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Course Policies & Requirements:

Your mission, should you accept it, is as follows:


Attendance:
Students who wish to successfully complete
this course must attend regularly. I realize that
students encounter personal difficulties
(emergencies, illness, the passing of family
members, etc.) which cause them to miss
class. For this reason you may miss a maximum
of 2 classes this quarter with no questions
asked and no need for notes. Other than the 2
aforementioned absences no absences will be
excused for any reason. Students who have
more than 2 absences FAIL the course for the
quarter. NO Excuses, NO Exceptions!
Note: Attendance sheets may be passed
around at any time or multiple times
throughout a class. If you ever sign your name
and leave before class is over you fail (F) this
course for the quarter. If you sign someone
elses name and they are not here you both fail
(F) this course for the quarter.

FLM&MDA 110:
Film & Media Theory

Lateness:
Lateness which exceeds 10 minutes is counted
as an absence. Students who leave class early
will be marked absent.

Survey of major directions in film and media theory. Various theories of


mass culture, realism, auteurism, semiotics, feminism, cultural studies, and
theories of other media. Offered as a seminar, with an emphasis on
developing the student's ability to analyze and articulate a theoretical
argument. Prerequisites: Film and Media Studies 85A-B-C and 101A-B-C.
Instructor: Dr. Lauren Steimer
Office: 2127 Humanities Gateway
Office Hours: Tues 12:30-2:30 PM, by Appointment
Email: Lauren.Steimer@uci.edu
Email: Expect a response time of up to 3 days.
Course Schedule/Enrollment:
This class meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:00 PM-4:20 PM in Humanities
Gateway Room 2341. All screenings are mandatory. You must be enrolled in and
attend this class to receive credit.
Required Readings:
All course readings are available in the class readings dropbox.
Assignment

Frequency/Due Date

Summary
Worksheet/

Complete 1 per reading. Due Every Monday at 9PM in Course

Seminar
Participation

Dropbox

Percentage

20%

Term
Clarification

Give four 5-10 minute presentations throughout the quarter

20%

Midterm Exam

May 4 at 11:00:00AM

30%

Final Exam

Tuesday 8 June 10:30AM-12:30PM

30%

Sleeping:
If you fall asleep in class once you will be
marked absent, if you fall asleep in class twice
you fail this course.
Class Participation:
This includes not only substantial involvement
in class discussion but also in-class performance
which demonstrates your familiarity with the
assigned readings. In order to pass this course
students MUST do the required readings.
Disruptive Behavior:
Student behavior which is rude or disruptive
will not be tolerated. This type of behavior
makes it difficult for the instructors to teach
the class and makes it difficult for other
students to learn. If you are disruptive or rude
you will be asked to leave the class. If you are
repeatedly disruptive or rude the matter will
be referred to Student Judicial Affairs.
Leaving Class During the Screening:
Any student who leaves class during a
screening is automatically docked 10% of their
final grade. Students have the option of making
up that loss by writing a 25 page paper on the
screening in question which is worth UP TO
10%.
Electronic devices:
You may keep your phone (PDA/Ipod/etc.) on
on a low vibrating setting (no sound) but your
phone (PDA/Ipod/etc.) can NEVER leave your
bag when you are in the classroom. It must be
in your bag, out of your reach, and invisible. If
your cell phone rings aloud once in class you
will be marked absent. If your cell phone rings
aloud twice in the course of the quarter you
fail this class. If you are found with a cell phone/
PDA/Ipod/etc. out during an exam you
automatically fail the course.
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FLM&MDA 110: Film and Media Theory


Statement of Principles and Services:
Please note that this course strongly abides by the University's stated Principles of
Community and Academic Honesty . These statements outline the University's
standards for student conduct and its policies regarding academic dishonesty,
particularly cheating and plagiarism. Please carefully review these policies and
approach the instructor if you are encountering difficulties with the course
materials, and/or with matters outside the course that are hindering your attention
or abilities as a student.! We are sympathetic to the challenges confronting
students, and are open to accommodating or helping to address any problems or
concerns you may have.
Assignments:
Summary Worksheet/Seminar Participation (20%)
Due Every Monday by 9:00:00 PM in the Class Dropbox
Worksheet available for download in the class administration dropbox.
Worksheets must be completed for each reading every week. When you answer
the questions on the worksheet, you must write clearly and accurately and explain
in detail the author's argument, thesis, and key points. You must demonstrate a
complex understanding of the authors thesis through organized argumentation.
Class will be run like a seminar, you must come ready to discuss the readings, you
must also already have a firm grasp of the readings. If you do not substantially
contribute to class or if you cannot accurately answer the instructors questions,
you will be given a grade of zero on your summary for that week.
Note: If you do not read for this class you will fail, and by fail I do not mean C-, I
mean F. Students who cannot clearly express knowledge of the readings will be
given a grade of F. Students who pretend to have a grasp of the readings or
borrow ideas from classmates will be given a grade of F. You must speak extensively
in class and prove without a doubt that you have done the readings, know the
author's thesis, argument, and key points. If you have ever taken a class and not
done all of the assigned readings or simply skimmed some readings you should
reconsider taking this class.
Term Clarification (20%)
Every week you are likely to encounter terms/ideas that are completely foreign to
you in the readings. You must give 5 presentations throughout the quarter on such
terms. If you wish to present on a specific term, you must post it by 9:00:00PM
Monday on the eee noteboard. Presentations are first come, first served, so the
first person to post the term can present. You cannot present a duplicate term.
Presentations are to be 5-10 minutes. You have to explain the term clearly and in
great detail. You cannot use internet-based sources. You must turn in a copy of your
presentation with bibliography.
Midterm Exam (30%)
The Midterm Exam covers weeks 1 - 5 and will be administered in class during
Week 6. Students who are late will not be admitted to the exam and makeup
exams will not be given.
"
Final Exam (30%)
The Final Exam covers weeks 6 - 10 and will be administered in class during Finals
Week on Tuesday, 7 June from 4:00:00PM-6:00:00PM in Humanities Gateway
Room 2341. Students who are late will not be admitted to the exam and makeup
exams will not be given.

Course Policies & Requirements:


(Continued)
Computer Use:
In order to use a computer in this class you
must have the express permission of the
instructor. If you are not on the list of students
who have been allowed to use computers and
you use a computer in class, you fail the course
for the quarter.
All students who have been explicitly cleared
to use their computers in class can only utilize
word processing software and a PDF reader.
Students must turn off wireless connectivity
while in the classroom.
If you are found using your computer/PDA/
Ipod/etc. online you fail this class. If you are
found using an instant messenger/texting during
class or during an exam you automatically fail
this class. If you are found using a personal
audio device you fail this class.
This class is for adults who want to learn, if you
cannot separate from your electronic devices
for the length of our class period, maybe you
should reconsider whether college is for you.
A Note on Deadlines:
Do not turn an assignment in late and expect a
grade for the assignment. It is not fair to
students who worked hard to get their
assignments in on time for an instructor to
accept late work. This is a reading intensive
class. Do not complete your assignments at the
last minute. Check your computers and
printers to make sure that they are in working
order on the week an assignment is due. If your
computer is not working properly the week
the assignment is due I suggest you utilize one
of the Open Access NACS Computing Labs on
campus: http://www.nacs.uci.edu/computing/
labs/
Plagiarism (Academic Dishonesty):
Students who plagiarize will be punished to the
full extent of university policy. Plagiarism
warrants a failing grade for this class and
disciplinary action on the part of the University.
Plagiarism is when you use someone else's
words without attribution. Plagiarism includes
using portions of a previously published work
in a paper without citing the source, submitting
a paper written for another course, submitting
a paper written by someone else, and using the
ideas of someone else without attribution. If
you have any questions about the proper
citation of sources please discuss them with the
instructor.
Disability Services Center:
We are also committed to ensuring equal
opportunities and access to the educational
process for all students.! Please let us know if
we can improve our teaching for students with
disabilities, or any other needs or challenges.!
You may also seek assistance or information
from the Disability Services Center , (949)
824-7494, TDD (949)-6272.
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FLM&MDA 110: Film & Media Theory

29 & 31 March

WEEK 1: INTRODUCTION & FORMALISM


Screening:
Extracts: Psycho (Steven Spielberg, USA 1975 Universal Pictures DVD 124 mins.)
Battleship Potempkin (Steven Spielberg, USA 1975 Universal Pictures DVD 124 mins.)
Readings:
Eisenstein, Sergei. Beyond the Shot/The Cinematographic Principle of the Ideogram and
The Dramaturgy of Film Form/ The Dialectical Approach to Film Form, Film Theory and
Criticism: Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New
York: Oxford University Press, 1999. 13-40.
Munsterberg, Hugo. Why We Go to the Movies, Critical Visions in Film Theory: Classical
and Contemporary Readings. eds. Timothy Corrigan, Patricia White, and Meta Mazaj New
York: Bedford/St. Martins Press, 2011. 10-17.

WEEK 2: REALISM
Screening:
X-Files: X-Cops (20th Century Fox Television)

5 & 7 April

Readings:
Bazin, Andre. The Ontology of the Photographic Image, and The Evolution of the
Language of Cinema. Critical Visions in Film Theory: Classical and Contemporary
Readings. eds. Timothy Corrigan, Patricia White, and Meta Mazaj New York: Bedford/St.
Martins Press, 2011. 310-325..
Kracauer, Siegfried. Basic Concepts, and Inherent Affinities, Critical Visions in Film
Theory: Classical and Contemporary Readings. eds. Timothy Corrigan, Patricia White, and
Meta Mazaj New York: Bedford/St. Martins Press, 2011. 291-308.
Arnheim, Rudolf. Film and Reality. Critical Visions in Film Theory: Classical and
Contemporary Readings. eds. Timothy Corrigan, Patricia White, and Meta Mazaj New
York: Bedford/St. Martins Press, 2011. 280-289.

WEEK 3: AUTEUR THEORY

12 & 14 April

Readings:
Sarris, Andrew. Notes on Auteur Theory, Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory
Readings. Eds. Leo !Braudy and Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford University
Press, 1999. 561-564.
Wollen, Peter. The Auteur Theory, Critical Visions in Film Theory: Classical and
Contemporary Readings. eds. Timothy Corrigan, Patricia White, and Meta Mazaj New
York: Bedford/St. Martins Press, 2011. 363-375.
Foucault, Michel. What is an Author? Aesthetics, Method, Epistemology: The Essential
Works of !Michel Foucault, 1954-1984, Volume 2. Eds. Paul Rabinow and Robert Hurley.
New York: New Press, 1999. 205-222.
Barthes, Roland.The Death of the Author. Critical Visions in Film Theory: Classical and
Contemporary Readings. eds. Timothy Corrigan, Patricia White, and Meta Mazaj New
York: Bedford/St. Martins Press, 2011. 346-349.

WEEK 4: GENRE THEORY


19 & 21 April

Readings:
Altman, Rick. A Semantic/Syntactic Approach to Film Genre. Film Theory and Criticism:
Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford
University Press, 1999. 680-690.
Schatz, Thomas. Film Genre and the Genre Film. Critical Visions in Film Theory: Classical
and Contemporary Readings. eds. Timothy Corrigan, Patricia White, and Meta Mazaj New
York: Bedford/St. Martins Press, 2011. 454-465.

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FLM&MDA 110: Film & Media Theory

26 &28 April

WEEK 5: STARS
Readings:
Dyer, Richard. Heavenly Bodies: Film Stars and Society. Film and Theory Eds. Robert
Stam and Toby Miller. (Oxford: Blackwell , 2000) 603-617.
Ellis, John. Stars as Cinematic Phenomenon. Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory
Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford University
Press, 1999. 598-605.

WEEK 6: APPARATUS/IDEOLOGY/PSYCHOANALYSIS
3 & 5 May

3 May: Midterm Exam 3:00AM-4:20PM


Readings::

Baudry, Jean-Louis. The Apparatus: Metaphysical Approaches to the Impression of Reality


in the Cinema, Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and
Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. 760-777.
Metz, Christian. Identification Mirror, The Passion for Perceiving and Disavowal
Fetishism, Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and
Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. 820-836.

WEEK 7: FEMINIST FILM THEORY


10 & 12 May

Readings::
Mulvey, Laura. Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema. Film Theory and Criticism:
Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford
University Press, 1999. 837-848.
Hansen, Miriam. Valentino and Female Spectatorship. Film Theory and Criticism:
Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford
University Press, 1999. 634-651.

17 & 19 May

WEEK 8: CRITICAL RACE THEORY


Readings::
Shohat, Ella and Robert Stam. Stereotype, Realism, and the Struggle Over
Representation. Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy and
Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. 801-822.
Dyer, Richard. White. Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. Eds. Leo Braudy
and Marshall Cohen. 5th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. 823-839.

WEEK 9: THE CULTURE INDUSTRY AND THE ACTIVE AUDIENCE


24 & 26 May

Readings:"
Adorno, Theodore and Max Horkheimer. The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass
Deception, Critical Visions in Film Theory: Classical and Contemporary Readings. eds.
Timothy Corrigan, Patricia White, and Meta Mazaj New York: Bedford/St. Martins Press,
2011. 1016-1031.
Hills, Matt. Fan Cultures. New York: Routledge, 2002. 27-45.

31 May & 2 June

FLM&MDA 110: Film & Media Theory


WEEK 10: GLOBALIZATION. POLITICAL ECONOMY AND CULTURAL POLICY
Readings::
Miller, Toby, Nitin Govil, John McMurria, and Richard Maxwell. Global Hollywood.
London:British Film " Institute, 2001. Extracts.
Wasko, Janet. The Political Economy of Film. A Companion to Film Theory. Eds. Toby
Miller and Robert Stam. Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishers, 2004. 221-233.

EXAM WEEK
Exam Week

Final Exam
Tuesday, 7 June 4:00:00PM-6:00:00PM
Humanities Gateway Room 2341

DEPARTMENT OF FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES LAB FEES


1)!!!A Lab Fee of $20.00 is mandatory for every student enrollment in a Film and
Media Studies class, including cross-listed and concurrently scheduled film classes.
Majors and non-majors alikeeven those who are from another school or are
enrolled through UNEXare responsible for paying the course Lab Fee. Students
dropping after the 2nd week Humanities DROP deadline remain liable for course
lab fees and any invoice charges.
2)!!!Why a Lab Fee? Film and Media Studies receives no funding for media. The Lab
Fee is an important resource for the department to cover media and course
expenses.! Without Lab Fees the Department would not have the media (i.e., no
DVDs, 16mm films, or videos) needed for class screening and for Library and/or
Humanities Instructional Resource Center reserve use, nor would guest filmmaker
presentations and approved special screenings be part of the classroom experience.!
3)!!!Upon enrollment, Lab Fees are assessed automatically along with Registration
Fees on ZOTBILLS, and/or amended ZOTBILLS. Information on ZotBill Payment can
be found on the web at https://sbs.adcom.uci.edu/ZA/. Payment information is also in
the NOTES section in the Electronic Schedule of Classes corresponding to Film and
Media Studies and cross-listed classes.
4)!!! Non-payment of Lab Fees and invoice charges on Zotbills hold up access to
transcripts, financial aid disbursements, enrollment, and diplomas.
5)!!!Students experiencing inordinate financial hardship may visit Financial Services in
109 Aldrich Hall or call (949) 824-2455 for payment counseling to discuss payment
options.
IMPORTANT: Students dropping before the second week School of Humanities
Drop deadline may request a lab fee cancellation or refund. The student is
responsible for requesting a refund in writing by contacting Film and Media Studies
Lab Fee Administrator Eva Yonas in 2012 Humanities Gateway. !No cancellations or
refunds are will be made for an unpaid Lab Fee that goes to a collection agency.
If you have any questions, please contact the Film and Media Studies Lab Fee
Administrator Eva Yonas in person in 2012 Humanities Gateway or by phone at
(949) 824-3532.

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