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MAPA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Department of Mathematics
VISION
The Mapua Institute of Technology shall be a global center of excellence in education by providing instructions that are current
in content and state-of-the-art in delivery; by engaging in cutting-edge, high impact research; and by aggressively taking on
present-day global concerns.
MISSION
a. The Mapua Institute of Technology disseminates, generates, preserves and applies knowledge in various fields of study.
b. The Institute, using the most effective and efficient means, provides its students with highly relevant professional and
advanced education in preparation for and furtherance of global practice.
c. The Institute engages in research with high socio-economic impact and reports on the results of such inquiries.
d. The Institute brings to bear humanitys vast store of knowledge on the problems of industry and community in order to make
the Philippines and the world a better place.
BASIC STUDIES EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
1.
2.
3.
4.

To provide students with a solid foundation in mathematics, physics, general chemistry


and engineering drawing and to apply knowledge to engineering, architecture and
other related disciplines.
To complement the technical training of the students with proficiency in oral, written,
and graphics communication.
To instill in the students human values and cultural refinement through the humanities
and social sciences.
To inculcate high ethical standards in the students through its integration in the
learning activities.

MISSION
b
c

COURSE SYLLABUS
1.

Course Code:

Math 21

2.

Course Title:

Differential Calculus

3.
4.

Pre-requisite:
Co-requisite:

Math 13, Math 14


none

5.

Credit:

3 units

1. Course Description:

6.
7.

A course which covers topics on functions, limits, basic rules of differentiation of


algebraic and transcendental functions, higher order derivatives, implicit
differentiation, applications of derivatives which include mean-value and Rolles
theorem, curve tracing, applied maxima-minima problems, related rate
problems, tangent and normal line, approximation of indeterminate forms, the
differentials and its application and parametric differentiation.

Student Outcomes and Relationship to Basic Studies Educational Objectives


Basic Studies Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4

Student Outcomes
(a)
(b)
(c)

an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science,


and engineering
an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as
to analyze and interpret from data
an ability to design a system, component, or process to
meet desired needs

Course Title:

DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS

Date Effective:
rd

3 Term
SY2012-2013

Date Revised:
January 7, 2013

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster II
Committee

LD SABINO
Subject Chair

Page 1 of 6

(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
(k)

8.

an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams


an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering
problems
an understanding of professional and ethical
responsibility
an ability to communicate effectively
the broad education necessary to understand the impact
of engineering solutions in the global and societal context
a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in
life-long learning
a knowledge of contemporary issues
an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern
engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Course Outcomes (COs) and Relationship to Student Outcomes


Course Outcomes
After completing the course, the student must be able to:
1. Apply principles gained from the prerequisite courses

2. Discuss and apply comprehensively the concepts, properties and theorems


of functions , limits and continuity
3. Discuss comprehensively the concept and properties of the derivatives and
the differentials and apply them to determine the derivatives of
algebraic/transcendental functions
4. Analyze correctly and solve properly application problems involving the
derivatives and the differentials

* Level: I- Introduced, R- Reinforced,


9.

Student Outcomes*
d e f g h i

D- Demonstrated

Course Coverage
WEEK

TOPIC

TLA

Course
Outcome

AT

Mission and Vision of Mapua Institute


of Technology
Orientation and Introduction to the
Course
Discussion on COs, TLAs, and ATs of the
course
Overview on student-centered learning and
eclectic approaches to be used in the
course.

CO1
Diagnostic
Examination

The Algebraic and Transcendental


Functions
- Definition
- Function Notations
- Domain and Range of Functions
- Graphs of Functions
- Special Functions
- Absolute Value Function
- Greatest Integer Function
- Piecewise Function
- Operations With Functions
- Addition
- Subtraction
- Multiplication
- Division
- Composition
- Determination of Domain of
Functions as a result of
Operation
Limits of Functions:
- Definition
- Theorems on Limits

Course Title:

DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS

Date Effective:
rd

3 Term
SY2012-2013

Class Produced
Reviewerk#1A

Class
Argumentation/

Cooperative
Learning/Group
Discussion

Guided Discovery

Date Revised:
January 7, 2013

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster II
Committee

LD SABINO
Subject Chair

Page 2 of 6

- Evaluation of
- One sided Limits
- Limits at Infinity
- Horizontal Asymptote

Class Produced
Reviewer #1B

- Infinite Limits
- Vertical Asymptote
- The Squeeze Theorem and Limits
of Trigonometric Functions
Continuity of Function:
- Definition
- Missing Point Discontinuity
- Infinite Discontinuity
- Jump Discontinuity
- Points of Discontinuity

Dyadic Discussion

LONG QUIZ 1
3

The Derivative:
- Definition of the Derivative and
Differentiability of Function
- The Derivative of a Function
based on the Definition
(Increment Method)
- The Derivative of the Algebraic
Functions:
Constant
- Sum
- Difference
- Product
- Quotient
- Power

CO2

Guided Discovery

Class produced
Reviewer# 2A

Guided Discovery
CO3

The Chain Rule


- The General Power Formula
- Higher Order Derivative

Dyadic Discussion

- Implicit Differentiation
The Transcendental Functions:
Definition, Properties, Derivatives
- The Trigonometric Functions
- The Inverse Trigonometric
Functions

Cooperative
Learning/Class
Discussion

Class produced
Reviewer#2B

Guided Discovery

- The Exponential and Logarithmic


Functions
- Variable with Variable Exponent
and Logarithmic Differentiation
- Hyperbolic Function and Inverse
Hyperbolic Function

Guided Discovery

Guided Discovery

Class
Presentation
#1A
Class
Produced
Reviewerk#2C
Class
Presentation#1
B

LONG QUIZ 2
6

The Differentials
- Definition
- The Differential of the Dependent
Variable
- Derivatives of Parametric
Equations
Application of the Differentials
- Approximate Formula ( nth root,
volume of shells and others)
- Differential of Length of Arc
- Radius of Curvature
Application of the Derivatives:
The Indeterminate Forms
- The LHopitals Rule

Course Title:

DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS

Date Effective:
rd

3 Term
SY2012-2013

CO3

Guided Discovery

Class
Produced
Reviewerk#3A

Homework#3A
Guided Discovery

Date Revised:
January 7, 2013

CO4
Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster II
Committee

LD SABINO
Subject Chair

Page 3 of 6

- The 0 /0 Form
- The / Form
The Other Indeterminate Forms
The - Form
The 0 Form
The 00 Form
The 0 Form
The 1 Form

Guided Discovery

Group Dynamics

Tangent and Normal Lines to a


Curve
At Point P(h,k)

Sketching Curves Using Calculus-Based


Analysis of Properties
- Increasing/ Decreasing Function
- Rolles and Mean Value
Theorems
- Critical and Extreme points of
Functions
- Concavity
- Points of Non-differentiability of
Functions

Optimal Values of Functions


(Maxima/Minima Problems)

Class Produced
Reviewer#3B

Class Produced
reviewer#3C
Concept Mapping

CO4

Guided Discovery

9
- The derivative as a Rate of
Change Problems
- Related Rates Problems
(Algebraic/Transcendental
Functions)

Group Dynamics

Class Produced
Reviewerk#3D

Group Dynamics
- Time Rate Problems

10

Reflective
Journal
Poster/Project
Output

PROJECT

CO4

LONG QUIZ 3
SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
FINAL EXAMINATION

11

10.

Opportunities to Develop Lifelong Learning Skill


To help students understand and apply the mathematical principles of Calculus and provide them with the
needed working knowledge of the different mathematical concepts and methods for them to fully
understand the relationship of Calculus with the increasingly complex world.

11.

Contribution of Course to Meeting the Professional Component


Engineering Topics
General Education
Basic Sciences and Mathematics

12.

:
:
:

0%
0%
100%

Textbook:
University Calculus, Early Transcendentals, 2nd Ed.
Joel Hass, Maurice D. Weir, and George B. Thomas, Jr., 2012

Course Title:

DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS

Date Effective:
rd

3 Term
SY2012-2013

Date Revised:
January 7, 2013

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster II
Committee

LD SABINO
Subject Chair

Page 4 of 6

13.

Course Evaluation
Student performance will be rated based on the following:
Assessment Tasks

Diagnostic
Examination
RLA
CO 2
Long Test
RLA
CO 3
Long Test
RLA
CO 4
Long Test
Project
Summative Assessment:
Final Examination
TOTAL
CO 1

Weight
(%)

Minimum Average for


Satisfactory
Performance (%)

10

3
16
3
17
4
17
5

13.3
14
18.2

25

17.5

100

70

The final grades will correspond to the weighted average scores shown below:
Final Average
96 x < 100
93 x < 96
90 x < 93
86 x < 90
83 x < 86
80 x < 83
76 x < 80
73 x < 76
70 x < 73
Below 70

13.1.

Final Grade
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.25
2.50
2.75
3.00
5.00 (Fail)

Other Course Policies


a. Attendance
According to CHED policy, total number of absences by the students should not be more than
20% of the total number of meetings or 9 hrs for a three-unit-course. Students incurring more
than 9 hours of unexcused absences automatically gets a failing grade regardless of class
standing.
b. Submission of Assessment Tasks
Student output should be submitted on time. Late submission of course works will not be
accepted.
c. Written Examination
Long quizzes and final examination will be administered per schedule. No special exam will be
given unless with a valid reason subject to approval of the Department Chairman.
d. Course Portfolio
Course portfolio will be collected at the end of the quarter.
e. Language of Instruction
Lectures, discussion, and documentation will be in English. Written and spoken work may receive
a lower mark if it is, in the opinion of the instructor, deficient in English.

Course Title:

DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS

Date Effective:
rd

3 Term
SY2012-2013

Date Revised:
January 7, 2013

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster II
Committee

LD SABINO
Subject Chair

Page 5 of 6

f.

Honor, Dress and Grooming Codes


All of us have been instructed on the Dress and Grooming Codes of the Institute. We have all
committed to obey and sustain these codes. It will be expected in this class that each of us will
honor the commitments that we have made.
For this course the Honor Code is that there will be no plagiarizing on written work and no
cheating on exams. Proper citation must be given to authors whose works were used in the
process of developing instructional materials and learning in this course. If a student is caught
cheating on an exam, he or she will be given zero mark for the exam. If a student is caught
cheating twice, the student will be referred to the Prefect of Student Affairs and be given a failing
grade.

g. Consultation Schedule
Consultation schedules with the Professor are posted outside the faculty room and in the
Departments web-page ( http://math.mapua.edu.ph ). It is recommended that the student first set
an appointment to confirm the instructors availability.

14.

Other References
14.1.

Books
a. TCWAG by Louis Leithold, International Edition 2001.
b. Schaumms Outline Series, Differential and Integral.
c. Differential and Integral Calculus by Love and Rainville
d. Calculus 6e by Edwards and Penny
e. CALCULUS (One and Several variables) 10th Ed. by Salas, Hille, and Etgen
f. Calculus, 9th Ed. By Larson and Edwards

14.2

Websites
www.mymathlab.com

15. Course Materials Made Available


Course schedules for lectures and quizzes
Samples of assignment/Problem sets of students
Samples of written examinations of students
End-of-course self-assessment

16. Committee Members:


Course Cluster Chair:
CQI Cluster Chair:
Members:

Course Title:

DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS

Engr. Maria Rosario C. Exconde


Engr. Reynaldo C. Lanuza
Prof Servando D. Bernardo, Jr.
Engr. Ernarnie C. De Guzman
Engr. Gerardo G. Usita
Prof. Alberto C. Villaluz

Date Effective:
rd

3 Term
SY2012-2013

Date Revised:
January 7, 2013

Prepared by:

Approved by:

Cluster II
Committee

LD SABINO
Subject Chair

Page 6 of 6