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! ! The Language of Masks !
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The Language
of
Masks
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Shelley!W.!Patterson ! Samford!University !

The Language of Masks Someone once said, “Behind every mask there is a face and
The Language
of
Masks
Someone once said, “Behind every mask there is a face and behind that a
story.” What does this statement mean? And, is it true? Have you ever
pondered the thought that masks have a bigger purpose? They may be the
mysterious link between us all?
Masks are everywhere. You can find them sprinkled throughout history. In
almost every culture masks have a presence. Even in our modern world, they
can be seen on Halloween, at festivals and in parades, in museums, and used
for theatrical performances. Have you ever wondered where they come from?
And, more importantly, what they have to say?
Communication is a very important part of our every day lives. Everywhere
you look, people are in constant communication with one another through
emails, phone calls, texting, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. But, if we stop
and take a minute to examine the world around us, will we find stories of long
ago hidden in the artifacts of our ancestors? Will these masks communicate
more about who we are and where we came from?
In the next few months, you will explore the language of masks. You will
examine the mask- it’s purpose, place, and transformation in society. You will
travel the world through the mask and make connections to our modern life.
Finally, you will listen. You will listen to the mask and hear what secrets it
reveals to you and understand it has much to say.
Shelley W. Patterson
EDUC578
Page 2
The Language of Masks
The Language of Masks

Rationale:

In schools today, students are often taught to rely on memorization of rote facts to master content in the classroom. Many times, gifted students easily learn the isolated pieces in order to make good grades, soar to the top of the academic world, and feel undeniably successful. However, these same students can often be found years later struggling in college and life in general as challenges present themselves that require a person to use higher-order thinking skills and piece together the isolated facts to look at the big picture or end goal to solve problems. In education, there needs to be a shift in the way we plan and prepare instruction for the gifted and talented. These students need to have a deeper and more complex understanding of overarching concepts, so they can apply them to the multi-faceted challenges of the real world. In this concept-based unit, gifted students will have the opportunity to study the communication through examining the masks of the world in a whole new way. They will learn to equip themselves with creative and critical thinking skills, which are needed not only to soar in school, but also in life.

Purpose:
Purpose:

The purpose of this unit is to study and analyze masks of the world to answer the question: Why is communication an important aspect of a culture? In this unit, students will investigate masks of the world to understand how a culture’s identity can be communicated through this form of art. They will also learn how these mysterious masks have connections to several modern American traditions and reveal more about who we are as a nation. It is also designed for students to take on the role of a practicing professional in order to communicate their understanding of a culture’s rituals and traditions through creating an art exhibit to share their knowledge with others.

Target Audience:

This unit was created for 5 th grade gifted students. However, due to mature content it is extremely important that teachers are discerning in using many of the resources that are suggested. While many of resources are authentic and thought provoking, some of them may need to be slightly altered to censor for the use of 5 th grade students. Additionally, this unit can easily be adapted for grades 6 th -8 th as it is aligned to 8 th grade Social Studies standards.

Appropriateness for Gifted Learners

Peter Drucker said, “The most important thing in communication is hearing what isn't said.In an ever-changing, diverse world, students are constantly being challenged with understanding who they are and who the people are around them. Communication can be explored far beyond what is written on a page. In this concept based unit, gifted students will have the opportunity to view the world through the conceptual lense of communication in order to have a deeper understanding of what makes up a cutlure’s identity and how it translates personally to them. Additionally, it is important for gifted students to have to exposure to varied ways of communicating their ideas, feelings, and understandings. Through mask work, they will learn how other cultures utilized this art form to communicate and apply it in their own lives. This conceptual unit is designed for gifted students to simultaneously think critically while learning to express themselves creatively.

Prerequisites:

There are not any prerequisites for any students to participate in this conceptual unit.

Shelley W. Patterson

EDUC578

Page 3

Standards
Standards

Social Studies:

8 th Grade ALCOS # 1:

Explain how artifacts and other archaeological findings provide evidence of the nature and movement of prehistoric groups of people.

8 th Grade ALCOS # 4:

Identify cultural contributions of Classical Greece, including politics, intellectual life, arts, literature, architecture, and science.

8 th Grade ALCOS # 12:

Describe China's influence on culture, politics, and economics in Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.

Art:
Art:

5 th Grade Arts Education # 1:

Utilize the elements of art and principles of design and the structures and functions of art to communicate personal ideas.

5 th Grade Arts Education # 5:

Identify societal values, beliefs, and everyday experiences expressed through works of art

Reading:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.9:

Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.7:

Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).

Science:
Science:

9 th - 12 th Grades Anatomy and Physiology Elective #15:

Identify physiological effects and components of the immune system.

Technology:

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 2:

Use various technology applications, including word processing and multimedia software.

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 8:

Collect information from a variety of digital sources.

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 9:

Use technology tools to organize, interpret, and display data.

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 10:

Use digital environments to collaborate and communicate.

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 12:

Create a product using digital tools.

Shelley W. Patterson

EDUC578

Page 4

Concept Map
Concept Map
Concept Map Shelley W. Patterson ED UC 578 Page 5

Shelley W. Patterson

EDUC578

Page 5

Concept-Based Curriculum Flowchart

Representative Topic The Language of Masks
Representative Topic
The Language of Masks

Conceptual Lens

Communication Critical Content/Standards • 8 th Grade ALCOS # 1: Explain how artifacts and other
Communication
Critical Content/Standards
8 th Grade ALCOS # 1: Explain how artifacts and other archaeological findings
provide evidence of the nature and movement of prehistoric groups of people.
8 th Grade ALCOS # 4: Identify cultural contributions of Classical Greece, including
politics, intellectual life, arts, literature, architecture, and science.
8 th Grade ALCOS # 12: Describe China's influence on culture, politics, and
economics in Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.

5 th Grade Arts Education # 1: Utilize the elements of art and principles of design and the structures and functions of art to communicate personal ideas.

• 5 th Grade Arts Education # 5: Identify societal values, beliefs, and everyday experiences expressed through works of art.

Disciplines Fields of Study

• Film Director

• Historian

• Museum

Curator

• Theatre

Professor/

Actors

• Costume

Designer

• Anthropologist

Facts

• Masks are used for actor training/performing, celebrations, spiritual rituals/religion, in time of war, and to cope with tragedy.

• Masks are used to disguise, conceal, amuse, terrify, express/ communicate ideas or feelings to other people.

• Masks can be found in the traditions and rituals of many cultures, including:

African, Ancient Greek, Italian, Chinese, Korean, Native American, African, and modern American cultures.

Skills/Processes

• Developing Hypotheses

• Recognizing Attributes

• Compare and Contrast

• Analyze

• Making Observations

• Classifying

• Seeing Relationships

• Planning

• Originality

• Collaborating

• Performing

• Creating/Designing

• Research

• Organizing Information

Concepts

Communication

Culture

Identity

Origin

Rituals

Traditions

Name: Shelley W. Patterson

Date:

June 19, 2014

Essential Understandings/Generalizations • Students understand that communication is an important aspect of a culture.
Essential
Understandings/Generalizations
• Students understand that communication is an important aspect of a culture.
• Students understand that communication provides a means of understanding a culture's identity.
• Students understand that a culture's identity is essential in interpreting the origin of rituals and traditions.
Essential Questions
• Why is communication an important aspect of a culture?
• How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?
• In what ways does understanding a culture’s identity help you interpret the origin of rituals and traditions?
Culminating Performance Task/Summative Assessment
PBL Scenario:
The Jule Collins Museum of Art in Auburn, Alabama is hosting a new exhibit titled, The Language of Masks, to display
at this spring’s art gala. As the newly hired museum curator, you will assemble a team to help you organize and
prepare for the new exhibit. Your team will consist of two other members, including a commissioned local artist and
anthropologist. Together, you will plan, design, and develop an art exhibit consisting of 5 to 7 mask artifacts to display
at the art gala. The artifacts must communicate one specific culture’s rituals, traditions, beliefs, or values through your
exhibit. Your exhibit may include a three-dimensional replica of a mask (required), mock-up drawings, dramatizations,
photographs and/or printed of pictures. The anthropologist will be responsible for the accuracy of the content, the artist
will be responsible for design, and the curator will organize and write the descriptions for the exhibit.
*Students may chose a culture we have studied or a research a new culture.
Instructional Activities
• Pre-assessment: Students will complete a Frayer Model Diagram on the concept of “Communication”.
Throughout the unit, we will keep a concept web of communication displayed on our wall. As we learn new
purposes of communication for the mask, we will add it to our map.
• Lesson 1: Students will take a “mask gallery walk” of various kinds of masks hypothesizing on the purpose of
each mask. Students will complete the concept development group activity.
• Lesson 2: Students will learn how to communicate with masks in theatre using the neutral mask. They will
develop tableaux using neutral masks to perform for the class.
• Lesson 3: Students will research the use of masks in Ancient Greece theatre. They will compare and contrast
the design and structure of masks for use in comedy vs. tragedy and chorus vs. a central character
(Suggested site: www.richeast.org/htwm/Greeks/theatre/actors.html) We will analyze pictures of masks and
determine what each mask would communicate to the audience.
• Lesson 4: Bibliotherapy lesson using the book: Behind the Mask” by Yangsook Choi (A young boy begins to
understand his grandfather through learning about the culture his grandfather’s mask).
• Lesson 5: Students will jigsaw the purpose and cultural meaning behind various Chinese masks (exorcising
masks, Tibetan masks, sorcerers' masks in Yunnan and Guizhou, Shamanic masks and dramatic masks etc.)
• Lesson 6: Students will explore the need for Commedia Dell’arte and how is originated by discussing why
humor is needed in culture? (Students will become familiar with the impact of the Black Death on Italian
culture.)
• Lesson 7: Guest teacher: Daydrie Hague (if available) Students will learn to improvise and delve into the
world of Commedia Del’arte by performing skits.
• Lesson 8: Students will learn ready folktales, myths, and legends from three West African Tribes. They will
visit virtual museums and picture galleries to analyze the relationship between the design of masks and
folktales, myths, and legends in West Africa.
• Lesson 9: American traditions: how do we use masks in our culture and can we see any relationships or
trends that are similar with other cultures? Students will make connections between cultures, rituals, and
traditions. (Why did we originally wear masks on Halloween? Mardi-Gras, masquerade balls, etc.)
• Lesson 10: Affective lesson: The Masks We Wear Students will participate in working with neutral masks to
reveal their thoughts/feelings while concealed with a mask.
• Lesson 11: Career Fair: Student will visit information centers from three practicing professionals (museum
Name: Shelley W. Patterson
Date:
June 19, 2014
curator, local artist, and an anthropologist) either in person or via Skype.
Lesson 12 (Performance Task): In teams of three, create an art exhibit of 5-7 mask artifacts from the
perspective of one culture.
Unit Overview: The Language of Masks
Unit Overview: The Language of Masks

Essential Understandings/Generalizations:

• Students understand that communication is an important aspect of a culture.

• Students understand that communication provides a means of understanding a culture's identity.

• Students understand that a culture's identity is essential in interpreting the origin of rituals and traditions.

Essential Questions:

• Why is communication an important aspect of a culture?

• How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

• In what ways does understanding a culture’s identity help you interpret the origin of rituals and traditions?

Preassessment:

Instructional Activities:

1-2 weeks before students will complete a Frayer Model Diagram on the concept of “Masks”. Throughout the unit,

we will keep a web about masks displayed on our wall. As we learn new purposes for the mask, materials used, and cultural understandings - we will add it to our map.

Lesson 1: Introduction to the Unit:

Guiding Questions: What is communication? What are some unconventional ways to communicate? Can art communicate? What is culture? What are the components that make up a society’s culture? Why is communication an important aspect of a culture?

1. Upon entering the room, students will hear the song, “Communication”, by Mae. As each student sits, they will find a sheet of paper with the lyrics printed on them. I will direct the students to read the lyrics as we finish listening to the song. Afterwards, I will ask my students to define, “What is communication?” and “How did the musician in this song communicate?”

2. Students will complete “Concept Development Group Activity”. In groups of four, students will brainstorm, examples of the concept of communication onto a Padlet wall. They may represent the examples of communication with words, symbols, and/or pictures. I will ask students to think of unusual/unconventional ways we communicate to add to the wall, too. Once student groups have generated their list, I will ask them to categorize the ideas into groups and then, think of non-examples. Finally, as a whole group, I will demonstrate how to write a generalization about communication from our examples, categories, and non-examples. Once I have demonstrated it, students will work in groups to write additional generalizations. We will record them onto our wall concept map about communication.

3. Teacher will then reveal a gallery of masks that are already hung (but covered up) in the room. Student will use a graphic organizer and take a “Mask Gallery Walk” with a partner making notes about what culture, circumstance/purpose, and message they hypothesize the mask is telling them. (Type& I)

Lesson 2: The Neutral Mask:

Guiding Questions: In what ways can you communicate without using spoken language? Can you reveal a message while hiding? How do actors use neutral masks in order to communicate more effectively to their audience? Why is communication an important aspect of a culture?

1. Class will read quote, The neutral mask can lead an actor to reject his habitual identification in favor of a deeper, simpler understanding of his powers of expression.” (By Philip Zarrilli) Class will discuss how when using masks you can no longer communicate with speech or facial expressions, and therefore, you need to expand your vocabulary of what it means to communicate. You must focus on the most intricate movements of body language in order to communicate your message.

2. Creative Dramatic (Warm-up): Wearing a neutral mask, students will work on communicating a message without any speech used. One student will draw a word from two separate bowls (one bowl containing adjectives, and the other containing an animal). Then, all the students will move throughout the room communicating both the adjective and the animal by transforming their body language to complete the task (Example: ferocious dog, playful frog, or an injured fox). (Type&I)

Shelley W. Patterson

EDUC578

Page 8

3. Students will learn how to communicate with masks in theatre using the neutral mask. They will develop tableau using neutral masks to perform for the class. In groups of 3-4 people, using the neutral masks, create a frozen tableau, which expresses an emotional state (e.g. fear, pride, aggression, joy). Hold for a count of 5. Show the class. Discussion of what tableau they were showing, and what communicated the message. Create a statement of the exact opposite emotion (e.g. bravery, modesty, timidity, misery). Hold for a count of 5. Ask the class, “What changed within the actors body language that communicated a new tableau?” (Type&II)

4. Add new ideas/connections to our mask web.

Lesson 3: Masks of Ancient Greece:

Guiding Questions: How does the construction of a mask help the audience interpret different meanings? Why were masks so important in Ancient Greek theatre? How do the masks of Ancient Greek theatre help us to understand the gender roles in their society? What do the masks of Ancient Greek theatre communicate about societal traditions and rituals during that time in history? How do the masks of Ancient Greece help communicate its culture’s identity? How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

1.

Students will look at a picture of Theatre of Dionysus. Groups of four will have a discussion of “How theatres have changed over time?”

2.

Students will research the use of masks in Ancient Greece theatre. While researching, they will use a Venn-diagram to compare and contrast the purpose, design and structure of masks for use in comedy vs. tragedy vs. chorus masks. (Suggested site: www.richeast.org/htwm/Greeks/theatre/actors.html) (Type& I)

3.

Once students have an understanding for how Ancient Greek theatre masks were used for communication, teacher will hand each group envelopes of pictures of Ancient Greek Mask and a compilation of modern poems. Students will read the poems and choose appropriate masks that actors may have worn if this poem was performed in the Theatre of Dionysus during Ancient Greek times. (Type&II)

4.

Add new ideas/connections to our mask web. Students

1.2.

Lesson 4: Masks of China:

 

Guiding Questions: What are celebrations? What are rituals? How did Chinese culture incorporate masks in their beliefs, celebrations, rituals, and ceremonies? What do these masks tell us about Chinese culture? How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

1. Upon entering the room, an animated mask will be talking to the students explaining a brief history of the importance of masks in Chinese culture. At the end of the animation, the mask will then tell the students which groups they are working in and give them directions.

2. Students will “jigsaw” the purpose and cultural meaning behind various Chinese masks (exorcising masks, Tibetan masks, sorcerers' masks in Yunnan and Guizhou, Shamanic masks and dramatic masks etc.) Students will first organize into five separate “expert” groups studying the sub-categories listed above. They will fill out a graphic organizer about their mask, its purpose, and how it was used to communicate within Chinese cultural. (Type& I)

3. Students will use the information from the graphic organizer to write an informative paragraph about their mask.

4. Students will remain in their expert groups, and use the App “iFunFace” to capture photographs of Chinese masks, animate the masks to talk, and then record the information they have learned about their mask. (Type&II)

5. Then, students will take their individual animations back to “secondary” groups, and share their expertise with new group.

6. Add new ideas/connections to our mask web.

Lesson 5: Masks of Italy:

Guiding Questions: What are origins? What is humor? Why is comedy needed? What is improvisation? How was humor communicated through masks in Italian culture? How is humor changed over time? How Commedia Dell’arte influenced humor in modern culture? What professions care about improvisation? How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

1. Students will watch a clip from The Three Stooges: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdBvBtdbQpw Teacher will reveal to students that this type of entertainment originated from Commedia Dell’arte. Teacher will explain that as we explore the world of Commedia Dell’arte- they need to be thinking of other ways Commedia’ Dell’arte has transformed and translates into modern entertainment.

2. Students will become familiar with the impact of the Black Death on Italian culture. They will watch two clips http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRZYb2Jl22g and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DyE8z_Ztifc (Type& I)

3. Teacher will give out copies of “Ring Around Rosy” rhyme. There will be a discussion of what the true meaning of the rhyme meant and its relationship to the Bubonic Plague.

4.

Teacher will pose the questions: “What is humor?” “Why would humor become a necessity during this time?” Students will discuss the need for humor.

5. Teacher will introduce the characters of Commedia Dell’arte by providing each student a character description of each mask and showing them the mask. Play video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_0TAXWt8hY Ask them if they saw any of the same comedic techniques in this video that was similar to the comedic techniques in The Three Stooges clip. Discuss the similarities. (Type&I)

6. Introduce the ideas of slapstick and improvisation. Ask, “Who cares about improvisation?” Brainstorm professions that incorporate improvisation making a Popplet map.

7. Guest teacher: Daydrie Hague. Students will learn how to move their bodies to embody the characters. Students will learn to improvise and delve into the world of Commedia Del’arte by performing skits. Assign students Commedia Dell’arte characters. Give students scenarios and students have to interact with one another in character. (Type&II)

8. Add new ideas/connections to our mask web.

Lesson 6: Masks of Africa:

Guiding Questions: What is a belief? What aspects of nature do many African cultures incorporate into their belief systems? Why do many people of Africa wear masks during spiritual ceremonies? Are the masks necessary? What are folktales, myths, and legends? Do you think every aspect of African culture is communicated through masks? How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

1. Teacher will read the West African tale, Anansi and the Moss-Covered Rock- retold by Eric A. Kimmel. Teacher will ask the students if they believe this story to be true? Students will define the meaning of folktales, myths, and legends. Explain to students that Anansi originates from the West African culture of Ashanti of Ghana.

2. Students will explore three West African Cultures: the Bambara of Mali, the Yoruba of Southwestern Nigeria, and the Ashanti of Ghana. Students will read two more myths: How Twins Came Among the Yoruba and The Ancient Myth of the Twi Wara (the Bambara of Mali). (Type&I)

3. Students will then take virtual trips to online photo galleries and museums to see if they can find masks that represent any of the spirits, gods, and characters in the story. If they think they find one, they will display the picture of the mask to the class and elaborate on their reason in linking this mask to the myth or folktale. (Type&II)

Resource links:

http://www.zyama.com/index.htm http://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/ http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/afr

4. Add news ideas/connections to our mask web.

Lesson 7: Masks of America

Guiding Questions: How are masks important to you? How are masks important in American culture? In what ways does understanding a culture’s identity help you interpret the origin of rituals and traditions? How do we use masks in our culture and can we see any relationships or trends that are similar with other cultures? How do our ancestors still communicate to us today that help us to understand who we are and where we came from?

1.

Teacher will read the book, Behind the Mask” by Yangsook Choi (A young boy begins to understand his grandfather through learning about the culture his grandfather’s mask). Ask: Do you think the young boy has a new appreciation for his grandfather’s mask at the end of the story?

2.

Students will answer the journal prompt: “How are masks important to you?”

3.

American traditions: Teacher will give a PowerPoint Presentation about the history of masks in America. (Why did we originally wear masks on Halloween? Mardi-Gras, masquerade balls, circus etc.) (Type&I)

4.

Students will add an additional section to our concept map on the wall about masks in America.

5.

Students will make connections between cultures, rituals, and traditions. Students will be given string and they will attach the string onto the map on the wall by physically connecting categories on the map that are linked with string.

6.

Students will be handed a large sheet of poster paper where they will work in groups of four to answer:

In what ways does understanding a culture’s identity help you interpret the origin of rituals and traditions?

How do we use masks in our culture and can we see any relationships or trends that are similar with other cultures?

Lesson 8: The Masks We Wear:

Guiding Questions: What is a metaphor? What does it mean to wear a metaphorical mask? Why do people feel the need to mask

themselves? How can we break down the barrier of masks? Is it necessary to mask yourself and when? Why is it important to reveal your true self? Is masking your true self ever warranted?

1. Upon entering the room, there will be quote posted on the walls in the room. The poem, Masks, by Shel Silverstein will be centered

in the middle of all of the poems. Students will be asked to write down the quote that speaks the most to them and explain why.

2.

Teacher will discuss a metaphor and students will have the opportunity to share their thoughts about the quotes.

3. Socratic Circle: Students will answer the questions-

Why do people feel the need to mask themselves?

How can we break down the barrier of masks?

Is it necessary to mask yourself and when?

Why is it important to reveal your true self?

4. Students will complete a graphic organizer about, “Who I Am?”

5. Students will then students will write the characteristics from their graphic organizer on color scraps of paper. They will then Hodge Podge the color strips onto their neutral masks in order to reveal who they are behind the mask.

6. Students will choose a characteristic from their mask that they would like to physically embody through movement. Students will perform, “Who I Am?” skits for one another. (Type&II)

Lesson 9: Why Masks Matter?:

Guiding Questions: What practicing professionals find masks important? How are masks from the past still communicating to us today? How are masks from history found and handled? What materials are masks made from? How are masks displayed? How are exhibits organized?

1. Students will work in pairs to answer the question, “Who care about masks?” They will generate a list of 20 to 25 professionals that care about masks.

2. Teacher will inform students that three practicing professionals (museum curator, local artist, and an anthropologist) will be visiting us shortly either in person or via Skype. Students will have 15 minutes to generate 5 questions, they would like to ask each practicing professional about their jobs and if they have any connections to masks. (Type&II)

3. Students will visit career stations to see demonstration/presentation.& (Type& I )& After each station, there will be a Question/Answer segment. Students will have 25 minutes at each station. They will take notes, videotape, or record each session to obtain information for their PBL scenario. ( Type&II)

4. After the practicing professionals leave, students will complete applications for the job of their choice and turn it into my box not later than Friday of that week.

Lesson 10 (Performance Task): The Language of Masks Exhibit:

Guiding Questions: What skills do I need to make a mask? How can I communicate a culture’s identity through creation of masks?

1. Give out rubric and discuss cultures they may choose.

2. Review PBL Scenario: In teams of three, create an art exhibit of 5-7 mask artifacts from the perspective of one culture.

3. Review process of making mask: Guest teacher: Tracy Olenick- show strategies on mask making and samples of masks. (Type& I)&&

4. Other resources for mask making techniques: (Type& II)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCiYNE_hmNg

http://artchoo.com/african-mask-project/

5. Assess finished exhibits using a scoring rubric. They will also display the exhibits in the spring art show.

Purposes

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Lesson One Introduction to the Unit :
Lesson One
Introduction to the Unit
:

Topic: Masks

Grade Level: 5 th

Lesson Length: 1 ½ Hours

Discipline(s): Art, History

Instructor: Shelley W. Patterson

Content Knowledge/Standards

Standards:

 
 

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 10:

 
 

Use digital environments to collaborate and communicate.

 
 

5 th Grade Arts Education # 5:

 
 

Identify societal values, beliefs, and everyday experiences expressed through works of art

 
 

Unit Conceptual Lens: Communication

 

Unit Essential Understanding(s): Students understand that communication is an important aspect of a culture.

Unit Essential Question(s): Why is communication an important aspect of a culture?

 

Additional Concepts (this lesson): Culture

 

Guiding

Question(s)

for

this

lesson:

What

is

communication?

What

are

some

unconventional ways to communicate? Can art communicate? What is culture? What are the components that make up a society’s culture?

Assessment In this lesson, students will… Know (content): Masks used to communicate in many cultures. Understand (concepts/big ideas):

Preassessment: 1-2 weeks before students will complete a Frayer Model Diagram on the concept of “Masks”.

Formative Assessment(s): Teacher observation of discussion and group participation, journal entry, “Mask Gallery Walk” graphic organizer, Padlet wall, exit slip

 

Communication is an important aspect of culture, and communication often happens through masks. Be able to (skills/processes): Brainstorm, categorize, generalize, and make observations

Post-assessment: Throughout the unit, we will keep a web about masks displayed on our wall. As we learn new purposes for the mask, materials used, and cultural understandings - we will add it to our map.

Introduction

“Hook” for this lesson:

 

Upon entering the room, students will hear the song, “Communication”, by Mae. As the students sit, they will find a sheet of paper with the lyrics printed on them. I will direct the students to read the lyrics as we finish listening to the song. We will discuss the meaning of the artist’s lyrics in verse 6.

Teaching Methods

Direct Instruction

 

Concept Attainment

Cooperative Learning

 

Simulation

 

Shelley W. Patterson

EDUC578

Page 13

Learning Activities

1.

Brainstorming: Students will complete “Concept Development Group Activity”. In groups of four, students will brainstorm, examples of the concept of communication onto a Padlet wall. They may represent the examples of communication with words, symbols, and/or pictures. I will ask students to think of unusual/unconventional ways we communicate to add to the wall, too.

What kinds of things communicate?

 

What is it about them that communicate?

 

Can you think of nonliving things that communicate?

 

2.

Categorizing: Once student groups have generated their list, I will ask them to categorize the ideas into groups.

How would you categorize these ideas into groups?

 

Can you give each group a title?

 

Might some of your ideas fit into more than one group?

 

3.

Brainstorming: Students will begin the procedure again, but thinking of non-

examples. They will categorize the non-examples once they generate the list.

 

What are some things that do not communicate?

 

What

evidence

or

proof

do

you

have

that

these

things

do

not

communicate?

 

4.

Generalizing: Finally, as a whole group, I will demonstrate how to write a generalization about communication from our examples, categories, and non- examples. Once I have demonstrated it, students will work in groups to write additional generalizations. We will record them onto our wall concept map about communication.

5.

Teacher will ask question: What is a culture? What components make up a culture? Show the video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvdivB5kTUU

6.

Making Observation/ Developing Hypotheses: Teacher will then reveal a gallery of masks that are already hung (but covered up) in the room. Student will use a graphic organizer and take a “Mask Gallery Walk” with a partner making notes about what culture, circumstance/purpose, and message they hypothesize the mask is telling them. (Type& I)

7.

Debrief and add ideas to our wall web about Masks.

 

8.

Exit Slip: Can art communicate?

 

Resources

Lyrics of “Communication

 

Various printed pictures of Masks for “Mask Gallery Walk”

 

Recording sheet for the “Mask Gallery Walk”

 

Poster Paper

Products

Padlet Wall with generalizations from concept attainment

 

“Mask Gallery Walk” graphic organizer

 

Exit Slip

Grouping

Whole group: Discussion of lyrics, writing generalizations, debriefing/recording ideas onto our wall mask web Small group: Groups of 4: Concept Development Activity, Groups of 2: Mask Gallery Walk Individual: Journaling, Exit Slip

Extensions

There will be a variety of extension links an interest center available for extension.

 

Extension Links: (discern before assigning these links to students- however, there are many wonderful resources and activities provided) http://africa.uima.uiowa.edu

 

http://www.mardigrasneworleans.com/news/news/mardi-gras-masks-are-

 

tradition.html http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

 

http://broadwayeducators.com/?p=1821

 
 

http://polkmuseumofart.org/exhibitions/exhibition-development/

http://www.greektheatre.gr/greek_theater_masks_2.html

http://www.theplayersjournal.org/archive/using-the-mask/

http://ada201.weebly.com/uploads/5/6/9/6/5696091/masks_--_a_brief_history.pdf

http://masksoftheworld.com/masks/ http://www.brooklynkids.org/attachments/Masks_FIN.pdf

http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1993/2/93.02.04.x.html

http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/what-masks-reveal#sect-activities

http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/studentwork/jones/shell.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/African_Mask_Faces.html

http://asianhistory.about.com/od/arthistoryinasia/ss/KoreanMasks.htm

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Masks-from-Melanesia

http://natural-history.uoregon.edu/collections/web-galleries/native-american-masks-

northwest-coast-and-alaska

http://www.way-of-the-samurai.com/Samurai-Masks.html

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/06/140610-oldest-masks-israel-

museum-exhibit-archaeology-science/

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/04/african-masks/galembo-photography#/07-

limba-devil-ghongorli-sierra-leone-670.jpg

Interest Centers:

Improvisational Center- a center will be available for students to work on their improvisational skills. There will be a collection of masks, character descriptions, scenarios, Reader’s Theatre scripts, Commedia Dell’arte scripts for kids to practice their improv skills:

http://www.pioneerdrama.com/SearchResults.asp?keywords=commedia&nns=on&size=1-

35&time=15-120&nns=on

Peking Opera Mask Center: In this center, there will be videos of Peking Opera Mask performances, as well as, a notebook (printed PowerPoint) of what all the various colors of the opera masks mean. Students will come to this center to make a Peking Mask to represent their personal character traits. They will independently study the meaning behind the colors, use the supplies (card stock, paints, etc). to create a mask, and a description of why the colors were chosen. (Resource link: http://www.paulnoll.com/China/Opera/China-opera-colors.html)

Differentiation/ Ascending Intellectual Demand

Throughout the unit, students will have opportunity to choose their practicing profession, culture of focus, choice in presentation, and method of creating final projects.

Quotes, poetry, and literature will be of varying levels, so that all students can find literature to work with on their independent level.

Student discussions will be scaffolded, and teacher can work with students independently as needed.

Lesson One: Scripted Introduction to the Unit :
Lesson One: Scripted
Introduction to the Unit
:
Hook:
Hook:

As students enter the room, the song, “Communication” (by Mae), will be playing aloud. On each desk, I will have placed a printed copy of the lyrics. (As each student comes into my room) Boys and girls, please find your name plate and notice there are a set of lyrics and a highlighter on your desk. Please take a moment and read over the lyrics as you listen to the song play. You do not need your highlighter right now, we will use those in just a moment.

(Once the song has finished playing, I will say to my students-) In this song, the artist continuously sings about communication. Let’s look back at the lyrics. Can you find and highlight the verse where, he says:

Communication is calling us, it's all in us, A celebration, for you and me, and the universe, Our destination, oh, (How we find the answer) When we search beyond ourselves, you know we always learn (We've become so clever) Let our walls crumble and burn away, (We can change forever) Can we lend a better hand then the one that we've been?

What does the artist mean by, “Communication is calling us, its all in is. A celebration, for you and me, and the universe, Our destination, oh, How we find the answer?” I am going to give you about 3-4 minutes to turn and talk to your group about what you think the artist means by these lyrics. You may jot down its meaning on in the margins of the paper if you would like. You only need one secretary to record the group’s ideas, unless you have differing opinions. (I will set my timer, which my students are accustomed to, and after 3-4 minutes, say:). Okay, boys and girls, what do you think the artist meant? (Each group will have a representative read their responses). All of your responses are wonderful, this song may have different meanings to different people. However, I agree with many of you that the artist was saying that communication is a very important part of our everyday lives and not only for us, but he says “for the universe”. Look at what he says a moment later, “How we find the answer when we search beyond ourselves, you know we always learn”. It is almost like the artist and I are kindred spirits, because I agree communication is a very important part of who we are, how we learn, and it tells us about things that are beyond our personal lives.

Concept Attainment:

Over the next several months, we are going to be exploring the world of communication, and how it plays a very present and important part of our lives. Sometimes, we don’t even realize how big of a role communication plays in our lives. But, just think about it… communication occurs in almost everything we do- ALL DAY LONG! Are there times when it is challenging to communicate with others? When? Why? (Wait for responses.) You guys are right. Communication can be challenging when you speak different languages or have other interferences.

I am going to divide you all into groups of four. I will come around and give you an animal. If you are a lion, go to table 1. If you are a monkey, go to table 2. If you are an otter, go to table 3. If you are a panda, go to table 4. If you are a parakeet, go to able 5. Finally, if you are a platypus, go to table 6. We are going to do an activity, where we are going to think a little bit deeper about communication. Please choose one person in your group to be the secretary for this activity. Secretaries you will see that each group has a laptop and there is a web tool called Padlet pulled up on the screen. If you

will watch me, I am going to show you how to use Padlet. First of all, you can click anywhere on the wall of Padlet and a vritual sticky note comes up. You are going to click on the wall, and in the first space, type in your group’s animal name. Then, you are going to type in the box a response to the question (after you have discussed it as a group). I will be walking around to listen to your discussions. I am only going to give you about 6-7 minutes complete this task, so stay focused. Once your group has completed your sticky note, hit enter and it will show up on the SmartBoard. If you cannot see someone’s sticky note come up, please refresh your computer, and it will pop up. You may also post pictures of your ideas. (I will demonstrate as I talk, and it will show up on my SmartBoard) If you would like to add pictures, you need to move your mouse on the bottom of the sticky note. Do you see the icon that looks like a figure eight with a line through it? If you want to add a picture to your wall, you may open the Google search engine, search for images you think illustrate the idea of communication, then click on the image, copy the url to the picture (not the site), and paste it into where that icon is on the virtual sticky note. Just like this (I will add a picture of a music note.) Really awesome, isn’t it? Remember you have to answer two parts. The prompt says if you had to define the word “communication” what would you say? What is communication? Make sure your whole group discusses the answers before typing it into Padlet. Any questions? You may start. (Probable responses: Communication is talking or sending a message to someone else. Communication is how people transfer information through spoken language, etc.) Now, I will have posted an additional prompt. I see you all are posting some perfect examples. But, I want you to think a little deeper. What are some unusual or unconventional ways of communication? For example, does communication always happen through word of mouth? Can non-living things communicate, too? Give me some examples of nonliving things that communicate? (Allow time, 5 minutes, for student responses on Padlet wall.) Wow, you all have some great ideas of things that communicate. I think we are all starting to understand why Mae describes communication as our destination, because it is a very important part of our everyday lives and who we are, isn’t it?

What I would like for you to do now, is to look at all of the examples of the Padlet wall. I would like for your groups to see if you can create categories or groups for your examples and ideas to go into. You may use your ideas or borrow others ideas from the Padlet wall. You are not going to type this part into Padlet. You are going to categorize it onto a blank sheet of paper. You may want to make a graphic organizer to well, organize you ideas! For example, we have already talked about how both living and nonliving things communicate. So, that would be two separate categories. I may put teachers, friends, animals, and family into the “living” category. Then, I could put books, computers, instruments, and music into another category titled- “nonliving things”. I would like for you to take five minutes with your group and see if you can think of additional categories. Understand? Okay, brainsTHINK! (Put five more minutes on my timer. Once time is up, say:) Tell me some of your categories, and I will write them on this poster paper. (Some examples may be: art, language, writing, technology, body language, entertainment etc.)

Now, boys and girls, let’s really see who wore their thinking caps today. Now, we are going to brainstorm some non- examples of communication. This one is going to be a little more challenging to answer. But, think of things that do not communicate? Ask yourself: What evidence do you have that these things do not communicate? For example, do all nonliving things communicate? I know this one is a little more brain boggling, but try to think of 5-6 non-examples and post it onto our Padlet wall. I am going to give you 5-7 minutes. Ready? Begin. (I will start with five minutes and check in. If they need an additional two minutes, I will allot it to them.) Okay, by looking at your responses. I can see that most of you typed in objects that definitely do not communicate. What does this tell us about communication? (Wait for responses). You are right most things communicate- that is why thinking of non-examples was more challenging. Are there any subgroups or categories, we could place these objects in? (Wait for responses. I will list groups/categories on the board).

Okay, the last task for us to do with these brainstormed ideas we have created is to use them to write generalizations about communication. You will use the categories/groups to write your generalizations, not the examples and non- examples. A generalization is a broad statement that can apply to many examples. For example, what broad statement could I say about living and non-living things and communication? I could write (I will write this on the board as I say it-) Both living and nonliving things communicate. Does that apply to many examples? Yes! Okay, let’s try one more. Let’s

use the category of entertainment. Who communicates through entertainment? You are right actors do, screen writers, musicians, and film directors. Good! Could we group them into people? Okay. So, could we say, “People communicate through entertainment or Entertainment communicates people’s ideas?” Now, I would like you to try to think of 3 or four generalizations in your group. I am going to come around and give you a sheet of poster paper and a marker, so choose a new secretary to record your ideas. You will have about 7 minutes to do this activity. (I will start the timer for 7 minutes. At the end of the lesson, we will share our ideas. We will post them on the wall.) We are going to post our generalizations on the wall. As we learn new ideas through this lesson, we are going to add to our wall. You will find throughout this unit, that lots of ideas are going to connect, so we may need to reorganize and create new groups or new generalizations.

Mask Gallery Walk:

Okay, everybody. We are going to shift gears for a moment. I am going to show you a video clip. As you watch this clip, you will see lots of diverse groups. As you watch, I want you to be thinking about the answer to these questions, “What is culture?” and “What components mask up a culture?” Show the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvdivB5kTUU (After the video is over, say:) I just love that clip. The first time I watched it, I actually teared up. In this video, how did the different cultures communicate? Yes, dance. So, let’s talk about what we were supposed to think about. In this clip, could you tell there were cultures represented that were different from your culture and the culture of others in the video? So, what is culture? (Allow response time- teacher will write idea onto poster paper). I can tell that you guys think a culture is what your wear, eat, believe, the house you live in, etc. So, what components mask up a culture? Let’s try to group your ideas into larger categories. (Allow response time- teacher will write it on poster paper and add it to our wall).

In this unit, we are going to explore communication and culture through the topic of masks. Last week, when I gave you a chart to fill out about masks, I see that most of you think masks are for scaring people on Halloween and to make horror films. But, masks are actually present in almost every culture in the world. In fact, in the video we just watched there were several masks shown, weren’t there? Everyone look around the room, do you see those black sheets of paper hanging up? In just a minute, I am going to assign you a partner, so you do not have to worry about finding one. Then, I am going to uncover 12 masks that are used in cultures around the world, for differing purposes, and they all communicate something about their culture. You and a partner are going to make hypothesize about which culture you think the mask originated from, the purpose or circumstance in which the mask would be used, and the message you think it would send. For example, do you think it sends a message of warning, honor, celebration, or humor? Many of these masks are going to look quite unusual to you, and right now you may not have a lot of schema about it, but you and your partner do the best you can. You will have 30 seconds at each mask. Are you ready? (I will assign partners, give them a clip board with a graphic organizer attached. Students will take the “Mask Gallery Walk” and indicate ideas on their paper. Once time is up, I will say:) Okay, everyone- please find a seat anywhere in the room with your partner. Now, I am going to walk around the room, point to each mask, and you can tell me what you thought about it. I am not going to reveal the answers to you today. We are going to actually study each of these masks, and at the end of the unit, I am going to let you adjust your answers. I bet you are going to be surprised at how you will not only be able to tell me what culture each mask comes from, but also how it communicates a message about the culture and who they are as a society. You do not have to wait until the end of the unit to change your answers about these masks, as you learn, feel free to make new notes. Please place your graphic organizer into you or your partner’s notebook, and we will revisit it as needed.

Debriefing:

Wow, you all have discussed a lot about communication and culture. Do you all agree that communication is an important aspect of a culture? Yes, I do, too. We are going to be exploring this concept more in depth each week. (I will post this generalization on the wall). On this wall, I am also going to write the word, “Masks”. I have documented many of the ideas that you discussed on your Frayer Models last week. Let’s review many of your ideas. (Class discussion of ideas). As we learn new ideas through our investigation, it is very important that we document it on our wall. At the end of this unit, you will be given the opportunity to act as a practicing professional and create an art exhibit to communicate what your have learned about the culture’s identity. (Give them the Unit Narrative and the Culminating Performance Task Assignment). We will talk more about the details of your final project, next week. However, it is important for you to understand that you are going to be conducting research and investigations throughout the next several months, which will help you with your art exhibit. So, please make sure you are documenting new ideas on our class web a priority. Does everyone understand? Please take these two forms home to share with your parents, and let them know that you many bring resources from home, however, the culminating task will be completed at school.

Unfortunately, it is about time to go. However, I have one last question for you to answer. I am going to come around and give you a sticky note. On it, I would like you to answer the question, “Can art communicate?” Please make sure to elaborate on your answer and do not just write “yes” or “no”. Then, write your name at the top, and stick it on the laminated poster paper for 5 th grade on your way out the door. I am so excited about this unit, and I hope you are, too. I will see you next week!

Lesson Two The Neutral Mask
Lesson Two
The Neutral Mask

Topic: The Neutral Mask

Grade Level: 5 th

Lesson Length:

Discipline(s): Art

Instructor: Shelley W. Patterson

45-60 minutes

Content Knowledge/Standards

Standards:

5 th Grade Arts Education # 1:

 

Utilize the elements of art and principles of design and the structures and functions of art to communicate personal ideas.

5 th Grade Arts Education # 5:

 
 

Identify societal values, beliefs, and everyday through works of art

experiences expressed

Unit Conceptual Lens: Communication

Unit Essential Understanding(s): Students understand that communication is an important aspect of a culture.

Unit Essential Question(s): Why is communication an important aspect of a culture?

Additional Concepts (this lesson): Culture

 

Guiding Question(s) for this lesson: In what ways can you communicate without using spoken language? Can you reveal a message while hiding? How do actors use neutral masks in order to communicate more effectively to their audience?

Assessment In this lesson, students will… Know (content): Neutral masks are used in theatre and various cultures to communicate more effectively. Understand (concepts/big ideas):

Communication is presented in many ways and is an important aspect of culture. Be able to (skills/processes): Make observations, list attributes, expand on originality and elaboration, and engage in metacognition.

Formative Assessment(s): Teacher observation of discussion and group participation of creative dramatics, journal entry

Post-assessment: Throughout the unit, we will keep a web about masks displayed on our wall. As we learn new purposes for the mask, materials used, and cultural understandings - we will add it to our map.

Introduction

“Hook” for this lesson:

 

Class will read quote, The neutral mask can lead an actor to reject his habitual identification in favor of a deeper, simpler understanding of his powers of expression.” (By Philip Zarrilli) Class will discuss how when using masks you can no longer communicate with speech or facial expressions, and therefore, you need to expand your vocabulary of what it means to communicate. You must focus on the most intricate movements of body language in order to communicate your message. The teacher will ask, “In what ways can you communicate without using spoken language?”

Teaching Methods

Demonstration/Modeling

 

Cooperative Learning

Coaching

Visualization

Learning Activities

1. Making Observations/Creative Dramatic (Warm-up): Students will work on communicating a message without any speech used. Students will be broken into two groups: Group A and Group B. One student from Group A will draw a word from two separate bowls (one bowl containing adjectives, and the other containing an animal). Then, Group A students will move throughout the room communicating both the adjective and the animal by transforming their body language communicate the message while Group B students observe and take notes. Then, someone from Group B will draw an adjective/animal from the two bowls and move throughout the space depicting that animal/adjective while Group A observes and take notes. (Example: ferocious dog, playful frog, or an injured fox). (Type&I)

2. Listing Attributes/Creative Dramatic (Debriefing/ Process discussions):

Students will sit in one large circle. We will discuss how is felt to participate in the warm-up, how we utilized body language to help us communicate, and how it would have been different if we were not allowed to use facial expressions to communicate the animal or activity. Teacher will ask the students to share some of their observations of what they saw as others communicated the messages.

3. Originality/ Elaboration/ Creative Dramatic (Dramatic Activity): Students will learn how to communicate with masks in theatre using the neutral mask. Teacher will ask students to think of cultures that may use a neutral mask. Do we ever see individuals using neutral masks in our culture? They will develop tableau using neutral masks to perform for the class. In groups of 3-4 people, using the neutral masks, create a frozen tableau, which expresses an emotional state (e.g. fear, pride, aggression, joy). Hold for a count of 5. Show the class. Discussion of what tableau they were showing, and what communicated the message. Create a statement of the exact opposite emotion (e.g. bravery, modesty, timidity, misery). Hold for a count of 5. Ask the class, “What changed within the actors body language that communicated a new tableau?” (Type & II)

4. Metacognition/ Creative Dramatic (Debriefing/ Journaling): Students will write in their journals reflecting on how it felt to redefine communication by taking away facial expressions and communicating solely through their bodies. Answer the questions: 1). “How did using a neutral mask help you communicate your tableau more effectively?” 2). “How did wearing the mask pose challenges for you in terms of communicating to your audience?” 3). “Can you reveal a message while hiding?”

5. Debrief the day: Add new ideas/connections to our mask web.

Resources

Laminated Animal Charade Cards

Laminated Adjective Cards

Laminated Tableau Cards

Products

Journal Entry

Grouping

Whole group: Creative Dramatic Warm-up, Debriefing process discussions Small group: Creative Dramatic Tableau (groups of 3-4) Individual: Journaling

Extensions

There will be a variety of extension links an interest center available for extension.

Extension Links: (discern before assigning these links to students- however, there are many wonderful resources and activities provided) http://africa.uima.uiowa.edu

http://www.mardigrasneworleans.com/news/news/mardi-gras-masks-are-

tradition.html http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://broadwayeducators.com/?p=1821

http://polkmuseumofart.org/exhibitions/exhibition-development/

 

http://www.greektheatre.gr/greek_theater_masks_2.html

http://www.theplayersjournal.org/archive/using-the-mask/

http://ada201.weebly.com/uploads/5/6/9/6/5696091/masks_--_a_brief_history.pdf

http://masksoftheworld.com/masks/ http://www.brooklynkids.org/attachments/Masks_FIN.pdf

http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1993/2/93.02.04.x.html

http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/what-masks-reveal#sect-activities

http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/studentwork/jones/shell.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/African_Mask_Faces.html

http://asianhistory.about.com/od/arthistoryinasia/ss/KoreanMasks.htm

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Masks-from-Melanesia

http://natural-history.uoregon.edu/collections/web-galleries/native-american-masks-

northwest-coast-and-alaska

http://www.way-of-the-samurai.com/Samurai-Masks.html

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/06/140610-oldest-masks-israel-

museum-exhibit-archaeology-science/

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/04/african-masks/galembo-photography#/07-

limba-devil-ghongorli-sierra-leone-670.jpg

Interest Centers:

Improvisational Center- a center will be available for students to work on their

improvisational skills. There will be a collection of masks, character descriptions, scenarios, Reader’s Theatre scripts, Commedia Dell’arte scripts for kids to practice their improv skills:

http://www.pioneerdrama.com/SearchResults.asp?keywords=commedia&nns=on&size=1-

35&time=15-120&nns=on

Peking Opera Mask Center: In this center, there will be videos of Peking Opera Mask performances, as well as, a notebook (printed PowerPoint) of what all the various colors of the opera masks mean. Students will come to this center to make a Peking Mask to represent their personal character traits. They will independently study the meaning behind the colors, use the supplies (card stock, paints, etc). to create a mask, and a description of why the colors were chosen. (Resource link: http://www.paulnoll.com/China/Opera/China-opera-colors.html)

Differentiation/ Ascending Intellectual Demand

Throughout the unit, students will have opportunity to choose their practicing profession, culture of focus, choice in presentation, and method of creating final projects.

Quotes, poetry, and literature will be of varying levels, so that all students can find literature to work with on their independent level.

Student discussions will be scaffolded, and teacher can work with students independently as needed.

THINKING SKILL # 1: CREATIVE DRAMATICS

Hook:
Hook:

Class will read quote, The neutral mask can lead an actor to reject his habitual identification in favor of a deeper, simpler understanding of his powers of expression.” (By Philip Zarrilli) Class will discuss how when using masks you can no longer communicate with speech or facial expressions, and therefore, you need to expand your vocabulary of what it means to communicate. You must focus on the most intricate movements of body language in order to communicate your message. The teacher will ask, “In what ways can you communicate without using spoken language?Teacher will record their answers on poster paper.

Warm-Up Activity:

Okay, boys and girls… Now that we have come up with this list of ways people communicate beyond spoken language, we are going to delve a little deeper into the idea of using body language to communicate. As you see in my hand, I am holding a mask. How would you describe this mask? Teacher will wait for students to respond. You are exactly right! This mask is plain and boring. In theatre, many actors and actresses use this mask to train themselves how to communicate more effectively on stage. Now, we are not going to use the neutral mask right away, because I first want you to make observations about how we use our facial expressions to communicate messages without using spoken language. We are going to participate in creative dramatics today. I know for some of you it is going to push you outside your comfort zone, but I think if you just focus on the task it will become easier as you go. When you are participating in creative dramatics, you are going to use something called improvisational skills- in the entertaining world many call it improv. What that means is that there is not a right answer or a script, you have to use your imagination and visualize what you would think you should do and then, physically embody what you have envisioned. We have already participated in some forms of creative dramatics this year, but today I am going to introduce you to a new activity. First of all, I am going to split everyone into two groups: Group A and Group B. Teacher will walk around and assign each student a group. Here is what is going to happen: First Group A will participate in creative dramatics, while Group B observes and takes notes about how they see their classmates communicating a message. Now, do not worry about anyone mocking you or teasing you, because we are all a family and we are going to respect and support each other. Plus, the roles will reverse in a minute, and I know that they will want the same respect when it is their turn to practice imrprov. One person from Group A will come up two the two jars on my desk. In one jar, there are cards of pictures of animals, and in the other, there are adjectives written on them. What the leader will do is choose two cards, read them, and then share the cards with the group. For example, they may pull out a picture of a penguin and the adjective lonely. Once, everyone in the group understands the two words the leader pulled from the jar, it is their job to transform into the phrase (i.e. lonely penguin). Once they transform their face and body, they must move throughout the space while Group B observes what they see, as well as, writing down guesses about what adjective/animal they are embodying. So, actors you may ask yourself… “How would this animal move normally?” “How would they move if they were lonely?” “How do I need to manipulate my body and face to take on that character I am trying to play?” “How should I interact with other animals that feel this same way?” Remember… you CANNOT use spoken language or even sound effects. You must communicate to Group B who you are completely using unconventional methods of communication. Once Group A has had ample time to move through the space, we will reverse roles. We will do this process a couple of times, so that you may have opportunity to observe several times. You guys ready? Group B get your journals ready. Group A, go to my desk area to draw your adjective/animal. After each group has gone at least twice. Great work boys and girls. I, too, was jotting down

what I saw in terms of communication. Everyone, please grab your journals and let’s form a circle in the middle of the space. Everyone may sit where you are.

Debriefing:

Who would like to start off by sharing how it felt to participate in communicating without using spoken language? Student responses. What did you have to rely on to communicate your animal character? Student responses Did the spectators have trouble figuring out who you were? Student responses Now, let’s see if we can make a list of what we observed the actors doing as they moved through the space? Students will share observations while teacher documents them on poster paper. Great! You all made lots of observations. You all noticed what I did. Without language, you heavily have to rely on movements of the eyes, face, and body. When you take away language, you notice more of the micro-movements of the actor. I noticed I was definitely keying into people’s eyes. But, what if I took your facial expressions away, too? How might that present even more challenges? What might you all have done differently? Student responses.

Creative Dramatic Tableau:

Teacher will go and retrieve the neutral masks and pass one out to each child. I would like all of you to take a minute and look at the mask in your hand. Earlier, you described the mask as plain and boring, but many actors and actresses use these masks to communicate more effectively on stage. What sort of challenges would using these masks present? And, how would it “Help” actors? Student responses. Well, these masks have a name- it is called the neutral mask. What makes it neutral? You are right! They do not show any expression or emotion. They are neutral- which means neither happy, sad, worried, scared, or dumbstruck. Can anyone think of a culture or even a time in our culture when you have seen a mask like this used? Yeah- Jason on Halloween has a sort of neutral mask. I think that is what makes him so creepy. But, think about mimes. No- they do not technically wear a mask. But, they paint their faces white and often do not show facial expressions. Believe it or not, I have trained using neutral masks. I actually have a degree in theatre, and when I was studying to become an actress I had challenges morphing my body into a new character. I want you guys to think for a second. If you were in Walmart and you saw a women walk in, but you couldn’t see her face- but, you KNEW it was your grandmother. How did you know? Believe it or not, we memorize each other’s body movements. When you are trying to become a new character, it is challenging to transform the way you normally move into the way a new character moves. Often times, we think if we have a grumpy face- then, people understand we are grumpy. But, if you are truly grumpy does just your face change? No way! Your entire body morphs. Right? So, today we are going to see why so many cultures on stage and off stage use masks for this purpose to reveal messages in unique ways. I am going to divide you into groups of four. Do not worry, because I have already designated the groups. In this group, you are going to be given two words that have opposite meanings. In your group, you are going to create two separate tableaus. Teacher will write tableau on the board. A tableau is a dramatically striking scene. So, you and your group are going to have to put on your neutral mask and convey the message of the first word by creating a frozen dramatic scene. You will have to put great emphasis on body language to convey the message. But, once I say freeze- You may not move. It has to be a frozen dramatic scene. You will hold the first scene for 5 seconds, and then when I say scene two- you will slowly move into you second scene to portray the opposite meaning. Again, no movement is allowed once I say freeze. After each group goes, we will stop for a moment to discuss what we observed, how their body movement made an impact, and how we saw their body language change when the message changed. Does everyone understand what to do? I will give you 10 minutes to work in your groups to brainstorm and practice your two tableaus, and then we will return to our circle. I will be walking around to coach anyone that is having a stumbling block. Any questions? Teacher divides them into groups and passes out tableau cards. After 10 minutes, okay boys and girls, time is up. Please return to the circle and group 1 come into the center to perform. Everyone, please pay close attention to how they use their bodies to communicate in the tableau scenes. Also, does the neutral mask assist you into paying closer attention to body language both as the actor and audience? Each group will perform and discussions will take place.

Journaling:

You guys have done a wonderful job today! I could see that several of you had a moment where you felt uncomfortable throughout this process, but I am proud of you for pushing through and having new experiences. What I would like for you to do now is to collect your journal. I want to reflect on what we have done today, and about what we have learned about communication. On the board, I have written several questions to probe your mind. I would like you to read the questions, and choose two to respond to in your journals. Try to think about your process of thinking today and what steps you had to go through when answering these questions. Once you are finished, please leave your journal on your desk for me to read if you would like to share. You may either participate in one of the interest centers or complete minute minders on my board if your finish early. I hope you are as excited as I am about this unit on masks. I cannot wait for you to see what wonderful things you will be learning about in the next few weeks. Students will write in their journals reflecting on how it felt to redefine communication by taking away facial expressions and communicating solely through their bodies. Answer the questions: 1). “How did using a neutral mask help you communicate your tableau more effectively?” 2). “How did wearing the mask pose challenges for you in terms of communicating to your audience?” 3). “Can you reveal a message while hiding?”

&

Lesson Three Masks of Ancient Greece &
Lesson Three
Masks of Ancient Greece
&

Topic: Masks of Ancient Greece

Grade Level: 5 th

 

Lesson Length:

 

Discipline(s): Art, History

Instructor: Shelley W. Patterson

 

60-80 minutes

Content Knowledge/Standards

Standards:

 

5 th Grade Arts Education # 5:

 
 

Identify societal values, beliefs, and everyday experiences expressed through works of art

 
 

8 th Grade ALCOS # 1:

 
 

Explain how artifacts and other archaeological findings provide the nature and movement of prehistoric groups of people.

evidence of

 

8 th Grade ALCOS # 4:

 
 

Identify cultural contributions of Classical Greece, including politics, intellectual life, arts, literature, architecture, and science.

 
 

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 8:

 
 

Collect information from a variety of digital sources.

 
 

Unit Conceptual Lens: Communication

 

Unit Essential Understanding(s):

Students understand that communication provides a

means of understanding a culture's identity.

 

Unit

Essential

Question(s):

How

does

communication

provide

a

means

of

understanding a culture’s identity?

 

Additional Concepts (this lesson): Culture’s Identity

 

Guiding Question(s) for this lesson: How does the construction of a mask help the audience interpret different meanings? Why were masks so important in Ancient Greek theatre? How do the masks of Ancient Greek theatre help us to understand the gender roles in their society? What do the masks of Ancient Greek theatre communicate about societal traditions and rituals during that time in history? How do the masks of Ancient Greece help communicate its culture’s identity?

Assessment In this lesson, students will… Know (content): The Ancient Greek Culture used masks in theatre performances to communicate the character, purpose, and meaning of the play. Understand (concepts/big ideas):

Formative Assessment(s): Class discussion of Theatre of Dionysus, Venn-diagram, an 3-2-1 Exit Slip

 

Post-assessment: Throughout the unit, we will keep a web about masks displayed on our wall. As we learn new purposes for the mask, materials used, and cultural understandings - we will add it to our map.

Communication provides a means of understanding a culture’s identity. Be able to (skills/processes): Compare and contrast, see relationships, and make decisions.

Introduction

“Hook” for this lesson: Students will look at a picture of Theatre of Dionysus. Groups of four will have a discussion of “How theatres have changed over time?”

Teaching Methods

Cooperative Learning

 

Shelley W. Patterson

EDUC578

Page 26

 

Strategy-Based Instruction

Independent Investigations

Learning Activities

1. Comparing and Contrasting: Students will research the use of masks in Ancient Greece theatre. While researching, they will use a Venn-Diagram to compare and contrast the purpose, design and structure of masks for use in comedy vs. tragedy vs. chorus masks. (Suggested site:

www.richeast.org/htwm/Greeks/theatre/actors.html (Type& I)

2. Seeing Relationships/ Decision Making: Once students have an understanding for how Ancient Greek theatre masks were used for communication, teacher will hand each group envelopes of pictures of Ancient Greek Mask and a compilation of modern poems. Students will read the poems and choose appropriate masks that actors may have worn if this poem was performed in the Theatre of Dionysus during Ancient Greek times. (Type&II)

3. Debrief the day: Add new ideas/connections to our mask web.

4. 3-2-1 Exit Slip: Tell me Three things you know, Two things that surprised you, a and one question you have about Ancient Greek Masks.

Resources

Picture of Theatre of Dionysus

Venn- Diagram Graphic Organizer

Modern Poems

Assortment of pictures of Ancient Greek Masks

Products

Venn- Diagram

3-2-1 Exit Slip

Grouping

Whole group: Adding ideas to the Mask Web Small group: Discussion of Theatre of Dionysus (pairs), Matching theatre masks to modern poetry (groups of 4), Venn-Diagram Activity (groups of 4) Individual: 3-2-1 Exit Slip

Extensions

There will be a variety of extension links an interest center available for extension.

Extension Links: (discern before assigning these links to students- however, there are many wonderful resources and activities provided) http://africa.uima.uiowa.edu

http://www.mardigrasneworleans.com/news/news/mardi-gras-masks-are-

tradition.html http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://broadwayeducators.com/?p=1821

http://polkmuseumofart.org/exhibitions/exhibition-development/

http://www.greektheatre.gr/greek_theater_masks_2.html

http://www.theplayersjournal.org/archive/using-the-mask/

http://ada201.weebly.com/uploads/5/6/9/6/5696091/masks_--_a_brief_history.pdf

http://masksoftheworld.com/masks/ http://www.brooklynkids.org/attachments/Masks_FIN.pdf

http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1993/2/93.02.04.x.html

http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/what-masks-reveal#sect-activities

http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/studentwork/jones/shell.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/African_Mask_Faces.html

http://asianhistory.about.com/od/arthistoryinasia/ss/KoreanMasks.htm

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Masks-from-Melanesia

http://natural-history.uoregon.edu/collections/web-galleries/native-american-masks-

northwest-coast-and-alaska

http://www.way-of-the-samurai.com/Samurai-Masks.html

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/06/140610-oldest-masks-israel-

museum-exhibit-archaeology-science/

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/04/african-masks/galembo-

photography#/07-limba-devil-ghongorli-sierra-leone-670.jpg

Interest Centers:

 

Improvisational Center- a center will be available for students to work on their improvisational skills. There will be a collection of masks, character descriptions,

scenarios, Reader’s Theatre scripts, Commedia Dell’arte scripts for kids to practice their improv skills:

http://www.pioneerdrama.com/SearchResults.asp?keywords=commedia&nns=on&size=1-

35&time=15-120&nns=on

Peking Opera Mask Center: In this center, there will be videos of Peking Opera Mask performances, as well as, a notebook (printed PowerPoint) of what all the various colors of the opera masks mean. Students will come to this center to make a Peking Mask to represent their personal character traits. They will independently study the meaning behind the colors, use the supplies (card stock, paints, etc). to create a mask, and a description of why the colors were chosen. (Resource link: http://www.paulnoll.com/China/Opera/China-opera-colors.html)

Differentiation/ Ascending Intellectual Demand

Throughout the unit, students will have opportunity to choose their practicing profession, culture of focus, choice in presentation, and method of creating final projects.

Quotes, poetry, and literature will be of varying levels, so that all students can find literature to work with on their independent level.

Student discussions will be scaffolded, and teacher can work with students independently as needed.

Lesson Four Masks of China
Lesson Four
Masks of China

Topic: Masks of China

Grade Level: 5 th

Lesson Length:

Discipline(s): Art, History, Technology

Instructor: Shelley W. Patterson

50-60 minutes

Content Knowledge/Standards

Standards:

8 th Grade ALCOS # 12:

Describe China's influence on culture, politics, and economics in Japan, and Southeast Asia.

5 th Grade Arts Education # 5:

Identify societal values, beliefs, and everyday experiences expressed through works of art

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 12:

Create a product using digital tools.

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 8:

Collect information from a variety of digital sources.

Unit Conceptual Lens: Communication

Unit Essential Understanding(s):

Students understand that communication provides a

means of understanding a culture's identity.

Unit Essential Question(s): How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

Additional Concepts (this lesson): Culture’s Identity, Celebrations, Rituals, and Ceremonies

Guiding Question(s) for this lesson: What are celebrations? What are rituals? How did Chinese culture incorporate masks in their beliefs, celebrations, rituals, and ceremonies? What do these masks tell us about Chinese culture?

Assessment In this lesson, students will… Know (content): Masks are an extremely important part of communication in Chinese culture, and they are intertwined throughout the culture revealing much about the culture’s identity. Masks are used for very specific purposes in Chinese culture, and various masks have differing purposes. Understand (concepts/big ideas): Masks are used to communicate Chinese beliefs, celebrations, rituals, and ceremonies, which helps us to understand their cultural identity. Be able to (skills/processes): Identify characteristics, judge essential and incidental evidence, judge the accuracy of information, summarize, and create an original product.

Formative Assessment(s): Observations of group discussions and research, discussions of information gathered on the graphic organizers and iFunFace Animations

Post-assessment: Throughout the unit, we will keep a web about masks displayed on our wall. As we learn new purposes for the mask, materials used, and cultural understandings - we will add it to our map.

Introduction

“Hook” for this lesson: Upon entering the room, an animated mask will be talking to the students explaining a brief history of the importance of masks in Chinese

Shelley W. Patterson

EDUC578

Page 29

 

culture. At the end of the animation, the mask will then tell the students which groups they are working in and give them directions.

Teaching Methods

Demonstration/Modeling

Cooperative Learning

Independent Investigations

Learning Activities

1. Identifying Characteristics/Judging Essential and Incidental Evidence, Juding the Accuracy of Informaiton: Students will “jigsaw” the purpose and cultural meaning behind various Chinese masks (exorcising masks, Tibetan masks, sorcerers' masks in Yunnan and Guizhou, Shamanic masks and dramatic masks etc.) Students will first organize into five separate “expert” groups studying the sub-categories listed above. They will fill out a graphic organizer about their mask, its purpose, and how it was used to communicate within Chinese cultural. (Type&I)

2. Summarizing: Students will use the information from the graphic organizer to write an informative paragraph about their mask in their journal.

3. Creating: Students will remain in their expert groups, and use the App “iFunFace” to capture photographs of Chinese masks, animate the masks to talk, and then record the information they have learned about their mask. (Type&II)

4. Then, students will take their individual animations back to “secondary” groups, and share their expertise with new group. Students will document what they learned on their graphic organizers, and glue them in their notebooks.

5. Debrief the Day: Add new ideas/connections to our mask web.

Resources

iPads

“iFunFace” App downloaded for each iPad

Graphic organizer

Research materials/ sites about exorcising, Tibetan, sorcerer, shamanic masks, and dramatic masks: http://traditions.cultural-china.com/en/16T34T135.html

http://traditions.cultural-china.com/en/16T34T135.html

(BE DISCERNING WHEN GATHERING THESE MATERIALS)

Products

“iFunFace” animations

Completed graphic organizer

Informative Paragraph in Journal

Grouping

Whole group: Adding new ideas to our Mask Web Small group: Jigsaw (groups of 4-5) Individual: Actual construction and sharing of iFunFace animations

Extensions

Extension Links: (discern before assigning these links to students- however, there are many wonderful resources and activities provided) http://africa.uima.uiowa.edu

http://www.mardigrasneworleans.com/news/news/mardi-gras-masks-are-

tradition.html http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://broadwayeducators.com/?p=1821

http://polkmuseumofart.org/exhibitions/exhibition-development/

http://www.greektheatre.gr/greek_theater_masks_2.html

http://www.theplayersjournal.org/archive/using-the-mask/

http://ada201.weebly.com/uploads/5/6/9/6/5696091/masks_--_a_brief_history.pdf

http://masksoftheworld.com/masks/ http://www.brooklynkids.org/attachments/Masks_FIN.pdf

http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1993/2/93.02.04.x.html

http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/what-masks-reveal#sect-activities

http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/studentwork/jones/shell.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/African_Mask_Faces.html

http://asianhistory.about.com/od/arthistoryinasia/ss/KoreanMasks.htm

 

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Masks-from-Melanesia

http://natural-history.uoregon.edu/collections/web-galleries/native-american-masks-

northwest-coast-and-alaska

http://www.way-of-the-samurai.com/Samurai-Masks.html

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/06/140610-oldest-masks-israel-

museum-exhibit-archaeology-science/

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/04/african-masks/galembo-

photography#/07-limba-devil-ghongorli-sierra-leone-670.jpg

Interest Centers:

Improvisational Center- a center will be available for students to work on their

improvisational skills. There will be a collection of masks, character descriptions, scenarios, Reader’s Theatre scripts, Commedia Dell’arte scripts for kids to practice their improv skills:

http://www.pioneerdrama.com/SearchResults.asp?keywords=commedia&nns=on&size=1-

35&time=15-120&nns=on

Peking Opera Mask Center: In this center, there will be videos of Peking Opera Mask performances, as well as, a notebook (printed PowerPoint) of what all the various colors of the opera masks mean. Students will come to this center to make a Peking Mask to represent their personal character traits. They will independently study the meaning behind the colors, use the supplies (card stock, paints, etc). to create a mask, and a description of why the colors were chosen. (Resource link: http://www.paulnoll.com/China/Opera/China-opera-colors.html)

Differentiation/ Ascending Intellectual Demand

Throughout the unit, students will have opportunity to choose their practicing profession, culture of focus, choice in presentation, and method of creating final projects.

Quotes, poetry, and literature will be of varying levels, so that all students can find literature to work with on their independent level.

Student discussions will be scaffolded, and teacher can work with students independently as needed.

Lesson Five Masks of Italy
Lesson Five
Masks of Italy

Topic: Masks of Italy

Grade Level: 5 th

Lesson Length:

Discipline(s): Art, Drama, Science, Technology

Instructor: Shelley W. Patterson

Two 60 minute sessions

Content Knowledge/Standards

Standards:

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 12:

Create a product using digital tools.

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 9:

Use technology tools to organize, interpret, and display data.

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 10:

Use digital environments to collaborate and communicate.

9 th - 12 th Grades Anatomy and Physiology Elective #15:

Identify physiological effects and components of the immune system.

5 th Grade Arts Education # 5:

Identify societal values, beliefs, and everyday experiences expressed through works of art

Unit Conceptual Lens: Communication

Unit Essential Understanding(s):

Students understand that communication provides a

means of understanding a culture's identity.

Unit Essential Question(s): How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

Additional Concepts (this lesson): Culture’s Identity, Humor, Origins, Comedy

Guiding Question(s) for this lesson: What are origins? What is humor? Why is comedy needed? What is improvisation? How was humor communicated through masks in Italian culture? How has humor changed over time? How Commedia Dell’arte influenced humor in modern culture? What professions care about improvisation? How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

Assessment In this lesson, students will… Know (content): Commedia Dell’arte is an art form that is hypothesized to have been created in response to the Bubonic Plague. The art form of Commedia Dell’arte has influenced many of our modern day entertainment. Understand (concepts/big ideas): The masks of Commedia Dell’arte help us to understand the identity of Italian culture, how comedy originated from this culture, and why comedy is needed. Be able to (skills/processes): Interpret, recognize attributes, see relationships, use imagery, utilize inductive thinking, and become create original ideas with ease.

Formative Assessment(s): Teacher observations of class discussions, teacher observations of participation in creative dramatics and character work/skits, and journaling

Post-assessment: Throughout the unit, we will keep a web about masks displayed on our wall. As we learn new purposes for the mask, materials used, and cultural understandings - we will add it to our map.

Shelley W. Patterson

EDUC578

Page 32

Introduction

“Hook” for this lesson: Students will watch a clip from The Three Stooges:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdBvBtdbQpw Teacher will reveal to students that this type of entertainment originated from Commedia Dell’arte. Teacher will explain that as we explore the world of Commedia Dell’arte- they need to be thinking of other ways Commedia’ Dell’arte has transformed and translates into modern entertainment.

Teaching Methods

Direct Instruction

Cooperative Learning

Simulation

Demonstration/Modeling

Learning Activities

1. Students will become familiar with the impact of the Black Death on Italian culture. They will watch two clips http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRZYb2Jl22g and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DyE8z_Ztifc (Type& I)

2. Interpretation: Teacher will give out copies of “Ring Around Rosy” rhyme. There will be a discussion of what the true meaning of the rhyme meant and its relationship to the Bubonic Plague.

3. Teacher will pose the questions: “What is humor?” “Why would humor become a necessity during this time?” Students will discuss the need for humor.

4. Recognizing Attributes/Seeing Relationships/Imagery: Teacher will introduce the characters of Commedia Dell’arte by providing each student a character description of each mask and showing them the mask. Play video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_0TAXWt8hY Ask them if they saw any of the same comedic techniques in this video that was similar to the comedic techniques in The Three Stooges clip. Discuss the similarities. (Type&I)

5. Inductive Thinking: Introduce the ideas of slapstick and improvisation. Ask, “Who cares about improvisation?” Brainstorm professions that incorporate improvisation making a Popplet map.

6. Flexibilty/Originality/Imagery: Guest teacher: Daydrie Hague. Students will learn how to move their bodies to embody the characters. Students will learn to improvise and delve into the world of Commedia Dell’arte by performing skits. Assign students Commedia Dell’arte characters. Give students scenarios and students have to interact with one another in character. (Type&II)

7. Students will write in their journals, answering the prompt: How has the influence of Commedia dell’arte impacted my life in modern times?

8. Debrief the lesson: Add new ideas/connections to our mask web.

Resources

Black Death video clips (2)

Ring Around the Rosy” lyrics

Commedia Dell’arte clip

Commedia Dell’arte character descriptions

Three Stooges Clip

Creative Dramatics scenarios

iPads (1 per small group)

Popplet App downloaded on each iPad

Products

Skits

Journals

Popplet Map

Grouping

Whole group: Adding new ideas to our Mask Web, Class discussions of Black Death, Improvisation, and Commedia Dell’arte characters, Creative Dramatics: Character Work Small group: Discussion of need for humor (groups of 4), Character Work (partner work), and Popplet map (groups of 4) Individual: Journaling

Extensions

Extension Links: (discern before assigning these links to students- however, there are

 

many wonderful resources and activities provided) http://africa.uima.uiowa.edu

http://www.mardigrasneworleans.com/news/news/mardi-gras-masks-are-

tradition.html http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://broadwayeducators.com/?p=1821

http://polkmuseumofart.org/exhibitions/exhibition-development/

http://www.greektheatre.gr/greek_theater_masks_2.html

http://www.theplayersjournal.org/archive/using-the-mask/

http://ada201.weebly.com/uploads/5/6/9/6/5696091/masks_--_a_brief_history.pdf

http://masksoftheworld.com/masks/ http://www.brooklynkids.org/attachments/Masks_FIN.pdf

http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1993/2/93.02.04.x.html

http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/what-masks-reveal#sect-activities

http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/studentwork/jones/shell.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/African_Mask_Faces.html

http://asianhistory.about.com/od/arthistoryinasia/ss/KoreanMasks.htm

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Masks-from-Melanesia

http://natural-history.uoregon.edu/collections/web-galleries/native-american-masks-

northwest-coast-and-alaska

http://www.way-of-the-samurai.com/Samurai-Masks.html

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/06/140610-oldest-masks-israel-

museum-exhibit-archaeology-science/

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/04/african-masks/galembo-

photography#/07-limba-devil-ghongorli-sierra-leone-670.jpg

Interest Centers:

Improvisational Center- a center will be available for students to work on their improvisational skills. There will be a collection of masks, character descriptions, scenarios, Reader’s Theatre scripts, Commedia Dell’arte scripts for kids to practice their improv skills:

http://www.pioneerdrama.com/SearchResults.asp?keywords=commedia&nns=on&size=1-

35&time=15-120&nns=on

Peking Opera Mask Center: In this center, there will be videos of Peking Opera Mask performances, as well as, a notebook (printed PowerPoint) of what all the various colors of the opera masks mean. Students will come to this center to make a Peking Mask to represent their personal character traits. They will independently study the meaning behind the colors, use the supplies (card stock, paints, etc). to create a mask, and a description of why the colors were chosen. (Resource link: http://www.paulnoll.com/China/Opera/China-opera-colors.html)

Differentiation/ Ascending Intellectual Demand

Throughout the unit, students will have opportunity to choose their practicing profession, culture of focus, choice in presentation, and method of creating final projects.

Quotes, poetry, and literature will be of varying levels, so that all students can find literature to work with on their independent level.

Student discussions will be scaffolded, and teacher can work with students independently as needed.

Lesson Six Masks of West Africa
Lesson Six
Masks of West Africa

Topic: Masks of West Africa

Grade Level: 5 th

Lesson Length:

Discipline(s): Art, Reading

Instructor: Shelley W. Patterson

45 minute session

Content Knowledge/Standards

Standards:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.9:

Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of vents (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.7:

Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).

5 th Grade Arts Education # 5:

Identify societal values, beliefs, and everyday experiences expressed through works of art

3 rd - 5 th Grades Technology # 8:

Collect information from a variety of digital sources.

Unit Conceptual Lens: Communication

Unit Essential Understanding(s):

Students understand that communication provides a

means of understanding a culture's identity.

Unit Essential Question(s): How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

Additional Concepts (this lesson): Culture’s Identity, Beliefs, Ceremonies

Guiding Question(s) for this lesson: What is a belief? What aspects of nature do many African cultures incorporate into their belief systems? Why do many people of Africa wear masks during spiritual ceremonies? Are the masks necessary? What are folktales, myths, and legends? Do you think every aspect of African culture is communicated through masks? How does communication provide a means of understanding a culture’s identity?

Assessment In this lesson, students will… Know (content): African culture communicates many of their beliefs through masks, which can be a representation of their myths, folktales, and

legends. Understand (concepts/big ideas):

Formative Assessment(s): Teacher observations of class discussions, and journal entry

Post-assessment: Throughout the unit, we will keep a web about masks displayed on our wall. As we learn new purposes for the mask, materials used, and cultural understandings - we will add it to our map.

Communication provides a means of understanding three West African tribe’s cultural identity and belief systems. Be able to (skills/processes): Compare and contrast, See relationships, recognize attributes, make observations, and think inductively.

Shelley W. Patterson

EDUC578

Page 35

Introduction

“Hook” for this lesson: Teacher will read the West African tale, Anansi and the Moss- Covered Rock- retold by Eric A. Kimmel. Teacher will ask the students if they believe this story to be true? Students will define the meaning of folktales, myths, and legends. Explain to students that Anansi originates from the West African culture of Ashanti of Ghana.

Teaching Methods

Direct Instruction

Jurisprudence

Collaborative Learning

Learning Activities

1. Students will explore three West African Cultures: the Bambara of Mali, the Yoruba of Southwestern Nigeria, and the Ashanti of Ghana. Students will read two more myths: How Twins Came Among the Yoruba and The Ancient Myth of the Twi Wara (the Bambara of Mali). (Type&I)

2. Compare and Contrast, Recognizing Attributes, Making Observations, Inductive Thinking, and Seeing Relationships: Students will then take virtual trips to online photo galleries and museums to see if they can find masks that represent any of the spirits, gods, and characters in the story. If they think they find one, they will display the picture of the mask to the class and elaborate on

their reason in linking this mask to the myth or folktale in their journals. (Type&

II)

Resource links:

http://www.zyama.com/index.htm http://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/ http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/afr

3. Debriefing the Day: Add news ideas/connections to our mask web.

Resources

Book: Anansi and the Moss-Covered Rock- retold by Eric A. Kimmel

Journals

Printed version of How Twins Came Among the Yoruba and The Ancient Myth of the Twi Wara (the Bambara of Mali) (YOU MAY NEED TO CHANGE SOME OF THE WORDING IN THESE STORIES TO CENSOR FOR 5TH GRADE)

Resource links

Products

Journal Entries/ Printed Photographs of the Masks

Grouping

Whole group: Reading of Anansi and the Moss-Covered Rock- retold by Eric A. Kimmel and discussion Small group: Virtual Field Trip Discussion (partner work) Individual: Journaling

Extensions

Extension Links: (discern before assigning these links to students- however, there are many wonderful resources and activities provided) http://africa.uima.uiowa.edu

http://www.mardigrasneworleans.com/news/news/mardi-gras-masks-are-

tradition.html http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://broadwayeducators.com/?p=1821

http://polkmuseumofart.org/exhibitions/exhibition-development/

http://www.greektheatre.gr/greek_theater_masks_2.html

http://www.theplayersjournal.org/archive/using-the-mask/

http://ada201.weebly.com/uploads/5/6/9/6/5696091/masks_--_a_brief_history.pdf

http://masksoftheworld.com/masks/ http://www.brooklynkids.org/attachments/Masks_FIN.pdf

http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1993/2/93.02.04.x.html

http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/what-masks-reveal#sect-activities

http://art.pppst.com/masks.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/studentwork/jones/shell.html

http://cti.itc.virginia.edu/~bcr/African_Mask_Faces.html

http://asianhistory.about.com/od/arthistoryinasia/ss/KoreanMasks.htm

 

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Masks-from-Melanesia

http://natural-history.uoregon.edu/collections/web-galleries/native-american-masks-

northwest-coast-and-alaska

http://www.way-of-the-samurai.com/Samurai-Masks.html

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/06/140610-oldest-masks-israel-

museum-exhibit-archaeology-science/

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/04/african-masks/galembo-

photography#/07-limba-devil-ghongorli-sierra-leone-670.jpg

Interest Centers:

Improvisational Center- a center will be available for students to work on their

improvisational skills. There will be a collection of masks, character descriptions, scenarios, Reader’s Theatre scripts, Commedia Dell’arte scripts for kids to practice their improv skills:

http://www.pioneerdrama.com/SearchResults.asp?keywords=commedia&nns=on&size=1-

35&time=15-120&nns=on

Peking Opera Mask Center: In this center, there will be videos of Peking Opera Mask performances, as well as, a notebook (printed PowerPoint) of what all the various colors of the opera masks mean. Students will come to this center to make a Peking Mask to represent their personal character traits. They will independently study the meaning behind the colors, use the supplies (card stock, paints, etc). to create a mask, and a description of why the colors were chosen. (Resource link: http://www.paulnoll.com/China/Opera/China-opera-colors.html)

Differentiation/ Ascending Intellectual Demand

Throughout the unit, students will have opportunity to choose their practicing profession, culture of focus, choice in presentation, and method of creating final projects.

Quotes, poetry, and literature will be of varying levels, so that all students can find literature to work with on their independent level.

Student discussions will be scaffolded, and teacher can work with students independently as needed.

Lesson Seven Masks of America
Lesson Seven
Masks of America

Topic: Masks of America

Grade Level: 5 th

Lesson Length:

Discipline(s): Art

Instructor: Shelley W. Patterson

45-60 minutes

Content Knowledge/Standards

Standards:

 
 

5 th Grade Arts Education # 5:

 
 

Identify societal values, beliefs, and everyday experiences expressed through works of art

 
 

Unit Conceptual Lens: Communication

 

Unit

Essential

Understanding(s):

Students

understand

that

a

culture's

identity

is

essential in interpreting the origin of rituals and traditions.

 

Unit Essential Question(s):

In what ways does understanding a culture’s identity help

you interpret the origin of rituals and traditions?

 

Additional Concepts (this lesson)