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GBST 001

Global Studies

Fall 2014
Dr. Allison

COURSE INFORMATION AND READING LIST


COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVE
This course provides a multidisciplinary introduction to the study of
contemporary globalization. Its objective is to examine some of the most
important processes and problems that have come to transcend nations
territorial boundaries, including economic interdependence, transnational
terrorist organizations and social movements, social violence, migration, and
the spread of information and communications technologies. An environment
will be provided for students to develop their abilities to think critically and
globally about their lives and the world they inhabit.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Lecture:
Students are required to attend and participate in class, which will
include small group exercises and time for discussion as well as lectures.
Students are also required to complete three written assignments (to include
only one short essay). Outside of class, students will complete a walk
across Riverside, that is designed to be completed on foot, but need not be
completed all at once. Students will also take three comprehensive exams.
Discussion Section:
Attendance & Participation (Lecture):
Written Assignments (3):
Walk Across Riverside:
Exams (3):
OFFICE HOURS
Tue.: 12:30-2PM
Wed.: 12:30-1 PM
INTS 4159
e-mail: Juliann.allison@ucr.edu.
TELEPHONE/EMAIL PROTOCOL

15%
10%
30%
10%
35%

Your email style and username as well as your telephone manner send
a message about who you are and what your objectives are. When
addressing me, any guests, and/or your classmates in relation to this course,
please be courteous and professional. Keep the following points in mind:

Proper
form
of
address:
Begin
with
Dear
or
Good
morning/afternoon. Until/unless we become close friends, please
address me as Professor or Dr.
Content: Write/speak clearly and succinctly in complete sentences. Do
not use shorthand phrases or abbreviations common in text
messaging. Check grammar and spelling before sending email.
Messages/Signature: Use your full name as it appears on the class
roster when leaving a phone message or signing an email message.
Email: If your online name is informal or irreverent, use your UCR email
address for communications related to this course.

CLASSROOM DEPORTMENT

Participation: Come to class prepared to remain AWAKE for the duration


of the lecture, and to participate in classroom activities, including
contributing to discussions as appropriate.
Electronics: Turn off cell phones and refrain from computer use, unless
it is directly related to lecture/class activities/discussions; unnecessary
disruptions and blatant inattention is disrespectful, if not also
disruptive.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
In writing, we draw upon others words and ideas and the
intellectual heritage underlying human progress. Scholarship
entails researching, understanding, and building upon the work
of others, but also requires that proper credit be given for any
borrowed material. UC Riverside students are responsible
under our Student Conduct and Discipline Policy for ethical
scholarship and for knowing what plagiarism is and how to avoid
it.
Avoiding Plagiarism: Mastering the Art of Scholarship
UCR Library website: http://lib.ucr.edu/help/Plagiarism/shtml
If you are caught cheating, YOU WILL RECEIVE AN F in the course and
you will be subject to disciplinary action.

READING LIST AND ASSIGNMENTS


Required texts:

Eitzen, Stanley D. and Maxine Baca Zinn. 2012. Globalization:


The Transformation of Social Worlds. Cengage.
Giddens, Anthony. 2001. How Globalization is Reshaping our
Lives. Routledge.
Solnit, Rebecca and David Solnit. 2009. The Battle of the
Story of the Battle of Seattle AK Press.
Steger, Manfred. 2013. Globalization: A Very Short
Introduction, Oxford University Press.

Supplemental texts:
Octavia Butler. 2003. Parable of the Sower. Seven Stories Press.
Thomas L. Friedman. 2007. The World is Flat 3.0: A Brief History of the
21st Century.
Picador.
Stephanie Elizondo Griest. 2004. Around the Bloc: My Life in Moscow,
Beijing, and
Havana. Villard.
Jean Kwok. 2010. Girl in Translation. Riverhead.
Jhumpa Lahiri. 2004. The Namesake: A Novel. Mariner.
Doris Lessing. 1999. Mara and Dann: An Adventure. HarperPerennial.
Haruki Murakami. 2000. Norwegian Wood. Vintage.
Michael Pollan. 2007. The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of
Four Meals.
Pietra Rivoli. 2009. Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy: An
Economist
Examines the Markets, Power, and Politics of World Trade. Wiley.
Joseph E. Stiglitz. 2003. Globalization and its Discontents. W.W. Norton.

Any additional readings will be available either in Course Materials on


our ilearn page, or on reserve. Alternatively, you may purchase your
own copies online or at a local bookstore.
Introduction & Historical Overview
Week 0: Introduction
October 2:

Globalization and the Global Imaginary

Allison, Juliann. 2010. A Geography of My Life


Steger, Chapter 1: Globalization.

Assignment 1:
Consider a selection of maps of the world
(http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/history_world.html). Then briefly
explain how the geography of your life to date explains your (life) story. Be
prepared to discuss your draft in class next week. About 500 words, doublespaced in 11/12 point font with 1-inch margins. Due October 14.
Week 1: A Very Brief History of Globalization
October 7: No Class.
Go
to
http://www.sporcle.com/games/g/world.
Countries of the World quiz twice. Record best score.

Try

October 9: History of Globalization


Eitzen and Zinn, Section 2: Debating Globalization.
Steger, Chapter 2: Globalization and History.
Assignment 2:
Is the world flat? Please explain. Stronger responses will include critical
analysis and provide empirical evidence. About 750 words, double-spaced in
11/12 point font with 1-inch margins. Due October 21.
Economic Globalization
Week 2: The Contemporary Global Political Economy
October 14:Institutionalization of the Global Political Economy

Steger, Chapter 3, The Economic Dimension of


Globalization.

Dollars & Sense Collection, ABCs of the Global Economy.


In Eitzen and Zinn, Section 4: Economic Globalization

October 16:
Critics of the Neoliberal Economic Order
Rothkopf, Two Septembers and Stiglitz, A real Cure for
the Global Economic Crack-up. In Eitzen and Zinn, Section
4: Economic Globalization
Watch Low Wage Capitalism, Lecture by Fred Goldstein at
Long
Beach
City
College,
April
2011.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aqWfRaOCLk
Week 3: Economic Growth, Development, and Resistance
October 21:
Beer, Oil, and Women
Dangl, Beer Globalization. In Eitzen and Zinn, Section 4:
Economic Globalization
Ferree, Globalization and Feminism and Hearn, Big Oil
Wreaks Havoc in the Amazon. In Eitzen and Zinn, Section
9: Changing Global Structures
George, Patrick. How the Crude Oil Market Works. How
Stuff
Works.
http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/cr
ude-oil-market.htm
Watch
Craft
Bear:
A
Hopumentary
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETnlrYq7btE
World Bank. 2012. Globalizations Impact on Gender
Equality.
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTWDR2012/Resources/
7778105-1299699968583/77862101315936222006/chapter-6.pdf
Exam 1: Geography and History
October 23:
Resistance
Brecher, Costello, and Smith, Globalization from Below
and The Power of Social Movements In Eitzen and Zinn,
Section 9: Changing Global Structures
Solnit and Solnit, entire text.
Watch
This
is
what
Democracy
Looks
Like
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBUZH2vCD_k
Globalization of Politics and Culture

Week 4: Globalization Politics and Consequences


October 27:
Economic Globalization Requires Political Action
Steger, Chapter 4: The Political Dimension of
Globalization
Stiglitz, Globalizations Discontents, Rosenberg, Why
Mexicos Small Corn Farmers Go Hungry and and James,
The Late Great Globalization In In
Eitzen and Zinn,
Section 5: Political Globalization
October 30:
Transnational Migration
Choucri and Mistree, Globalization, Migration, & New
Challenges to Governance. In Eitzen and Zinn, Section 5:
Political Globalization
Koser, Why Migration Matters, Robinson, Globalization
and the Struggle or Immigrant Rights in the United States,
Gibler, Mexicos Ghost Towns, and Bowe, Bound for
America. In Eitzen and Zinn, Section 3: Transnational
Migration
Watch The State of Arizona
Watch The Other Side of Immigration on Netflix, Amazon
Prime, or iTunes.
Assignment 3:
To what extent has the process of increased economic globalization also
increased economic growth and development. Include clear definitions of
globalization and development, and provide empirical evidence to
support your argument. Be prepared to discuss your draft in class next week.
About 750-1000 words, double-spaced in 11/12 point font with 1-inch
margins. Due November 9.

Weeks 5-6: Globalization and Cultural Transformation


November 4: Whose Culture?

Condry, Japanese Hip Hop and Glen, Yearning for


Lightness. In Eitzen and Zinn, Section 6: Cultural
Globalization
Steger, Chapter 5: The Cultural Dimensions of
Globalization
Watch Making Sense of Globalization: Japanese Hip Hop
Culture, Parts 1 and 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?

v=EB4tccVWYOM and
v=ChmXWdBp8vo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?

November 6: Globalization, Gender, and Family

Giddens, entire text.


Eitzen and Zinn, Section 7: The Restructuring of Social
Institutions and Social Arrangements.

November 13: Globalization, Identity, and Society

Samuel Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations


Read Kwok, entire text OR Lahiri, entire text.
Watch In America on Amazon.
Watch The Visitor on Amazon.

Exam 2: Political Economy


Assignment 4:
The policies necessary to institutionalize economic globalization have had
profound impacts on societies. Consider a specific cultural change in a nation
or region of your choice that has arguably been the result of globalization.
Identify and critique the policies that have been necessary to incite and
maintain that change. Would you say that, overall, the policies have been
effective? Have they also been positive with respect to their cultural
implications? Why or why not?
Use the exercise available on ilearn to inform and provide evidence for your
response. Essay should be about Abou 1000 words (and no shorter than 750
words), double-spaced in 11/12 point font with 1-inch margins. Due
November 21.
Ecological Globalization
Weeks 7-8: This Changes Everything
November 18: The Science and Political Economy of Global Climate
Change

Klein, Naomi. 2011. Capitalism versus the Climate The


Nation
http://www.thenation.com/article/164497/capitalism-vsclimate

McCright, Aaron M. and Riley E. Dunlap. 2011. Cool Dudes:


The Denial of Climate Change among Conservative White
Males in the United States. Global Environmental Change
21 (4): 1163-1172.
Steger, Chapter 6: The Ecological Dimension of
Globalization
Watch Climate Change 101

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/3play_1/clim
atechange-101-with-bill-nye-the-science/?
no-ist
November 20: Global Climate Activism

McKibben, Bill. 2008. First, Step up, Yes! January 29.


http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/climate-solutions/firststep-up
Watch Highlights from the 3-hour Democracy Now! Special
Broadcast at Historic Climate March
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ag6RlogTUYA

November 25: Consequences of Global Climate Change

Kaplan, Robert D. 1994. The Coming Anarchy, The


Atlantic
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1994/02/thecoming-anarchy/304670/
Ross, Saving Turtle Island and Sullivan and Jordan,
Diseases Travel Fast In Eitzen and Zinn, Section 8:
Globalization of Social Problems
Werz and Manlove, Climate Change on the Move. In
Eitzen and Zinn, Part 3: Transnational Migration.
Watch Years of Living Dangerously, Part I.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brvhCnYvxQQ

Assignment 5:
What is global warming? What scientific bases exists for taking action to
avert the worst effects of global warming? What are the foundations of the
political debate. Do you feel that the scientific and/or political economic
arguments for international efforts to address global warming are justified?
Why or why not? About 750-1000 words, double-spaced in 11/12 point font
with 1-inch margins. Due December 2.

The Global Imaginary


Week 9: Ideologies of Globalization
December 2: Globalization is only an Idea

Jacques, We are Globalized and Klein, Reclaiming the


Commons. In Eitzen and
Zinn, Section 10: Rethinking Globalization.
Steger, Chapter 7: Ideologies of Globalization

December 4: Whats Next?


Sachs, Ten Ideas that are Changing the World. In Eitzen
and Zinn,
Part 10: Rethinking Globalization.
Sato, Katsuaki. 2014. The Next Ten Years of the World in
the Era of
Globalization and the Internet. Huffington Post
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/katsuakisato/the-next-tenyears-ofthe_b_4761714.html
Steger, Chapter 8: Global Crises and the Future of
Globalization
Exam 3: Ecological Globalization
Assignment #6:
Discuss your autobiographical relationship to the world in the context of a
single event or small collection of events. To what extent have the processes
and problems associated with globalization impacted your life to date? In
what ways do you, your voice, matter? Be prepared to discuss your draft in
class next week. About 500 words, double-spaced in 11/12 point font with 1inch margins. Due December 11.
Week 10: Globalization is All Around
December 9-11: Walk Across Riverside Presentations

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