Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 47

COMPANY UPDATE 

 
ASIAN PAINTS
The growth palette
India Equity Research| Consumer Goods

Asian  Paints  is  one  of  the  best  discretionary  plays  on  macro  recovery  EDELWEISS 4D RATINGS 
given  that  paint  volumes  surge  a  healthy  1.5‐2.0x  GDP.  Moreover,    Absolute Rating  BUY
decisive  policy  measures  by  the  new  business‐friendly  government  will    Rating Relative to Sector  Outperformer
spur urban demand. Diversification into water proofing, modular kitchens    Risk Rating Relative to Sector  Medium
and  bath  fittings  places  the  company  in  a  sweet  spot  to  corner  higher    Sector Relative to Market  Underweight
wallet share (Masco Corp in US has done this successfully). With 22% EPS 
CAGR, 347bps RoCE spurt over FY14‐17E and metamorphosis into a home 
  MARKET DATA (R:  ASPN.BO, B:  APNT IN) 
décor company, we anticipate valuations to remain rich. Reiterate ‘BUY’. 
  CMP   :  INR 509 
 
  Target Price   :  INR 720 
GDP revival, urban demand recovery to cheer volumes    52‐week range (INR)   :  565 / 373 
We estimate volumes to clock 13% CAGR over FY14‐17E (~8% over FY12‐14) anchored    Share in issue (mn)   :  959.2 
by  the  much  anticipated  recovery  in  urban  sentiments,  GDP  revival  and  toothless    M cap (INR bn/USD mn)   :  488 / 8,217 
competition (Akzo, Nippon, Jotun failed to make headway). Additionally, low per capita    Avg. Daily Vol.BSE/NSE(‘000)   :  1,108.1 
paint consumption (one fourth of China), strong distribution network (2x next player) 
and reduction in repainting cycle (down to 5 from 7 years) bode well. Industrial paints’   SHARE HOLDING PATTERN (%)
growth has likely bottomed out given the pick up in the investment cycle.   Current Q3FY14  Q2FY14
  Promoters *  52.8 52.8  52.8 
International stroke: Investing in growth; synergy in home décor   MF's, FI's & BK’s 9.4 7.9  8.3 
International business is set to gather pace with expanded  capacity (Bangladesh) and  FII's 18.0 19.5  19.0 
investment in future growth drivers (Ethiopia). The company is strategically expanding  Others 19.9 19.9  19.9 
* Promoters pledged shares  : 9.2
in home décor and scaling it up via distribution support and effective branding.     (% of share in issue) 
 
Premiumisation, GST, appreciating INR to bolster margin   PRICE PERFORMANCE (%)
Potential margin triggers include product mix improvement due to increasing salience  EW Consumer 
Stock  Nifty 
of water‐based paints/ premium launches, likely GST implementation, appreciating INR  Goods Index 
(5% appreciation improves EPS by 6.7%) and ramp up in capacity utilisation.   1 month  2.5   9.1  0.6 
  3 months  7.9   16.8  4.8 
Outlook and valuations: Lustrous growth; reiterate ‘BUY’   12 months  6.0   20.1   (0.0) 

  Domestic  decorative  volume  growth  is  likely  to  improve  and  we  are  positive  on  new 
growth drivers. We assign 31x P/E to FY17E EPS, arriving at a two‐year target price of 
  INR720 (~41% upside). Reiterate ‘BUY’ and rate it ‘Sector Outperformer’. 
  Financials
   Year to March FY14 FY15E FY16E FY17E
  Abneesh Roy 
 Revenues (INR mn)     127,148     150,344     178,301     213,695 +91 22 6620 3141 
  Rev. growth (%)            16.2            18.2            18.6            19.9 abneesh.roy@edelweissfin.com 
  EBITDA (INR mn)       19,979       23,916       28,636       34,832  
Pooja Lath 
  Net profit (INR mn)       12,188       14,760       18,126       22,292 +91 22 6620 3075 
  Shares outstanding (mn)             959             959               959             959 pooja.lath@edelweissfin.com 
 
  Diluted EPS (INR)            12.7              15.4            18.9            23.2 Tanmay Sharma 
  EPS growth (%)              9.4            21.1            22.8            23.0 +91 22 4040 7586 
tanmay.sharma@edelweissfin.com 
Diluted P/E (x)            39.8            33.1            26.9            21.9
   
EV/EBITDA (x)            23.7            19.8            16.4            13.3
ROAE (%)            33.0            33.7            34.7            35.7 June 3, 2014 
Edelweiss Research is also available on www.edelresearch.com, 
Bloomberg EDEL <GO>, Thomson First Call, Reuters and Factset.  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 

GDP Growth to Revive Fortunes of Paint Industry 
 
There is a high correlation between the paint industry’s growth and GDP growth rate (as per 
our  calculations,  the  correlation  between  Asian  Paints’  volume  growth  and  India’s  GDP 
growth  rate  is  a  strong  0.76x)—paint  industry  volumes  grow  1.5‐2.0x  India’s  GDP.  We 
anticipate GDP to surge to 7.5% (5.4%, 6.3% and 7.5% in FY15, FY16 and FY17) riding on a 
new  stable  and  business‐friendly  government  in  the  saddle  at  the  Center.  Hence,  we 
anticipate the paint industry to grow at a much faster pace. We estimate 11%, 13% and 15% 
YoY volume growth for Asian Paints in FY15, FY16 and FY17, respectively.  
 
Table 1: Positive correlation between paint industry and GDP 
Income Level Increase in GDP will increase standard of living.  With rise in income level, consumers will 
increase consumption which in turn will help the decorative segment.
Housing Sector Growth in housing sector will increase urbanisation, provide cheaper loans and shift from semi – 
permanent to permanent housing structures will increase spending in the decorative segment.
Industrial Segment The industrial segment can be further broken down into protective, general industrial, automotive 
powder and marine coatings. This segment accounts for 25% of the paint industry's revenue. 
Infrastructure Investment New projects in roads and ports will increase revenues of paint industry and drive the industrial 
segment.
 
 
Fig.  1: Revival in GDP growth positive for paint industry 

Boom in  Expansion of  Increased 


Increase in  Increased  Growth in 
Housing  Industrial  Infrastructure 
GDP Income Level Paint Industry
Sector Segment Investment

 
 
Chart 1: Asian Paints’ volume grows 1.5‐2.0x GDP growth rate  
20.0

16.0

12.0
(%)

8.0

4.0

0.0
FY15E

FY16E

FY17E
FY04

FY05

FY06

FY07

FY08

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

GDP Forecasted Volume Growth Actual Volume Growth


 
Source: Edelweiss research 

2  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 

Urban Recovery to Spur Growth 
 
Urban demand revival to boost paint demand 
Rural  growth,  that  had  consistently  outstripped  urban  growth  for  the  past  many  years,  is 
now  gradually  losing  steam;  this  is  amply  evident  from  the  Q4FY14  results  of  a  few 
consumer companies. As a result, players who were focusing on enhancing their presence in 
rural  areas  and  introducing  products  catering  to  the  rural  population  are  shifting  focus  to 
urban  areas  and  are  now  introducing  more  urban‐centric  products  (premium  products 
which are also margin accretive). The central government, bolstered by a historic mandate, 
is  likely  to  herald  policies  boosting  urban  demand;  BJP  is  focused  on  infrastructure 
development,  faster execution of policies, development of 100 new smart  cities and asset 
creation  under  NREGA.  This  urban  revival  will  potentially  benefit  companies  like  Asian 
Paints, which have a higher urban salience in terms of sales. 
 
Urban demand on the mend  
As  per  consumer  sentiment  tracker  BluFin,  consumer  confidence  in  India  improved  for 
fourth  consecutive  month  in  February;  the  Consumer  Confidence  Index  (CCI)  shot  up  0.5 
points  to  42.6  (highest  since  August  2012).  The  rising  score  could  be  an  early  sign  of 
recovery. Persistent inflation, slower economic growth and high interest rates had led to a 
flattish  inflation  index,  indicating  cautious  consumer  stance.  However,  with  CAD  under 
control and CPI & WPI easing a tad, inflation is now taming. Though urban consumers have 
gradually adapted to food inflation, these early signs of tapering inflation are encouraging. 
Consumer spending is likely to pick pace as the new government sheds policy paralysis and 
kick  starts  growth.  Also,  as  per  latest  findings  by  Nielsen,  consumer  confidence  in  urban 
India increased by six points in Q1CY14 to 121—the highest level of optimism since Q4CY12. 
India retained its position as the second‐most‐optimistic country in Nielsen’s survey. 
 
Chart 2: Consumer confidence index—On an uptrend 
44.0 

41.8 

39.6 

37.4 

35.2 

33.0 
Dec‐12

Dec‐13
Aug‐12

Aug‐13
Oct‐12

Oct‐13
Apr‐13
Nov‐12

Nov‐13
Jan‐13

May‐13

Jan‐14
Sep‐12

Feb‐13

Sep‐13

Feb‐14
Mar‐13

Jun‐13
Jul‐13

 
Source: BluFin, Edelweiss research 
 
   

3  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 

New Business‐Friendly Government to Spur Growth 
  
BJP manifesto cheers paint companies 
BJP, in its manifesto, has emphasized on the need to build infrastructure and has promised 
“The job market will grow at least 
to build 100 new smart cities—a clear positive for paint companies. Also, it has stated that it 
by 30% and with Modi in power, 
will  look  at  urbanisation  as  an  opportunity,  building  upon  areas  like  housing.  Urban 
the number of vacancies expected 
development  will  be  based  on  integrated  habitat  development  and  on  concepts  like  Twin 
are about 15mn, far better 
Cities  and  Satellite  Towns.  Real  estate  and  infrastructure  development  will  in  a 
compared to the previous 
proportionate  manner  increase  paint  demand,  benefitting  paint  companies,  especially  the 
numbers.”  
leader—Asian Paints—as it commands the preferred status owing to high brand recall. 
 
 
‐ Udit Mittal, MD,
New government to spur job market  
Unison International
The job market in India is set to revive with a stable government coming into power at the 
Centre. As per media articles, only 3mn jobs were created during the UPA tenure from FY05‐
10. Sentiments have turned positive as the new government assumes power and as per ABC 
Consultants’ (placement firm) survey, ~84% employers indicated that the total headcount in 
their firms will rise in FY15. Revival in the job market will be a significant driver of economic 
growth as it will spur per capita consumption, which in turn will boost GDP. 
 
Chart 3: Higher salary growth rate bodes well for paint companys’ margins 
14.0 

11.2 

8.4 
(%)

5.6 

2.8 

0.0 
FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14E

Salary growth GDP growth
 
Source: Aon Hewitt, Edelweiss research 
 
NDA regime to boost urban trade  
As per a FICCI survey, almost 93%  In  Edelweiss  report,  BLIND  SPOT  ‐  The  big  switch:  Bharat  Nirman  to  India  Shining?,  dated 
of the 76 CEOs said they foresee a  April 02, 2014, our strategy team has analysed evolution of the Indian economy under the 
substantial improvement in the  two  alliances  that  governed  India  in  the  past  15  years—NDA  (1998‐2004)  and  UPA  (2004‐
near‐term economic situation,  2014). 
while the balance 7% participants   
expected marginal improvement in  The  study  throws  up  an  interesting  fact—under  UPA  (especially  starting  2006),  there  has 
the situation   been a remarkable shift in terms of trade from urban to rural India, with price increase for 
agri‐goods far outpacing that of manufactured goods. This, we believe, has been triggered 
by  massive  increase  in  minimum  support  prices  (MSPs),  procurement  of  food  grains  by 
government,  pick  up  in  government  spending  in  irrigation/agriculture  sector,  rise  in  agri 
credit and expansion in social sector schemes under UPA compared to NDA. The rising rural 

4  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
prosperity  is  evidenced  in  capital  deepening,  income  trends  of  farm  workers  and  rural 
consumption  patterns  more  generally.  Thus,  in  the  past  10  years,  tractor  sales  have 
catapulted, use of fertilisers & pesticides has increased, productivity gains have been large 
across  crops,  rural  wages  have  seen  unprecedented  rise  (outpacing  GDP  growth  in  recent 
years) and discretionary spending saw sustained uptrend. In our view, with NDA back in the 
saddle, the terms of trade will reverse in favour of urban India (as was the case during 1998‐
2004, which saw little productivity gains in crops, minimal MSP hikes etc). 
 
Chart 4: Trade shifted from urban to rural areas under UPA; could revive under NDA 
140 

(Index re‐based to 100)
130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

Jan 09
Jan 10
Jan 11
Jan 12
Jan 13
Jan 14
Jan 98
Jan 99
Jan 00
Jan 01
Jan 02
Jan 03
Jan 04
Jan 05
Jan 06
Jan 07
Jan 08
WPI food articles relative to non‐food articles
 
Source: CMIE 
 
Chart 5: High MSPs in rice under UPA…  Chart 6: …accompanied by high procurement 
340  40.0 

290  34.0 
NDA UPA
(Re‐based to 100)

240  28.0 
(MT)

190  22.0 

140  16.0 

90  10.0 
FY02
FY03
FY04
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
FY99
FY00
FY01
FY02
FY03
FY04
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
FY14

Rice minimum support price (INR) Rice buffer stocks Rice buffer requirement norms


  
       Source: Food Corporation of India, CMIE 

5  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Chart 7: Similar trend in wheat as well  Chart 8: …accompanied by high procurement 
50 
265 
NDA UPA
40 
230 
(Re‐based to 100)

30 
195 

(MT)
20 
160 
10 
125 

FY02
FY03
FY04
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
90 
FY99
FY00
FY01
FY02
FY03
FY04
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
FY14
Wheat buffer stocks
Wheat minimum support price (INR) Wheat Buffer requirement norms
  
       Source: Food Corporation of India, CMIE 
 
Chart 9: Sharp increase in agri and irrigation spending…  Chart 10: …also agri credit  
17.5  40.0 

15.0  33.0 
(CAGR, %)

12.5  26.0 
(%)

10.0  19.0 

7.5  12.0 

5.0  5.0 
FY90‐FY98 NDA  UPA
FY90
FY92
FY94
FY96
FY98
FY00
FY02
FY04
FY06
FY08
FY10
FY12
(FY98‐FY04) (FY04‐FY14)

Budget expenditure on agri and irrigation Agri credit outstanding as a % of Nominal agri GDP
           
Source: Union Budgets, Government of Indi, RBI, CMIE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

6  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Chart 11: Sharp growth in tractor sales under UPA…   Chart 12: …also fertiliser consumption 
15.0  6.0 

10.0  4.6 
(CAGR, %)

(CAGR, %)
5.0  3.2 

0.0  1.8 

(5.0) 0.4 

(10.0) (1.0)
FY90‐98 NDA  UPA  FY91‐FY98 NDA  UPA 
(FY98‐FY04) (FY04‐FY14) (FY98‐FY04) (FY04‐FY13)
Tractor sales Fertilizer sales volume
             
Source: Crisil, Fertiliser Association of India 
Chart 13: Improvement in productivity of all crops under UPA 
2,500  1,200 

2,350  (Kg/Hectare) 1,120 


(Kg/Hectare)

2,200  1,040 

2,050  960 
NDA NDA

1,900  880 

1,750  800 
FY97

FY99

FY01

FY03

FY05

FY07

FY09

FY11

FY13
FY97
FY98
FY99
FY00
FY01
FY02
FY03
FY04
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13

Cereals yield (3Y moving average) Oilseeds yield (3Y moving average)
              
 
Chart 14: Rapid rise in rural wages…   
20.0 

15.0  NDA
UPA
10.0 
(%, yoy)

5.0 

0.0 

(5.0)
FY00

FY01

FY02

FY03

FY04

FY05

FY06

FY07

FY08

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14td

Rural wages of unskilled labourers GDP at market prices
 
                                                                           Source: RBI, CMIE, Ministry of Agriculture 

7  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Increasing migration to propel urban growth  
Urbanisation has been growing at a fast pace as: (i) the aspirational value is increasing; and 
(ii) urban areas provide lucrative opportunities leading to increased migration. As per 2011 
census, urban population share to total residents has increased to 31.16% from 28.53% in 
2001  and  as  per  UN  State  of  the  World  Population  report,  40.76%  of  India's  population  is 
expected  to  reside  in  urban  areas  by  2030.  This  increasing  trend  of  urbanisation  coupled 
with  revival  in  urban  demand  bodes  well  for  companies  that  have  higher  urban  salience. 
Real  estate  demand  will  grow  proportionately,  thus  boosting  paint  demand.  Also,  the 
repainting cycle is shorter in urban areas (a factor of higher per capita income) compared to 
rural areas.  
 
Chart 15: Urban population in India—On the rise  

 
Source: McKinsey Global Institute, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 16: Rate of urbanisation on an uptrend  
48.0 

42.4 

36.8 
(%)

31.2 

25.6 

20.0 
1990 1991 2001 2005 2008 2011 2025E 2030E
Urbanisation Rate
 
Source: McKinsey Global Institute, Edelweiss research 
 
 

8  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 

Shorter Repainting Cycle Bodes Well 
 
As per industry sources, ~70% of the total decorative paints’ demand in India comes from 
repainting (higher for Asian Paints at ~85‐90%) and balance from fresh construction. Fresh 
construction  is  a  function  of  improvement  in  real  estate  and  infrastructure  development, 
which  in  turn  is  linked  to  GDP  growth.  Repainting,  on  the  other  hand,  is  influenced  by 
factors  like  increase  in  income  levels,  number  of  festive  &  marriage  days  and  lifestyle  of 
people. Repainting cycle in India has reduced significantly from 7 years about a decade ago 
to  5  years  now;  the  trend  is  expected  to  continue  as  income  levels  rise  and  lifestyle 
improvement induces consumers to change the look and feel of their homes more often.  
 
Repainting  also  depends  on  occasions  like  marriage,  etc.  Such  occasions  coupled  with 
increase  in  per  capita  incomes  are  leading  to  higher  consumption  of  paints  and  shorter 
repainting cycle.  
 
Change in the mindset of people is another reason for the shorter repainting cycle. Earlier, 
people painted their walls only when they started to peel off, but now paint is perceived as 
décor and customers are open to investing more in beautification of homes.  
 
Asian Paints derives 85‐90%  of demand from  repainting, which is higher than the industry 
average. We expect this to put the company  in an advantageous spot compared to peers, 
who  rely  on  fresh  painting  demand.  Upgrading  in  paint  quality  is  a  key  characteristic  of 
repainting which bodes well for Asian Paints’ premiumisation strategy. 
 
Chart 17: Urban income share to improve as percentage of total income  
100.0

80.0

60.0
(%)

40.0

20.0

0.0
1990 2001 2008 2030
Urbal Income Rural Income
 
  Source: McKinsey Global Institute, Edelweiss research 
 
 

9  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 

Asian Paints: Market Leader in an Oligopoly Market 
 
An  oligopolistic  market  is  characterised  by  a  few  sellers  producing  and  selling  either 
homogeneous  or  close  substitutes  of  products.  The  domestic  paint  industry  is  thus 
oligopolistic  in  nature,  with  more  than  90%  of  the  organised  decorative  paints  market 
dominated  by  the  top  four  players—Asian  Paints,  Berger  Paints,  Kansai  Nerolac  and  Akzo 
Nobel. Asian Paints has the lion’s share of this market with ~54% market share. Some of the 
essential  characteristics  of  any  oligopolistic  market  are  pricing  power,  entry  barriers, 
product differentiation and advertisement & selling costs. Asian Paints, the market leader, 
exhibits all these characteristics and is poised to gain from any surge in the paint industry. 
 
“There’s been a massive  Fig. 2: Decorative business in India is an oligopolistic market 
transformation in the Indian 
consumer. Earlier, people used to 
paint when walls were peeling. 
Now, it’s about décor. We 
perceived this before most of our  Entry  Pricing power
competition.”   Barriers
 
Oligoplistic 
‐ K.B.S. Anand, MD &CEO,
Asian Paints
market

Product  Advertisement 
Differentiation & selling cost

 
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
Robust pricing power 
One of the most important features of an oligopolistic market is that firms are price setters 
rather  than  price  takers.  Asian  Paints,  by  virtue  of  being  the  market  leader,  enjoys  strong 
pricing power, while the industry exhibits pricing discipline and follows the leader in pricing 
action.  
 
Asian  Paints  tries  to  maintain  and  operate  within  a  range  of  gross  margin.  Raw  material 
prices  largely  determine  the  company’s  pricing  strategy.  The  primary  raw  materials, 
titanium dioxide (TiO2) and monomers, being crude linked are impacted by crude inflation 
and also currency fluctuation. Though global Tio2 prices have remained flattish in the past 
one year, currency depreciation has had an adverse impact, compelling paint companies to 
hike  prices—Asian  Paints  effected  total  price  increase  of  6.1%  in  FY14,  followed  by  other 
competitors.  Despite  this  price  increase,  Asian  Paints  delivered  consistent  double  digit 
volume growth even amongst tough macro environment. Recently, the company took two 
price  hikes  effective  from  May  1,  2014,  and  from  June  1,  2014,  of  1.0%  and  1.2%, 
respectively, to offset the increased monomer prices.  
 
 

10  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Table 2: Price hike taken by Asian Paints over the years 
Date Price hike (%)
Jun‐14                                                                                           1.2
May‐14                                                                                           1.0
Feb‐14                                                                                           2.1
Sep‐13                                                                                           1.8
Aug‐13                                                                                           1.0
May‐13                                                                                           1.2
Jan‐13                                                                                         (0.2)
May‐12                                                                                           3.2
Mar‐12                                                                                           2.1
Mar‐12                                                                                           1.4
Dec‐11                                                                                           2.2
Jul‐11                                                                                           1.3
Jun‐11                                                                                           2.5
May‐11                                                                                           4.4
Q4FY11                                                                                           1.0
Dec‐10                                                                                           3.0
Aug‐10                                                                                           1.2
Jul‐10                                                                                           2.6
May‐10                                                                                           4.2  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Robust volume growth strong despite slowdown, price hikes 
Despite having taken 6.1% price increase in FY14, Asian Paints clocked ~11% volume growth. 
Paint  demand  thus  remains  resilient  in  spite  of  pricing  action.  We  expect  the  company  to 
continue to deliver strong volume growth riding robust urban recovery. Compared to other 
companies  in  the  consumer  goods  space—Emami,  Nestle  and  HUL—Asian  Paints’  volumes 
have remained resilient despite discretionary slowdown. We expect its volume growth to be 
much faster as economic growth picks pace. 
 
Chart 18: Volumes resilient despite slowdown 
22.0 

18.2 

14.4 
(%)

10.6 

6.8 

3.0 
FY15E

FY16E

FY17E
FY04

FY05

FY06

FY07

FY08

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

Asian Paints Volume Growth
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 

11  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Volume  growth  is  not  only  a  function  of  price,  but  also  other  factors  including  per  capita 
consumption,  market  share  gain,  innovation,  repainting  demand,  marriage  days,  festive 
seasons etc. As per Nielsen, the per capital consumption of paints in India was 2.6kg in FY12 
(2.2kg  in  FY08),  one  of  the  lowest  compared  to  many  other  countries  (one  fourth  that  of 
China). It is expected to increase to 4kg by FY16E. The low consumption indicates that there 
is ample opportunity for growth in paints, with Asian Paints likely to benefit the most due to 
its strong brand equity.  
 
Chart  19:  Low per capita consumption of paints in India 
5.0 

4.0 

3.0 
(kg)

2.0 

1.0 

0.0 
2007 2008 2012 2016E
Per Capita Consumption
 
Source: AC Nielsen, Edelweiss research  
 
Market share gains to continue 
In 1967, Asian Paints became the leader in the decorative paint industry and since then has 
maintained its pole position. The company’s market share in the decorative paints segment 
surged from ~44% in FY05 to ~54% in FY13 among the top 5 players due to its strong dealer 
network,  brand  equity,  easy  availability,  customer  centricity,  advertisements  and  superior 
quality.  
 
The  domestic  paint  industry  has  ~12  paint  players  in  the  organised  sector  and  more  than 
2,000  in  the  unorganised  space.  Despite  the  presence  of  a  large  number  of  players  in  the 
organised  sector,  the  market  is  dominated  by  Asian  Paints.  Other  players  are  not  able  to 
match  the  scale  and  brand  power  of  Asian  Paints  which  being  a  dominant  player  gains 
market share riding on these abilities. Also, the unorganised sector, ~35% of the total paint 
market, provides enough opportunity for gaining and expanding the market share further as 
more people are shifting from unorganised players to the more reliable organised ones. The 
rising  middle  class  population  and  increase  in  per  capita  incomes  helps  shift  to  branded 
paints  as  house  painting  is  a  high  investment  warranting  superior  quality.  Asian  Paints 
becomes the preferred pick due to its strong dealer network and brand recall. 
 
Going forward, we expect Asian Paints to not only maintain its leadership in the decorative 
paints  market,  but  also  gain  incremental  share.  Also,  players  having  a  higher  revenue 
contribution  from  industrial  segment  stand  to  lose  out  in  the  decorative  space.  These 
players are not able to back their brands in the decorative space with sustained investments 
as  investments  are  also  made  in  the  low‐margin  technologically  intensive  industrial 
segment. Drag in the industrial segment resulting in lower cash flows paves way for players 

12  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
like Asian Paints to capture market share from such players as well. If we take the universe 
of the top 5 organised players in the decorative paints segment, Asian Paints has constantly 
gained market share—from 44% in FY05 to 53.7% in FY13. Kansai Nerolac, Akzo Nobel and 
Shalimar Paints, on the other hand, have lost market shares over the same period; Berger’s 
market share has remained constant over the past four‐five years.  
 
Chart 20: Market share of paint companies in decorative paints segment 
100.0 

80.0 

(%) 60.0 

40.0 

20.0 

0.0 
FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13

Asian Paints Berger Kansai Akzo Shalimar


 
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 21:  Share of organised and unorganised cos in total decorative paints market 
100.0 

80.0 

60.0 
(%)

40.0 

20.0 

0.0 
FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13

Organised share Unorganised share
 
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
High entry barriers  
Oligopolistic markets present a huge entry barrier, thereby securing market share of existing 
players  from  outside  threat.  Since  the  domestic  paint  market  is  dominated  by  a  few  large 
players,  it  makes  entry  difficult  owing  to  their  strong  distribution  network,  pricing  power, 
robust capacity and brand strength. Asian Paints, being the largest player, is the leader on 
all fronts as far as barriers to entry are concerned. 
 

13  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Unmatched distribution strength 
Asian Paints’ strong dealer network creates a huge entry barrier for new players and makes 
it difficult for existing players to make inroads into the decorative market. The company has 
strong  distribution  in  terms  of  dealer  network  (in  urban  and  rural  areas)  and  tinting 
machines, which makes it difficult for other players to compete. Asian Paints leverages upon 
its strong brand strength, efficient inventory management, a vibrant product variety and a 
large dealer network while negotiating with dealers. 
 
Distribution  is  thus  the  key  parameter  differentiating  Asian  Paints  from  other  paint 
companies.  The  company  invests  heavily  in  dealers  and  IT  services  to  improve  the  supply 
chain management. It has a total dealer network of 35,000 and it is planning to add 1,500‐
Tinting machine: Painting growth  2,000  dealers  to  its  network  every  year.  Though  other  players  are  also  increasing  their 
story   dealer network, they have a long way to go (Berger Paints’ dealer network is half of Asian 
Paints).  
 
Tinting  machines,  which  are  colour  dispensing  machines,  is  another  crucial  factor  that 
bolsters  a  company’s  distribution  strength.  Asian  Paints  has  been  adding  ~1,000  tinting 
machines per year with a total of 27,000 currently. Large number of tinting machines helps 
retain  dealers  as  these  machines  result  in  low  inventory  at  the  dealer  level.  It  also  helps 
provide  a  wider  variety  of  colours  to  customers.  Tinting  machines  entail  an  investment  of 
INR0.30‐0.35mn and they are becoming an integral part of the business for dealers as they 
help meet rising demand.  
 
Asian Paints maintains strong relationships with dealers, helping the company retain dealers 
and also enhance brand push through them. Dealer relationship indirectly results in a good 
relationship  with  customers.  The  company’s  top  management  meets  dealers  personally. 
Asian Paints also organises events (‘Asian Paints Rangmanch' for dealers in Mumbai) for its 
dealers which gives them a sense of belonging to the company. The company built a solid 
connect with consumers by providing different services which helps them choose the right 
paint for their homes, calculate total amount of painting cost, understand different types of 
paints  available  for  selection  etc.  Asian  Paints  has  a  detailed  website  from  where  a 
consumer  can  get  live  consultancy  on  paints  online  via  Colour  Consultancy  Online  from 
where a consumer can chat online with a colour consultant and get his/her queries solved. A 
consumer can also schedule a meeting with a colour consultant of Asian Paints at his home 
to solve his queries through the consultancy@home tab on the website. The company, apart 
from Colour Consultancy Online, also has an online chat app, Ask Aparna, where queries can 
be solved online via chat by consumers. Apart from this, Asian Paints also offers tools like 
paint selector, budget calculators, dealer locator etc., which provide consumers the ease of 
resolving all the queries and needs related to their painting needs. 
 
Table 3: Dealer network, tinting machines and depots of paint companies   
Tinting Machines Depots Dealers
Asian Paints                  27,000                     110               35,000
Berger Paint                  12,000                     125               16,500
Kansai Nerolac                     7,500                       75               15,000
Akzo Nobel                     5,500 NA                 8,500  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research  
 
 
 

14  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Table 4: Asian Paints—Colour World dealers (2.7x in 6 years) 
Color World Dealers
FY08 10,000
FY09 12,000
FY10 14,600
FY11 18,000
FY12 21,100
FY13 24,000
FY14 27,000  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Formidable brand strength 
Each  company  in  the  paint  industry  has  created  its  own  brand—Asian  Paints  has  Royale, 
Aspira,  Tractor;  Berger  has  Silk,  Easy  Clean  etc.  Purchases  are  heavily  influenced  by  brand 
recall,  which  is  directly  proportional  to  the  advertising  frequency  and  its  impact  on 
Asian Paints was a part of the nine 
consumers.  
Indian companies that were 
 
included in the Forbes 'World's 100 
Asian  Paints  has  been  able  to  create  strong  brand  equity  with  dealers,  painters  and 
most innovative growth 
customers,  making  it  difficult  for  a  new  player  to  compete.  A  strong  brand  helps  build  a 
companies’ 
strong emotional connect with customers. This, coupled with superior quality of products, 
helps  create  strong  brand  loyalty,  making  Asian  Paints  the  preferred  paint  company  for 
repainting.  
 
Asian  Paints  has  travelled  a  long  way  in  its  brand  building  exercise  right  from  1954  when 
‘Gattu', a cartoon kid created by R.K. Laxman, was its mascot, which was changed to a logo 
in red and golden yellow in 2002. After a decade, the logo was re‐launched to make it look 
more fresh and contemporary. The new logo  reflects a more meaningful and personalised 
engagement with the customer. The flowing ribbon that creates the ‘AP’  design highlights 
easy flow, smoothness and dynamism that the company provides. 
 
Fig. 3: Asian Paints—Changing with times  

 
Source: Company 
 
 
 
 
 

15  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Product differentiation  
Each  player  in  an  oligopolistic  market  attempts  to  differentiate  its  products  to  attract 
consumers.  Investments  in  innovation  also  help  earn  better  margins  as  it  commands  a 
premium  over  other  plain  vanilla  offerings.  Asian  Paints  has  been  at  the  forefront  of 
differentiation  and  innovation.  It  was  the  first  company  to  allow  consumers  to  choose  a 
particular pattern and colour for their walls. In 2004, it launched a premium range of paint 
Royale  Play.  Recently,  it  launched  ultra  luxury  paint  Royal  Aspira  with  differentiated 
features  like  five  years’  warranty,  teflon  surface  protector,  anti‐microbial  formula,  crack 
bridging property etc.  
 
Differentiation  can  also  be  via  services.  In  2009,  the  company  introduced  dealer‐owned 
Colour  Idea  stores,  which  is  a  retail  format  where  a  customer  can  get  free  in‐store  colour 
consultancy by trained professionals along with an option to visualise the colour choice on a 
Colour Visualiser. Asian Paints launched 70 new Colour Idea stores in FY14 taking the total 
count  to  around  170  stores.  It  has  also  launched  Ezycolour  Store  and  Ezycolour  Beautiful 
Home Guide which lets customers try different colours and textures, select the right colour 
and  finish  for  each  room,  to  find  a  paint  that  best  fits  their  budget  etc.  All  these 
differentiations  and  innovations  keep  brands  alive  and  helps  develop  strong  customer 
loyalty.  
 
Table 5: Asian Paints—Different brands across segments  
Interior Paints Exterior Paints Metal Finishes
Value for Money Tractor Acrylic Distemper Ace Emulsion Utsav Enamel
Tractor Emulsion Apex Exterior Emulsion
Tractor Sythetic Distemper
Premium Apcolite Premium Emulsion Apex Ultima Apcolite Premium Gloss Enamel
Apcolite Advanced Emulsion Apcolite Premium Satin Enamel
Premium Semi‐Gloss
Luxury Royale Glitter Apex Duracast Finetex
Royale Lustre Apex Duracast RoughTex
Royale Luxury Emulsion Apex Duracast CrossTex
Royale Shyne Apex Duracast PebbleTex
Apex Duracast SwirlTex
Apex Ultima Protek
Super Luxury Royale Aspira  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
Effective advertising  
Advertising  and  sales  promotion  (A&P)  activities  play  an  important  role  in  an  oligopolistic 
market,  enabling  players  capture  higher  mind  share  by  harping  on  the  superiority  of  their 
products.  Asian  Paints  has  maintained  high  level  of  A&P  spends  as  a  percentage  of  sales 
over  the  years.  A&P  spends  include  differentiated  advertisements  on  TV  and  other  media 
like newspapers etc., and target based promotional offers to dealers etc.  
 
The  company  spends  heavily  on  A&P  across  product  categories  (mass  to  premium)  to 
outpace competitors in specific segments. Saif Ali Khan is the brand ambassador for certain 
offerings (Asian Paints Royale, Royal Aspira) for interior walls. The company launched an ad 
campaign for its high‐end emulsion for interiors Royal Aspira with Saif Ali Khan and Soha Ali 
Khan. For exterior paints like Apex Ultima it relies more on conceptual eye‐catching ads than 
on brand ambassadors (similar to Pidilite’s strategy). Asian Paints hired Rahul Dravid to re‐
launch the Apcolite brand. It recently launched an interesting ad for its exterior paint Apex 

16  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Ultima Protek highlighting its superior anti‐ageing quality. The company, as part of product 
promotion, also sponsored a television show Har Ghar Kuch Kehta Hai on Colors channel. It 
was  a  10‐part  series  featuring  celebrities  talking  about  their  childhood  memories  and  the 
house where they spent their childhood. 
 
Table 6:  Ad spends as percentage of sales of paint companies  
% of Revenue FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13
Asian Paints         3.9         4.8         4.6         4.8         4.5         4.1         4.6
Berger India         3.9         4.0         4.2         4.6         4.9         5.1         5.6
Akzo Nobel         5.6         6.6         7.3         9.2         9.2         5.3         5.0
Kansai Nerolac         3.1         3.2         3.4         4.0         3.8         3.8         3.6  
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
Fig. 4: Rahul Dravid in a recent Asian Paints Apcolite advertisement 

 
Source: Company

17  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 

Margin Set to Paint Cheery Picture 
 
Asian Paints enjoys higher EBITDA margin compared to other organised players like Berger, 
Kansai  and  Akzo  Nobel  as  its  products  command  a  premium  and  has  higher  operating 
leverage  due  to  its  larger  scale.  Also,  strong  brand  strength,  efficient  inventory 
management, wide product variety and a large dealer network help negotiate better terms 
with dealers. Operating leverage also kicks in owing to a large scale. 
 
However,  the  company’s  margin  fluctuates  depending  upon  raw  material  prices  (in  turn 
depends on INR movement). The other concern on margin is increase in power and diesel 
prices.  
 
In  H2FY14,  Asian  Paints’  other  expenses  shot  up  due  to  higher  transportation  cost  on 
account of strike at the Sriperumbudur plant. Margin is likely to improve in FY15 given that 
transportation cost will normalise (will not need to transport paints from other factories to 
areas catered by the Sriperumbudur plant as the issue has been resolved; strike was called 
off in April 2014 ).  
 
 We expect margin to improve due to: (i) stabilising INR; (ii) operating leverage due to pick 
up in demand and enhanced capacity utilisation; and (iii) premiumisation. 
 
Table 7: EBITDA margin profile of paint companies 
(%) FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13
Asian Paints      15.1      16.4      13.2      19.8      18.3      16.2      16.5
Berger Paints        9.9      10.1        8.4      10.5      10.6      10.4      11.1
Kansai Nobel      14.0      14.1      11.5      15.5      13.6      13.0      11.8
Akzo Nobel      11.1      10.4      11.6      12.4      12.0        8.7        8.4  
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
Stabilising INR to curb raw material prices 
INR  movement  affects  gross  margins  of  paint  companies  as  key  raw  materials—TiO2  and 
monomers—are indirectly crude linked. With a stable government in power we expect INR 
to  strengthen  as  economic  growth  revives.  The  currency  has  already  appreciated  from 
INR68/USD in August 2014 to INR59 now with CAD under control.  
 
Asian  Paints  directly  imports  ~30%  of  total  raw  material  (largely  TiO2).  If  we  take  into 
account  crude‐linked  raw  materials,  ~50%  of  total  COGS  get  impacted  by  INR  movement. 
Many other raw materials are also linked to crude oil prices. 
 
Crude oil prices are currently steady at USD108 per barrel.  Assuming crude to be at these 
levels,  it  is  only  currency  fluctuation  that  will  affect  raw  material  costs.  On  a  conservative 
basis, if we assume that ~40% of total raw material is affected by currency movement (both 
directly and indirectly) keeping all other variables constant, then 5% INR movement leads to 
6.7% impact on standalone EPS. When INR appreciates, gross margin benefit flows for two 
to three quarters as price cut is taken with a lag. Thus, any INR appreciation will pave way 
for margin expansion in FY15. 
 
 
 

18  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Table 8: Effect of appreciation and depreciation of INR on margins   
INR mn FY14 Rupee depreciates by 5% Rupee appreciates by 5%
Revenues            104,188                                         104,188                                           104,188
Cost of goods sold
Raw material consumed              57,587                                            58,739                                             56,435
Indigenous @60%              34,552                                            34,552                                             34,552
Imported @40%              23,035                                            24,187                                             21,883
Purchase of stock in trade                2,566                                              2,566                                               2,566
Changes in inventory                  (753)                                                (753)                                                 (753)
Total COGS              59,400                                            60,551                                             58,248
Gross profits              44,788                                            43,637                                             45,940
Staff expenses                4,824                                              4,824                                               4,824
Other expenses              22,191                                            22,191                                             22,191
Total expenses (Excluding COGS)              27,016                                            27,016                                             27,016
EBITDA              17,773                                            16,621                                             18,924
Depreciation                2,123                                              2,123                                               2,123
EBIT              15,650                                            14,498                                             16,801
Other income                1,737                                              1,737                                               1,737
Finance cost                    261                                                 261                                                   261
PBT              17,125                                            15,974                                             18,277
Tax                5,335                                              4,976                                               5,694
Core PAT              11,790                                            10,997                                             12,583
EPS                   12.3                                                11.5                                                  13.1
% change in EPS                                                  (6.7)                                                    6.7
% of sales
Gross margins (%)                   43.0                                                41.9                                                  44.1
EBITDA margins (%)                   17.1                                                16.0                                                  18.2
EBITDA margin (decline)/expansion (bps)                                                (111)                                                   111  
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 22: INR appreciating against USD 
70.0

64.0
(INR per USD)

58.0

52.0

46.0

40.0
Feb‐12

Feb‐13

Feb‐14
Aug‐11

Aug‐12

Aug‐13
May‐11

Nov‐11

May‐12

Nov‐12

May‐13

Nov‐13

May‐14

 
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
 
 

19  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Operating leverage on robust volumes, enhanced capacity utilisation  
Operating  leverage  is  a  function  of  improvement  in  sales  and  effective  fixed  cost 
rationalisation. Asian Paints has been able to sustain strong volume growth of ~11% YoY in 
FY14  despite  economic  slowdown.  We  expect  it  to  gain  from  urban  recovery  as  it  has 
commissioned a manufacturing facility in Khandala (in February 2014 with installed capacity 
of  300,000KL  per  annum)  and  enhanced  capacity  at  Rohtak  plant  (from  150,000KL  per 
annum  to  200,000KL  per  annum  in  Q1FY14).  With  such  huge  capacity  in  place  and  likely 
volume growth boost from recovery in urban demand and revival in GDP growth, optimal 
capacity utilisation will kick in operating leverage.  
 
The  company’s  other  expenditure  as  a  percentage  to  sales  has  surged  over  the  past  five 
quarters  because  of  issues  like  strike  at  the  Sriperumbudur  plant  (leading  to  higher 
transportation costs) and power & diesel cost inflation (Khandala plant was initially running 
on  DG  sets  further  heightening  power  costs).  These  issues  have  been  resolved—strike  at 
Sriperumbudur  plant  has  been  called  off  and  power  issue  at  the  Khandala  plant  has  been 
solved.  We  expect  other  expenditure  to  remain  high  but  will  remain  constant  as  a 
percentage  of  sales.  Freight  costs  may  see  some  inflation  owing  to  diesel  prices  moving 
North, but rapid volume surge will lead to scale benefit and thereby spur margin.  
 
Chart 23: Other expenditure as percentage of sale 
26.0 

24.0 
(% of sales)

22.0 

20.0 

18.0 

16.0 
Q1FY04
Q3FY04
Q1FY05
Q3FY05
Q1FY06
Q3FY06
Q1FY07
Q3FY07
Q1FY08
Q3FY08
Q1FY09
Q3FY09
Q1FY10
Q3FY10
Q1FY11
Q3FY11
Q1FY12
Q3FY12
Q1FY13
Q3FY13
Q1FY14
Q3FY14
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Table 9: Asian Paints—Capacity expansion  
Area Capacity
Feb‐14 Khandala Industrial Area, Maharashtra 3,00,000 KL pa
Apr‐12 Rohtak, Haryana  50000 KL pa; extended and started
Feb‐12 Rohtak, Haryana  150000 KL pa; shutdown
Apr‐10 Rohtak, Haryana  1,50,000 KL pa
Feb‐07 Taloja, Maharashtra 14000 KL pa
Apr‐06 Baddi, Himachal Pradesh 1800 KL pa; shutdown  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
 
 

20  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Margin to get premiumisation boost 
With  increasing  per  capita  income  and  improvement  in  aspirational  levels,  consumers  are 
looking  for  better  quality  and  are  more  willing  to  uptrade.  Most  consumer  companies  are 
tapping this opportunity and focusing on premiumising their portfolios.  
 
This trend has been apparent in the paint industry as well with consumers upgrading from 
distempers, putties etc., to more premium emulsions. Asian Paints has also benefitted from 
pick  up  in  this  trend  backed  by  higher  saliency  of  premium  products,  wider  variety  of 
technologically advanced and differentiated premium products, strong dealer network to be 
able to cater to demand and its strong brand equity. 
“We expect that with a new   
government coming in, things  As per an AC Nielsen report, the paint industry is witnessing premiumisation as contribution 
would improve in terms of  of exterior emulsions has increased to 20.3% in 2012 from 13.5% in 2008 and that of interior 
investment climate and  emulsions increased to 16.8% in from 12.3% over the same period. The share of lower‐end 
subsequently, the protective  distempers declined to 11.5% in 2012 from 12.9% in 2008.  
coating business, in which we are   
ranked first, will naturally begin  We  expect  premiumisation  trend  to  increase  at  a  faster  pace,  particularly  in  urban  areas, 
growing at a fast pace.”   with urban growth revival on the cards and the new government’s emphasis on building 100 
  new  cities.  Improvement  in  per  capita  income  of  urban  population  will  also  boost 
– Abhijit Roy, MD, premiumisation.  
Berger Paints  
Asian Paints has a strong premium portfolio with Royale, Apcolite, Protek, etc., in its stable. 
Recently, the company launched a super premium offering Royale Aspira (INR600 per litre) 
and  re‐launched  Apcolite  as  Apcolite  Advanced  as  a  more  premium  offering.  With  strong 
marketing  campaigns  and  brand  ambassadors  like  Saif  Ali  Khan  and  Rahul  Dravid  for  its 
premium  offerings,  Asian  Paints  has  been  aggressive  in  marketing  its  premium  end  of 
portfolio. We expect it to benefit from improvement in mix and see improvement in margin. 
 
Water‐based paints to boost margin 
There has been a steady shift towards the use of water‐based paints from oil‐based paints 
not only because of the environmental advantages, but also because of ease of application. 
Consumers prefer water‐based paints as they dry quickly, emit less odour and are easier to 
clean (with water). Solvent‐based paints, on the other hand, contain high levels of Volatile 
Organic Compound (VOC), take longer to dry and emit strong odour. This has led to strong 
consumer inclination towards water‐based paints/emulsions as evident from their increased 
contribution  to  overall  paint  demand.  From  a  paint  manufacturer’s  perspective,  water‐
based  paints  carry  5‐7%  higher  margin  than  oil‐based  paints.  This  is  the  reason  behind 
higher focus of paint companies on water‐based paints. As per industry reports, the share of 
water‐based  paints  in  the  decorative  paints  market  is  ~52%,  while  balance  48%  is  solvent 
based. Companies offer water‐based enamels that give look and feel of oil‐based enamels.  
 
Asian  Paints  has  the  highest  revenue  contribution  from  water‐based  emulsion  and 
distempers (more than 50%). Also, the company is increasingly introducing more products in 
this  category.  In  line  with  global  paint  companies,  Asian  Paints  has  been  emphasizing  on 
paints  with  reduced  VOC.  Vast  opportunity  to  further  increase  contribution  from  water‐
based paints bodes well for margin improvement. Another trigger for margin improvement 
is uptrading of consumers from distempers to emulsions.  
 

21  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Apart  from  many  water‐based  emulsions  like  Royale,  Apex  Ultima,  Apex  Weather  Proof 
emulsions etc., Asian Paints also has water‐based enamels under the Asian Paints Premium 
Semi  Gloss  Enamel  brand.  It  also  has  water  based  wood  finishes.  We  expect  revenue 
contribution  of  water‐based  paints  to  improve  riding  higher  focus  led  by  innovations  and 
aggressive marketing. 
 
Chart 24: Share of emulsions increasing over the years for the industry 
39.0 

31.6 

24.2 
(%)
16.8 

9.4 

2.0 

Primers, 
Thinners
Distemper

Wood  Fin
Cement Paint

Putty
Enamel

Ext Emulsion
Int Emulsion
2008 2012
 
Source: AC Nielsen, Edelweiss research

22  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 

Anticipated Industrial Paint Segment Revival a Boon 
 
Industrial paints contribute ~7% to Asian Paints’ total revenue and the segment continues to 
remain  affected  by  slowdown  in  automotive  and  industrial  paints  sectors. The  company  is 
present  in  the  automotive  coating  segment  via  JV  with  PPG  (PPG  AP)  and  is  the  second 
largest supplier to the auto segment in India (behind Kansai Nerolac). It is the largest player 
in  auto  refinish  segment.  In  the  non‐auto  industrial  segment,  Asian  Paints  participates 
through  a  JV  (AP  PPG)  that  covers  protective  coatings,  floor  coatings,  road  marking  paints 
and  powder  coatings  segments.  With  the  business‐friendly  BJP  government  coming  into 
power, growth in the industrial segment is likely to pick up phenomenally, particularly in the 
infrastructure sector. This will  drive performance of the industrial coatings sector as there 
will  be  an  increase  in  the  public  and  private  investments  due  to  the  new  government 
coming in.  
“The demand for industrial paint is   
going to be driven by the pick‐up in   
the automobile industry and  Real estate revival to spur industrial paint volumes  
growth in infrastructure.  While repainting contributes 85‐90% to Asian Paints’ overall demand, 10‐15% is dependent 
Infrastructure is at the lowest level  on new real estate development. Since the past six‐eight months, real estate prices in a few 
in the country today, hence we see  metros and tier‐I cities have been under pressure. However, owing to improved sentiments 
a sustained growth in the industrial  due  to  a  stable  government  at  the  Centre,  property  prices  are  expected  to  stabilise  and 
paints business."   volumes are set to improve. This was highlighted in a latest research report by the Edelweiss 
  real  estate  team,  ‘Real  Estate‐Rising  on  a  strong  foundation’,  dated  May  16,  2014.  Any 
‐ H M Bharuka, MD, improvement  in inflation, high GDP growth  as well as reduction in  interest rates will drive 
Kansai Nerolac consumer demand, which should benefit the real estate sector.  
 
The real estate sector has been gearing up in anticipation of a recovery by strengthening its 
operations  and  improving  balance  sheets.  New  launches  by  real  estate  developers  have 
picked up speed over the past few years. Because of the expected recovery in the entire real 
estate  sector,  completion  of  these  projects  is  expected  to  accelerate.  When  this  pent  up 
supply hits markets, it should drive volumes of paint companies like Asian Paints. Also, many 
real estate developers have lined up attractive project launch pipelines.   
 
 

23  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Table 10: Key launches by major real estate developers 
launch area 
key Immediate launches (msf)  INR psf Total Value
DLF
DLF Camelias ‐ 3.55msf total project size                   1.4       26,000           36,400
DLF Crest ‐ 2.66msf total project size                   0.8       16,000           12,800
DLF Ultima ‐ 2.2msf project                   0.8          9,000             7,200
Oberoi Realty
Oasis Worli                   0.6       45,000           25,650
Oberoi Exotica, Mulund                   3.2       12,000           38,400
Oberoi Exquisite III                   2.2       16,500           36,300
Borivali land                   4.5       15,000           67,500
Sobha Developers
Sobha Silicon Oasis                   1.5          5,500             8,250
Sobha Valley View                   0.7          6,000             4,200
Kanakapura road                   0.7          5,000             3,500
Godrej Properties
Panvel township ‐ 3.5msf total project size                   1.2          5,250             6,458
Chembur redevelopment                   1.0       17,500           16,625
Ghatkopar redevelopment                   0.2       15,000             2,850
Gurgaon, Sector 79                   0.8          5,500             4,510
Gurgaon, Sector 88A                   0.5          6,250             2,875
Mahindra Lifespace
Sector 59, Gurgaon                   0.4       10,000             4,400
Andheri project                   0.4       13,500             4,995
Bannerghatta, Bengaluru                   0.5          6,500             3,185
Kolte‐Patil Developers
Wakad, Pune                   2.0          5,500           11,000
Kondhwa                   0.4          5,000             2,200
Mirabilis, Bangalore                   0.6          5,000             3,000
Hosur  Road, Bangalore                   0.6          4,500             2,610
Brigade Enterprises
Brigade Northridge, Yelahanka Junction                   0.4          4,850             1,940
Brigade Panorama, Mysore Road ‐ Highway                   0.9          5,200             4,792
Meadows Phase 2 , Bangalore                   0.9          3,500             3,080
Exotica ‐ Tower 2                   0.7          4,750             3,420  
Source: Edelweiss research 
 
Revival in auto sector to spur industrial paints  
With ~24% market share, PPG AP is the second largest player in the automotive OEM paint 
segment  after  Kansai  Nerolac.  The  company’s  revenue  clocked  10.3%  CAGR  over  FY09‐13 
and  it  has  been  profit‐making  since  inception.  However,  performance  of  the  automotive 
segment was dented in FY13 and FY14 owing to slowdown in the automobile industry. Total 
vehicle production fell by 0.3% YoY in FY13  and 7.4% in FY14. As a result of the economic 
slowdown, many first‐time buyers have delayed their car purchases. For example, first time 
buyers fell to 37% for Maruti Suzuki compared to ~50% a couple of years back. 
 
   

24  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Table 11: Auto production data suggests demand has been low since past two years 
FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14
Passenger cars     2,442,820     2,536,625     2,426,509     2,310,336
% growth                 3.8               (4.3)               (4.8)
Utility vehicles        314,307        371,492        565,417        558,787
% growth              18.2              52.2               (1.2)
Total vans        216,533        237,954        239,434        196,693
% growth                 9.9                 0.6             (17.9)
Total passenger vehicles    2,973,660    3,146,071    3,231,360    3,065,816
% growth                 5.8                 2.7               (5.1)
Heavy Commercial Vehicles        345,597        384,801        279,626        221,564
% growth              11.3             (27.3)             (20.8)
Light Commercial Vehicles        413,973        544,335        552,335        476,983
% growth              31.5                 1.5             (13.6)
Total commercial vehicles        759,570        929,136        831,961        698,547
% growth              22.3             (10.5)             (16.0)
Total vehicle production     3,733,230     4,075,207     4,063,321     3,764,363
% growth                 9.2               (0.3)               (7.4)  
Source: SIAM, Edelweiss research 
 
While urban auto demand has been soft, rural auto demand has been strong since the past 
few  years.  Lackluster  economic  growth  had  impacted  job  creation,  while  wages  had  been 
increasing  in  line  with  inflation.  Thus,  discretionary  purchasing  power,  especially  in  urban 
areas, had taken a hit. 
 
Chart 25: Rural wages growing faster than national income    
 
25.0 

19.2 

13.4 
(%, yoy)

7.6 

1.8 

(4.0)
FY00

FY01

FY02

FY03

FY04

FY05

FY06

FY07

FY08

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

Rural wages National Income
 
Source: CMIE, Edelweiss research 
 
 
 
 
 
 

25  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Management commentary on automotive segment in FY14 
Q1FY14:  Industrial  and  automotive  segments  remained  under  pressure  due  to  tough 
business conditions. These segments’ margins dipped QoQ. 
 
Q2FY14: Industrial and automotive segments continued to remain under pressure. 
Q3FY14: Demand continued to be weak in industrial segment. In the industrial space, non‐
automotive  segment  continued  to  face  slowdown  pressure.  However,  growth  in  the 
automotive segment was decent in the refinishing space (OEMs continued to face sluggish 
demand). Asian Paints raised prices in this portfolio to protect margin. 
 
Q4FY14:  Slow  demand  in  automotive  segment  resulted  in  a  challenging  environment  for 
paint  companies.  However,  margins  improved  due  to  lower  inflation  in  material  cost  and 
better operational efficiencies. 
 
Historical analysis suggests that auto sector recovery is likely  
Analysis of auto sector demand shows that in the past three recovery cycles of FY99, FY03 
and FY09, when GDP growth recovered by ~200bps, auto demand surged by more than 20% 
CAGR over two years post trough year. The primary demand drivers for the auto sector are 
improvement in GDP, high liquidity and improvement in purchasing power. We expect GDP 
growth  to  improve  to  5.4%,  6.3%  and  7.5%  in  FY15E,  FY16E  and  FY17E,  respectively,  from 
~4.5%  in  Q4FY14.  Also,  improved  consumer  sentiment  due  to  a  stable  government  should 
drive  job  creation  and  wage  hikes.  Analysis  by  the  Edelweiss  auto  sector  research  team  in 
the  report  ‘Automobiles  ‐  Get  Set,  Go!!’  dated  May  19,  2014  indicates  current  underlying 
conditions  are  similar  to  earlier  cycles,  thereby  infusing  confidence  of  recovery  in  auto 
demand along with GDP recovery.  
 
Chart 26: Auto volume trend vs GDP recovery from FY98‐00  Chart 27: Auto volume trend vs GDP recovery from FY03‐05 
FY98 ‐ 00 400 
FY03 ‐ 05 40
400  40

FY03 
GDP (bps over trough period)
GDP (bps over trough period)

340  34 340  GDP 6.8% 34

Vol. CAGR (% YoY)
Vol. CAGR (% YoY)

280  28 280  28
FY98 
GDP 4.8%
220  22 220  22

160  16 160  16

100  10 100  10
PV 2W M&HCV GDP (LHS) PV 2W M&HCV
    
Source: Bloomberg, SIAM, Edelweiss research 
 
   

26  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Chart 28: Auto volume trend vs GDP recovery from FY09‐11                              

400 
FY09 ‐ 11 40.0 

GDP (bps over trough period)
340  34.0 

Vol. CAGR (% YoY)
280  28.0 

220  22.0 
FY09
GDP 6.7%
160  16.0 

100  10.0 
GDP (LHS) PV 2W M&HCV
 
Source: Bloomberg, Companies, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 29: Edelweiss estimate of ~280bps of recovery in GDP over FY14‐17E  
10.5 

9.0 
GDP (% YoY)

7.5 

6.0 

4.5 

3.0 

FY15E
FY16E
FY17E
FY95
FY96
FY97
FY98
FY99
FY00
FY01
FY02
FY03
FY04
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
FY14
 
Source: Edelweiss research 
   

27  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 

International Stroke: Betting Big on Africa 
 
International  operations  contribute  ~13%  to  Asian  Paints’  overall  consolidated  sales.  The 
company’s  international  business  is  divided  into  four  regions—Caribbean  (Barbados, 
Jamaica,  Trinidad  and  Tobago),  Middle  East  (Egypt,  Oman,  Bahrain  and  UAE),  Asia 
(Bangladesh,  Nepal,  Sri  Lanka  and  Singapore)  and  South  Pacific  (Fiji,  Solomon  Islands, 
Samoa,  Tonga  and  Vanuatu).  The  largest  contribution  comes  from  Middle  East,  which 
contributes 51%, followed by Asia with 27%, Caribbean with 14% and South Pacific with 8%.  
Though  international  business  contributes  only  13%  to  overall  revenue,  it  presents  a  huge 
growth  opportunity  as  the  company  is  among  the  top  three  players  in  all  international 
markets (except in Singapore) in decorative paints.  
 
In  FY14,  growth  was  commendable  in  the  international  business  led  by  Bangladesh  and 
Nepal in Asia and UAE in the Middle East. Bangladesh presents a big FMCG opportunity with 
many  consumer  companies  trying  to  capture  market  share.  Asian  Paints  is  a  distant  No.2 
player in Bangladesh with 14% market share and operates at low margin compared to the 
leader,  Berger  Paints.  The  company’s  capacity  expansion  in  the  region  to  24,000KL  per 
annum will further help drive margin through operating leverage benefit. Middle East grew 
only  14.5%  YoY  in  FY14  as  it  has  been  bearing  the  brunt  of  political  turmoil  in  Egypt  and 
Bahrain. We believe this slowdown is temporary and growth will return, particularly in Egypt 
(most populous and second largest country in Arab world). Asian Paints is present in Egypt 
through  SCIB  Paints.  FY14  international  business  PBT  grew  4.6%  YoY.  Excluding  Egypt,  PBT 
growth would have been 16.2% YoY, indicating improvement in international business once 
the political situation in Egypt improves.  
 
Chart 30: International sales contribution by different geographies 
100.0 

80.0 

60.0 
(%)

40.0 

20.0 

0.0 
FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13

Caribbean  Middle East Asia South Pacific


 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
   

28  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Table 12: International geographies—Sales growth (% YoY) 
FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14
Caribbean  (1.4) 8.7 2.0 (3.0) 9.5 15.0 7.9
Middle East 22.6 45.8 15.0 (4.0) 12.1 26.0 14.5
Asia ‐ ‐ ‐ 20.0 31.0 21.0 21.0
South Asia 33.4 38.5 28.0 ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐
South East Asia 5.2 19.3 ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐
South Pacific (7.2) 13.2 7.0 4.0 20.9 25.0 16.3  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Asian Paints is following the footsteps of other consumer companies like Godrej Consumers 
and Marico and has marked its entry in Africa by acquiring 51% equity in Kadisco Chemical 
Industry,  Ethiopia.  This  acquisition  will  help  the  company  enter  other  markets  of  Africa.  
Africa is an immense opportunity for Asian Paints and with its scale and size, the company 
can exploit this untapped market, which is growing at a fast pace (especially Nigeria).  
 
Africa’s  GDP  is  growing  at  more  than  5%  and  it  can  be  compared  to  the  situation  that 
existed in India 10 years ago. Africa is well poised for growth with six of the 10 regions with 
fastest  growing  GDP  globally.  Growth  is  stable  in  the  region  with  sustained  and  gradual 
reduction  of  debt  and  inflation.  As  paints  volume  growth  has  high  correlation  with  GDP 
growth, the paint sector is likely to post robust growth. Though North Africa is facing some 
issues, sub Saharan Africa is growing well. Nigeria, which is growing at more than 7% (set to 
become the largest economy in Africa), stands second to South Africa. 
 
Table 13: Africa—Paint industry size  
Region  Paints and coating market size (USD mn)
North Africa                                                                             910
South Africa                                                                             603
East Africa                                                                             111
West Africa                                                                             258  
Source: Frost & Sullivan, Edelweiss research 
 
Most consumer companies, having realised Africa’s potential well in advance, have built 
presence in the region.  
 
Table 14: Africa’s contribution to consumer companies 
Company Contribution from African region (%)
GCPL                                                                            12.0
Dabur                                                                              7.0
Marico (in South Africa)                                                                              9.0
Emami                                                                              1.0  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 
 
Africa has a large population which is young, has good GDP growth potential and has a large 
portion of unorganised market, making it a lucrative play for consumer companies. 
 
 
 
 
 

29  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Chart 31: Africa—Paint market in different geographies 
420,000 

336,000 

(tonnes)
252,000 

168,000 

84,000 

Morocco
South Africa

Algeria

Tunisia
Senegal
Egypt

Zambia
Nambia
2011 2016E
 
Source: IRL, Edelweiss research 
 
Chart 32: Africa—Volume share of different geographies in paints  
Zambia
Tunisia
1%
Senegal 10%
3% South Africa
23%
Nambia
1%

Morocco
16%

Algeria
21%

Egypt
25%
 
Source: IRL, Edelweiss research  
 
   

30  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 

Home Improvement: The New Frontier 
 
Asian  Paints  ventured  into  the  home  improvement  segment  by  the  acquisition  of  Sleek,  a 
modular kitchen brand. It recently entered into a binding agreement with Ess Ess Bathroom 
Products  (Ess  Ess)  to  acquire  its  entire  front‐end  sales  business  including  brands,  network 
“Home improvement is an aligned  and sales infrastructure. ~10% of Asian Paints dealers are already selling bathroom fittings 
business. The basic customer is the  and this synergy effect will help them to increase the sales of Ess Ess products. Asian Paints 
same–the homeowner. This is a  will benefit by its entry into these aligned business as it will get the synergy of its vast dealer 
large potential market that’s  network which can also be used for the home improvement segment. Globally, Masco Corp 
growing. Eventually, we want to be  in US has successfully accomplished similar diversification into a home décor company from 
in all areas of home improvement– a plumbing products company (details in Annexure I). 
from furnishings to bathrooms.”   
  In the near future, in our view, the company may acquire tiles and sanitary ware companies 
‐ K.B.S. Anand, MD and CEO, as these portfolios are necessary for it to be a market leader in the décor business and these 
Asian Paints businesses can also get synergies from the its vast dealer network. With presence in paints, 
water proofing, modular kitchens and bath fittings, Asian Paints aims to gain higher wallet 
share  of  existing  customers.  With  aspirations  of  being  a  complete  home  décor  company, 
Asian  Paints  may  enter  home  furnishing  and  sanitary  ware  segments.  As  per  PWC’s  India 
Home  Furnishing  Market  Forecast  and  Opportunities,  2018,  report  the  home  furnishing 
market  is  expected  to  post  8%  CAGR  over  2013‐18  riding  higher  per  capita  incomes  and 
increase in the number of working women. 
 
Modular kitchen (Sleek) 
In  2012,  household  consumption  in  India  grew  at  12%,  leading  to  growth  in  the  modular 
kitchen market. The domestic modular kitchen market is at a nascent at INR21bn (in 2012) 
with  the  potential  to  grow  up  to  INR60bn  by  2016.  The  market  segment  is  largely 
unorganised  (70‐75%)  and  is  mostly  cornered  by  local  and  small  players.  Unorganised 
players include carpenters who design kitchens based on requirements of customers.  
 
Generally, end users in this segment are urban middle class and affluent households. Due to 
increase  in  urbanisation,  rise  in  working  women,  increase  in  disposable  incomes  and 
aesthetics  of  modular  kitchens  over  traditional  kitchens,  this  segment  has  been  gaining 
consumer  traction.  Thus,  modular  kitchen  has  become  an  attractive  space.  Key  players  in 
this segment include Godrej Interio, Sleek, Hafele, Gilma, Haecker and Veneta Cucine.  
 
In November 2013, Asian Paints entered this segment with the acquisition of 51% stake in 
Sleek Group (for eight month in FY14 sales stood at INR793mn, 3.9% PBIT margin), a leading 
player  in  modular  kitchen  segment  with  seven  years  of  experience.  The  company  has  30 
showrooms and a network of 250 dealers. The acquisition was a strategic fit for Asian Paints 
as  the  company  will  derive  distribution  synergies  by  selling  spare  parts  of  Sleek  through 
Asian Paints’ dealer network. 
 
Sleek:  It  commenced  operations  as  a  wire  basket  manufacturer  in  1993  and  went  on  to 
become  a  complete  kitchen  solutions  provider.  The  company  has  tied  up with  the  world’s 
best  modular  kitchen  companies  like  Grass  (Austria),  Lamp  (Japan)  Scilm  (America),  Sige, 
Technoinoc and Airforce (Italy).  
 
 
 

31  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Chart 33: Modular kitchens—Organised and unorganised players’ share 

Organized 
Sector
30%

Unorganized 
Sector
70%

 
Source: PWC, Edelweiss research  
Chart 34: Modular kitchens—Market size  
72.0 

60.8 

49.6 
(INR bn)

38.4 

27.2 

16.0 
2012 2016
 
Source: PWC, Edelweiss research 
 
Wall papers (Nilaya) 
Wall papers can be used to decorate interiors and ceilings of homes and offices. Wall papers 
come  in  various  styles  and  designs  and  can  be  easily  applied  (approximately  8  hours) 
without any dampness and leakages and are easy to maintain. People use walls as a canvass 
to  express  their  imagination,  thus  making  wall  papers  an  attractive  segment  for  the  paint 
industry. Digital printed wall coverings are the latest innovation in the industry. Wall papers 
attract  customers  looking  for  convenience  and  time  saving  (fixing  takes  eight  hours 
compared  to  10‐12  days  for  painting).  People  with  breathing  problems,  skin  problems  or 
odour  allergies  also  prefer  wall  papers  over  painting.  Asian  Paints  has  entered  this  space 
with Nilaya (launched in February 2014 at Taj Palace). However, a key issue with wall papers 
is that they are not suitable for walls with leakage problems.  
 
 
 
 

32  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Wall proofing (SmartCare) 
Wall proofing is another solution provided by the paint industry. Dampness affects exterior 
as well as interior walls and this problem is exacerbated during monsoon. Consumers expect 
painting  companies  to  provide  a  dampness  solution  along  with  painting.  Initially,  Asian 
Paints  directed  consumers  to  unorganised  players  or  other  companies  like  Pidilite,  which 
provided water proofing solutions. However, recently it entered the construction chemicals 
space under which it offers water proofing solutions—SmartCare products like damp block 
(interior waterproofing solutions), damp proof (exterior waterproof coating) and crack seal 
(crack filing compound). 
 
Bathroom fittings (Ess Ess) 
The  Indian  bathroom  fittings  market  is  approximately  ~INR45bn,  of  which  15%  belongs  to 
the  premium  segment.  Indian  brands  like  CERA,  Jaguar  and  Hindustan  Sanitaryware  are 
dominant players in the market. Rapid urbanisation is leading to higher standards of living, 
which results in higher demand for super‐premium or luxury bathroom products.  
 
Asian Paints has entered into a binding agreement with Ess Ess to acquire its entire front‐
end  sales  business  including  brands,  network  and  sales  infrastructure.  Ess  Ess  is  an 
established player in the bath and wash business segments in India. It has more than 1,500 
dealers in India and eight branch offices (Mumbai, Delhi, Ahmedabad, Bengaluru, Chennai, 
Kerala, Kolkata and Secunderabad) and a factory Himachal Pradesh. It exports to the UK, Far 
East and Middle East. This move by Asian Paints is in line with its strategy to be a one‐stop 
solution in the home décor space. Ess Ess is a profitable entity. We expect Asian Paints to 
utilise  its  paints  distribution  network  to  drive  Ess  Ess  sales.  We  also  expect  it  to  drive 
marketing of Ess Ess (currently low brand equity) and take it to the next level. This has been 
the case with Sleek, which saw marked increase in advertising post acquisition. 
 
   

33  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 

GST Implementation: A Key Trigger 
 
GST, which was to be implemented in April 2010, has not seen the light of the day as yet. 
However,  with  a  strong  government  in  the  saddle  at  the  Centre,  chances  of  its 
implementation  are  bright.  GST  aims  to  replace  the  multiple  acts  contained  in  indirect 
taxation like central excise, additional excise, value‐added tax, octroi and service tax that are 
levied by the Centre and state governments and replace them by a uniform tax.  
 
Asian  Paints  too  will  reap  benefits  of  GST  as  it  will  gain  from  the  lower  tax  rate  planned 
under  the  regime,  which  will  be  executed  by  increasing  the  tax  base  and  minimising 
exemptions.  Under  the  current  regime,  there  is  taxation  at  different  points  like  on  the 
finished  product  when  it  is  moved  out  of  the  factory  and  also  during  retail  sales.  GST  will 
abolish this cascading tax as under it tax will be levied at one point i.e., point of sale. Thus, 
lower incidence of tax will lead to reduction in manufacturing cost, which will result in low 
cost  of  production.  It  may  also  lead  to  lower  prices,  which  will  boost  consumption.  Lower 
prices will also help Asian Paints wrest market share from unorganised players as consumers 
of  latter  could  shift  towards  organised  players  because  of  lower  prices.  ~35%  of  the  paint 
industry  is  unorganised  and  as  it  too  will  come  under  GST  ambit,  it  will  be  a  level  playing 
field with organised players like Asian Paints which have got high economies of scale.  
 
Under  the  current  regime,  CST  is  levied  on  inter‐state  sale  of  goods,  but  stock  transfer 
between factory and C&F agent/depot of the same entity is not liable for CST. To reduce the 
CST  liability  many  companies  currently  operate  depots/C&F  agents  in  all  major  states  to 
avoid  CST.  The  result  is  increased  number  of  depots  and  warehouses,  which  leads  to  cost 
equal to 1‐2% of revenue towards maintenance of these facilities. With the introduction of 
GST,  CST  will  be  phased  out  and  companies  need  not  bear  these  additional  infrastructure 
costs. A company can then have only four or five big warehouses from where it can supply 
the goods to dealers without having to pay taxes for inter‐state sale of goods. Asian Paints, 
which has around 110 depots, will have to evaluate whether the tax savings from reduction 
of depots is higher than the increase in transportation cost because of this.  
   

34  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 

Robust Growth Momentum; Reiterate ‘BUY’ 
 
Urban growth in India is set to revive with a stronger/ stable government coming to power, 
which  had,  in  its  election  manifesto,  outlined  a  strong  focus  on  urban  growth  recovery, 
EPS likely to post 22% CAGR over  infrastructure development, faster execution, development of 100 new cities, among other 
FY14‐17E  initiatives.  We believe Asian Paints is well poised to reap benefits of this impending urban 
recovery  riding  its  strong  market  share,  pricing  power,  brand  strength  and  wide  spread 
dealer network (2x next player).  
 
We  expect  Asian  Paints  to  be  one  of  the  best  plays  on  the  much  anticipated  recovery  in 
macros  given  that  paint  volumes  surge  a  healthy  1.5‐2.0x  GDP.  We  expect  the  company’s 
volumes to clock 13% CAGR over FY14‐17E (~8% over FY12‐14) anchored by the recovery in 
urban sentiments, GDP revival and toothless competition (global behemoths Akzo, Nippon, 
Jotun  failed  to  make  headway  in  India).  Additionally,  low  per  capita  paint  consumption  in 
India  (one  fourth  China’s)  and  reduction  in  repainting  cycle  (5  years  now  from  7  years  a 
decade ago) render the company the best play on paints. 
 
Industrial segment growth, which has languished over the past few quarters, is likely to pick 
up, especially in the automotive space (forms large part of non‐decorative segment), led by 
likely improvement in discretionary spends and higher investments by the new government. 
We  expect  distribution  synergies  between  home  décor  segments  and  the  existing  paint 
distribution network. Also, investments in home décor brands (Sleek, Ess Ess) will help these 
businesses gain scale riding Asian Paints’ well entrenched brand equity.  
 
Though  Asian  Paints  is  trading  at  close  to  its  all  time  high  valuations  and  despite  the  fact 
that  consumer  companies  have  gone  out  of  flavour  in  the  current  bull  run,  we  remain 
positive  on  the  stock  because  it  is  a  quality  play  in  the  consumer  discretionary  segment. 
With  22%  EPS  CAGR,  347bps  RoCE  spurt  over  FY14‐17E  and  metamorphosis  into  a  home 
décor  company,  we  expect  valuations  to  remain  rich.  On  account  of  strong  performance 
coupled with investment in new growth drivers (construction chemicals, wall paper, Sleek, 
Ess Ess), we assign 31x to FY17E earnings (against 3 year average 1‐year forward PE of ~31x) 
with two‐year target price of INR720. We maintain ‘BUY/Sector Outperformer’ rating. 
 
Chart. 35: One year forward P/E band  
650
35x
530
30x

410 25x
(INR)

20x
290
15x

170 10x

50
May-10

May-11

May-12

May-13

May-14
Nov-10

Nov-11

Nov-12

Nov-13

 Source: Company, Edelweiss research  

35  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 

Annexure I 
 
Global companies venturing into home improvement  
Masco Corporation 

Masco  Corporation  was  founded  in  1929  when  Alex  Manoogian  started  the  first 
commercially successful Masco screw product factory in the US. Though it began as a screw 
manufacturing factory, today it is the world’s leading manufacturer of home improvement 
and  décor  business.  The  enterprise  focused  on  innovation  and  quality  and  years  later, 
Masco  Corporation  is  still  dedicated  to  these  priorities.  In  1954,  it  started  production  of 
single  handled  faucet,  revolutionising  the  plumbing  industry.  Continuing  its  diversification 
strategy,  Masco  Corporation  entered  the  cabinet  manufacturing  business  in  1985.  Moving 
ahead,  it  diversified  into  architectural  coating  business  and  windows  business.  The 
achievements  of  past  decades  clearly  show  that  its  strategy  lead  to  success  as  operating 
margin did well for decorative business compared to the plumbing business. 
 
Chart 1: Masco: Contribution from different businesses  
100.0 

80.0 

60.0 
(%)

40.0 

20.0 

0.0 
CY 2000

CY 2001

CY 2002

CY 2003

CY 2004

CY 2005

CY 2006

CY 2007

CY 2008

CY 2009

CY 2010

CY 2011

CY 2012

CY 2013
Plumbing Products Revenues Decorative Products Revenues
Installation and Other Services Cabinets and Related Products
Other Specialty Products  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research  
 
Asian Paints is following in its footsteps. It started as a paint company and is now trying to 
diversify into different businesses, but having synergies in distribution network. Its aims is to 
be a market leader in home improvement and décor space and to make this dream come 
true,  it  has  acquired  Sleek,  a  modular  kitchen  company,  and  Ess  Ess,  a  bathroom  fittings 
company. Though it is a long journey for Asian Paints to achieve its dream, we believe that 
the innovative path taken by it is an excellent strategic move. In the near future, in our view, 
Asian  Paints  may  acquire  companies  in  segment  like  tiles  and  sanitary  ware  as  these 
portfolios are necessary for it to be a market leader in the décor business.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

36  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 
Fig. 1: Asian Paints’ planned entry in home décor space 

Sleek, 
Modular 
Kitchen 
Business
ESS ESS, 
Furnishing  Bathroom 
Company 
Fitting 
(likely)
Business

Asian 
Paints

Sanitary 
Glass  ware 
Company 
Company 
(?)
(likely)

Tiles 
Company 
(likely)
  
Source: Company, Edelweiss research 

PPG Industries 

The journey for Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company (PPG) started way back in 1883 when Capt. 
John  Ford  and  John  Pitcam  decided  to  establish  a  plate  glass  factory  in  Creighton,  United 
States. The company has rapidly expanded, serving clients throughout the world. Though it 
started as a plate glass factory, it vertically integrated its portfolio with the construction of 
an alkali plant in Barberton, Ohio, in 1899 which provided raw material for glass making. For 
the  first  time  in  1900s,  PPG  diversified  its  product  range  by  moving  into  coatings  business 
with  the  acquisition  of  Wisconsin‐based  Patton  Paint  Company.  Though  being  a  globally 
famous glass company which focused continuously on product innovation and quality, today 
it  is  also  a  leading  global  coating  company.  PPG’s  excellent  strategic  plan  to  diversify  into 
different businesses, but via the same distribution channel, proved to be a good strategic fit 
for the company. 
 
Fig. 2: PPG Industries—Entry in diverse businesses  
Introduced 
DesignaColor  Acquired 
system,  architectural 
Founded  Entered  custom‐tinting  coatings 
plate glass  optical  consumer  business of 
factory business paints AkzoNobel

Diversifie Started its  Acquired 


d into  fibres  SigmaKalon 
coating  glass  Group, a 
business business worldwide 
coatings 
producer
 
Source: Company, Edelweiss research   

37  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 

Annexure II 
 
El Nino and its impact on monsoon  
Monsoon  plays  an  important  role  in  deciding  the  number  of  paint  days  available  for  any 
household as exterior painting is not possible during monsoon. Q2FY14 witnessed a strong 
and prolonged monsoon, which did impact paint companies as it resulted in loss of painting 
days.  We  believe,  if  the  reverse  happens,  the  same  will  be  beneficial  for  paint  companies 
from a near term perspective.  
1883 1990 1940   1952 1970 2000 2013
As  confirmed  by  the  Australian  Bureau  of  Meteorology  and  also  by  other  meteorological 
departments,  2014  is  expected  to  be  an  El  Nino  year  which  will  result  in  a  below  normal 
monsoon  in  India.  This  will  lead  to  lesser  number  of  rainy  days  or  in  other  words  more 
number  of  available  painting  days.  Though  below‐normal  monsoon  will  affect  agriculture 
growth  and  impact  overall  growth  as  India  is  still  largely  dependent  on  monsoon,  low 
monsoon  in  a  year  only  has  a  short‐term  impact  in  terms  of  food  inflation,  price  rise  etc. 
Also, a below‐normal monsoon will have a larger impact on growth in rural areas compared 
to urban areas, so the negative impact of low monsoon is largely shielded by revival in urban 
demand.  Though  a  good  monsoon  is  always  beneficial  for  the  overall  economy,  which  in 
turn  benefits  companies  as  well,  El  Nino  does  not  mean  that  the  impact  will  be  reversed. 
Historically, in the past decade, El Nino has not impacted Asian Paints’ growth and volume 
growth has remained in double digits despite drought or below‐normal monsoon.  
 
Chart 2: Asian Paints—Volume growth in El Nino years  
17.0 

15.4 

13.8 
(%)

12.2 

10.6 

9.0 
2004 2009 2012
El Nino years in last decade
 
Source: Skymet, Edelweiss research  
 
   

38  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 

Annexure III 
 
Competitors 
 Berger Paints 
Berger Paints (Berger) is the second largest paint company in India after Asian Paints. The 
company  has  a  strong  brand  name  with  brands  like  Berger  Easy  Clean,  Silk,  Rangoli, 
WeatherCoat  etc.  The  company  has  a  strong  distribution  network  of  ~16,500  dealers  and 
has ~12,000 tinting machines. As far as international operations are concerned, Berger has 
presence in Russia where it has a production facility with a manufacturing unit in Krasnodar. 
The  company  entered  Nepal  in  2000  when  it  acquired  Jenson  &  Nicholson.  It  has  also 
acquired  Bolix  SA  of  Poland  and  also  tied  up  with  Becker  of  Sweden.  In  2013,  Berger 
acquired the decorative business of Sherwin Williams India. Berger recently commissioned 
its  Hindupur  plant  (total  capacity  of  300,000Kl)  in  Andhra  Pradesh  and  will  increase  its 
capacity in a phased manner.   
 
Kansai Nerolac 
Kasai Nerolac is the third largest decorative paint company in India. The company has good 
brand  strength,  particularly  in  the  interior  paints  segment  with  brands  like  Nerolac 
Impressions,  Nerolac  HD  etc.  It  has  high  exposure  to  the  industrial  paints  segment  (~45% 
contribution), which has resulted in the company’s subdued performance. The company has 
taken  significant  initiatives  to  improve  revenue  from  the  decorative  business.  It  recently 
launched HD paints under Nerolac and was the first player to launch eco‐friendly Zero VOC, 
low VOC, low odour range of decorative paints.   
 
Akzo Nobel 

Akzo Nobel, the world’s No.1 paint company, is trying to increase market share in India, but 
has failed to do so. To achieve this, it has launched some innovative products and has also 
increased production. It has started a new greenfield facility which commenced production 
in  2013  and  will  supply  a  range  of  decorative  paints.  It  is  also  planning  to  improve 
distribution channels for the Dulux brand.  
 
Jotun India  
The Jotun Group, which began operations in 2005 in India, is one of the world’s largest paint 
groups with 74 companies and 29 production facilities. Its first production plant was opened 
in Ranjangaoh, 50km outside Mumbai, which has a capacity of 40ML of paint. Currently, it is 
not  an  immediate  threat  to  other  companies  in  the  paints  industry.  Unlike  other  paint 
industries,  it  uses  the  shop‐in‐shop  concept  through  which  it  sells  paints.  However,  in  the 
past few years, no advertising or promotion was done and hence the brand of Jotun India 
has eroded in consumer’s mind.  
 
Nippon India  
Nippon India, another major competitor of Asian Paints, entered India in 2006 and is among 
the leading paint manufacturers in Asia. In August 2013, it launched odourless paint Nippon 
Paint  Odour‐Less  AirCare,  which  is  the  first  paint  product  that  uses  carbon  technology  to 
clean the air. Though it is continuously innovating and developing products, it has failed to 
take away Asian Paints’ market share. 
 

39  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 
 
Company Description 
Asian Paints is the largest paints company in India and figures among the top 10 players in 
the world. The company has 25 manufacturing plants in 17 countries, serving consumers in 
65 countries globally. The decorative segment accounts for almost 70% of the overall paints 
market.  Paints  sales  in  domestic  and  international  markets  contributed  81%  and  13%, 
respectively,  to  the  company’s  consolidated  revenue;  chemical  sales  accounted  for  the 
balance.  Among  Asian  Paints’  international  businesses,  while  the  Middle  East  contributes 
the lion’s share at 51% to revenue, the Caribbean contributes 14%. Asia and South Pacific 
contribute 27% and 8%, respectively. 
 
Investment Theme 
The  paints  industry  is  expected  to  post  robust  volume  growth  led  by  strong  repainting 
demand  and  from  construction.  Growth  in  the  repainting  segment,  accounting  for  about 
90% of decorative demand, is on account of good demand in rural and small towns. Further, 
expected  growth  in  construction  activity  over  the  next  five  years  creates  opportunity  for 
fresh painting. Though Asian Paints is expected to grow ahead of the market on account of 
its pricing strategy at the lower end, higher growth in premium products, brand equity and 
distribution strength, moderation in real estate and auto segments can act as barrier. 
 
Key Risks 
A  slowdown  in  the  economy  is  the  biggest  risk  for  the  paints  industry,  as  about  75%  of 
demand for decorative paints arises from repainting, which, in turn, depends heavily on the 
country’s economic condition.  
 
A rise in crude oil price and rupee depreciation could hurt the company’s margin as crude 
derivatives account for majority of Asian Paints’ input costs.

40  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 

Financial Statements 
Key Assumption Income statement (INR mn)
Yearto March FY13 FY14 FY15E FY16E FY17E Year to March FY13 FY14 FY15E FY16E FY17E
Macro Assumptions Net revenues   109,386   127,148   150,344   178,301   213,695
GDP(Y‐o‐Y %)  5.0               4.8               5.4               6.3               7.5
Cost of materials      64,130      73,407      86,601   102,521   122,750
Inflation (Avg) 7.4               6.2               5.5               6.0               6.0
Gross profit      45,256      53,741      63,742      75,780      90,945
Repo rate (exit rate) 7.50               8.0               7.8               7.3               6.5
USD/INR (Avg) 54.5            60.5            58.0            56.0            55.0 Employee costs         6,236         7,597         9,113      10,803      13,051
Ad & sales costs         5,227         6,547         7,764         9,208      11,050
Company  Others      16,474      19,618      22,949      27,133      32,011
Sales assumptions 0.1               0.1               1.1               2.1               3.1 EBITDA      17,320      19,979      23,916      28,636      34,832
Volume growth ‐  4.5            11.0            11.0            13.0            15.0 Depreciation         1,546         2,457         2,509         2,867         3,224
standalone
EBIT      15,774      17,522      21,407      25,770      31,608
Pricing change ‐ standalone 10.4               6.0               6.0               6.0               6.0
Other income         1,145         1,342         1,615         1,842         2,216
Subsidiary net sales growth 19.9            13.9            19.9            18.4            16.4
EBIT incl. other income      16,919      18,865      23,023      27,612      33,824
Cost assumptions 0.1               0.1               1.1               2.1               3.1
Net interest charges             367             422             435             389             346
Titanium Dioxide (as % of  32.3            31.1            31.1            32.2            33.2
COGS) PBT      16,552      18,442      22,588      27,223      33,478
Crude Linked RM (as % of  17.3            19.1            20.1            21.0            22.0 Provision for taxation         4,957         5,715         7,002         8,439      10,378
COGS) Core PAT      11,595      12,727      15,585      18,784      23,100
Packing Material (as % of  14.9            14.3            14.4            14.3            14.2 Extraordinary item               ‐            (100)            (280)               ‐               ‐
COGS) Minority            (456)            (440)            (545)            (657)            (809)
COGS as % of sales (Consol) 58.6            57.7            57.6            57.5            57.4
Adjusted PAT      11,139      12,188      14,760      18,126      22,292
COGS as % of sales  57.9            58.0            56.4            56.3            55.8
Eshares outstanding (mn)             959             959             959             959             959
(standalone)
EPS (INR) basic            11.6            12.8            15.7            18.9            23.2
Staff costs as % of sales  5.7               6.0               6.1               6.1               6.1
(Consol) Diluted shares (mn)         959.2         959.2         959.2         959.2         959.2
Staff costs as % of sales  4.8               5.3               5.4               5.4               5.4 EPS (INR) fully diluted            11.6            12.7            15.4            18.9            23.2
(standalone) CEPS (INR)             13.7            15.8            18.9            22.6            27.4
A&P as % of sales (Consol) 4.8               5.1               5.2              5.2             5.2 DPS 4.6 5.3 6.5 7.9 9.8
A&P as % of sales  4.8               5.3               5.4               5.4               5.4 Dividend payout ratio (%)            39.6            41.7            42.0            42.0            42.0
(Domestic)
Tax rate            29.9            31.0            31.0            31.0            31.0

Financial assumptions 0.1               0.1               1.1               2.1               3.1


Tax rate (Consol) 29.9            31.0            31.0           31.0          31.0 Common size metrics (%)
Debtor days 29                32                32               32              32 Year to March FY13 FY14 FY15E FY16E FY17E
Inventory days  98             103             103            103           103
Cost of materials            58.6            57.7            57.6            57.5            57.4
Payable days 77                87                88               88              88
Employee costs               5.7               6.0               6.1               6.1               6.1
Cash conversion cycle  50                48                47                47                47
(days) Advertising & sales costs               4.8               5.1               5.2               5.2               5.2
Depreciation as % of gross  5.6               7.0               6.5               6.5               6.5 Other general expenditure            15.1            15.4            15.3            15.2            15.0
block EBITDA margin            15.8            15.7            15.9            16.1            16.3
Capex 7230         2,000         5,500        5,500       5,500 EBIT margin            14.4            13.8            14.2            14.5            14.8
Dividend as % of net profit 39.6            41.7            42.0           42.0          42.0 Net profit margin            10.2               9.7            10.0            10.2            10.4

Growth metrics (%)
Year to March FY13 FY14 FY15E FY16E FY17E
Revenues            13.6            16.2            18.2            18.6            19.9
EBITDA             14.8            15.4            19.7            19.7            21.6
PBT             13.8            11.4            22.5            20.5            23.0
Net profit            12.7               9.4            21.1            22.8            23.0
EPS 12.7 9.4 21.1 22.8 23.0

41  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
Consumer Goods 

Balance sheet Cash flow metric
As on 31st March FY13 FY14E FY15E FY16E FY17E Year to March FY13 FY14E FY15E FY16E FY17E
Share capital  959 959 959 959 959 Operating cash flow 10,989 14,954 16,138 18,934 22,735
Reserves       32,884      39,124      46,631      55,850      67,187 Financing cash flow (6,007) (6,320) (8,168) (9,497) (11,500)
Shareholders' funds      33,843      40,083      47,590      56,809      68,146 Investing cash flow (7,970) (2,808) (5,700) (5,700) (5,700)
Minority interest         1,608         2,047         2,593         3,250         4,059 Change in cash (2,989) 5,826 2,270 3,738 5,536
Borrowings         2,510         2,660         2,460         2,260         2,060 Capex       (7,230)       (2,000)       (5,500)       (5,500)       (5,500)
Deferred tax liability 1,544 1,544 1,544 1,544 1,544 Dividends paid (5,155) (5,948) (7,253) (8,907) (10,954)
Sources of funds      39,504      46,334      54,186      63,862      75,808
Total net fixed assets 24,560 24,911 28,102 30,935 33,411 Ratios
Goodwill on consolidation 442 442 442 442 442 Year to March FY13 FY14E FY15E FY16E FY17E
Non current investments 1,501 1,501 1,501 1,501 1,501 ROAE (%) 36.3 33.0 33.7 34.7 35.7
Current investments 1,306 1,306 1,306 1,306 1,306 ROACE (%) 47.6 43.7 45.1 45.8 47.2
Cash and cash equivalents 7,520 13,346 15,616 19,353 24,889 Debtor days 29 32 32 32 32
Inventories 18,303 20,699 24,438 28,931 34,639 Inventory days  98 103 103 103 103
Sundry debtors 9,809 11,102 13,181 15,632 18,735 Payable days 77 87 88 88 88
Loans & advances 3,211 3,211 3,211 3,211 3,211 Cash conversn cycle (days) 50 48 47 47 47
Other assets 1,215 1,215 1,215 1,215 1,215 Current ratio               1.5               1.6               1.7               1.8               1.9
Total c. assets (ex cash) 32,538 36,227 42,045 48,988 57,800 Debt/EBITDA               0.1               0.1               0.1               0.1               0.1
Trade payable 14,416 17,453 20,879 24,717 29,595 Debt/Equity               0.1               0.1               0.1               0.0               0.0
Other c. liabilities & prov 13,946 13,946 13,946 13,946 13,946 Adjusted debt/equity               0.1               0.1               0.1               0.0               0.0
Total c.liabilities & prov 28,362 31,399 34,826 38,664 43,541 Interest coverage (x)            46.2            44.7            52.9            70.9            97.9
Net current assets (ex cash) 4,176 4,828 7,219 10,325 14,259
Uses of funds      39,504      46,334      54,186      63,862      75,808 Operating ratios
BV (INR)                35            41.8            49.6            59.2            71.0 Year to March FY13 FY14E FY15E FY16E FY17E
Total asset turnover               3.0               3.0               3.0               3.0               3.1
Free cash flow (INR mn) Fixed asset turnover               6.0               5.4               6.0               6.4               7.1
Year to March FY13 FY14E FY15E FY16E FY17E Equity turnover               3.6               3.4               3.4               3.4               3.4
Net profit      11,139      12,188      14,760      18,126      22,292
Add: Non cash charge         2,369         3,418         3,770         3,913         4,378 Valuation parameters
Depreciation         1,546         2,457         2,509         2,867         3,224 Year to March FY13 FY14E FY15E FY16E FY17E
Others             823             961         1,261         1,047         1,154 Diluted EPS (INR)            11.6            12.7            15.4            18.9            23.2
Gross cash flow      13,508      15,606      18,530      22,039      26,670 Y‐o‐Y growth (%)           12.7              9.4           21.1           22.8           23.0
Less:Changes in WC 2,519 652 2,392 3,105 3,934 CEPS (INR)            13.7            15.8            18.9            22.6            27.4
Cash from operations      10,989      14,954      16,138      18,934      22,735 Diluted P/E (x)            43.8            39.8            33.1            26.9            21.9
Less: Capex 7,230 2,000 5,500 5,500 5,500 Price/BV (x)            14.4            12.1            10.3               8.6               7.2
Free cash flow         3,759      12,954      10,638      13,434      17,235 EV/Sales (x)               4.4               3.7               3.2               2.6               2.2
EV/EBITDA (x)            27.8            23.7            19.8            16.4            13.3
Dividend yield (%)               0.9               1.0               1.3               1.6               1.9

Peer comparison valuation 
    Market cap Diluted PE (X) EV/EBITDA (X) ROAE (%)
Name  (USD mn) FY15E FY16E FY15E FY16E  FY15E FY16E
Asian Paints  8,236 33.1 27.1 19.9 16.6  33.5 34.4
Akzo Nobel India Ltd  795 24.4 23.7 17.5 15.2  18.4 21.1
Berger Paints India Ltd  1,419 32.5 27.6 18.8 15.8  23.9 26.1
Hindustan Unilever  21,653 30.2 27.4 21.7 19.4  85.6 74.4
ITC  44,236 26.7 23.5 17.4 15.2  37.1 37.7
Kansai Nerolac Paints Ltd  1,243 29.2 23.9 16.9 14.1  16.0 17.7
Pidilite Industries  2,683 28.6 23.0 19.0 15.1  26.1 27.3
United Spirits  6,953 54.6 44.4 27.6 23.6  9.7 10.9
AVERAGE  ‐ 31.8 29.1 19.6 18.0  31.2 36.9
Source: Edelweiss research

42  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
 

Additional Data 
Directors Data 
Ashwin Choksi  Non‐executive Chairman  Ashwin Dani Non‐executive Vice Chairman
Abhay Vakil  Non‐executive Director  K.B.S. Anand MD & CEO 
Mahendra Choksi  Non‐executive Director  Amar Vakil Non‐executive Director 
Mrs Ina Dani  Non‐executive Director  Ms. Tarjani Vakil Non‐Executive Independent Director
Dipankar Basu  Non‐Executive Independent Director Deepak Satwalekar Non‐Executive Independent Director
R. A. Shah  Non‐Executive Independent Director S. Sivaram Non‐Executive Independent Director
Mahendra Shah  Non‐Executive Independent Director S. Ramadorai Non‐Executive Independent Director
 
M. K. Sharma  Non‐Executive Independent Director
 
  Auditors ‐  Shah & Co‐ Chareted Accountants, B S R & Associates ‐ Charted Accountants 
*as per last annual report
 
 
 
Top 10 holdings
Perc. Holding Perc. Holding
Life Insurance Corp Of India                       6.41 Smiti Holding & Trading Co                       5.64
Isis Holding & Trading                       5.51 Geetanjali Trading & Inv                       5.14
Ojasvi Trading Pvt Ltd                       4.90 Elcid Investments Limited                       2.95
Oppenheimerfunds Incorporated                       2.32 Sudhanava Inv & Trading                       1.99
Rupen Investment & Indus                       1.95 Satyadharma Invst & Trdg                       1.91
*as per last available data
 

Bulk Deals
Data  Acquired / Seller  B/S Qty Traded Price 
     
No Data Available     
*in last one year 

Insider Trades
 Reporting Data    Acquired / Seller    B/S   Qty Traded 
07 Feb 2014  Suprasad Investments and Trading Company Private Limited Buy  30000.00
02 Dec 2013  Sudhanva Investments And Trading Pvt. Ltd. Sell  116500.00
*in last one year

43  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
RATING & INTERPRETATION

Company  Absolute  Relative Relative Company Absolute  Relative Relative


reco reco risk  reco  reco  Risk 
Asian Paints  BUY  SO  M  Bajaj Corp  HOLD  SU  H 
Colgate  HOLD  SP  M  Dabur  BUY  SO  M 
Emami  BUY  SP  H  GlaxoSmithKline Consumer  HOLD  SP  M 
Healthcare 
Godrej Consumer   BUY  SP  H  Hindustan Unilever  REDUCE  SU  L 
ITC  BUY  SO  L  Marico  BUY  SO  M 
Nestle Ltd  HOLD  SU  L  Pidilite Industries  BUY  SP  M 
United Spirits  BUY  SP  H         

ABSOLUTE RATING 
Ratings Expected absolute returns over 12 months

Buy More than 15%

Hold Between 15% and - 5%

Reduce Less than -5%

RELATIVE RETURNS RATING 
Ratings Criteria
Sector Outperformer (SO) Stock return > 1.25 x Sector return

Sector Performer (SP) Stock return > 0.75 x Sector return

Stock return < 1.25 x Sector return

Sector Underperformer (SU) Stock return < 0.75 x Sector return

Sector return is market cap weighted average return for the coverage universe
within the sector

RELATIVE RISK RATING
Ratings Criteria

Low (L) Bottom 1/3rd percentile in the sector

Medium (M) Middle 1/3rd percentile in the sector

High (H) Top 1/3rd percentile in the sector

Risk ratings are based on Edelweiss risk model

SECTOR RATING 
Ratings Criteria
Overweight (OW) Sector return > 1.25 x Nifty return

Equalweight (EW) Sector return > 0.75 x Nifty return

Sector return < 1.25 x Nifty return

Underweight (UW) Sector return < 0.75 x Nifty return

44  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints

   Edelweiss Securities Limited, Edelweiss House, off C.S.T. Road, Kalina, Mumbai – 400 098. 
Board: (91‐22) 4009 4400, Email: research@edelweissfin.com 

Vikas Khemani   Head   Institutional Equities    vikas.khemani@edelweissfin.com  +91 22 2286 4206 

Nischal Maheshwari  Co‐Head  Institutional Equities & Head   Research  nischal.maheshwari@edelweissfin.com   +91 22 4063 5476 

Nirav Sheth  Head   Sales    nirav.sheth@edelweissfin.com  +91 22 4040 7499 

Coverage group(s) of stocks by primary analyst(s): Consumer Goods 
Asian Paints, Bajaj Corp, Colgate, Dabur, Godrej Consumer , Emami, Hindustan Unilever, ITC, Marico, Nestle Ltd, Pidilite Industries, GlaxoSmithKline 
Consumer Healthcare, United Spirits 
 

Recent Research 

Date  Company Title Price (INR) Recos

29‐May‐14  Pidilite  Volumes robust; VAM singes  309 Buy


Industries  margins;  
Result Update 
26‐May‐14  Colgate  Margins bounce back;  1369 Hold
Palmolive  volumes resilient;  
Result Update 
23‐May‐14  ITC  Margins surprise; Budget 2014  343 Buy
awaited;  Result Update 

Distribution of Ratings / Market Cap 
Edelweiss Research Coverage Universe  Rating Interpretation 
   
    Buy  Hold  Reduce Total Rating Expected to
 
Rating Distribution*  133  40  16  190 Buy  appreciate more than 15% over a 12‐month period 
* 1 stocks under review 
Hold  appreciate up to 15% over a 12‐month period 
> 50bn  Between 10bn and 50 bn  < 10bn
 
Reduce depreciate more than 5% over a 12‐month period
Market Cap (INR)  126  55  9

45  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Consumer Goods 

DISCLAIMER  
 
General Disclaimer: 
This  report  has  been  prepared  by  Edelweiss  Securities  Limited  (Edelweiss).  Edelweiss,  its  holding  company  and  associate 
companies are a full service, integrated investment banking, portfolio management and brokerage group. Our research analysts 
and  sales  persons  provide  important  input  into  our  investment  banking  activities.  This  report  does  not  constitute  an  offer  or 
solicitation for the purchase or sale of any financial instrument or as an official confirmation of any transaction. The information 
contained  herein  is  from  publicly  available  data  or  other  sources  believed  to  be  reliable,  but  we  do  not  represent  that  it  is 
accurate or complete and it should not be relied on as such. Edelweiss or any of its affiliates/ group companies shall not be in any 
way responsible for any loss or damage that may arise to any person from any inadvertent error in the information contained in 
this report. This report is provided for assistance only and is not intended to be and must not alone be taken as the basis for an 
investment decision. The user assumes the entire risk of any use made of this information. Each recipient of this report should 
make  such  investigation  as  it  deems  necessary  to  arrive  at  an  independent  evaluation  of  an  investment  in  the  securities  of 
companies referred to in this report (including the merits and risks involved), and should consult his own advisors to determine 
the merits and risks of such investment. The investment discussed or views expressed may not be suitable for all investors. We 
and our affiliates, group companies, officers, directors, and employees may: (a) from time to time, have long or short positions in, 
and buy or sell the securities thereof, of company (ies) mentioned herein or (b) be engaged in any other transaction involving such 
securities and earn brokerage or other compensation or act as advisor or lender/borrower to such company (ies) or have other 
potential  conflict  of  interest  with  respect  to  any  recommendation  and  related  information  and  opinions.  This  information  is 
strictly  confidential  and  is  being  furnished  to  you  solely  for  your  information.  This  information  should  not  be  reproduced  or 
redistributed or passed on directly or indirectly in any form to any other person or published, copied, in whole or in part, for any 
purpose. This report is not directed or intended for distribution to, or use by, any person or entity who is a citizen or resident of or 
located  in  any  locality,  state,  country  or  other  jurisdiction,  where  such  distribution,  publication,  availability  or  use  would  be 
contrary  to  law,  regulation  or  which  would  subject  Edelweiss  and  affiliates/  group  companies  to  any  registration  or  licensing 
requirements within such jurisdiction. The distribution of this report in certain jurisdictions may be restricted by law, and persons 
in whose possession this report comes, should inform themselves about and observe, any such restrictions. The information given 
in this report is as of the date of this report and there can be no assurance that future results or events will be consistent with this 
information. This information is subject to change without any prior notice. Edelweiss reserves the right to make modifications 
and alterations to this statement as may be required from time to time. However, Edelweiss is under no obligation to update or 
keep the information current. Nevertheless, Edelweiss is committed to providing independent and transparent recommendation 
to its client and would be happy to provide any information in response to specific client queries. Neither Edelweiss nor any of its 
affiliates,  group  companies,  directors,  employees,  agents  or  representatives  shall  be  liable  for  any  damages  whether  direct, 
indirect, special or consequential including lost revenue or lost profits that may arise from or in connection with the use of the 
information.  Past  performance  is  not  necessarily  a  guide  to  future  performance.  The  disclosures  of  interest  statements 
incorporated  in  this  report  are  provided  solely  to  enhance  the  transparency  and  should  not  be  treated  as  endorsement  of  the 
views expressed in the report. Edelweiss Securities Limited generally prohibits its analysts, persons reporting to analysts and their 
dependents  from  maintaining  a  financial  interest  in  the  securities  or  derivatives  of  any  companies  that  the  analysts  cover.  The 
information  provided  in  these  reports  remains,  unless  otherwise  stated,  the  copyright  of  Edelweiss.  All  layout,  design,  original 
artwork, concepts and other Intellectual Properties, remains the property and copyright Edelweiss and may not be used in any 
form or for any purpose whatsoever by any party without the express written permission of the copyright holders.  
 
Analyst Certification: 
The analyst for this report certifies that all of the views expressed in this report accurately reflect his or her personal views about 
the subject company or companies and its or their securities, and no part of his or her compensation was, is or will be, directly or 
indirectly related to specific recommendations or views expressed in this report.  
 
Analyst holding in the stock: No. 
 
Edelweiss shall not be liable for any delay or any other interruption which may occur in presenting the data due to any reason 
including  network  (Internet)  reasons  or  snags  in  the  system,  break  down  of  the  system  or  any  other  equipment,  server 
breakdown, maintenance shutdown, breakdown of communication services or inability of the Edelweiss to present the data. In no 
event  shall  the  Edelweiss  be  liable  for  any  damages,  including  without  limitation  direct  or  indirect,  special,  incidental,  or 
consequential  damages,  losses  or  expenses  arising  in  connection  with  the  data  presented  by  the  Edelweiss  through  this 
presentation. 
 

46  Edelweiss Securities Limited 
  Asian Paints
Disclaimer for U.S. Persons 
This  research  report  is  a  product  of  Edelweiss  Securities  Limited,  which  is  the  employer  of  the  research  analyst(s)  who  has 
prepared  the  research  report.  The  research  analyst(s)  preparing  the  research  report  is/are  resident  outside  the  United  States 
(U.S.)  and  are  not  associated  persons  of  any  U.S.  regulated  broker‐dealer  and  therefore  the  analyst(s)  is/are  not  subject  to 
supervision by a U.S. broker‐dealer, and is/are not required to satisfy the regulatory licensing requirements of FINRA or required 
to otherwise comply with U.S. rules or regulations regarding, among other things, communications with a subject company, public 
appearances and trading securities held by a research analyst account. 
This report is intended for distribution by Edelweiss Securities Limited only to "Major Institutional Investors" as defined by Rule 
15a‐6(b)(4) of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Act, 1934 (the Exchange  Act) and interpretations thereof  by U.S. Securities and 
Exchange Commission (SEC) in reliance on Rule 15a 6(a)(2). If the recipient of this report is not a Major Institutional Investor as 
specified above, then it should not act upon this report and return the same to the sender. Further, this report may not be copied, 
duplicated and/or transmitted onward to any U.S. person, which is not the Major Institutional Investor.  
In reliance on the exemption from registration provided by Rule 15a‐6 of the Exchange Act and interpretations thereof by the SEC 
in  order  to  conduct  certain  business  with  Major  Institutional  Investors,  Edelweiss  Securities  Limited  has  entered  into  an 
agreement with a U.S. registered broker‐dealer, Enclave Capital, LLC ("Enclave").  
Transactions in securities discussed in this research report should be effected through Enclave Capital, LLC. 
Disclaimer for U.K. Persons 
The  contents  of  this  research  report  have  not  been  approved  by  an  authorised  person  within  the  meaning  of  the  Financial 
Services and Markets Act 2000 ("FSMA").  
In the United Kingdom, this research report is being distributed only to and is directed only at (a) persons who have professional 
experience  in  matters  relating  to  investments  falling  within  Article  19(5)  of  the  FSMA  (Financial  Promotion)  Order  2005  (the 
“Order”); (b) persons falling within Article 49(2)(a) to (d) of the Order (including high net worth companies and unincorporated 
associations);  and  (c)  any  other  persons  to  whom  it  may  otherwise  lawfully  be  communicated  (all  such  persons  together  being 
referred to as “relevant persons”). 
This research report must not be acted on or relied on by persons who are not relevant persons. Any investment or investment 
activity  to  which  this  research  report  relates  is  available  only  to  relevant  persons  and  will  be  engaged  in  only  with  relevant 
persons.  Any  person  who  is  not  a  relevant  person  should  not  act  or  rely  on  this  research  report  or  any  of  its  contents.  This 
research  report  must  not  be  distributed,  published,  reproduced  or  disclosed  (in  whole  or  in  part)  by  recipients  to  any  other 
person.  
Disclaimer for Canadian Persons 
This research report is a product of Edelweiss Securities Limited ("ESL"), which is the employer of the research analysts who have 
prepared the research report.  The research analysts preparing the research report are resident outside the Canada and are not 
associated persons of any Canadian registered adviser and/or dealer and, therefore, the analysts are not subject to supervision by 
a Canadian registered adviser and/or dealer, and are not required to satisfy the regulatory licensing requirements of the Ontario 
Securities  Commission,  other  Canadian  provincial  securities  regulators,  the  Investment  Industry  Regulatory  Organization  of 
Canada and are not required to otherwise comply with Canadian rules or regulations regarding, among other things, the research 
analysts' business or relationship with a subject company or trading of securities by a research analyst. 
This report is intended for distribution by ESL only to "Permitted Clients" (as defined in National Instrument 31‐103 ("NI 31‐103")) 
who  are  resident  in  the  Province  of  Ontario,  Canada  (an  "Ontario  Permitted  Client").    If  the  recipient  of  this  report  is  not  an 
Ontario Permitted Client, as specified above, then the recipient should not act upon this report and should return the report to 
the sender.  Further, this report may not be copied, duplicated and/or transmitted onward to any Canadian person. 
ESL  is  relying  on  an  exemption  from  the  adviser  and/or  dealer  registration  requirements  under  NI  31‐103  available  to  certain 
international  advisers  and/or  dealers.    Please  be  advised  that  (i)  ESL  is  not  registered  in  the  Province  of  Ontario  to  trade  in 
securities  nor  is  it  registered  in  the  Province  of  Ontario  to  provide  advice  with  respect  to  securities;  (ii)  ESL's  head  office  or 
principal  place  of  business  is  located  in  India;  (iii)  all  or  substantially  all  of  ESL's  assets  may  be  situated  outside  of  Canada;  (iv) 
there may be difficulty enforcing legal rights against ESL because of the above; and (v) the name and address of the ESL's agent for 
service of process in the Province of Ontario is: Bamac Services Inc., 181 Bay Street, Suite 2100, Toronto, Ontario M5J 2T3 Canada. 
 
Copyright 2009 Edelweiss Research (Edelweiss Securities Ltd). All rights reserved 

Access the entire repository of Edelweiss Research on www.edelresearch.com 

47  Edelweiss Securities Limited