You are on page 1of 35

Portrait Painting Lessons

Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques

46

Table of Con T e n T s

Know Your Subject: An Excerpt from Expressive Portraits by Jean Pederson

Painting Skin Tones: An Excerpt from Vibrant Children’s Portraits by Victoria Lisi

Brush With History (The Artist’s Magazine, January/February 2013)

3

 

More r esour C e s

7

Quiet Reverence: Inspired by the human experience, Dongfeng Li paints his subjects with emotion and dignity by Meredith E Lewis (Watercolor Artist,

April 2012)

20

27

35

2

resist the urge to exaggerate proportions

Because this model is so physically fi t, it would be easy to draw his muscular upper body larger than it is. But if we look carefully at the proportions of the fi gure, we’ll fi nd that they generally fi t into the standard guidelines for an adult male.

self assured

watercolor, gesso and India ink on

140-lb. (300gsm) cold-pressed paper 30" x 22" (76cm x 56cm) collection of the artist

know your subject

B ecause our faces are so similar, our minds want to exag- gerate the small nuances that distinguish one face from

another. As artists, we try to paint what we see, rather than what we think we see. If we observe carefully how light falls on the diff erent planes of the face, we see shapes instead of features. I keep these ideas in mind when I begin a drawing. Regardless of where you are in your artistic journey, a solid foundation in the structural relationships of your subject will give you the confi dence to draw and paint with freedom. It allows you to understand the fi gure and to observe your model’s distinct features as they deviate from the standard. Sometimes our drawings go awry, but with this foundation, we can identify problem areas and adjust them appropriately.

notice relationships among facial features

The key to becoming adept at drawing and paint- ing many diff erent faces is to see their similarities fi rst. No matter how much individual facial features vary from person to person, we are strikingly similar in the relationships of our features. The closer a face corresponds to the average relationships of facial features, the more “comfortable” that face will appear. Most of us have facial relationships that diverge slightly from the norm, giving each of us our own unique look. When you create portraits, considering some standard relationships will help you develop a “comfortable” face as a foundation before making any adjustments to accommodate the unique- ness of your model. You will learn to spot individual diff erences among your models and adjust angles and distances to gain an accurate likeness.

With practice and experience, you’ll be able to draw and paint a portrait through shapes and rela- tionships and then use the “comfortable” face as a guideline if something doesn’t seem quite right. By comparing it with the standard facial format, you’ll discover where your drawing is out of balance in its relationships.

  • 3 the “comfortable” face

In general, this model’s features and facial relationships are proportional. This standard is seen globally as what a “comfortable” face should be. All ethnici- ties would see this as a comfortable face.

transfi xed

watercolor and gouache on 140-lb. (300gsm) cold-pressed paper 11" x 15" (28cm x 38cm) collection of doris lehodey

notice relationships among facial features The key to becoming adept at drawing and paint- ing many

ill-placed features

notice relationships among facial features The key to becoming adept at drawing and paint- ing many

On my computer, I separated the model’s features and re- arranged them on her face to illustrate just how similar we all are in our facial relationships. If we draw these relationships without considering average proportions, the face becomes odd or less comfortable. You can see how slight changes to these proportions change the appeal of the simple face, which in turn can signifi cantly aff ect the success of your portrait.

notice relationships among facial features The key to becoming adept at drawing and paint- ing many

make a three-dimensional face reference

Create your own inexpensive reference tools that will help you understand general characteristics of facial features and the relationships among them. Refer to them as you draw and paint. You need a standard egg- shaped balloon and a felt-tip marker for this one.

balloon head

Mark the guidelines and standard relationships of the com- fortable face (see pages 26–27) on your infl ated balloon. The “comfortable face” measurements change because we cannot see the hidden side of the face; however, the lines that mark positions don’t change. Mark the guidelines and standard relationships of the comfortable face on your infl ated balloon. Refer to the balloon to help you evaluate what relationships may be out of proportion in your por- trait. If you “tie” your balloon by wrapping the end around a pencil, it can be defl ated and saved for future reference.

make a three-dimensional face reference Create your own inexpensive reference tools that will help you understand
make a three-dimensional face reference Create your own inexpensive reference tools that will help you understand

25

46

SKIN
SKIN

The range of skin tones is vast. Buying a tube of paint marked “fl esh” is completely inadequate. Look at the enormous array of skin tones available at a makeup counter. Some companies even offer customized blends. Racial ancestry plays a signifi cant role in skin tone. Some children are multiracial with both strong and subtle infl uences on skin tone. Careful observation is crucial. What color is the skin undertone? Pink, blue, olive, yellow, purple? All sorts of beautiful subtleties exist in skin colors of all races. The skin also changes hue on different parts of the face. Thinner skin, such as at the temples, tends toward more cool tones. The tip of the nose, cheeks and forehead tend toward warmer, rosier hues. This holds true for all races. Lighting also affects skin tones. Skin color changes dramatically depending on the amount of light falling on it. A strong light lightens the areas of skin where it falls, while low light can darken the skin tones. Even a very light-skinned child will look dark if the light is insuffi cient. The color of the light also has an infl uence. The skin tones of a child on a cloudy day or standing in the shade will look cooler. Furthermore, different light sources give different results. Cool northern light gives a cooler bluish hue. Low evening or morning sunlight is pink or orange and affects skin tones accordingly. If you make a skin chart of all the potential skin palettes, you’ll be in a much better position to select appropriate colors.

Margaret

oil on canvas 14" × 11" (36cm × 28cm) collection of Jane Maday

47
47

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 8

DETERMINING VALUES

The next step after drawing is estab- lishing the correct values. Value is the degree of
The next step after drawing is estab-
lishing the correct values. Value is the
degree of lightness or darkness. It is
more important to get correct values
than correct color. A black-and-white
photo is an arrangement of values from
black through white with all the grays in
between. A person in a black-and-white
photo is still recognizable. Imagine
looking at the same photos with no
values—only colors. The subject prob-
ably wouldn’t be recognizable. There
are a number of tips and techniques for
getting correct values.
Using Gray Scales to Mix
Using Gray Scales to Test Mixtures
A gray scale has eight to ten values,
ranging from pure white to black. Lay
the gray scale on your reference and
painting (only when the painting is dry!)
to compare the values. Keep it near
your palette when you mix your colors.
Laminate your gray scale to try this
handy trick. Place a mixture of paint
directly on the gray scale to see if it
matches the reference. Wipe off the
paint with a paper towel once you’ve
established the correct value.
ARTIST’S TIP
Here are a couple of tricks that will
help you see values:
1.
Squint at your reference or
painting. This allows you to see
value more distinctly. Make this
a habit. Don’t try to paint while
squinting though.
2.
Hold a sheet of acetate or
undeveloped fi lm close to your
eyes like a pair of spectacles,
then view your painting and
reference through the colored
fi lm. This will remove much of
the color, and you will see the
values better.
Isolating Values
Punch a hole in two pieces of card stock. Lay one piece on your reference and one
on the corresponding area of the dry painting. This will isolate the area so you can
better judge value. This technique also works well for selecting colors (see page 59).
48
48

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 9

PLACING VALUES Weak values create a weak painting. Strong values draw attention. With children, the values
PLACING VALUES
Weak values create a weak painting. Strong values draw
attention. With children, the values should be subtle and
change gradually or they will look too harsh.
Mix a suffi cient number of values. I use at least fi ve, but
no more than nine. When establishing values, it’s better
to use more opaque colors. Mix white into all of the lighter
mixes. Titanium White is very opaque.
Concentrate on the values early in the painting. Put the
darkest color down as soon as you can. It will be a key to
determining values in the rest of the painting.
As a general principle, apply dark colors thinly and light
colors with more paint. The idea is to let the light of the canvas
shine through the darks. The light colors will refl ect light
automatically.
Place the center of interest in the light area of the painting.
Use contrast (such as a black pupil with a light glint) to draw
the viewer’s attention to the center of interest (usually the eye
angled closest to the viewer in a three-quarter view or the eyes
in a front view). Avoid extreme value contrast at the edge of
your painting, as it leads the viewer’s eye off the page.
Clarifying Value and Color
Using Sepia Photos
To separate value from hue (color), it can help to make a
black-and-white and a color print of your reference photo.
Use the black-and-white print for the underpainting stage
and the color print for the color stage.
Sepia closely emulates Burnt Umber, which is often used for
the underpainting in oils, so it can be helpful for determining
the values in underpaintings. Use photo editing software to
manipulate and improve your photos to make them more
suitable for painting.
ARTIST’S TIP
Black is a controversial color. Some artists never use black from a tube. Instead,
they mix dark colors with their complements (colors opposite each other on
the color wheel). This creates a black that is more vibrant than pure fl at black,
which can suck the life out of a painting. Try using tiny amounts of Mars Black
at the center of interest. Mix the rest of your darks with complements, such
as French Ultramarine and Burnt Sienna, or Permanent Alizarin Crimson and
Winsor Green.
49
49

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 10

BLENDING

Many artists don’t advocate blending, preferring a looser, more painterly style. This approach can look great
Many artists don’t advocate blending, preferring a looser, more
painterly style. This approach can look great on portraits of
adults, but painting the smooth skin of a child calls for blending.
Blending is easier with a properly primed canvas and the
right brushes, paints and medium. Opaque colors blend better
than transparent ones. Don’t try to blend colors that have
begun to dry out. You’ll have a streaky mess. Use a good
brush with the right level of stiffness to apply paint, such as
a synthetic mongoose fi lbert.
Soft, Rounded Brush
Fan Brush
Practice Blending
Once you’ve applied the paint to the
canvas with a fi lbert, use a soft,rounded
brush, such as a mop or glazing brush,
for blending. Always use a clean, dry
brush.
Fans are also good for blending.
Select three colors from one of the skin
tone palettes (see pages 53–56), and
lay them out on your palette. Thoroughly
mix a drop of medium into each color.
Mix nine values from light to dark and
place them side by side on your canvas
(see left bar above). Use a glazing or fan
brush to blend, creating a blended bar
that goes smoothly from light to dark.
It usually takes two coats to get it really
smooth (see right bar above).
If you have trouble, make sure you
take enough time to mix the paint. You
may not have mixed enough values, or
the paint might be dried out. It should
be buttery, not too liquid or too stiff.
Toddler Skin
Toddler Skin, Blended
I applied the paint with a no. 2 short
fi lbert. I didn’t blend the paint after
applying it.
Here is the same image after I blended
the paint with a no. 6 glazing brush. The
skin is much smoother.
50
50

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 11

GLAZES Glazing produces rich colors with luminosity and depth. It is a wonderful technique for fi
GLAZES
Glazing produces rich colors with luminosity and depth. It
is a wonderful technique for fi nishing the painting process.
Glazing is done with only transparent colors. These allow
light to pass through the paint fi lm and bounce off the paint
underneath, almost like a sheet of stained glass or acetate
overlaid on the painting. Because oils dry slowly, it’s usually
possible to apply only one or two glaze layers per painting.
It’s best to use opaque colors in the early stage and trans-
parent colors in the later glazing stage. If you try to use only
glazing colors at the beginning, you won’t get coverage and
your work will look streaky. A glaze will make an area darker
in value.
Practice glazing transparent colors over dried opaque
ones to get a sense of what this technique can add to your
work. Mix a drop of fi ne detail medium in your glaze color.
Paint the transparent coat thinly, spreading it with your glaz-
ing brush or fan.
See the list of transparent colors below. Of course there
are more transparent colors than these. Many manufacturers’
tubes are labeled opaque, transparent or translucent. If not,
there’s a simple way to test colors. Draw a black line with a
marker on canvas. Paint color swatches over it. Opaque col-
ors will cover the line better, while transparent colors will let
the line show. The colors that are in between are translucent.
Permanent Magenta
Indian Yellow Deep
TRANSPARENT
COLORS FROM
MY PALETTE
Red Rose
Green Gold
Rose Madder
Winsor Green
Genuine
Permanent Alizarin
Winsor Blue
Crimson
(Green Shade)
Burnt Sienna
French Ultramarine
Transparent
Violet Deep
Red Ochre
Transparent Maroon
Winsor Violet Dioxazine
Burnt Sienna
French Ultramarine
Green Gold
Indian Yellow Deep
Permanent Alizarin Crimson
Permanent Magenta
Red Rose
Rose Madder Genuine
Transparent Maroon
Transparent Red Ochre
Violet Deep
Winsor Blue (Green Shade)
Winsor Green
Winsor Violet Dioxazine
Glazing Chart
Make your own chart once you know which of your colors are transparent. Paint
an opaque fl esh strip using any of the skin tone palettes, and let it dry. You can
use fast-drying medium to save time. Then, mix transparent colors with a thin,
fast-drying medium and apply them over the fl esh strip. This will give you an idea
of how skin colors might respond to various glazes.
51
51

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 12

SCUMBLING

Scumbling is the opposite of glazing. To scumble, take a lighter opaque color (usually white or
Scumbling is the opposite of glazing. To scumble, take a
lighter opaque color (usually white or an opaque color mixed
with white) and paint it over a darker area. It changes the
temperature, producing a cooler, more bluish color. Scumbling
is a little tricky because it can cause an unexpected color
change, such as turning blond hair greenish. It can produce
beautiful pearly skin tones when done properly. You can
alternate glazes and scumbles at the end of your painting for
a really beautiful fi nish.
Bismuth Yellow +
Titanium White
Cadmium Yellow
Hue + Titanium
White
Transparent White*
Cadmium Red
Scarlet Hue +
Titanium White
Titanium White
Naples Yellow Light
Prescumbled Skin
Here is a painting before scumbling.
See how the skin is a bit too orange.
Opaque Colors Useful for Scumbling Skin
Using scumbling and glazing properly can take a relatively lackluster painting and
add dimension and mystery. Scumbling and glazing are best used at the end of
the painting process.
To experiment, paint opaque swatches of different skin colors and let them dry.
Add fl uid medium to a lighter opaque color and scumble it over the skin tones.
Spread the lighter opaque scumble coat very thinly, creating a thin veil of color.
Observe the change in temperature.
*Transparent White is more transparent than Titanium White. It is useful if you
want a very delicate scumble. Even though it’s called “transparent,” it will create a
scumble rather than a glaze.
Scumbled Skin
Here is the same painting after scumbling.
Notice how the skin is cooler and bluer
after scumbling. This is an optical effect
created by applying light over dark.
52
52

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 13

LIGHT SKIN TONES Light skin tones range from pearl through peach, olive, beige and brown. Some
LIGHT SKIN TONES
Light skin tones range from pearl through peach, olive, beige
and brown. Some have freckles. Children of Northern European
descent often have more pink tones while those of Southern
European descent may have more olive.
White, red and yellow create a generic light skin tone.
Different reds and different yellows produce different results.
So will different proportions of paint ratios. On some children
the areas of thinner skin will require some blues. Mixing a
blue with an orangey red and white can also yield light tones.
Opaque Chart of Triads
A
B
Here are some combinations with each
mixture including two pigments and
Titanium White. The ratio of the other
two colors changes the temperature.
The amount of white changes the value.
White always cools and grays the
colors it’s mixed with. Titanium White
makes transparent colors opaque.
CD
E
A.
Permanent Magenta + Cadmium Yellow
Hue + Titanium White
B.
Yellow Ochre Pale + Permanent Alizarin
Crimson + Titanium White
C.
Yellow Ochre Pale + Transparent Maroon +
Titanium White
D.
F
G
Indian Yellow Deep + Terra Rosa + Titanium
White
E.
Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue + French
Ultramarine + Titanium White
F.
Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue + Winsor Blue
(Green Shade) + Titanium White
G.
Green Gold + Rose Madder Genuine +
Titanium White
Glaze and
Scumble Chart
Here is a chart with strips
of opaque light skin tones
that have been further
modifi ed with glazes
(Transparent Red Ochre
and Rose Madder Genu-
ine) and a scumble (Tita-
nium White). Notice how
each affects the colors.
Cadmium Yellow
Hue + Permanent
Magenta + Titanium
White
Yellow Ochre
Pale + Permanent
Alizarin Crimson +
Titanium White
Cadmium Red
Scarlet Hue +
Winsor Blue
(Green Shade) +
Titanium White
Transparent Red
Rose Madder
Titanium White
Ochre
Genuine
53
53

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 14

DARK SKIN TONES

There is a wide range of dark skin tones. Colors can range from delicate mochas to
There is a wide range of dark skin tones. Colors can range
from delicate mochas to golden honeys to rich mahoganies.
Some areas, such as lips, may have a deep rose, a soft pink
or a subtle violet cast. Palms and soles are often lighter than
other areas.
Mixing complements (colors that are opposite each other
on the color wheel) makes interesting dark skin shades. Varying
the ratio will help give nuance and life. This is a better strategy
than simply using paint from a brown tube, which can look fl at.
Opaque Chart of Triads
Here are some combinations you can
use. Dark skin benefi ts from colors with
strong tinting strength and less white in
some areas.
A
B
A.
Cadmium Yellow Hue + Winsor Magenta
+ Titanium White
B.
Venetian Red + Violet Deep + Titanium
White
C.
Winsor Blue (Green Shade) + Cadmium
Red Scarlet Hue + Titanium White
D.
CD
E
Green Gold + Winsor Magenta + Titanium
White
E.
Venetian Red + French Ultramarine +
Titanium White
F.
Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue + Violet Deep +
Titanium White
G.
Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue + Winsor
Green + Titanium White
F
G
Glaze Chart
After you have painted
dark skin tones opaquely,
enhance the colors with
transparent glazes.
Transparent Maroon is
one of my favorite glaze
colors. It’s particularly
effective on dark skin.
Purples and magentas
can be effective in
selected areas such as
the shadows and lips.
Cadmium Yellow Hue+
Permanent Magenta +
Titanium White
Venetian Red +
Violet Deep +
Titanium White
Cadmium Red Scarlet
Hue + Violet Deep +
Titanium White
Winsor Violet
Permanent
Transparent
Dioxazine
Magenta
Maroon
54
54

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 15

WARM SKIN TONES Warm skin tones range from palest cream through deep honey to rich browns.
WARM SKIN TONES
Warm skin tones range from palest cream through deep honey
to rich browns. There can be a subtle underlying golden hue.
Try mixing various yellows with reds or magentas.
Opaque Chart of Triads
A
B
Mixing different yellows with different
reds and purples yields believable
warm skin tones. Yellow and red make
orange, and yellow and purple make a
neutral brown. Adding Titanium White
to these mixtures cools them and makes
them more suited for fl esh tones.
A.
Cadmium Yellow Hue + Rose Madder
Genuine + Titanium White
B.
CDE
Yellow Ochre Pale + Transparent Maroon +
Titanium White
C.
Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue + Winsor Blue
(Green Shade) + Titanium White
D.
Indian Yellow Deep + Terra Rosa + Titanium
White
E.
Naples Yellow Light + Burnt Sienna +
Titanium White
F
G
F.
Bismuth Yellow + Venetian Red + Titanium
White
G.
Green Gold + Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue +
Titanium White
Glaze and
Scumble Chart
Glazes or scumbles can
work well over warm skin.
Here are some examples.
Notice how the yellow
glaze warms and the
white scumble cools the
underlying colors.
Naples Yellow Light +
Burnt Sienna +
Titanium White
Bismuth Yellow +
Venetian Red +
Titanium White
Cadmium Yellow
Hue + Rose Mad-
der Genuine +
Titanium White
Indian Yellow
Burnt Sienna
Transparent
Deep
White
55
55

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 16

BROWN SKIN TONES

From warm amber to cool olive and deep umber, there is an enormous variety in brown
From warm amber to cool olive and deep umber, there is an
enormous variety in brown skin tones. Any number of com-
binations might work: reds with greens, yellows with reds or
blues with orange-reds.
Opaque Chart of Triads
A
B
Stronger colors work well with brown
skin tones. Children with Latin heritage
will tend toward olive while those with
Native American heritage will have a
redder skin tone.
A.
Bismuth Yellow + Permanent Magenta +
Titanium White
B.
Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue + French
Ultramarine + Titanium White
C.
CD
E
Green Gold + Permanent Alizarin Crimson
+ Titanium White
D.
Cadmium Yellow Hue + Venetian Red +
Titanium White
E.
Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue + Winsor
Green + Titanium White
F.
Cadmium Yellow Hue + Permanent Aliza-
rin Crimson + Titanium White
F
G
G.
Yellow Ochre Pale + Venetian Red +
Titanium White
Glaze Chart
Determine if the under-
tone is red or green
when selecting glazes
or scumbles for brown
skin tones. If the child
has olive tones, Green
Gold is a good choice.
If the undertone is more
red, Permanent Alizarin
Crimson would work well.
If the skin is neutral, Burnt
Sienna will work.
Bismuth Yellow +
Permanent Magenta +
Titanium White
Cadmium Yellow
Hue + Permanent
Alizarin Crimson +
Titanium White
Yellow Ochre Pale
+ Venetian Red +
Titanium White
Green Gold
Burnt Sienna
Permanent
Alizarin
Crimson
56
56

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 17

MIXING In the initial stages of a portrait, mix a suffi cient number of fl esh
MIXING
In the initial stages of a portrait, mix a suffi cient number of
fl esh values, at least fi ve but not more than nine. You can mix
more than nine skin tones, but the difference should be in hue
(color) rather than value. Mix colors with a palette knife. Use
more drying medium in the white paint, but a consistent amount
in the other colors. The one exception is Burnt Umber, which
does not need drying medium.
I usually mix many values and hues of paint for a portrait
in the early and middle stages. It’s time consuming, so I keep
the paint in an airtight container and store it in the refrigerator
between sessions.
Skin Tone Mix Chart
Cadmium
Yellow Hue
Permanent
Magenta
Cadmium Red
Scarlet Hue
French Ultramarine
I used fi ve colors to create twenty mix-
tures varying in value and hue.
The top two rows contain Cadmium
Yellow, Permanent Magenta and Tita-
nium White. The top row contains more
Cadmium Yellow Hue than Permanent
Magenta, making a slightly more yellow-
ish skin tone, while the second row con-
tains slightly more Permanent Magenta
than Cadmium Yellow Hue, making a
slightly more pinkish skin tone.
The bottom two rows contain Cad-
mium Red Scarlet Hue, French Ultra-
marine and Titanium White. The third
row contains slightly more Cadmium
Red Scarlet Hue than French Ultramarine,
making a more reddish skin tone, while
the fourth row contains slightly more
French Ultramarine, making a bluer
skin tone.
In all the rows, as you move toward
the right, each mixture has progressively
more Titanium White. You can mix many
more shades from these colors. This
would be a minimum.
57
57

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 18

COLOR VARIATION OF FEATURES

All skin tones have areas that are more reddish or more blue. Creased areas such as
All skin tones have areas that are more reddish or more blue.
Creased areas such as the inside of ears, nostrils and between
fi ngers refl ect light, which gives them a reddish hue. The thin-
ner skin of the temples, eyelids and wrists often has a bluish
or violet cast because blood veins show through transparent
skin layers.
Cheeks, fi ngers, noses and ears are often more pink or
red due to weather exposure. The amount of sun exposure a
child has produces deeper skin tones. Cadmium Red Scarlet
Hue is particularly effective for redder areas.
Highlights are important as they give skin dimension and
describe the form. It may be necessary to warm the Titanium
White highlight color with Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue or Cad-
mium Yellow Hue.
Lips Before Blending
Blended Lips
Before blending, it is easy to see the separate colors: Cadmium
Red Scarlet Hue and Transparent Maroon in the shadows, and
Titanium White with a touch of Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue for
the highlights.
After blending, the Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue, Transparent
Maroon and Titanium White are still visible, but they are softly
blended in.
Ears Before Blending
Blended Ears
The same process works with ears. Here they are before
blending. Cadmium Red Scarlet Hue is in the creases. Titanium
White is in the highlights. Use miniatures in the tight areas.
After blending, the colors have been softened. A no. 6 glazing
brush works well for this.
58
58

Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 19

Quiet

Reverence

Inspired by the human experience, Dongfeng Li paints his subjects with emotion and dignity.

By Meredith E. Lewis

Extraordinary Quietude “The subject in Under the Eaves, Soft Touch of the Sun [watercolor on paper, 30 x22] is my mother’s still-living childhood friend,” says Li. “I tried to present her quietness and her ordinary life in the rural village through her pale face and typical country-house door curtain. The soft afternoon sunlight touches her face through the tree leaves, conveying my feelings for my mother.”

H umility, grace, dignity: these are the hallmarks of Morehead State University professor Dongfeng Li’s watercolor

H umility, grace, dignity: these are

the hallmarks of Morehead State

University professor Dongfeng

Li’s watercolor portraits Choosing to paint people from a variety of places, ages and life experiences, Li works to imbue each subject with poise and distinc- tion “Their different backgrounds can create interesting contexts,” he says “I’m curious about these differences, so it’s one of my primary motivations in creating my work ” L i’s style is realistic, although dif- fuse, muted and atmospheric color washes—trademarks of his chosen medium—augment the transition from foreground detail to background abstrac- tion “My work is primarily realistic, though it can vary, depending on what I want to achieve with a piece,” he says “ With watercolor, I can often create detail that rivals that of oil paint, though sometimes I like to pursue a more sim- plistic approach, such as in the painting Joe [on page 34], which relies more on color washes ”

H umility, grace, dignity: these are the hallmarks of Morehead State University professor Dongfeng Li’s watercolor

Solitude “The subject in Liv - ing Alone [left; watercolor on paper, 26 x38] lives by himself without any children,” says Li. “His face, skin and wrinkles tell his history and experiences.” Vivid Life “In Pikeville Sun [below; watercolor on YUPO, 38 x26], I spent a great deal of time on the reflections and on alternate brushstrokes on his facial hair, to allow his face to reflect vivid sunlight,” says Li.

Mystery Man “ In Joe [opposite; watercolor on YUPO, 38 x26], I tried to approach the idea of ambi- guity and the obscurity of the subject’s identity,” says Li.

Contrast and Harmony

Li completed his undergraduate stud- ies in China, where he studied Chinese watercolor and oil painting, as well as drawing He credits this early training to his success with watercolor and with realism, noting the similarities between the Western watercolor tradition and the Chinese school “There are some simi- larities between watercolor and Chinese painting, such as washes, brushstrokes and paint bleeding effects, as well as their typically summarized and simple nature,” he says “Both contain a simplified approach to color by creating multiple subtle lay- ers of glazes Chinese painting and watercolor are focused more on design and composition above all else, as well as how the economy of the brushstroke is used to create structure of form ” I n college, Li was also preoccupied with sports Soccer, volleyball and table tennis were his favorites, and he spent a great deal of time outdoors or in the gym “Many of my professors told me that I should attend a sports academy, rather than studying art,” he says “This has influenced my work today, and is part of the reason why I’m interested in plein air painting, as I love being out- doors, surrounded by nature ” Li’s paintings explore color con- trasts, color temperatures and hues, elements that allow him to capture the personalities and moods of his sub - jects in two-dimensional space Emo- tion arrives through composition and through his use of light and dark values, color washes, texture, brushstrokes and color work “Contrast and harmony are based on my design purpose,” he says “If I need more attention, I’ll use more con- trast; when I want elements to seem uni- fied, I’ll do the opposite ” Painting from life, photographs and reference material, Li strives to achieve authenticity in each painting Life paint- ing is his favorite way of working If he chooses to work from photographs, he often changes the color scheme and vari- ous personal elements to complete and unify a composition Working and teach- ing in a variety of environments—from the studio to en plein air and travel painting—gives him flexibility and virtu-

Contrast and Harmony Li completed his undergraduate stud- ies in China, where he studied Chinese watercolor

Life Lived “ In Coalminer [watercolor on YUPO, 38x 26], I explored the effects of dripping rain and the feeling of being wet with color blending and washes.”

bridging traditions

Dongfeng Li prefers to paint with both soft- and hard-hair Chinese brushes, because both can be smoothed to a point, and the soft brush can hold a great deal of water. His palette of watercolors has more than 20 wells with a casket seal, which prevents the paints from drying out. His favorite colors are: blue-green, ultramarine blue, sap green, rose madder and alizarin crimson from brands such as Rembrandt and Da Vinci. Additional materials include liquid soap, for mixing with paint; a spray bottle; and a sponge.

Memories of Home “ In Pack Rat [opposite; watercolor on paper, 38x 26], I characterized my subject through her aging skin and I imbued her with a very quiet feeling,” says Li. “She reminded me of my mother and aunt.”

osity with the medium It also allows him to demonstrate a wide variety of paint- ing methods to his students

Vivid Forms

Composition takes two forms in Li’s process The first is brainstorming He spends time with his subject, watch- ing the model or examining the photo- graph for clues “Often, after a period of time, I’ll have a vague idea of the theme,

color, light design and composition,” he says “ Then come the thumbnail sketches and black-and-white value study, or color studies ” With this preliminary work in place, the second stage of Li’s process sees him developing his final painting accord- ing to the road map set out by his initial thoughts and studies For the paint- ing Pack Rat (on page 37), Li first com- pleted a black-and-white drawing and

quick color design study—elements that allowed him to edit and perfect his composition With these references in place, he drafted his drawing in pencil on his watercolor paper He then blocked in the lightest colors and, where gestural strokes were required, he worked addi- tional colors into these areas while they were still wet He designed and glazed the background before he went to work on the face and detail areas When he finally launched into the facial planes of the work, he began by creating the value and blending in cool and warm colors, before achieving depth in detail areas T hroughout his process, Li takes

care not to overwork any particu- lar area of the painting “My process of watercolor isn’t that different from many other artists,” he says “How- ever, I do emphasize the idea of ‘lost and found’ in my work I use this tool to pro- vide emphasis in certain areas of the face and details, allowing less empha- sized areas to subtly blend into the back- ground It’s key to making the form of a portrait more vivid ” In addition, he “counts white as black,” he says, and allows some areas of his paintings to be busy and tight in contrast to quieter areas with less detail “These are both well-known theo- ries in Chinese painting,” he says “They

Off Guard “In Cat’s Cradle [opposite; watercolor on paper, 22 x30], I tried to capture the confused expression of the girl and the cool lighting cast upon her, which was challenging in classic transparent watercolor,” says the artist.

Fond Recollections “ What I depicted in Loess, Light Misty at the Village [below; watercolor on paper, 30 x22] is the accumulation of my feelings and mem- ories of China,” says Li. “I tried to present all that I saw and know about this senior in my parents’ hometown.”

Fond Recollections “ What I depicted in Loess, Light Misty at the Village [below; watercolor on

Workaday “ I tried to create the idea of a miner exiting a coal mine at the end of a workday, tired and exhausted, in Morning Relief [watercolor on paper, 38x26],” says Li. “There are certain risks involved in deep mining, and his expres- sion shows a sense of pride from his job—as well as relief from having safely com- pleted a day of work.”

describe the use of positive and negative spaces I also sometimes look for more abstract shapes in both spaces ”

New Vocabularies

For Li, who enjoys the quiet dignity of the human face, the challenge is to remain open to new ways of working with and exploring a subject He admits that he’s often dissatisfied with his initial paint- ing efforts, and it may take weeks of addi- tional work and assessment for him to arrive at the finish line

“In giving myself this time,” he says, “I can explore new and interesting ideas that I can later add to the piece that I wouldn’t have explored initially ” Suc- cess in painting can be elusive, but exploration—the search and the inves- tigation itself—is key “Explore your own visual vocabulary and use your heart and

soul when creating your art,” he says “Always look for new vocabularies, explor- ing new and innovative processes ”

Fond Recollections “ What I depicted in Loess, Light Misty at the Village [below; watercolor on

Meredith e . L ewis is a freelance writer and editor working in Central Pennsylvania. She’s a frequent con - tributor to Watercolor Artist, The Artist’s Magazine and Pastel Journal .

To see more of Dongfeng Li’s watercolors visit www.artistsnetwork.com/ medium/watercolor/dongfeng-li-gallery.
To see more of Dongfeng Li’s watercolors
visit www.artistsnetwork.com/
medium/watercolor/dongfeng-li-gallery.

A 70-year career has taken Everett Raymond Kinstler from inking cartoons to illustrating books and magazines to painting thousands of portraits of America’s most celebrated.

brush with

history

By louise B. hafesh

S

A 70-year career has taken Everett Raymond Kinstler from inking cartoons to illustrating books and magazines

aBove: Intimate Confessions #4 (1952; pen and ink, 17½x13¼) is one of hundreds of illustrations Kinstler cre- ated during his six-year association with Avon Comics.

Sitting comfortably in the ante-

chamber of Everett r ay mond Kinstler’s

gramercy Park studio in ma nhattan, i felt

an overwhelming sense of the significance

of the place and its current inhabitant’s

contribution to the art world. a f ter all, we

were in not only an historic new york city landmark, the national a r ts club, but also the former studio of the a merican impressionist and prominent teacher frank Vincent Du mond (1865–1951). What’s more, this is the studio where Kinstler had painted what amounts to a pictorial who’s who of over 2,000 por- traits, including those of tony bennett, Katharine Hepburn, tom Wolfe, count- less business leaders, more than 50 U.S. cabinet members and seven U.S. presidents. li ke a kid in a candy store, i scoured the place, taking everything in.

left: Avon Books had asked Kinstler to create a cover illustration for the detective novel The General Died at Dawn, which was based on a 1936 movie of the same name. Avon never used the illustration but, in 2012, the painting, Untitled (Couple) (ca 1958; oil, 18x14), became the cover of the catalogue for his retrospective exhibition, “Pulps to Portraits.”

aBove: Kinstler’s studio at the National Arts Club in New York City was once the studio of Frank Vincent DuMond, Kinstler’s early mentor.

Photo by Louise B. Hafesh

studio Mementos

“ not a day goes by,” says Kinstler, “that i don’t think of m r. Dumond, who was my teacher at the a r t Students l eague.” it was at that school that Kinstler himself would later teach full time from 1969 to 1974 and give weekend workshops through 2010. “ i loved the old man,” continues Kinstler. “He used to call me his ‘boy’ and, taking me under his wing, helped secure my first studio at the national a r ts club. a f ter his death, i moved into his larger space (above).” a nd what a space it is! br ight and airy (20x30 feet) with an 18-foot ceiling, one entire wall of north-lit windows plus a grand balcony that stretches across another wall. Paintings, sketches and photographs lie scat- tered about, along with an eclectic assort- ment of props and resources, including an impressive private library and a life-sized seated mannequin affectionately known as ms. Draper (bequeathed to the studio by por- traitist William f. Draper, 1912–2003). to t he right of Kinstler’s easel (originally owned by another mentor and friend, the illustrator

Materials

Canvas: New york Central ar t supply #90 SP (single-primed) linen on Jack richeson Best stretchers

Brushes: silver Brush Everett Raymond Kinstler Series— Kinstler’s most commonly used brushes are bristle filberts, sizes

2–12.

Paint: Jack richeson oils—sap green, ultramarine blue, ceru - lean blue, burnt umber, burnt sienna, alizarin crimson, cadmium red light, raw sienna, cadmium yellow, ivory black and white

Mediums: Kinstler Studio painting medium (very fluid; good for beginning stages, such as sketching and blocking in) and Kinstler alkyd oil painting medium (a thicker medium that expe- dites drying of the paint; used for glazing, detailing and other processes as the painting progresses); Kinstler directed the formulations of both mediums, which were developed through experimentation.

James montgomery f l agg, 1877–1960), a simple chair rests on a worn platform, while a hand-carved wooden screen is flanked on the right by a taboret on which rests John Singer Sargent’s actual palette. “That was a gift bequeathed to me from the new Jersey painter Paul bu rns (1910–1990),” says Kinstler. “ it had been part of Sargent’s estate sale in 1925.” Having already discovered that every nook and cranny holds some treasure and an opportunity for a personal anecdote, i try to appear nonchalant about this last revelation. i comment on a small, striking painting of Katharine Hepburn (whom Kinstler had

painted more than 40 times in the 1980s and 1990s). Kinstler confided that, at her sittings, the actress had insisted on overseeing every detail, dictating incessant instructions, often to Kinstler’s exasperation. “ i finally said to her, ‘ ms. Hepburn, i admire you so much, but your constant critiques are driving me crazy,” recalls Kinstler. “She thought for a second and then said, ‘ you k now what your problem is? you talk too much!’” When that particular portrait was complete, Hepburn declared (to Kinstler’s surprise) that it was her favorite and told the artist, “ i like you—you do your home- work.”

Below: Katherine Hepburn (ca 1987, oil, 46x46), one of many portraits Kinstler painted of the actress, is part of the perma- nent collection of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery.

Two Takes on Tom Wolfe

Kinstler’s friendship with Tom Wolfe began in 1964. At that time, Kinstler was painting astronaut Scott Carpenter and Wolfe was writing his novel about America’s first space travelers, The Right Stuff. Kinstler first painted Wolfe in 1987 (at right). Then, in 2000, Kinstler revisited the subject (below). Of the second Tom Wolfe, Kinstler says, “I challenged myself to paint Tom in his characteristic white suit against a stark white back- ground.” This “white” portrait is part of the permanent collection of the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Two Takes on Tom Wolfe Kinstler’s friendship with Tom Wolfe began in 1964. At that time,

aBove: Portrait of Tom Wolfe (1987; oil, 50x27)

left: Tom Wolfe (2000; oil, 56x44)

from Pulp to Portraits

my v isit with Kinstler took place a week after the opening of “Pulps to Portraits,” the art- ist’s 2012 exhibition at the norman rockwell museum in Stockbridge, massachusetts, a retrospective that explored how illustration had

shaped the artist’s work and influenced his tran- sition into portraiture. Still riding high from that celebration, he and i discussed his reaction to seeing his life’s work showcased in a signifi- cant place and in such a comprehensive way. “ i feel a little like a Dickens character who’s transported by the ghosts of past and present and gets to view everything from a dif- ferent perspective,” Kinstler said with a laugh. “ it ’s odd but quite rewarding to look back on a career that spans more than 70 years and see the progression of the work.” ti me travel aside, it’s been quite a ride for the ma nhattan-born artist who left school at age 16 to take a job drawing comic books, magazine illustrations and paperback book covers. His magazine and comic con- tributions, including the first Zorro comics and illustrations for the pulp magazine, The Shadow, are often credited with influencing the Pop art school—a point reinforced by roy

lichtenstein, who once told the artist, “ you were Pop art before it even existed.” a s a n inker’s apprentice in the 1950s, Kinstler com- pleted 180 comic strip panels each week. He credits this early work with helping him attract freelance pulp book and magazine assignments as well as honing his ability to tell a story visually, a skill he put to good use in his portraits. “When i began illustrating, i wasn’t aware that the field was disappearing,” he says. “cu lture was chang-

aBove: Kinstler painted John Wayne (1978; oil, 44x34) from life for the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. The Saturday Evening Post picked up the portrait as an August 1979 cover illustration.

ing, photography was taking over, television was coming in and magazines were folding. a nd with the market and business starting to decline, i had to think differently.”

aBove: Kinstler has drawn life portraits of each presi- dent of the Screen Actors Guild who

aBove: Kinstler has drawn life portraits of each presi- dent of the Screen Actors Guild who has come to office in the last 20 years. Mike Hodge, President, Screen Actors Guild (2012; charcoal, 20x15) is the latest of these portraits.

left: In Portrait of Will Barnet (1977; oil, 50x40), Barnet sits in front of an abstract painting that he was working on at the time in his National Arts Club studio. This portrait is now part of the collection of the Butler Institute of Ameri- can Art, in Youngstown, Ohio.

a Painter of People

o ut of necessity, the young illustrator began to look for more viable outlets for his art. “Painting people was always what i enjoyed most,” Kinstler explains, “so making the transition into portraiture was a natural shift.” Suffice to say, portraiture was also something he was excep- tionally gifted at. Signing on with Portraits, inc., a gallery that specializes in securing por- trait commissions, he soon established himself as one of a merica’s top portrait painters. “ it ’s been stimulating to paint people,” he says. “ i’m a storyteller; that’s my journey. What i value most are imagination, feeling and the skill to communicate—those qualities have always been the measure for me,” says Kinstler, who ranks capturing a person’s essential char- acter above all else. “Painting a convincing portrait is not always about getting a likeness,” he says. “ naturally, that helps, but often it’s about getting a point of view.” to t hat end, he recommends doing advance life studies, point-

ing out that spending time with the subject to get a sense of what he or she is like, looking for significant characteristics and being selective about certain traits—along with sincerity and passion for what you’re doing—are integral to the process.

anatomy of a Portrait

generally Kinstler works from life, although he does take photographs for secondary reference. He begins on a bluish-gray toned canvas and, once his model is posed to conform to prelimi- nary sketches, places a few rough indicators for composition before delving directly into paint- ing alla prima . “ i feel a responsibility to capture both the spirit and likeness of the people i paint, and so i prefer my sitters to be animated rather than motionless,” he says. “ca rrying on a lively conversation as i work helps. in so doing, i also get to see other facets of my subject that i can perhaps incorporate into the portrait.” concluding our visit, Kinstler remarked:

“ i was recently asked an intriguing question: ‘ if you could paint anyone in the world, who would that be?’ a l most immediately,” says Kinstler,

Artist Interprets Actor

By everett rayMoNd KiNstler

Collection of the artist, on loan to The Players Club, NYC
Collection of the artist, on loan to The Players Club, NYC
Artist Interprets Actor By everett rayMoNd KiNstler Collection of the artist, on loan to The Playerswww.paintersportal.blogspot.com . Meet Everett Raymond Kinstler Everett Raymond Kinstler, who dropped out of high school and abandoned a formal art education to take a job inking comic books, has been awarded honorary doc- torates from Rollins College (1983), outside Orlando, Florida; Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts (2002), in Old Lyme, Connecticut; and the Academy of Art University (2010), in San Francisco. For five decades he taught at the Art Students League of New York. Kinstler has painted seven United States presidents from life, and his paintings of President Ronald Reagan and President Gerald R. Ford are official White House portraits. Kinstler’s work is part of the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, Ohio, among others. The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery has acquired more than 100 pieces of his works and, in 1999, awarded Kinstler the Copley Medal, its highest honor. Visit his website at www.everettraymondkinstler.com . Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 34 " id="pdf-obj-33-8" src="pdf-obj-33-8.jpg">

Academy Award winner Christopher Plummer is an actor I admire, as well as a good friend and neigh- bor. Of course, I’d seen him on stage and in films through the years, but before picking up the brush to paint his portrait, I again watched at least a half dozen of his movies. Eventually, I decided to base his portrait on his most recent success, his role as Prospero in Shakespeare’s Tempest. His 2010 stage performance of this play had been filmed at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Canada to create a 2012 feature movie. After countless drawings and color sketches, as well as discussions with Plummer, I arrived at a concept for the portrait. Plummer’s input helped shape my interpretation, and I greatly appreciated getting his reaction to my ideas. He posed for me in my Connecticut studio (above).

left: Portrait of Christopher Plummer as Prospero (2011; oil, 50x42)

“names like Sir laurence ol ivier and Winston churchill came to mind—mostly people who were or are larger than life. a f ter further thought, though, i realized my subjects are not just well-known personalities, but rather people from all walks of life. a nd since every- one in his or her own way has a story and what i most enjoy about the process is capturing the essence of a person’s character, you could say that i’m already painting the very people whose essences i most want to interpret!”

louise B. h afesh is an award-winning artist and writer and a contributing editor for The Artist’s Magazine. You can see examples of her work at www.louisebhafesh. com and www.paintersportal.blogspot.com.

Meet Everett Raymond Kinstler

Artist Interprets Actor By everett rayMoNd KiNstler Collection of the artist, on loan to The Playerswww.paintersportal.blogspot.com . Meet Everett Raymond Kinstler Everett Raymond Kinstler, who dropped out of high school and abandoned a formal art education to take a job inking comic books, has been awarded honorary doc- torates from Rollins College (1983), outside Orlando, Florida; Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts (2002), in Old Lyme, Connecticut; and the Academy of Art University (2010), in San Francisco. For five decades he taught at the Art Students League of New York. Kinstler has painted seven United States presidents from life, and his paintings of President Ronald Reagan and President Gerald R. Ford are official White House portraits. Kinstler’s work is part of the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, Ohio, among others. The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery has acquired more than 100 pieces of his works and, in 1999, awarded Kinstler the Copley Medal, its highest honor. Visit his website at www.everettraymondkinstler.com . Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 34 " id="pdf-obj-33-31" src="pdf-obj-33-31.jpg">

Everett Raymond Kinstler, who dropped out of high school and abandoned a formal art education to take a job inking comic books, has been awarded honorary doc- torates from Rollins College (1983), outside Orlando, Florida; Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts (2002), in Old Lyme, Connecticut; and the Academy of Art University (2010), in San Francisco. For five decades he taught at the Art Students League of New York. Kinstler has painted seven United States presidents from life, and his paintings of President Ronald Reagan and President Gerald R. Ford are official White House portraits. Kinstler’s work is part of the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum and the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, Ohio, among others. The Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery has acquired more than 100 pieces of his works and, in 1999, awarded Kinstler the Copley Medal, its highest honor. Visit his website at www.everettraymondkinstler.com.

M ore resour C e s

M ore resour C e s <a href=CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Subscribe to The Artist’s Magazine and Watercolor Artist Get your copy of Expressive Portraits and Vibrant Children’s Portraits at North Light Shop today! CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Conne C T wi T h u s Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 35 " id="pdf-obj-34-5" src="pdf-obj-34-5.jpg">
M ore resour C e s <a href=CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Subscribe to The Artist’s Magazine and Watercolor Artist Get your copy of Expressive Portraits and Vibrant Children’s Portraits at North Light Shop today! CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Conne C T wi T h u s Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 35 " id="pdf-obj-34-11" src="pdf-obj-34-11.jpg">

Subscribe to The Artist’s Magazine and Watercolor Artist

Get your copy of

Expressive Portraits and Vibrant Children’s Portraits at North Light Shop today!

M ore resour C e s <a href=CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Subscribe to The Artist’s Magazine and Watercolor Artist Get your copy of Expressive Portraits and Vibrant Children’s Portraits at North Light Shop today! CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Conne C T wi T h u s Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 35 " id="pdf-obj-34-29" src="pdf-obj-34-29.jpg">
M ore resour C e s <a href=CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Subscribe to The Artist’s Magazine and Watercolor Artist Get your copy of Expressive Portraits and Vibrant Children’s Portraits at North Light Shop today! CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Conne C T wi T h u s Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 35 " id="pdf-obj-34-35" src="pdf-obj-34-35.jpg">

Conne C T wi T h u s

M ore resour C e s <a href=CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Subscribe to The Artist’s Magazine and Watercolor Artist Get your copy of Expressive Portraits and Vibrant Children’s Portraits at North Light Shop today! CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Conne C T wi T h u s Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 35 " id="pdf-obj-34-42" src="pdf-obj-34-42.jpg">
M ore resour C e s <a href=CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Subscribe to The Artist’s Magazine and Watercolor Artist Get your copy of Expressive Portraits and Vibrant Children’s Portraits at North Light Shop today! CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Conne C T wi T h u s Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 35 " id="pdf-obj-34-44" src="pdf-obj-34-44.jpg">
M ore resour C e s <a href=CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Subscribe to The Artist’s Magazine and Watercolor Artist Get your copy of Expressive Portraits and Vibrant Children’s Portraits at North Light Shop today! CLICK HERE CLICK HERE Conne C T wi T h u s Portrait Painting Lessons: Learn How to Paint a Portrait With These Professional Techniques | 35 " id="pdf-obj-34-46" src="pdf-obj-34-46.jpg">