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NEVADA STATE COLLEGE

TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAM


LESSON PLAN FORMAT
Description of Classroom:
Government, 17-18 year old High School Seniors, 17 male 17 female.

Background:
Students understand the foundations of American government, the constitution and structure of our
government.

Content Objective(s):
Students will evaluate the controversial issue of illegal immigration in America. They will analyze
deportation or amnesty and tell me why that argument is better for America.

Language Objective(s):
Students will listen, read, write and speak about Immigration in America.

Common Core State Standards (Math & ELA Content) and/or Nevada Power
Standards (with standard numbers referenced):
Related Standard: C13.[9-12].6 - Examine the rights of citizens and how these rights are protected and
restricted.
Related Standard: C13.[9-12].8 - Examine the responsibilities of local, state, and national citizenship.
Related Standard: C13.[9-12].7 - Analyze and evaluate the role of citizen participation in civic life.

Key Vocabulary:
Amnesty, deportation, alien, resident alien, illegal immigrant, refugee and nonresident alien.

Best Practices: (put an X next to those that you address in your lesson)
X
X
X
X

Preparation
Adaptation of content
Links to background
Links to past learning
Strategies incorporated

X
X
X
X

Integration of Processes
Listening
Speaking
Reading
Writing

X
X
X
X
X
X

Scaffolding
Modeling
Guided practice
Independent practice
Verbal scaffolds
Procedural scaffolds
Application
Hands-on
Authentic (Meaningful)
Linked to objectives
Promotes engagement

Teaching Strategies:
Directions, summary, debate and cooperation.

Warm Up Activity:

Grouping Options
Whole Class
Small groups
Partners
Independent

X
X
X
X

Assessment
Individual
Group
Written
Oral

Students will look over their summary of their particular argument about deporting or giving am
amnesty to illegal immigrants in America. In their summary for amnesty or deportation of
immigrants, they are to relate the debate to their family history and why either deportation or amnesty
their lives.

Lesson Sequence:
.

After the class reads over their argument, the teacher will explain the directions of the debate. With .
three rounds (the main arguments, rebuttal, and closing statements) students will all participate to
debate the topic of illegal immigration in America. The argument for deportation will go first then
amnesty. After both sides state their main arguments, rebuttal and make their closing statements to
the judges, the judges will decide which argument is better for America. For a closing, the teacher will
explain the importance of a democracy government, immigration policies and how illegal
immigration effect all Americans.

Accommodations:
Any student who needs extra help will be assisted by the teacher. Any student who finishes early can
help other students, or read the textbook.

Supplementary Materials:
Teacher directions, immigration debate handout and textbook.

Review Assessment:
Students will be graded out of 50 points on their half page argument and their participation in the
debate.

Reflection:
Diversity in lesson planning is essential for all students needs to be met. As the debate of immigration
has been a popular topic in current political discussion and students live with the outcome of
immigration policy in their daily lives, an illegal immigration debate would fit perfect into my class
lesson. Students were to research, write, discuss, and devise a political and personal opinion on either
deporting or granting amnesty to illegal immigrants. The differentiated instruction of the process to
prepare and present the debate will be able to meet students in a variety of ways. The grouping of the
students split the class in half by where their seats were. Next time I teach this lesson, I will choose the
groups based on their level of social ability, and learning level. One class had most outgoing students
on one side of the debate which resulted in a stronger side. It is important to meticulously decide
groups for a diverse group of students on each argument. The students were engaged throughout the
lesson. To have about 17 students on each side, engagement was not 100%. I assessed students on
participation and their argument they turned in. To get 100% of students to be engaged, it is important
to continue questioning to all students throughout the research process. Class by class I discovered by
giving them real-life examples of how illegal immigration effects them in more ways than they may
first realize, more and more students got more passionate about the debate. The lesson was
enlightening, engaging, moving and diverse. I was very impressed with the reactions from the students
in their excitement and engagement in the lesson. I would be eager to do this lesson again in future
classes of mine with a few adjustments.
Form: 005
9/4/2013 WC