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Matt Uren

BMETC

Introduction to Engineering Science


Solving problems in mechanics and in electrical
circuits Course work.
(All diagrams drawn using Microsoft Visio)

Course Tutor: Dave Sadler


Birmingham Metropolitan College
BMC Number: 131437827

1.

In the table below, for each quantity insert the


conventional symbol, the SI unit of measurement and the
symbol for that unit.

Physical
Quantity

Conventio
nal
Symbol
Distance
S
Force
F
Acceleration A
Volume
Mass
Length
Weight
Energy
Work
Pressure
Current
Resistance
Electromoti
ve Force

V
M
L
W
E
W
P
A
R
EMF

SI Unit of
Measurement

Unit
Symbol

Metre
Newton
Metres per second
squared
Metres cubed
Kilogram
Millimetre
Kilogram
Joule
Joule
Pascal
Amps
Ohms
Volts

m
n
m/s2
m3
KG
mm
KG
J
J
Pa
I

2.

Alongside each case below state a suitable physical


quantity corresponding to the units and write the
number in the standard format, using an
appropriate symbol and prefix, assuming trailing
zeros are not significant:

1.

47,210 Newtons 47.21 KN (Kilo Newtons)


56,500 Newtons per metre squared 56.5 KN/m2 (Kilo
Newtons per Metre squared)
2,500,000 Watts 2.5 MW (Megawatts)
0.0008 Kilometres 0.8 M (Metres)
756 microseconds 0.000756 s (Seconds)
Twenty-five thousand volts 25 KV (Kilovolts)

Convert the following values into the units shown


and enter the results below.

250cm into m: 0.25 metres.


0.036 m2 into mm2: 36mm2
45 km/hr into m/s: 12.5 m/s
75 miles/hr into m/s: 33.528 m/s
22.5 m/s into km/hr: 81 km/hr
0.370 cm2 into mm2: 37 mm2
2.75 m2 into cm2: 2750 cm2
1.26 tonnes into kg: 1260 kg
350kg into Newtons: 3432.328 n
0.045 V into mV: 45 mV
1350 mA into A: 1.35 A

1.

A horizontal beam 4.8m long of mass 18kg is


supported by pillars 0.2m from each end. There is a
man of mass 85kg standing 1.7m from one end of
the beam. Overleaf draw a diagram showing the
forces acting on the beam in this equilibrium
condition. Calculate the magnitudes of the loads
carried by each support.

2.

Define the following:

Energy and work


Energy as a concept is based on any kind of work expended in forms
such as mechanically driven water pumps, electrically powered motors
and even the kinetic energy of a moving object. For example if an
object is on the edge of a raised platform, it has gravitational potential
energy from the possibility of it falling off the edge of the platform. If it
falls off, the conditions in this scenario which define its vector and
velocity, are the objects mass, any initial velocity causing it to fall and
gravity. Additionally any potential energy it loses whilst falling is
equally gained in kinetic energy; kinetic energy can be described as
the energy an object has whilst it is In motion.

The formula for gravitational potential energy is mass x gravity x


height; gravity on Earth is always taken to be 9.81 m/s2, this
however depends upon the planetary body, E.G for example the
gravitational pull would be increased if the bodies mass was
greater than that of Earth. If an object has a mass of 2kg, and it
is at a height of 10 metres, the equation to work out it's
gravitational potential energy would be 2kg x 9.81m/s2 x 10m =
196.2 The unit of measurement for energy is the joule, so our
final answer would be 196.2 joules.

The formula for kinetic energy is x mass x velocity2. This can


be derived from the formula of momentum (P =mv) by
integrating the equation in terms of V. This gives us mv2. If we
apply this formula to a scenario such as: An object of mass 15kg
is travelling at 2m/s, the equation would be 0.5 x 15 x 22, this
gives us 30. Kinetic Energy like Potential Energy is measured in
joules so the final answer would be 30 joules.

Work can be defined as the outcome of any force acting upon


another physical entity. For example if a force of substantial
mass and acceleration hits an object and this causes to
object to move or react, work is being done onto the object.
The amount of work affects the reaction of the object to the
force, this can also be related to Newtons third law (Every
action has an equal and opposite reaction). Work like Energy
is also measured in joules.

Force and Mass


Force is the resultant value of a mass accelerating. Every
physical body with mass will generate force when it
accelerates; this force is then carried with the physical body
until it encounters another object, in which case the force is
then exerted onto the second object and then equally
rebounded. The formula for working out the force of a
moving object is force = mass multiplied by the acceleration
as described by Newtons second law. The unit of
measurement for force is the newton, named after the
scientist whose theories advanced our understanding of
mechanical physics and motion. An object with a large mass
that is accelerating slowly will generally output the same
force as another object with a small mass that is accelerating
at a great value. To find the exact values of force generated
you would have to use the formula F = ma.