slink, HOD and teacher.

Pupil Progress Data


The purpose
To inform the appraisal process by assisting the line manager arriving at an overall
judgement on a member of staffs performance and the overall judgement on the quality of
teaching across the department.
What will exactly happen?
Data trawls will take place 6 times during the school year. Following the submission of data
the member of staff will meet with the HOD to discuss the progress being made in the
classes they have responsibility for. There will be discussions around intervention strategies
and these will need recorded as part of the DepSEF/Subject intervention form. Refer to the
Actions Document (from 2012) for specific guidance.
What will the HOD be looking to see?
As a general rule good progress will be defined as 70% of students in a class either meeting
or exceeding their target.
Where significant underperformance has been identified after each Data Trawl, it is
expected that the class teacher will have discussed this with the HOD and planned
intervention/support strategies. These will have been recorded using the Subject
Intervention Form and subsequently updated after each Data Trawl. Letters to the parents
of ALL pupils should have been sent where significant underperformance has been
identified.
How the information gathered will help inform the HOD in reaching a holistic judgement of
the teacher which is required as part of the appraisal process as well as contributing to their
overall judgement on the quality of teaching across the department
Expectation is that 70% or more of all students a class teacher has responsibility form will
meet or exceed their target grade.
When a student is underachieving, an evidence based trail of interventions and strategies
needs to be in place, recorded, monitored and reviewed.
Data Trawl information, along with lesson observations, learning walks, work scrutiny and
overall end of year performance at KS3 and KS4 will be reviewed by the HOD/Class teacher
and used holistically to make an overall judgement.

Lesson Observations
The purpose
To inform the appraisal process by assisting the line manager in arriving at an overall
judgement on a member of staffs performance by looking at teaching skills and the overall
judgement on the quality of teaching across the department.
The aim is to be a supportive and developmental process that recognises best practice to
share with colleagues, and to develop teaching skills. Observers should be non-judgemental
and be a critical friend in supporting colleagues in becoming the best teacher they can be.
What will exactly happen
There will be three Lesson Observations conducted during the year and the record will be
logged on the SchoolIP system. This will be coordinated by the Assistant Headteacher
(Teaching and Learning) and will take into account staff strengths and areas for
development.
Each observation will be conducted by two colleagues such as the HOD or SLT Link, where
applicable, or colleagues within or outside the department. Observations will be arranged
two weeks in advance, and will be for a 20-25 minute part of the lesson using the school
Lesson Observation proforma. The observers will then discuss the observation, feedback at
the earliest opportunity and record the lesson observation on SchoolIP. Here the observed
colleague can also leave their comment on the lesson.
What will the HOD/Observers be looking to see?
Exemplary pedagogy (including teaching and learning, challenge to all pupils, differentiation,
questioning, independent learning, use of support, planning, homework, literacy and
numeracy, the implementation in practice of school approaches).
The observers will talk to pupils and look at pupils work. Lessons should be planned, but not
necessarily provide a lesson plan. The observed colleague should have an awareness of
progress data and gap groups, and cater for these groups.
For further guidance please see Guidance for completing lesson observations document.
How the information gathered will help inform the HOD in reaching a holistic judgement of
the teacher which is required as part of the appraisal process as well as contributing to their
overall judgement on the quality of teaching across the department
The HOD/observer will not score or attach a weighting to this element, however it will be
one piece of the jigsaw of evidence which will help inform the overall judgement which is
required on a member of staffs performance.

Appraisal
The Purpose
To inform the appraisal process by assisting the line manager or appraiser in arriving at an
overall judgement on a member of staffs performance and the overall judgement on the
quality of teaching/support across the department.
What will exactly happen
Staff will complete a self-review. The member of staff and the line manager will then hold a
meeting to review the previous appraisal objectives. At this meeting three objectives are
agreed for the start of the new appraisal cycle, and will take into account the self-review
and any other supporting information such as lesson observation feedback, performance
data, learning walks, meeting the core standards and work scrutiny.
The first appraisal objective will be focused on pupil performance data. The second
appraisal objective will be focused on improving teaching and learning. The third objective
will be focused on a member of staffs work and any additional responsibility they hold. This
means an objective will be focused around their work as a PPC or HOD. If a member of staff
is on UPS1 the appraisal objective should be focused on work that can be shared with
others in the Department, if on UPS 2 or 3 then it should be focused on work that can be
shared with the whole school. If the member of staff has no additional responsibility and is
not on UPS but is on M5 or M6 then the appraisal objectives should be focused on work for
the relevant department. If a member of staff is on M1 to M4 then an appraisal target
could be based on a target that focuses on the teaching standards. Each appraisal objective
should be directly linked to the SIP, the DDP and should address a teaching standard.
These appraisal objectives will be standardised by the Headteacher to ensure parity and
fairness for each member of staff. Appraisal objectives should be recorded on School IP and
monitored through School IP.
What will the HOD be looking to see
The HOD will be looking to see progress against the agreed targets. This will be on a day to
day basis, at the mid-year review and in the performance review at the end of the appraisal
cycle. If a target becomes no longer relevant then the target should be changed as required
and the Headteacher notified.
How the information gathered will help inform the HOD in reaching a holistic judgement of
the teacher which is required as part of the appraisal process as well as contributing to their
overall judgement on the quality of teaching across the department
There will be a formal review as part of the appraisal cycle requiring the completion of the
relevant documentation. This will be the opportunity for a judgement to be reached on the
progress made towards achieving the appraisal objectives. Both parties are responsible for
monitoring the process towards the target. Progress made towards an appraisal objective
will be considered when reaching a holistic judgement.

It is expected that as soon as it appears that an objective may not be met, this is discussed
by the line manager. It would be bad practice to raise an issue/cause of concern at the end
of the cycle, without having raised it during the year.
Teaching Standards
The purpose
To inform the appraisal process by assisting the line manager arriving at an overall judgement on a member of
staffs performance and the overall judgement on the quality of teaching across the department.
What will exactly happen?
The default position is that all teachers are meeting the Teaching Standards. The teaching standards will be
discussed at the start of the school and this will provide the opportunity for staff to identify aspects of their
performance where they would like to improve. This review will inform the identification of specific appraisal
objectives. The standards will be reviewed again at the end of the cycle.
What will the HOD be looking to see?
Progress against the TS may be seen during the L Observations, Learning Walks, Work Scrutiny and post trawl
pupil progress meetings.
Data
Including trawls, reports, SISRA, progress evenings, controlled assessments.
Standards 2, 5 and 6 link directly to data and the information we already gather within school.
Classroom management/Behaviour
Standards 1 and 7 link with expectations, challenge and creating a good and safe learning environment.
These standards will be listed and linked into the lesson observation cycle and specifically highlighted by the
teacher and observers.
There are still areas where CPD on effective classroom management strategies would be useful, especially when
dealing with specific behaviour issues. Attending this kind of training should be registered on SchoolIP.
Lesson Observations/Work Scrutiny/CPD
Standards 3 and 4 link to subject knowledge and lesson planning. Evidence of this could be seen through lesson
observations and work scrutiny but the links are not as specific as those stated above.
Wider contribution to the school
Standard 8 links to this area. Member of staff should log on SchoolIP extracurricular activities, attendance on
school events etc.
How the information gathered will help inform the HOD in reaching a holistic judgement of the teacher which is
required as part of the appraisal process as well as contributing to their overall judgement on the quality of
teaching across the department
The HOD/line manager will not score or attach a weighting to this element, however it will be one piece of the
jigsaw of evidence which will help inform the overall judgement which is required on a member of staffs
performance.

School IP
All department staff to record on a regular basis any relevant information on School IP that
relates to Appraisal, personal development and CPD.

Student Reviews/survey of projects


From September 2014 we will be conducting a series of student surveys of all students on
completion of their projects. This will be on line via Google Forms and be anonymous. The
results will be used to inform planning of our new Scheme of Work.
An example can be seen here.

Department meetings

These are held every week on Monday evenings, 3:30 4:00pm. Attendance by all
department team is required. The minutes from each meeting is recorded on a
continuous Google Document (2014-2015 document is here).
This is intended as a summary of the meeting and not full minutes.
Further meetings on Thursday CPD time are also to be expected.
Dep SEF
Guidance for HOD's in reaching overall judgements about the quality of teaching across their department.
Inadequate
Requires Improvement Good
Teaching that leads
As a result of
This requires
Teaching is usually
to progress
weak teaching
improvement as the
good, with examples
over time, pupils
teaching does not lead of some outstanding
and particular
to pupils making good
teaching. As a
groups of pupils,
progress and
result, most pupils
e.g. SEN, PP,
achieving well over
and groups of
Most Able, are
time.
pupils, make good
making
progress and
inadequate
achieve well over
progress
time.
50-60% good or better
with some inadequate
lessons
Below 50% good
or better with 10%
or above
inadequate
lessons.

70% good or better


with very few
inadequate lessons

Outstanding
Much of teaching in all
key stages is
outstanding and never
less than consistently
good. As a result
almost all pupils are
making rapid and
sustained progress.

80% good or better


teaching with no
inadequate lessons.

Health and Safety Policy


Refer to separate Health and Safety/Risk Assessment Folders in Department Office.
All updates are to be filed into the above folders.
COSHH
The department will follow the County and School codes of practice to control the use of
hazardous substances and thereby protect both the staff and the pupils. The following steps
will be taken: All substances should be clearly marked.
Information concerning potential hazards and correct working practices will be given to
the staff and the pupils either verbally or in written form.
Only limited stocks of hazardous substances will be kept if possible.
Care will be taken to reduce the amount of dust where possible.
To avoid using hazardous materials / substances and try to substitute safer alternatives
where possible.
Staff will have full access to information, both county and manufacturers concerning
hazardous materials.
To provide and maintain extraction equipment to improve air quality.
County Policy - COSHH Risk Assessment.
Examine School Safety policy.
Risk Assessment
As part of the department curriculum and individual lesson planning due consideration
should be given to the potential risks involved in the activity. Staff should assess if they can
teach the course content safely and if the pupils would be able to successfully carry out a
task in a classroom environment. They should follow any codes of practice and use the risk
assessments provided.
Staff should: Plan lessons with personal and pupil welfare in mind.
Assess the risks of each individual activity.
Where required decide upon control measures to reduce risk.
Communicate any potential problems to senior members of staff.

Provide an environment where staff and pupils can work safely.


Have full access to all literature on risk assessments and know where to find them.
The department recognises the need and value of assessment Dangerous Equipment:
It is the teachers responsibility to ensure all students are fully aware of potential hazards
arising from the use of dangerous equipment. The following safety precautions must always
be adhered to:

Knives and dangerous equipment must be kept in store cupboard when not in use.
The use of glue guns will always be supervised.
All toxic liquids are clearly labelled and kept in a locked secure cupboard.

Spillages of hazardous liquids:

Students must be encouraged to report spills and it is the teachers responsibility to


deal with the cleaning up of hazardous liquids egg. Bleach or
turps. Such solutions should be mopped up immediately.
Protective Clothing:

Aprons are available for students use. Students should be encouraged to wear
protective clothing.

Safety goggles are to be used when appropriate for the task, e.g. using electrical
wood working tools.
Reporting Accidents:

Accidents requiring medical treatment should be reported to the office immediately


where a qualified first aider can be sent for. Basic medical supplies such as plasters are
located in the first aid box in all rooms. If a student is taken to hospital then an accident
form must be filled in.
Reporting breakages:

Students must be encouraged to report all breakages immediately.

Reporting potential hazards:

Damaged fixtures, fittings, furniture or room fabric should be reported immediately


or alternatively they can be written up on the caretakers white board.
Fire Procedures:
In the event of a fire within the D&T Department the alarm should be raised by breaking the
glass of the nearest fire alarm point. Students should be evacuated according to the whole
school fire instructions policy. Where possible windows/doors should be closed by the
teacher on exit. The fire evacuation officer will check the room, once all the students have
left.

SAFETY - USE OF THE ROOMS AND WORKSHOPS BY NON-SPECIALISTS

2.

1. The workshops are to be kept locked at all times when they are not occupied.
Students are therefore not to enter a workshop until a member of staff has arrived.
Good advice on the supervision of students in D/Tech departments states that:
Staff should actively ensure that there will be adequate levels of supervision in
such areas at all times.
Therefore it is not acceptable for a member of staff to leave students in a workshop
whilst the member of staff goes to collect resources, etc. Thorough planning and
organisation is vital in order to avoid difficulties in complying with this directive.
3. Staff must ensure that students do not interfere with equipment/apparatus or
chemicals of any kind.
4. The mains electricity and gas supplies to each workshop are switched off by
D/Tech. staff at the end of the day. Therefore staff using a workshop should make
themselves familiar with the location and mode of operation of the following facilities:
a) the 'Mains electricity switch'
b) the 'Mains gas isolating valve'
5. No eating, drinking or chewing is to take place in a workshop. Staff should try and
dissuade students from touching their mouths and eyes with their fingers, pens,
pencils, etc.
6. Staff must lock the doors to the workshop at the end of the lesson.

67

Use of resources & Ordering Systems


Resources
All equipment is purchased and maintained from budgets allocated from the main school budget.
Each room has a set of facilities to match the teaching requirements for key stage 3 and key stage
4. The maintenance and checking of equipment is the responsibility of the member of staff
teaching in that room. The equipment in each room should:
Be checked at the beginning and end of every lesson.
Be visually checked on a regular basis for any potential hazards.
Be recorded in stock book if of a value of more than
and update the master record of stock and equipment.

. The Department technicians will retain

Finance
The Head of Design & Technology is responsible for the use of the department capitation. All
orders for key stage 3 materials are authorised by the Head of Department before being processed.
All members of staff are to order the relevant materials for their courses but The HoD is to
informed of any spending in order to track spending. Any money left is used for the development of
the department. The department meets and discusses resource priorities.
Each member of the department has his/her own photocopying card and pin number. All charges
made for photocopying are paid for by the Design Department budget.
Charging Policy
Workshop - Pupils are asked only for voluntary contributions and only charged where relevant.
Food/Catering
We ask for a parental contribution of 25 each year to cover costs of all foodstuffs used in
department. This is monitored by CH and all monies given to finance office. It is not compulsory
and parents in need of support are asked to liaise with CH and the school.
All foodstuffs required for Food/Catering are ordered by CH and invoices sent to Finance Office.
All contributions will be paid into the Design & Technology Account. For reasons of security aim to
pay in any money when it reaches over 10 or at the end of each term.
In key stage 4 pupils requiring specialist materials and components are encouraged to provide
these for themselves.
The cost of undertaking any educational visits. A voluntary contribution may be asked for.

Pupils will levy charges for willful damage.


Materials
Some materials are contributed to the department by local businesses. These contacts are vital if
the department is to continue to offer such a variety of key stage 4 courses.
1.
Income.
a)
Capitation is allocated near the start of the financial year.
b)

c)

Each year the HOD and the whole Department staff formulate the Development Plan based
on student and department review findings. Within this plan will be details of equipment,
resources and training needs. Whatever funds are forthcoming from the Development fund
they are used solely for the purposes identified in the Development Plan.
Those students who complete products made from wood, metal, plastics or fabric that have
been provided by the Department, may be charged the cost price of the material if or when
they take those products home. Details of such sales should be entered into the 'Sales
Book' kept for that purpose, and the proceeds should be paid into the School Office at
regular intervals, where they will be credited to the Department's capitation. Proceeds from
the sale of text books and folders are credited to the Department's capitation. Similarly
contributions towards the replacement costs of broken equipment also go into the petty
cash and into capitation when the petty cash exceeds 10.

2.
Expenditure.
The purchase of books, equipment and materials for use in the Design and Technology
Department, is (normally) financed from the income described above. From these sources are
purchased (virtually) all of the consumable and non-consumable items that the Department needs
in order to properly conduct its planned educational programmes. Included will be materials,
substances, items of equipment, tools, and stationery, but not items of 'very considerable expense'
such as microwave ovens, lathes and computers, which require 'special purchase' orders. Prior to
completing the bulk of their orders, the Head of Department (HOD) and the staff will meet to
discuss the kinds of items, other than the day-to-day items that they will need or would like for the
coming year. This, together with the HOD's review of all requisitions, should help to avoid any
undue duplication and serious omissions.
On being advised by the HOD of their share of the money available, teachers responsible for
particular Design/Tech. areas should complete the appropriate requisition forms, enter the code by
which their account is identified, and pass them to the HOD. On receipt of their goods, items
should be very carefully checked against the original requisitions, and the HOD advised of any
discrepancies.
Details of any inspection copies that a teacher wishes to retain, should be passed to the HOD, and
subsequently, should be entered onto the appropriate requisition form.

On occasions when it is not feasible or not sensible to complete formal requisitions, (as in cases of
considerable urgency or dire need, and/or when the amount of money involved is relatively small),
it may be possible to purchase sundry items from 'petty cash'. Items, currently costing no more
than 10.00, should be purchased by the teacher and a receipt obtained. On submitting the
receipt, in person, to the School Office, the teacher will be reimbursed, and the transaction
entered into the records. Staff are respectfully reminded that this facility should be used very
sparingly.
Recording of all capitation is on Google Docs by PA and CAS. Viewable by all in department, Bursar and
Slink.
SECTION 1
THE STOCK LIST & INVENTORY
The Department maintains an inventory of its moveable non-capital assets, i.e. chemicals, apparatus,
books, etc. To ensure effective stock control and security the Department has the following additional
procedures relating to the acquisition, storing, borrowing and disposal of stock:
The inventories identify the stock by description, quantity, location and date of purchase. For
items that are constantly in use, e.g. apparatus/equipment the HOD is responsible for monitoring their
usage and frequency of reordering;
staff must 'sign out' any equipment that they wish to take home, e.g. a computer if they are not
to be personally liable for any loss or damage and for the School's insurance to be active;
Our aim is for all non consumable items are identified with an identity code and the School name
in visible security paint and 'UV only' visible ink - whenever possible and/or appropriate;

SECTION 2
PRINTED & AUDIO VISUAL STOCK
It is necessary to regularly evaluate, withdraw and dispose of printed and audio visual stock as necessary
to:
keep items relevant to the current National Curriculum and the broader curriculum;
comply with DfES, OFSTED and OHMCI reports and guidelines, etc;
maximise the efficient use of shelf space;
support the aims and objectives of the School and the School's policies on Equal Opportunities
and more specifically those concerned with multicultural/anti-racist and gender/anti-sexist issues;
identify the need to withdraw and/or dispose of existing stock and the need to order new
editions/versions;
utilise new technology (CD ROMs, audio-visual);
have display stock that is both attractive and relevant to the pupils and which encourages them
to learn.
Withdrawal of a text should be considered if:
the stock item looks unattractive, i.e. is old, dirty, damaged or in generally poor condition;
the stock item has not been borrowed or used for at least 5 years;
the stock item gives unacceptable impressions about race, gender, religion, colour;
the stock item is not relevant to departmental syllabuses/not needed for general reference
stock;

the stock item has dated knowledge, language, illustrations or images;


the stock item suggests dangerous procedures or inappropriate behaviour;
the stock item is inappropriate to the Curriculum, age or interests of the pupils, e.g. degree level
texts;
the stock item has been superseded by more recent editions/versions, i.e. keep new and
immediately previous editions only if finance allows;
an audio-visual stock item has been superseded by more up-to-date technology, e.g. video and
multimedia CD ROMs. This also applies to hardware and software, e.g. old software may not run on the
latest operating system and old hardware eventually becomes redundant as the demands and
complexity of modern software progresses.
When a decision to withdraw a stock item has been made further consideration must be given to:
liaison with other Heads of Departments as they may have a legitimate use for the stock item in their
department, e.g. the History, Citizenship department may use inappropriate stock with respect to gender
and multi-cultural issues as a source of social research/project material;
offering the stock to local charity shops or charities/agencies which collect books on behalf of third
world countries - the books are usually sold and the proceeds used to provide new books for third world
countries;
offering the stock to staff at a nominal charge;
offering the stock to recycling firms which require material for pulping;
using the refuse collection/disposal service if all other options have failed to work.

SECTION 3
EQUIPMENT & HARDWARE STOCK
It is necessary to regularly evaluate, withdraw and dispose of equipment (including chemicals and materials
for which there is a COSHH assessment) in order to maintain a Healthy and Safe working environment. The
annual stock take is the main opportunity when this type of stock can be evaluated and disposed of as
necessary. However, regular inspection of stock both in and out of current use must be conducted as an ongoing programme.
Disposal of practical stock must take place if:
the stock shows signs of deterioration, i.e. is old, dirty, damaged or in generally poor condition;
the stock has not been used for at least 3 years on discussion with HoD;
the stock is not relevant to departmental syllabuses;
the container shows signs of deterioration/leakage/damage, i.e. is dented, cracked or in generally
poor condition;
the container has a dated label which indicates that the contents are over 3 years old;
the equipment shows signs of deterioration;
the annual safety check of electrical equipment determines that an item cannot be safely repaired.
Other considerations:
i.
After use all protective clothing and goggles should be returned to a suitable storage location and
checked for damage that could affect usage in subsequent lessons.

ii.
Spillages of chemicals/dangerous substances must be reported to the appropriate authority for
disposal if necessary.
iii.
At the end of every practical session, unused chemicals should be returned to their designated
containers, or disposed of as appropriate.
iv.
Small quantities of many chemicals commonly used in schools can usually be disposed of by diluting
with large quantities of water and then washing down the sink - if in doubt consult the Head of Department,
the Head Technician and relevant COSHH recommendations and advice. In all cases of known dangerous
chemicals or larger volumes the LEA or specialist licenced disposal firms must be used

Absence of teaching staff and cover.

It is expected that staff will make every effort to provide work for their classes when they are
absent from school. If the absence has been arranged in advance, a copy of the school cover sheet
should be completed to set the work, along with a class register and given to Julie Welsh or Lesley
Hilland.
If the absence is due to illness, staff should call School/HoD early in the morning or the evening
before, with details of work to be done wherever possible. The Department does have a selection
of cover worksheets which will be in line with projects that are been completed in class.
In respect of all periods of absence, teachers in the Design and Technology Department should
adhere to the procedures set out in the School's Staff Handbook, with which they should become
familiar.
SHORT-TERM ABSENCES
In cases of intended absence, teachers should furnish the Head of Department (HOD) with all
relevant details at the earliest opportunity. For other than intended absences, every reasonable
effort should be made to inform the HOD, presumably by telephone and directly if at all possible,
either during the evening preceding the day of absence, or between 7.30 am. and 8am. on the
morning of the actual absence, at which time the School Office staff should also be informed.
In all but extreme personal circumstances, work should be set for each of the student groups
concerned. Set work should be appropriate to their ages, abilities and (Design and Technology)
experiences, should be demonstrably relevant to their current, recent and/or impending learning,
and should be clearly and unambiguously explained.
All work should be on the proforma COVERWORK on D&T Staff folder on net work.
All Design and Technology teachers keep an envelope file for each teaching group. The files are
used for set work and are kept in the Departmental resources area and contain the following:
a class list;
detailing the following:
i.
date, day of the week and lesson;
ii.
recent relevant work covered;
iii.
today's set work;
iv.
any equipment, texts, worksheets, etc. to be used;
v.
title and number of texts/worksheets, etc. ;
vi.
any equipment, texts/worksheets to be collected in;
vii.
details of any homework to be set;
viii.
a space for comments by the cover teacher e.g. work progress, specific /individual,
behavioural problems, etc.* This issue to be developed September 2014 onwards.
In cases when it is known that the teacher who will be 'covering' a particular lesson has the
pertinent expertise, e.g. a Departmental colleague, then it may be appropriate for the students to
continue with any currently ongoing work. Depending upon the nature of the work in question and
73

of the resources required, and providing that no risks to health or safety would be involved, then, at
the discretion of the HOD, students may still be able to continue with ongoing work even when the
lesson is to be covered by a teacher who does not possess the necessary expertise. In all other
instances the work will have to be specifically identified or devised.
Whatever the case, the HOD will take, or delegate to a colleague, mainly CAS, responsibility for
providing the resources required, and for liaising with the teacher who will be 'covering' the lesson.
The HOD or delegated colleague will provide the 'covering' teacher with the complete cover work.
At the close of the lesson, the HOD or the delegate will collect the completed files, discuss the
lesson with the 'covering' teacher and ensure that notes have been made regarding the students
work and behaviour, which, subsequently, will be passed to the absent colleague.
Any persistent problems or difficulties may be referred to the Deputy Head i/c 'cover' for absent
teachers.
PROTRACTED ABSENCES
In the case of any protracted absence, the HOD will liaise with the Deputy Head responsible and
endeavour to arrange for a specialist supply teacher to be imported, who would be made welcome
and offered any help and advice necessary, by all members of the Department. In the event of only
non-specialist teachers being available, then urgent consideration would need to be given to the
prospect of modifying the course(s) in question, and/or to the possibility of re-organising student
groups or rotating them so that each would receive a fair share of the remaining specialised
teaching.

D&T Department Handbook update September 2014

External Links, Extra-curricular and Competitions.

As a department we are continually attempting to create links with local businesses and industry.
We do collect some of our materials from local companies. We are always looking for suitable
companies to work with.
CYBERSCRAPS BNFL year 9 pupils Robot competition
Rotary Club Technology Challenge since spring 2005
Cross curricular challenges granola bar MFL/Geography/English
Entry to local competitions eg Border Cars Sept 2011
National Catering competitions National winners 2011
Dept. Development plan has a target to further develop these issues 2010 onwards. These have
been built into some team members CPD targets.
*September 2014 update
Make it Challenge entered
Application to take part in Moon Rover Challenge
Development of noticeboard in corridor to promote competitions
Need to develop extra-curricular provision beyond GCSE sessions
School Visits

All visits will be organised according to Whole School policy.


Proforma and sequence of events required in planning any external visit is in the Staff Handbook.