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A Project Report on Integrated E-Waste

Recycling Facility, West Bengal

Group No- 11
(i) Puneet Yadav, A-40
(ii) R. Selvam, A-24
(iii) Arup Kumar Saha, B-31
(iv) Abhe Singh Yadav, A-17
(v) Ashok Kumar Sharma, B-44
(vi) Anis M Mankad, A-10

Phase III- Mid Career Training Programme

Project Report
Contents
Project at a glance......................................................................................................................................... 4
Financial Calculations from Owners Perspective ................................................................................. 7
NPV & IRR in Bankers Perspective ..................................................................................................... 11
The Governments Perspective Cash Flow.......................................................................................... 12
Economic Return in Country or Economic Point of View.................................................................... 14
Other Details- Project Justification ............................................................................................................. 15
Building of E-Waste Inventory in West Bengal ....................................................................................... 15
Objectives of the Project......................................................................................................................... 15
Role of Operator/ Implementer .............................................................................................................. 15
Land Availability for the E-Waste Recycling Facility ............................................................................... 16
The Project Conception............................................................................................................................... 17
Selection of land ..................................................................................................................................... 17
Integration of unorganized sector .......................................................................................................... 17
List of Ewaste items to be handled ....................................................................................................... 17
Sources/ Origin of E-Waste Collection .................................................................................................... 18
Building awareness ................................................................................................................................. 20
Manpower Employment opportunities ................................................................................................ 21
Annexure 1 .................................................................................................................................................. 22
Project Planning : ........................................................................................................................................ 22
Compliance Management ....................................................................................................................... 24
Annexure 2 .................................................................................................................................................. 25
The Technology ........................................................................................................................................... 25
Flow Chart ............................................................................................................................................... 25
Collection & Transportation: .................................................................................................................. 25
Storage of E-waste: ................................................................................................................................. 26
Manual Dismantling Section: .................................................................................................................. 28
Pre-Breaker Crusher:............................................................................................................................... 29
Hammer Mill: .......................................................................................................................................... 29

Pulverizer: ............................................................................................................................................... 29
Vibro Separators: .................................................................................................................................... 30
Conveyor Belts: ....................................................................................................................................... 31
Magnetic Separator Conveyor Belts: ...................................................................................................... 31
Vibrating Screens .................................................................................................................................... 31
Precious Metal Recovery: ....................................................................................................................... 31
Cable Recycling: ...................................................................................................................................... 32
CRT Cutting Machine :............................................................................................................................. 32
CFL/Tube Lights Recycling/Disposal : ...................................................................................................... 33
Utilities : .................................................................................................................................................. 33
Common Facilities : ................................................................................................................................. 33
Advantages with Technology: ................................................................................................................. 36
Annexure 3 .................................................................................................................................................. 37
Environment management plan ................................................................................................................. 37
Air pollution ............................................................................................................................................ 37
Water pollution ....................................................................................................................................... 37
Noise Pollution ........................................................................................................................................ 37
Hazardous waste disposal ....................................................................................................................... 37
Disposal of Metals & Non-metals: .......................................................................................................... 38
Environmental matrix: ............................................................................................................................ 38
Emergency preparedness & Safety Measurements: .............................................................................. 38
Quality Health & Safety Measurements; ................................................................................................ 39
Annexure 4 .................................................................................................................................................. 40
Detailed Calculations .................................................................................................................................. 40
Table of Pre-Operation Expenses and other calculations in Owners view ........................................ 40
Bankers View Financials ..................................................................................................................... 48

Project at a glance
As the usage of the ICT has increased over the last two decades in the everyday life, the amount of
Electronic Waste created has also increased substantially. Along with the increased user base, the
rapidly changing technology is also responsible for the generation of large amount of E-Waste; for
example, the newer versions of storage devices (Large floppies, Small Floppies, Compact Discs (CDs),
VCDs, DVDs, and pen drives etc.) create fast obsolescence and large waste. Similarly various types of
changes in Processors, Servers and monitors also result in fast replacement of these items.
There are two important issues about the E-Waste- firstly, quite a few of the components are non biodegradable and will continue to pollute the environment for a long time; secondly, there are quite a few
expensive, reusable and upgradable items in the E-Waste which could be recollected and recycled.
Globally, Electronic Waste is being handled effectively in the developed countries. Even in India, the
provisions for the handling of E-Waste are being created under the Hazardous Wastes (Management,
Handling and Transboundary Movement) Rules, 2008 and E-Waste (Management and Handling) Rules,
2011. Currently various states are under different stages of implementation of the appropriate rules and
handling of the E-Waste.
Government of West Bengal has planned to handle the problem of E-Waste in a timely manner and has
invited proposals from various firms and institutions- national and international- to bring out their
technical proposals towards the resolution of the problem of E-Waste.
The Government, however, has given a few clear indications about the project proposal to be
submitted:
(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

Government agrees to spare 3-4 acres of land for the E-Waste Recycling Project from
Calcutta Leather Complex Tanners Association (CLCTA), who has already been allotted with
50 acres of government land for a period of 10 years, extendible to another 10 years for
collection and transportation of hazardous waste landfill facility. The market value of the
government land may cost around Rs.2 crores/3 acres.
There will be no additional benefits made available to the implementer in form of subsidies.
The Tax benefits will be available in the form of Minimum Alternative Tax and no further
period of Tax rebate will be available.
The Project financial viability should be ensured by the implementer and it will be running
on BOO model and given the lack of resources and technology to handle such a project,
there is no plan for Transfer of the project to the Government at a later stage.
All risks associated with the Project are to be borne by the implementer. All the financial
profits arising from the project will also accrue to the implementer.

A brief profile of the project is given herewith:


Sl.no Name of the Project
1
Proposed location
2
Business

Integrated E Waste Recycling Facility


West Bengal Waste Management Ltd West Bengal
Handling of electronic waste as per SPCB/ CPCB guidelines

Service offered

4
5
6

Proposed capacity
Technology
Principal of operation

7
8

Project cost
Means of Finance

9
10

Schedule of Commissioning
Strength of the Operator for the
proposed E-Waste recycling

11

Uniqueness of the project

Collection ,storage ,recycling ,recovery and disposal of


Electronic waste as per CPCB guideline.
6000MTPA (Phase-I)
Both in house & imported
Pay/Charge for the E waste
(Depending on type of Material)
Rs.26.55 crores
Description
Amount in Rs Lakhs
Equity /Owners
795.49
Contribution Term loans
1856
From financial Inst /bank
Market Value of
200
Government Land Grant
Total
2851.49
Scheduled to be commissioned within 15 month
This is first of its kind facility being proposed in the state of
West Bengal /Eastern India.
Also the project operator will suggest
Land availability- with options
Opting for best available technology
The facility will be proposed within KMDA limits
located strategically, such that the location is the
hub for present and future growth of industries in
Kolkata
Strong financial resources of the operator
Vast experience in Construction Projects
Large experienced domain experts available with
the Operator
The proposed project is unique in itself. The facility shall be
the first of its kind in West Bengal and will bridge the
yawning gap in the demand and availability of E- waste
recycling facilities with complete end to solution in the
country. In fact it will be a giant step in the drive toward
environment protection

(Tables are in Chronological Order in the corresponding Excel Sheet)


Table-2
Sl no.
A
B

Cost of the project


Description
Land development and buildings
Lab equipments

Amount in lakhs
971.33
4

C
D
E
F
G
H

Plant and machinery


Vehicles
Office equipments
Pre operative expenses
Contingencies
Margin money for working capital
Total

1425.27
10
5
333.44
10.39
92.06
2851.49

The Sources for Financing of the Project have been estimated by the investor as follows:
Table-3
Sl no
A
B
C

Means of finance
Description
Equity/owners contribution
Term loans from financial institutions/banks
Government Land Grant
Total

Amt (lakhs)
795.49
1856
200
2851.49

(*) The financial statement has been developed for a period of ten years. The details of the financials are
attached in the Annexure 4.

Table-8
Calculation of Earnings
Sl. No.

Description
Earning Before Interest, Tax and
Depreciation

Yr-1

Yr-2

Yr-3

Yr-4

Yr-5

Yr-6

Yr-7

Yr-8

Yr-9

Yr-10

139.46

346.21

573.20

604.28

636.94

671.28

738.86

778.36

819.88

863.50

16.39

25.83

30.54

30.67

30.78

30.90

31.41

31.51

31.61

31.71

Depreciation
Note: Cost escalation is taken

179.85
5%

179.85

179.85

179.85

179.85

216.84

216.84

216.84

216.84

216.84

Earning before Interest and Tax

-40.39

166.36

393.35

424.43

457.09

454.44

522.02

561.52

603.03

646.66

Financial Expenses (Interest)


Interest on Working Capital
Interest on Term Loan

243.24
20.52
222.72

209.81 177.45
31.64
43.82
178.18 133.63

135.08
46.00
89.09

92.83
48.28
44.54

50.69
50.69
0.00

54.82
54.82

57.55
57.55

60.41
60.41

63.42
63.42

Earning before Taxation


Income Tax (MAT)

-283.63
0.00

-43.45
0.00

215.90
29.38

289.34
50.01

364.26
70.07

403.75
83.85

467.20
101.19

503.97
112.64

542.62
123.88

583.24
135.01

Earning After Tax

-283.63
-33.32%

-43.45
-3.24%

186.51
9.94%

239.33 294.19 319.90 366.01 391.32 418.73


12.15% 14.22% 14.72% 15.56% 15.84% 16.15%

448.23
16.46%

EBITDA (%)

Financial Calculations from Owners Perspective


As can be seen above, EBITDA, EBIT, EBT and Earning after Tax- all suggest that the requirement of fund is required in large amount initially to
start the project and fill gap funding is required in the form of Short term liabilities. The Working Capital has been maintained at a bare minimum
of 1 to 2 months stock. All this ensures that the Project is run on tight financials. High loan liability could be crippling, most frequently, for new
projects. Wherever some investment is required (twice in the detailed report) for meeting hike in requirements, the firm goes into inter firm
short term transfers to avoid high interests.

The loan schedule for the loaned amount is given below:


LOAN SCHEDULE
Nominal Interest Rate
Year
Beginning Debt
Interest Accrued
Loan Repayment
Interest Paid
Principal Paid
Ending Debt

12%
yr-1
yr-2
yr-3
yr-4
yr-5
1856.00 1484.80 1113.60 742.40 371.20
222.72 178.18 133.63 89.09 44.54
222.72 178.18
371.20 371.20
1484.80 1113.60

133.63 89.09 44.54


371.20 371.20 371.20
742.40 371.20
0.00

This along with the calculated Tax liability is used for the Final Net Cash Flow calculations as shown below; however, it may be noted in the
detailed calculations in the Excel Sheet that given the nature of the business and Government Tax policies, a Minimum alternative Tax of 19.54 %
per annum is applicable as against the usual tax of (30% plus 10% surcharge plus 3% education cess) :
Table-9
CASH FLOW STATEMENT- OWNER
(DEVELOPER) PERSPECTIVE
Sl. No.
Description
A
Sources of Funds
Profit After Tax
Depreciation
Land Grant
Equity
Secured Loans
Increase in Bank Borrowings
Increase in Current Liabilities
Un secured loans from Group
Companies

Yr-1

Yr-2

Yr-3

Yr-4

Yr-5

Yr-6

Yr-7

Yr-8

Yr-9

Yr-10

-283.63
179.85
200.00
795.49
1856
170.97
34

-43.45
179.85

186.51
179.85

239.33
179.85

294.19
179.85

319.90
216.84

366.01
216.84

391.32 418.73
216.84 216.84

448.23
216.84

0
0
92.67
19.55

0
0
101.51
21.42

0
0
18.16
3.75

0
0
19.07
3.94

0
0
20.02
4.13

0
0
34.45
7.19

0
0
22.74
4.70

0
0
23.87
4.93

0
0
25.06
5.18

115

190

Sub Total
B

3067.68

Application of Funds
Capital Expenditure
Land Grant Utilization
Increase in Current Assets
Repayment of Term Loans
Unsecured Loans Repayment
Sub Total
CASH FLOWS- Surplus/
(Deficit)

438.61 489.30

441.09

497.05

560.89

624.49

-341.33

-94.03

-58.79

-101.06

-71.66

526.76

565.14

Table-10
NPV & IRR
12%

IRR

Surplus/ (Deficit)
672.09
28.80%

Even the Debt Service Coverage ratio is attractive as shown below:


Table-11
DSCR
Sl. No.
A
B
C

Description
Profit after Tax & Depreciation
Depreciation
Interest on Working Capital

695.32

Yr-1
Yr-2
Yr-3
Yr-4
Yr-5
Yr-6
Yr-7
Yr-8
Yr-9
Yr-10
2557.03
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
200
280.78
161.45 176.89
30.96
32.50
34.13
59.35
38.80 40.74
42.78
371.20
371.20 371.20
371.20
371.20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
140
165
0
0
0
0
0
3409.01
532.65 548.09
542.16
568.70
34.13
59.35
38.80 40.74
42.78

The above Cash flows give the NPV and IRR as given below. Clearly the Project is attractive financially

NPV @ 12%

635.60 664.38

Yr-1
Yr-2
Yr-3
Yr-4
Yr-5
Yr-6
-283.63
-43.45
186.51
239.33
294.19
319.90
179.85
179.85
179.85
179.85
179.85
216.84
20.52
31.64
43.82
46.00
48.28
50.69

596.80 623.64

652.54

A
B
C

Interest on Term Loan

222.72

178.18

133.63

89.09

44.54

0.00

Sub Total

139.46

346.21

543.82

554.27

566.87

587.43

Interest on Working Capital


Interest on Term Loan
Repayment of Term Loan

20.52
222.72
371.20

31.64
178.18
371.20

43.82
133.63
371.20

46.00
89.09
371.20

48.28
44.54
371.20

50.69
0.00
0.00

Sub Total

614.44

581.01

548.65

506.28

464.03

50.69

DSCR

0.23

0.60

0.99

1.09

1.22

11.59

Average DSCR

2.62

It is felt that the critical factors for the success of this project will be the steady supply of the raw material and excellent processing quality which
makes the processed output demandable in the market.
Thus the availability of Raw Material has been assumed, against the total installed capacity, to be 40% in Y-1, 60% in Y-2, 80% from Y3 to Y6 and
82.5% from Y7 to Y10. This keeps the scope of increased production available, within the installed capacity.
The other critical factor is the efficiency of the refining process and the plant which has been kept at 93% to keep the business competitive.
The Sensitivity Analysis Table given below shows the impact of varying these two factors over a wide range, to keep a broader planning in
perspective.

Table-12
SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS
NPV
672

NPV
672

Efficiency %

80%

-494

82%

-314

Utilization %
Collection % at
T=3

40%

-696.15

45%

-525.12

84%
86%
88%
90%
92%
93%
94%
96%

50%
55%
60%
65%
70%
75%
80%
85%

-135
44
224
403
582
672
762
941

-354.09
-183.06
-12.03
159.00
330.03
501.06
672.09
843.12

NPV & IRR in Bankers Perspective


As per the calculations for Cash Flow from Bankers Perspective given in the Annexure 4, the following are the NPV and IRR. While the IRR is less
as the funding may be needed at a higher rate, the NPR improves as the initial liability of 1856 lakhs is not built up. Sensitivity Analysis is also
done herewith:
Table-10
NPV & IRR
NPV @ 12%

12%

IRR

Surplus/ (Deficit)
836.36
24.61%

Table-12
SENSITIVITY
ANALYSIS

40%

NPV
836
-531.88

45%

-360.85

50%
55%

-189.82
-18.79

NPV
836

Efficiency %

80%

-330

82%
84%
86%

-150
29
209

Utilization %
Collection % at
T=3

88%
90%
92%
93%
94%
96%

60%
65%
70%
75%
80%
85%
90%
95%

388
567
747
836
926
1,105

152.24
323.27
494.30
665.33
836.36
1007.39
1178.42
1349.45

The Governments Perspective Cash Flow


Government is only offering the initial benefit in the form of 3 Acres of land valued at Rs 2 crores and the Tax relief through MAT. The financial
cost to the Government of the two is calculated herewith, it may be noticed further that Government actually does not take any cash outflows
from the operations and the benefit is only to the society in the form of control of hazardous waste.
(i)
Sr. No
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L

The Tax benefit given to the Owner


Description
Normal Rate of Tax
MAT
PBT
Add: Depr under Companies Act
Sub Total
Less: Depr under IT Act
Sub Total
Exemption u/s 80 IA
Income chargeable to Tax
Regular IT
MAT
IT Payable (Maximum of regular
IT & MAT)

Yr-1
Yr-2
33.99% 33.99%
19.54% 19.54%
-60.91 134.72
179.85 179.85
118.94 314.57
325.57 282.53
-206.63
32.04
-206.63
32.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-40.37
6.26
0.00

0.00

Yr-3
33.99%

Yr-4
Yr-5
Yr-6
33.99% 33.99% 33.99%
19.54% 19.54% 19.54% 19.54%
378.43 408.81 403.75
349.53
179.85 179.85 216.84
179.85
558.28 588.66 620.59
529.38
213.26 185.51 191.47
245.37
345.02 403.15 429.12
284.01
345.02 403.15 429.12
284.01
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
67.42
78.78 83.85
55.50
55.50

67.42

78.78

83.85

Yr-7
33.99%
19.54%
497.08
216.84
713.92
166.18
547.74
547.74
0.00
0.00
107.03
107.03

Yr-8
Yr-9
Yr-10
33.99% 33.99% 33.99%
19.54% 19.54% 19.54%
535.35 575.57 617.83
216.84 216.84 216.84
752.19 792.41 834.68
144.33 125.46 109.14
607.86 666.95 725.54
607.86 666.95 725.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
118.78 130.32 141.77
118.78

130.32

141.77

(ii)

The Land Value- 200 Lakh

Cash Flow Analysis


Sr. No

Yr-1

Inflow
Outflow
NCF

Yr-2

Yr-3

Yr-4

Yr-5

Yr-6

Yr-7

Yr-8

Yr-9

Yr-10

200.00

4.63

41.04

49.86

58.26

62.01

79.15

87.84

96.37

104.84

-200.00

-4.63

-41.04

-49.86

-58.26

-62.01

-79.15

-87.84

-96.37

-104.84

12.00%
NPV

($447.42)

Economic Return in Country or Economic Point of View


Economic Return = Total Benefits- Costs (Investing and Operating) valued at Economic Prices
Consider the Hazards associated with E-Waste like:
(i)
(ii)

Source of Lead Poisoning


Sensory impairment, dermatitis, memory loss and muscle weakness, reduced fertility, liver
damage, kidney and heart diseases, eye and throat irritation are also some of the common
associated ailments.

Hence the Governments are under moral obligation to control the damages cost to the public by the EWaste. However, given the hugely large number of beneficiaries over a long period, it is difficult to
quantify this information
On its part, the Government is contribution land amounting to Rs 2 crores. However, this land is
underdeveloped and adjoining a large dumping ground. Its future value is also not quantifiable given its
poor location close to tanneries large development costs associated.

Other Details- Project Justification


Building of E-Waste Inventory in West Bengal

The e waste inventory is expected to exceed 800,000 tones/ Annum in India by 2012 as per
CPCB.
As per the E-waste inventorisation report given by Dr Juergen Bischoff Director of GTZ-ASEM
the Kolkata Metropolitan Area (KMA) generates 26000 tones of protection E-waste annually
out of which only 2,000 tons is being recycled. The report also projected that E-waste
generation is likely to likely to increase to 1,44,823 tones by the year 2020
Kolkata is among the top 5 cities generating the major quantity of ewaste and West Bengal is
amount top 10 states that contribute at least 70% of the total ewaste being generated in the
country.
Kolkata is the hub of commercial activities in the eastern part of the country and hence almost
all major companies: & banks have their presence in the city. This is one of the main reasons for
the substantial e waste generation
There is no mush awareness among the consumers in the city regarding the hazards of improper
disposal of EEE (Electronics and Electrical Engineering Waste)
The methods used for dismantling and recycling E-waste are very crude and have no norms for
occupational or environment safety, for example open burning of wires.

Objectives of the Project


To setup a complete integrated E Waste Recycling facility at KMDA Kolkata with complete end
to end solution for E waste.
To setup the facility with such a capacity to address the E-waste problem at least for the next
25-30 year and make it further expandable
To provide safe and secured E-waste destruction services on notified site
To provide innovative and pollution free technology for recycling
To recycle & extract base metals
To provide best environment management system and solutions
To ensure customer satisfaction

Role of Operator/ Implementer


The Project is proposed to be developed on Design, Built, Finance, Operate and Own basis. The role of
the Operator would mainly include the following:
To increase the e-waste recovery rate through propagation, collection mechanisms
Setting up an integrated E-waste processing facility in line with SPCB/MoEF /CPCB rules.

Planning, designing, financing, developing, operating and maintaining the project.


Operator to complete all the civil mechanical electrical & infrastructure work of the facility
including plant & machinery
To Provide all the pollution control & safety measures at the site
To apply & obtain all the compliances required like SPCB & CPCB registration and other licenses
required for an E-waste recycling facility as per E-waste (Management & Handling Rules, 2010)
To arrange a complete set up for collection & transportation with sufficient capacity of E-Waste
complying SPCB/ CPCB & guidelines & E Waste Rules, 2011
Regular submission of form & necessary information to WBPCB and CPCB

Land Availability for the E-Waste Recycling Facility


The following three sites have primarily been identified for the purpose of this facility,
1. The existing TSDF land at is the first available option for establishment of the E-Waste Recycling
facility. The total area needed for the facility will be 3-4 acres.
2. Site at Calcutta Leather Complex Tanners Association (CLCTA) is being developed for collection
and transportation of hazardous waste landfill facility for a period of 10 years, extendible to
another 10 years. The site is over 50 Acres and a small portion of 4-5 Acres could be used for the
E-Waste Recycling Facility.
3. WB Electronics Development Corporation Ltd. (WEBEL) Electronics Park Sonarpur, could also be
considered as a suitable site.

The Project Conception


Selection of land
Suitable pieces of land (approx 4-5 acres) have been identified within the limits of KMDA & which are
also convenient in all the aspects and which will be developed in future as per further requirements
under the guidance of WBPCB. Another piece of land has been identified in Haldia
For the identified land, the Operator will undertake the investment of the project and will develop it as
per the CPCB guidelines.

Integration of unorganized sector


Currently, a small sector of industry is using, dismantling, disposing or reselling the components of this
E-Waste; this is a completely unorganized sector. In order to protect the existing livelihood of this
informal sector, the Operator will undertake the following
Converting the existing locations of dismantling E-Waste into E-waste collection centers with all
the compliances as per E-waste Rules, 2011
Supporting them in obtaining necessary authorization as approved E-Waste collection centers
Providing them necessary training & education
Utilizing the experience of informal sector by providing them employment opportunities in
dismantling division of E-Waste Recycling facility

List of Ewaste items to be handled


List of Ewaste Products to be handled in the facility
S No

Category s of E-waste

IT and telecommunication equipment


centralized data processing
Mainframes Minicomputers
Personal computers
Personal computers (CPU with input and output devices )
Laptop (CPU and CPU with input and output devices )
Notebook, Notepad etc
Printing including cartridge
Copying equipment
Electrical and electronic typewriters
Pocket and desk calculators
And other products and equipment for the collection, storage, processing,
presentation or communication of information by electronic means
Used terminals and systems
Facsimile
Telex /telephones
Pay telephones
Cordless telephones
Cellular telephones
Answering systems
And other products and equipment of transmitting sound images or other
information by telecommunications
Consumer electrical and electronics:
Television sets (including LCD & LED )
Refrigerator
Washing Machine
Air conditioners
Fans
Tubes lights /CFL lights
Radios
Mobile Phones
And any other electric item that are used for house hold Purposes and any
other items as per E-Waste Management & Handling Rules 2010

Sources/ Origin of E-Waste Collection


As per the experience gained in the field of E-Waste, the following segments will be focused to collect
the E-Waste within the state of West Bengal
IT/ Software Companies
Electronic Good Manufacturers (Process Waste)
TSDF Customers & Other Industries
E-Waste Tenders (Online & General)
House Holds

25%
15%
20%
15%
5%

MOU with Government Organizations


Schools/ Colleges/ Hospitals/ Commercial Complexes
TOTAL

MOU with
Government
Organizations
10%

Schools/ Colleges/
Hospitals/
Commercial
Complexes
10%

House Holds
5%

10%
10%
100%

E Waste Collection Scenario

IT/ Software
Companies
25%

E-Waste Tenders
(Online & General)
15%
TSDF Customers &
Other Industries
20%

Electronic Good
Manufactureres
(Process Waste)
15%

IT software companies:
Kolkata being among the leading IT hubs have number of software companies which contributes the
major portion of electronic waste. They generate computer laptop printer & other official waste along
with the regular E-waste like bulbs cables &wires.
Electronic Equipment manufacturers
The process waste generated from the electronic manufacturing companies will fall under the category
of E-waste. Since it will be produced daily regularly tie ups with such units will be concentrated
Industries & TSDF customers:
The pharma automobile steel etc also generate huge quantities of e-waste. The operator in the state
will reach to the TSDF customers.
Tenders /Auctions
Most of the public Ltd companies /central government organizations /ports ets are disposing their E
waste though tender / auctions. Tie Ups /Memberships and necessary procedure will be followed for
getting E-waste through them

Schools / Colleges /Hospitals / commercial complexes


Schools, hospitals, collages, university etc will have huge quantities of obsolete good /E waste. So
awareness programmes will be designed for the collection and disposal of E-Waste from such
organizations

Building awareness

Conducting awareness programmes on E-Waste through self and joint initiatives with WSPCB,
Cll and other organizations
Utilization of NGO services
Spreading awareness through roaming of specially designed vehicle at all the places of cities at
regular intervals
Utilization of existing strong approach to the public through Hazardous Waste & MSW stake
holders
Aggressive advertising through paper & electronic media

Organogram
ORGANOGRAM INTEGTATED EWASTE RECYCLING FACILITY

Project head
HR Head

MBD

DGMCollection

GM/ AGMOperations

ManagerEHS

Collection
Team

Environmental
Engineer

Incharge
Store

Incharge
Dismantling
Section

Incharge
Recycling
line

Incharge
Precious
Metal

Helpers

Technicians

Operators &
Helpers

Technicians

Manpower Employment opportunities


The total manpower required for facility will be as follows
Qualified /Professional

: 15

Skilled &Unskilled labour

35

(At least 25 % of the required manpower will be taken present informal sector to give them employment
opportunities)

Annexure 1
Project Planning :
The Activities for the project implementation has been defined and recorded as given below:
Sr No
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y

Activities defined for Project Completion


DPR-release enquiry & Freeze Consultant
Receive review and approve DRP
Freeze consultant for detailed Engg.
Prepare / approve drawings for layout
Prepare Detailed BOQ for each area
Release enquiry for civil Contractor
Review, negotiate and finalize civil contractor
Release work order for civil and mobilize
Enhance Recycling Team prepare documents
Prepare documents for equipment specification
Release enquiry for equip / receive quotations
Prepare techno commercial comparisons for equip
Review and negotiate for equip procurement
Finalize and Place Orders
Release Enquiry for mechanical, Piping Contractor/ fabricator
Review/negotiate / finalize contractor
Mobilize and start fabricating of tanks/ piping
Receive Equipments, start Erection
Release enquiry for Electrical contractor
Review negotiate and finalize Electrical Contractor
Mobilize and start Electrical work
Negotiate and finalize sources for input waste material supplies
Mobilize input waste material at site
Complete Erection / piping /civil jobs
Trial run and commissioning

Project Duration Calculation


Expected time Te-is the duration of completion of an activity based on three time possibilities

Pessimistic Time

---

tp

Most likely Time

---

tl

Optimistic Time ---

to

Statistically, Te = (tp+4*tl+to)/6

Critical path network: The Expected time for each of the activities defined above are calculated after
assigning the three possible times.
The Critical path Network has been developed based on above activities, their dependence, event start
and finish dates and expected time for each. From the network attached the critical path activities which
are identified have been tabulated below.
The Critical path has been identified to consist of the following activities:
A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-R-X-Y
Total Duration in Weeks- 60
DPR and Land Acquisition-18 weeks
Implementation Duration- 42 weeks

Project duration: The sum of expected time (Te) of each of the Critical path activities.
Sr No
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
R.
X.
Y.

Activities in the Critical Path


DPR-Release Enquiry and Freeze Consultant
Receive, review and approve DPR
Freeze Consultant for detailed Engineering
Prepare layout and release drawings
Prepare detailed BOQ for each area
Release enquiry for Civil Contractor
Review, negotiate and finalize Civil Contractor
Release work Order for Civil and mobilize
Strengthen Recycling team
Receive Equipments, Start erection
Complete erection piping and civil jobs
Trial run and commissioning

Expected Time (Te)


2
8
8
2
4
1
2
2
2
11
16
3
Total- 61 weeks

Summary :

DPR and Engineering Consultant


Total Implementation Phase
Total Project Duration

19 Weeks
42 Weeks
61 Weeks

Compliance Management

The facility will be operated as per the E-waste (Management & Handling) Rules, 2010 and in
standards laid in accordance with the standards laid down in the guidelines published by the
central pollution control board from time to time.

Consent for Establishment (CFE) consent for establishing the E-waste facility will be taken from
the West Bengal State Pollution Control Board (WBSPCB) to commence the activities.

Consent for operation (CFO) facility will be established as per the terms & condition given in the
CFE and they will be strictly complied, Consent for Operating the E-Waste Facility will be taken
from the west Bengal state Pollution control board (WBSPCB) will be taken to start the
operation activities.

CPCB Registration The facility will be registered with central pollution control board (CPCB) as an
authorized e-waste recycler in accordance with the procedures prescribed under Rule-13, The
copy of the will be produced to WBPCB.

Make available all records to the central or state pollution control board for inspection

Ensure that residue generated thereof is disposed of in a hazardous waste treatment storage
disposal facility.

Ensure filing annual returns in form 3, the west Bengal state pollution control board on or
before 30th June following to the financial year to which that returns relate

Membership Certificate: Any industry/company disposing the E-waste should take the
membership certificate and details of such industry and its application/source of generation will
be taken such details will be submitted to WSPCB.

Six form Manifest : Manifest will be issued to the client at the time of lifting the E-waste the
manifest will be maintained as follows:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)

White colour : Forwarded to WBSPCB by Generator


Light yellow colour : Retained by the generator
Pink colour : Retained by the E-waste facility
Dark yellow : Retained by transporter
Green Colour : Forwarded to WBSPCB after Disposal
Light Blue : Returned to the generator after disposal

Annexure 2
The Technology
Flow Chart
The technology used in this facility will be a combination of both in-house and imported the complete Ewaste recycling line is explained below.

Manual Dismantling
Pre Breaker Crusher
Hammer Mill
Pulverizer
Vibro sleve

Metals
Precious Metal
Recovery through
Aqua Regia Method
(Au, Pt, Pd, Ag)

Non Metal
Metals (Cu, Al, Iron,
Steel etc.) will be
baled and sent to
Authorized Recycler

Various Type of Plastics


To Plastic Recyclers

Collection & Transportation:

After receiving information form client, operator will send one officer to survey the type of e
waste based on the recommendations of the officer, arrangement will be made for collection of
E-waste.

In this case, operator will provide an E-waste Help line, in which representatives will be available
for any kind of queries related their e-waste and their letup of disposal also any kind of queries
related to E-waste can be mailed to the operator. The person who mailed will get a response
with a solution.

A Suitable Vehicle will he sent for collection depending on the quantity of E-waste.

The electronic waste generated will be collected through specially closed designed vehicle
having a weighing machine and a mini shredder, inside.

The vehicle will be decorated with advertisement for creating awareness for proper E-Waste
disposal

The waste collected will be weighed at the clients premises and weigh receipt will be issued to
the customer on the spot along with an acknowledgement

The total quantity & type at waste will be entered into the manifest along with the customers
signature & stamp.

The type, weight and other details of the e waste collected will be entered in the CPCB pass
book along with the clients seal and signature.

The vehicle used for the transportation will follow the provisions of Motor Vehicles Act.

All the materials will be transported in good packing condition.

The people engaged for the process of collection will be qualities and shall provided all the
benefit of labor laws, medical insurance.
The people engaged will be provided with all the necessary safety equipments.

The six copy manifest system will be competed at all the stages.

The safe transportation the E-waste should be ensured.

After reaching the recycling facility the material will be weighed once again for comparison

Storage of E-waste:
Adequate storage space will be provided in the premises estimating the maximum quantity.
Storage area will be designed to withstand the load of material stocked and any damage of
material.
Automatic smoke, Heat detection system should be provided in the sheds. Adequate fire
fighting systems should be provided for the storage area, along with the areas in the facility.
Loading and unloading of wastes in storage sheds will be done only under the supervision of the
well trained and experienced staff.
Doors and approaches of the storing area will be of suitable sizes for entry of fork lift and
firefighting equipment.

The exhaust of the vehicles used for the purpose of handling, lifting and transportation within
the facility such forklifts of trucks will be fitted with the approved type of spark arrester.
All the necessary records of storage shed will be maintained and will be made available for
checking.
Smoking will be prohibited in and around the storage areas
Good housekeeping will be maintained around the storage areas.
The e-waste received from generator shall be stored at earmarked covered shed having
concrete floor and leak proof roof. Wooden or plastic pallets shall be provided to store the
waste.
The whole facility will have only one main incoming entrance and one main outgoing exit for
security purposes with sufficient CCTV 24 hours recording and card access coverage to ensure
that goods are under tight security and monitoring.
Adequate lighting (both natural and electrical) will be provided in the storage shed.
Bulbs, Wires, mobiles etc will be stored separately in individual carton boxes and with proper
labeling.
It is ensured that no damage is caused on the environment during storage and transportation of
E-waste.
The Dust generated due to the movement of the vehicles will be controller by frequent
sprinkling of water.
All the sensible items like CRT Monitors, TVs and bulb etc will be stored at ear-marked area.
Goods Receive note (GRN) for the gross weight will be issued upon receiving the material at the
warehouse.
Material will be then sent to its segregation department under IDO (Internet Debary Order) for
Segregation.
Finished Goods Storage Shed:
A separate shad will be provided for storing the finished goods having all the facilities as said
above. The segregated/dismantled/processed E-waste will be stored here for further
Recycling/reuse/disposal. The dismantled waste will be stored here as ferrous metals, Nonferrous metals, plastic, Glass etc separately for disposal.

Manual Dismantling Section:

Waste which contains mainly electronic and electrical material and monitors of computer or
TVs shall be shifted to manual dismantling section in hand trolleys.
A set of 8 to 10 no of work stations are proposed with a suction hood for any dust particle
coming out of the dismantling process. A team of experts in dismantling shall be deputed for
dismantling purpose with all the required tools and tackles. The tools and tackles shall be
identified with the best available brand to ensure optimization in working and to avoid small
accidents in the process. The employees at this section shall be provided with all required PPE's
i.e. apron safety shoes, gloves dust mask etc. Fire extinguishers shall be provided in the working
area.
The team deputed shall dismantle all the waste articles e.g. Computer CPU Box, hard drive, CD
ROM, Cables, PCB's etc and monitor into back cover and picture tube. The hard drive, PCB's shall
be further dismantled into components attached and naked PCBs.
The dismantled PCB's will be kept sent to pre breaker crusher for further recycling. Both the
products shall be stored in bags for disposal for recovery (metal part) and for making of toys and
monuments (non metal part). In case the non-metal part fails to be recycled, the same shall be
disposed through (Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities) TSDF as this consists of residue
with high C.V.
The ferrous material i.e. cabinet, body of monitor etc shall be baled and disposed for recycling.
Plastic shall be baled and sold out for recycling to authorized recyclers.
The chemical process for recovery of PGM shall be done in the next stage.
The waste generated from above process shall be stored at earmarked area with all the
provision by not allowing this waste to be exposed to the environment.
The dust generated from the dismantling and crushing will be collected through a set of
cyclones followed by high efficiency bag filter.
High efficiency bag house provided for manual dismantling area as well.
All the Segregation/ Recycling process carried out at the site is Mechanical Dry process and no
water utilization for this purpose is envisaged at this stage.
High efficiency bag house provided for manual dismantling area as well.
All the employees working at Mechanical and manual separation of metal shall be equipped
with appropriate PPE's.
The generation of noise shall not be significant as the operations do not include high noise
generating equipments at this stage.
No chemical fumes or gases are expected since the process is only physical separation and
crushing. Therefore, no stack is envisaged.
If there is any discrepancy, it will be discussed with customer at this stage and matter will be
rectified immediately.
Upon data destruction completed, official destruction certificate will be issued to customer for
records.
Segregated (or) crushed material will be then sent to next stage for suitable recycling process.

Pre-Breaker Crusher:
The pre-crusher breaks material like WEEE, washing machines, LCD, TV,s, etc. One of the pre-crusher's
advantages is that it does not cut the material, but breaks it which makes sorting afterwards easier to
take out for example valuable, reusable materials, such as printed circuit boards. Its functionality is
similar to the bag opener and bale breaker. The pre-crusher, however has a special design, such as
hardox lining for extra resistance.

Constant material flow after opening or breaking to increase the capacity of a waste
sorting line.
Can process high capacities and are multi-purpose machines.
Large force per hammer, wear-resistant hammers.
Directly driven by a planetary transmission.

The material falls on a drum, which is equipped with hammers that are arranged in a helical manner.
The slow rotating drum takes the material along to an adjustable cam on which robust wear-resistant
hammers are mounted, where the bags will be torn apart or bales will be broken.

Hammer Mill:

The Hammer Mill is an important tool in the security. It is specially designed grinding
rotor with engineered in such a fashion that it will be longest-lasting most durable
components available.
The powerful and turbulent action within the mill renders the electronic components
virtually unrecognizable and certainly unusable.
Scrap enters the steel grinding chamber and is attacked by a series of steel hammers
that crush, rip and shred the material into small pieces.
At the same time the material is being reduced in size. It is also scraped and scoured
rendering any remaining information on the components illegible.
Typical applications include the destruction of printed circuit boards (PCBs), lead frames,
ICs and ink wafers.
Computer hard drives are completely destroyed thus eliminating the ability to retrieve
any remaining imbedded data. The average hard drive is reduced to pieces that are less
than 3/4"(19mm) after passing through the mill. Secondary processes can reduce these
pieces to an even finer grind for which the pulverizer will be used.

Pulverizer:
Pulverizers are normally used at the end of the shredding process to further reduce materials and
improve the separation results between materials. This innovative concept is of dimensional reduction
based mainly on the self-reduction of material caused by air whirls and the friction of parts and thus

highly reducing the use and consumption of the cutting parts, which main function is transport and
acceleration of particles.
Unlike a shredder which can leave retrievable data, the pulverizing action will completely scour
electronic media of data while simultaneously liberating the majority of components for easy separation
and recycling independent testing of computer hard drives has proven that no retrievable data can be
found after processing.
With the ability to process Computer hard drives at a rate of one per second, this can also process
cellular phones, printed circuit boards, semiconductors, CDs and more all without any system
reconfiguration along with the following advantages;

reduced consumption and maintenance;


wear concentrated on small surfaces that be easily replaced;
Easy to use and compact in size.

Vibro Separators:

The Vibro Separator segregates the dry material into various particle sizes ranging from1 to 5
sizes with up to 4 screen decks incorporated in one Vibrowest separator.
Noise reduction- No noise.
Coarse mesh is provided beneath fine meshes to give proper support and reinforcement to the
fine mesh.
Special heavy duty imported cylindrical and roller bearings are used in the motor for longer
running life.
Motor is double flange mounted.
Winding of motor is done with thicker copper wire to withstand any minute fluctuation in current.

Specially designed round cross section springs are provided for better vibration and operating
efficiency.
Arrangement for adjustment of the Top out of balance weight without removing the sieve Deck
assembly can be provided if required.

Conveyor Belts:
Flat conveyor belts are used to transfer the material from Hammer mill to pulveriser. This reduces man
power and improves the work efficiency and reduces the time cost.

Magnetic Separator Conveyor Belts:

Magnetic conveyor belts are used shift the material from vibro separator to vibro Screens. They also
separate Ferrous & Non- ferrous materials.
Similarly, they are used to transfer the material form manual dismantling section to Pre- Breaker crusher
and Pre-breaker crusher to Hammer Mill.

Vibrating Screens
Vibrating Screens are used to separate the Metals and non metals. For achieving the best separation
results, the setting of the table inclination, the number of vibrations and the air flow, can be changed
according to the needs.
It will also consist of the following:

Base.
Fixed frame.
Inlet of product.
Suction fan (inlet of air).
Suction of dust(outlet of air)
Safety filter.
Outlet heavy product.

Precious Metal Recovery:


For the Precious Metal Recovery technology proposed is of AQUA REGIA Process. This system using is an
innovation and the technology is proven and used in more than 24 countries worldwide.
This machine can recycle precious metals like gold, silver. For other precious metals of the Platinum
Group Metals (PGM) like platinum, palladium and rhodium, the implementation team will develop
process with in-house R & D, tie-up with leading consultants and technologists in Precious Metal
Recovery in the next couple of years.
The e-waste fractions with precious metals are processed in a Titanium Reactor which is equipped with
an agitator it dissolves in Aqua Regia and subsequently neutralized in tanks and washed and passed
through a filter mesh of 50-150 micron size. The process is without any smell, or smoke. The process
precipitates the precious metals of e-waste scraps. The final waste is Copper Sulphate which can be

disposed for pesticides/fertilizers. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), missed with water, is used for filtering all
fumes and gases at the reactor.
The entire process is Pollution free with no emission and the area remains as very clean.
After the recycling process, the water solution in this system is filtered. The water becomes clean and
clear with a PH value of 8. It is suitable to be discharge into any drain or canal without having to install a
water treatment plant.
Hydrazinium hydroxide (N2H5OH), Zinc powder and so on are used for purification and separating all
kinds of precious metals.
The efficiency of the recovery of precious metals is 98 to 100%. Whatever spillages onto the floor will be
fully recovered easily as there is a PVC tray underneath the machinery. The system is so clean that we
can have our meals by the side of the machinery. There is no need for spending on additional safety
devices or automatic water sprinkle system. Your money saved can be used for the investment of this
system and machinery.
The operators of this system will not be in contact with any chemical or solution. All are done by vacuum
suction. Same apply to the filling and emptying of all solution in this particular system. The operators
just have to wear gloves for protection and avoid spillages of the solution into the eyes.

Cable Recycling:
Cables comprises of at least 10 15% of the E-waste (both industrial & domestic). Cable stripper for
cables ranging from 6mm to 100 mm without hydraulic shear. The cable wire stripper is designed to
separate the cooper or aluminum part of electric wires from the sheath, whether this is in plastic, lead
or other material of varying thickness. The new cable wire stripper machine, besides being quite
versatile, now includes incorporated shears able to cut the electric cable up to 120 mm in diameter, as
well as metal frames that are not very large, using a cutting power or approximately 250 BAR, maximum
speed and safety guaranteed.

CRT Cutting Machine :


The dismantled picture tube shall be sent to CRT cutting m/c which is a closed chamber attached with a
hood connected to cyclone and bag house. The CRT shall be put into the control panel connected
automatic CRT cutting frame. The CRT shall be cut into two pieces i.e. front glass and funnel glass.
The glass which is free from all coating etc. shall be crushed further and stored bags to be dispatched for
recycling. The phosphorous coating in the CRT glass be collected in a tank will be disposed to the TSDF.
Plastic from cabinet, monitor shall be shredded in the shredder and will go granulation in the facility.
Similarly, other materials/metals which can be recycled and reused will be sent to authorized recyclers.

CFL/Tube Lights Recycling/Disposal :


The CFL Premium Bulb Eater not only crushes spent fluorescent lamps of any size into 100% recyclable
material, but also removes virtually all mercury vapor from the lamps.
The system, which is mounted to a 55 gallon container, can hold up to 1,350 4 fluorescent lamps and
3,000 compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs).
A three-stage filtering process removes hazardous particulates and gases from bulbs while they are
being crushed. The control panel provided along with it, gives additional security and make the
operation easy.
The material after recycling will be disposed to TSDF.

Utilities :
The following Utilities will be provided with in the facility.

R & D Laboratory
DM Plant
Security Room
Weigh Bridge
DG set
Rain Water Harvesting
Compressor etc.

Common Facilities :
Administrative Building:
An Office Block of area 10 x 10 mts double storied is planned to be constructed with Reception, offices
for Operations and a lab. The offices will be furnished with computer with LAN and other functionaries
required.
Roads
Well laid out internal roads to facilitate movement and material handling has been planned. Tentative
size planned is road width 5 mts. Total length will be approx 500 mts.

Drainage underground and open


Each of the process plant will be equipped with adequate drains that converge into a storm water drain
on either side of the roads. Water with utilized for green belt irrigation.
Water Distribution Network
Water for process requirement along with its distribution network planned with Bore wells and
connected pipings.
Security
A closed Circuit Camera with TV to operate in E waste area, stores, finish goods storage shed and main
gate has been planned for surveillance.
Logistics
4 No. of collection vehicles are planned for the E-waste collection with different capacities.
Power
Power will be drawn from the WBSEB grid. The total connected load will 160 KVA DG set will also be
provided for Back up.

4.13

List of Equipments :

Sr. No.

Description

Capacity

Qty

Load
Details
KW
5
5.5
3
100

Conveyor

1 Nos

Fe & Non Fe Separation

1 Nos
55

Aspiration fan

1 Nos

Polygonal air filter

1 Nos

Discharging Cyclone

1 Nos

Rotating valve

1 Nos
3

grids

2 Nos

exits

3 Nos
3.3

Special Hopper
13

Cyclone

1 Nos

Rotating valve

1 Nos

Polygonal air filter

1 Nos
10

cyclone

2 Set 5

Bag Filters

3 Set

Refining and Recycling M/C 10kg/Batch

1 Nos

(1 batch=6Hrs)
b

Reactor

100 Lts

1 Nos

Vacuum Pump

90m3/Hr

1 Nos

Convection Cooler

150 Lts

1 Nos

Total Load
KW
205.8

Advantages with Technology:

Any type of E-waste except refrigerators, cables can be recycled without manual
dismantling.
No water requirement in the recycling process. Little water is required for Precious
Metal Recovery.
No loss as entire dust is collected and treated in the precious Metal recovery line.
Recovery could be around 99%.
No hazardous waste after process Copper sulphate is left out after recycling which can
be easily disposed to pesticides, fertilizers plants.
Area required is maximum 70 mts x 20 mts for the plant & machinery.
The Technology as claimed is a proven one without any loss with maximum output of
different fractions including precious metal.
No environmental concern envisaged due to the Recycling Process.
The Pre-Crusher and Hammer Mill capacity is more initially to accommodate large sizes
of the E-Wastes without manual dismantling.
Capacity easily scalable at any later stage with addition of Pulverisor and separators.
The plant will be established in such a fashion that it can be easily further expandable
and can address the e-waste problem in the state for the next 20-25 years.
The machineries/recycling line provided in the facility will be continuously updated
depending on the type of material, the facility receives.

The technology provided can be considered as Best Available Innovative Technology for
recycling the E-waste.

Annexure 3
Environment management plan
Air pollution
-No stack or chimney
-The dust generated due to the movement of vehicles is being controlled by frequent sprinkling of water
-The dust generated from the dismantling and crushing is being collected through a set of cyclones
followed by high efficiency bag filter.
-High efficiency bag house provided for manual dismantling area will be provided.
-The dust particles collected in the cyclones/Bag filters will be disposed to CHWTSDF.

Water pollution
-The entire process is a complete Dry process and water usage for industrial purpose is not envisaged.
-Water will be used only for domestic purpose (drinking, office use & green belt)
-Domestic waste water will be treated through septic tank followed by soak pit

Noise Pollution
-No noise generating equipments
-All the employees working at mechanical and manual separation of metal equipped with appropriate
PPEs.
-CRT cutting done within closed chamber to minimize noise generation.
-Feeding hopper at shredder is enclosed for noise reduction.
-Regular maintenance of shredding and cutting systems is carried out to reduce noise generation.

Hazardous waste disposal


Since the main purpose of the E-waste recycling facility is to dispose the Hazardous waste /particles in Ewaste in scientific way, top most care will be taken for removal for Hazardous waste, storage and
disposal.
-The hazardous collected from cyclones/bag filters etc will be stored in ear marked area within the
premises.
-TSDF membership will be taken & then it will be disposed to the TSDF for further treatment.

Disposal of Metals & Non-metals:


Plastics contribute one of the major portion of E-waste. The plastics generated will be baled and then
sent to WBSPCB/CPCB authorities Recyclers only. The metals like Copper, Aluminum, Iron and steel will
be baled into cubical and then sent to CPCB authorized recyclers/foundries etc where they; can be used
as base metals. The records of their disposal will be maintained at the facility and will be made available
for inspection/information to regulating authorities.

Environmental matrix:
Type of pollution

Quantity

Method of disposal

Remarks

air
Water

Nil
4kl/day(Domestic),
1kl/day(DM plant)

nil
Septic tank followed
by soak pit

Nil
No industrial water
usage

Noise
Hazardous waste

80-85 dB
3Mt/annum

PPEs
TSDF

Closed Process
Dust from cyclones,
bag filter, CFL
crushing machine,
CRT cutting machine,
etc,.

Non-Hazardous waste

30 Mt/annum

To auth recyclers

Packing waste, carton


boxes, wood, rubber,
etc.

Table Environmental Matrix.

Emergency preparedness & Safety Measurements:

An emergency preparedness plan will be prepared, submitted & followed under emergency
conditions
Sufficient nos of fire extinguishers are provided at all the locations
Sufficient water points will be provided all along the premises for water sprinkling, connected to
a pump
Emergency nos displayed at various places within premises
Regular shop floor safety meetings are being g be conducted
An independent HSE manager is appointed, directly reporting to unit head
First Aid Facility will be provided On-site
Periodical heath checkup for workers
Any other as suggested by authorities.

Quality Health & Safety Measurements;


Every employees health is given top priority and we will follow such procedures to give everyone a
healthy life. Operator should preferably have health and environment related awards such as OHSAS
18001:19001, ISO 14001:2004 awards for out outstanding QHSE policies in their sites.
Health measurements:
-Each employee is covered under health insurance policy (Both in-site& Office)
-A medical examination will be conducted for every employee before taking him into the job.
-Regular health check up will be conducted for every 6 months
-Pollution free environment
-Strict adherence to health, safety and environmental policies.
Safety measurements:
-All employees to be covered under Employee Safety insurance (ESI) and other group insurance policies.
-Fire Extinguishers at necessary places in the sites.
-An ambulance (own) to be readily available in every site for safety purpose.
-All employees are strictly instructed to wear helmet, hand gloves, safety shoes, etc,.
-Regular inspection is carried out in sites to check k the safety measurements
-Training to employees on safety measurements

Annexure 4
Detailed Calculations

Table of Pre-Operation Expenses and other calculations in Owners view

Table-4
Sl no
A
B
C
D
E
F
G

Pre-Operative Expenses
Description
DPR cost
Design/Detailed engg
Trial run/3rd party inspection
Interest during construction period
Administrative expenses during implementation
Salaries & Wages
Commissioning
Total

Amt (lakhs)
11.09
22.19
22.19
167.04
44.37
44.37
22.19
333.44

%
3.33
6.65
6.65
50.10
13.31
13.31
6.65
100%

Table: Estimation of Working Capital Requirements

Table-5
Holdings
(In months)
2
1
2
1
1
1

35%

Estimation of working capital


requirements
Description
Raw materials (2 months)
Finished goods
Receivables
salaries & wages
Utilities
Sub-total(A)
sundry creditors
Sub-total(B)
Working capital
requirements(A-B)
Working capital margin
Working capital borrowings
Interest rate
Interest payable
Increase in Working Capital
Borrowings

Yr-1
68
70.9
141.85
11.18
5.07
297.03
34
34

Yr-2
107.1
111.7
223.4
11.7
5.2
459.1
53.6
53.6

Yr-3
149.9
156.4
312.8
12.3
5.3
636.7
74.9
74.9

Yr-4
157.4
164.2
328.4
12.9
5.4
668.4
78.7
78.7

Yr-5
170.47
177.81
355.62
13.59
5.53
723.02
85.24
85.24

Yr-6
179.00
186.70
373.40
14.27
5.65
759.02
89.50
89.50

Yr-7
187.95
196.03
392.07
14.98
5.78
796.81
93.97
93.97

Yr-8
203.33
212.07
424.15
15.73
5.91
861.19
101.66
101.66

Yr-9
213.49
222.68
445.35
16.52
6.04
904.08
106.75
106.75

Yr-10
224.17
233.81
467.62
17.34
6.18
949.12
112.08
112.08

263.03 405.6 561.8 589.7 637.78 669.52 702.84 759.52 797.34 837.04
92.06 141.9 196.6 206.4 223.22 234.33 245.99 265.83 279.07 292.96
170.97 263.6 365.2 383.3 414.56 435.19 456.84 493.69 518.27 544.07
12%
12%
12%
12%
12%
12%
12%
12%
12%
12%
20.52 31.6 43.8 46.0 49.75 52.22 54.82 59.24 62.19 65.29
170.97

92.7 101.5

18.2

31.25

20.63

21.66

36.84

24.58

25.81

Table-6
Sl no
a

E- Waste refining & recycling product output


Description
Installed capacity
C&F electrical
Plastic
Metal-Non-ferrous
Computer& peripherals
Plastic
Metal- Ferrous
Metal-Non-ferrous
PCB
Glass
Mobile phone w/o Battery
Plastic
Metal-Non-ferrous
PCB
CRT monitors/TVs
Plastic
Metal-Non-ferrous
Metal-ferrous
PCB
Glass
Laptops, electronics
Plastic
Metal-Non-Ferrous
Glass
Metal-Ferrous
PCB

Installed capacity- 6000 MTA

yr-1
yr-2
yr-3
yr-4
yr-5
6000
6000
6000
6000
6000
1200
1200
1200
1200
1200
720
720
720
720
720
480
480
480
480
480
2400
2400
2400
2400
2400

yr-6
6000
1200
720
480
2400

yr-7
yr-8
yr9
yr-10
6000
6000
6000
6000
1200
1200
1200
1200
720
720
720
720
480
480
480
480
2400
2400
2400
2400

%
20%
60%
40%
40%

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

600
528
288
168
816
300
210
75

25%
22%
12%
7%
34%
5%
70%
25%

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

15
900
117
225
135
63
360
1200
276
180
360
300

5%
15%
13%
25%
15%
7%
40%
20%
23%
15%
30%
25%

84

84

84

84

84

84

84

84

7%

84 84

Estimation of Revenues
Sl.
no

Description

Yr-1

Yr-2

Total Revenue
From

851.11

1340.49 1876.69 1970.52 2133.71 2240.39

a
i
ii
iii
iv
v

Electronic waste
refining &recycling
Plastic
Metal-ferrous
Metal-Non-ferrous
PCB
Glass

Yr-3

Yr-4

Yr-5

Yr-6

Yr-7

Yr-8

Yr9

Yr-10

2352.41

2544.88 2672.13 2805.73

100000

Percentage
851.11
143.07
71.65
232.13
392.83
11.43

1340.49 1876.69 1970.52 2133.71 2240.39


225.34 315.47
331.25 358.68
376.61
112.84 157.98
165.88 179.62
188.60
365.60 511.84
537.43 581.94
611.04
618.71 866.19
909.50 984.82 1034.06
18.00
25.20
26.46
28.65
30.08

2352.41
395.44
198.03
641.59
1085.77
31.59

2544.88 2672.13 2805.73


427.80
449.19
471.64
214.23
224.94
236.19
694.08
728.79
765.23
1174.60 1233.33 1295.00
34.17
35.88
37.67

16.81
8.42
27.27
46.16
1.34

Estimation of Expenses
Table-7
Estimation of Expenses
Sl
no Description
E
Operating Expenses
1 Raw Materials
E-Waste Purchase
E-Waste Purchase
Quantity
Price Per Ton (17000)
5%
105%
6000
100000

yr-1
yr-2
yr-3
yr-4
yr-5
yr-6
yr-7
yr-8
yr9
yr-10
618.46 897.08 1202.06 1260.39 1357.68 1423.72 1493.02 1607.53 1685.95
1768.26
408 642.6
899.64
944.62 1022.85 1073.99 1127.69 1219.96 1280.95
1345.00
408 642.6
899.64
944.62 1022.85 1073.99 1127.69 1219.96 1280.95
1345.00
2400
17000
0
0
0
0

3600
17850
0
0
0
0

4800
4800
4950
4950
4950
5100
5100
18742.5 19679.62 20663.60 21696.78 22781.62 23920.70 25116.74
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

5100
26372.57
0
0
0
0

yr-1

yr-2

yr-3

yr-4

yr-5

yr-6

yr-7

yr-8

yr-9

yr-10

2 Salaries and Labour- Operations


a
Salaries Operations
i
CEO
ii
Plant Head
iii
Lab Manager
Ware Houses and Logistic
iv
Manager (2)
v
Plant Executive- 4
vi
EHS Officer
vii
Lab Chemist
viii Operators- 10
ix
Filters-02
x
Electricians-02

82.56
48
0
9
0

86.69
50.4
0
9.45
0

91.02
52.92
0.00
9.92
0.00

95.57
55.57
0.00
10.42
0.00

100.35
58.34
0.00
10.94
0.00

105.37
61.26
0.00
11.49
0.00

110.64
64.32
0.00
12.06
0.00

116.17
67.54
0.00
12.66
0.00

121.98
70.92
0.00
13.30
0.00

128.08
74.46
0.00
13.96
0.00

5%
105%
75000
25000

6
14.4
0
1.8
12
2.4
2.4

6.3
15.12
0
1.89
12.6
2.52
2.52

6.62
15.88
0.00
1.98
13.23
2.65
2.65

6.95
16.67
0.00
2.08
13.89
2.78
2.78

7.29
17.50
0.00
2.19
14.59
2.92
2.92

7.66
18.38
0.00
2.30
15.32
3.06
3.06

8.04
19.30
0.00
2.41
16.08
3.22
3.22

8.44
20.26
0.00
2.53
16.89
3.38
3.38

8.86
21.28
0.00
2.66
17.73
3.55
3.55

9.31
22.34
0.00
2.79
18.62
3.72
3.72

30000
15000

34.56
48
48

36.29
75.6
75.6

38.10
105.84
105.84

40.01
111.13
111.13

42.01
120.34
120.34

44.11
126.35
126.35

46.31
132.67
132.67

48.63
143.52
143.52

51.06
150.70
150.70

Direct Labour- 48
3 Consumables
Electronic Waste Refining (2000)

10000
10000
10000
6000

53.61
105%
158.24
2000
158.24 100000.00

Consumable Cost

2000 2100.00 2205.00 2315.25 2431.01 2552.56 2680.19 2814.20 2954.91 3102.66
4 Utilities
60.84
62.17
63.53
64.93
66.36
67.83
69.34
70.89
72.47
74.10
a
Power total
59.94
61.22
62.54
63.88
65.27
66.68
68.13
69.62
71.14
72.71
b
Power Cost
51.3
52.58
53.90
55.24
56.63
58.04
59.49
60.98
62.50
64.07
i
Connected Power Load-HP
300
300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00
ii
Maximum Demand- kVA
180
180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00
iii
Working Days per Annum- Days
300
300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00
iv
Power Factor
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
0.95
v
Number hours per days- Hours
20
20.00
20.00
20.00
20.00
20.00
20.00
20.00
20.00
20.00
vi
Unit Cost- in Rs
5
5.13
5.25
5.38
5.52
5.66
5.80
5.94
6.09
6.24
Cost Escalation is taken 2.50% 102.50%
c
Maximum Demand Charges
8.64
8.64
8.64
8.64
8.64
8.64
8.64
8.64
8.64
8.64

100000
5130000

24
100000

Maximum Demand Rates- Rs/


i
KvA
d
Water
i
Operating Days
ii
Operating Hours
iii
Consumption per hour
iv
Rate per M3
5 Other Operational Expenses
i
Electronic Waste Purchase
ii
Others- Purchase Price
iii
Repair and Maintenance
6 Administrative Expenses
A
Salaries- Administrative
i
Marketing Manager-10
ii
Asstt HR Manager- 1
iii
Finance Manager- 1
iv
Executives- 04
v
Accounts Officer- 01
vi
Administrative Officer
vii
Office Assistants- 02
Administrative Expenses- Other
B
than Manpower
i
Rent
ii
Telephone Expenses
iii
Conveyance, Tours and Travels
iv
Insurance
v
Security Expenses
vi
Rates and Taxes
vii
Printing and Stationary
viii Office Electricity Expenses

200
0.90
300
20
0.5
30
19.06
2.04
0
17.02
93.19
51.60
30
3
3.6
9.6
1.8
1.8
1.8

200
0.95
300
20
0.5
31.50
30.02
3.21
0
26.81
97.21
54.18
31.50
3.15
3.78
10.08
1.89
1.89
1.89

200
0.99
300
20
0.5
33.08
42.03
4.50
0
37.53
101.43
56.89
33.08
3.31
3.97
10.58
1.98
1.98
1.98

200
1.04
300
20
0.5
34.73
44.13
4.72
0
39.41
105.86
59.73
34.73
3.47
4.17
11.11
2.08
2.08
2.08

200
1.09
300
20
0.5
36.47
47.79
5.11
0
42.67
110.51
62.72
36.47
3.65
4.38
11.67
2.19
2.19
2.19

200
1.15
300
20
0.5
38.29
50.18
5.37
0
44.81
115.40
65.86
38.29
3.83
4.59
12.25
2.30
2.30
2.30

200
1.21
300
20
0.5
40.20
52.69
5.64
0
47.05
120.53
69.15
40.20
4.02
4.82
12.86
2.41
2.41
2.41

200
1.27
300
20
0.5
42.21
57.00
6.10
0
50.90
125.92
72.61
42.21
4.22
5.07
13.51
2.53
2.53
2.53

200
1.33
300
20
0.5
44.32
59.85
6.40
0
53.44
131.57
76.24
44.32
4.43
5.32
14.18
2.66
2.66
2.66

200
1.40
300
20
0.5
46.54
62.84
6.73
0
56.11
137.51
80.05
46.54
4.65
5.58
14.89
2.79
2.79
2.79

100000
25000
25000
30000
20000
15000
15000
7500
100000

41.59
1.2
0.6
4.8
12.79
2.4
3
1.2
1.2

43.03
1.26
0.63
5.04
12.79
2.52
3.15
1.26
1.26

44.54
1.32
0.66
5.29
12.79
2.65
3.31
1.32
1.32

46.12
1.39
0.69
5.56
12.79
2.78
3.47
1.39
1.39

47.79
1.46
0.73
5.83
12.79
2.92
3.65
1.46
1.46

49.54
1.53
0.77
6.13
12.79
3.06
3.83
1.53
1.53

51.38
1.61
0.80
6.43
12.79
3.22
4.02
1.61
1.61

53.31
1.69
0.84
6.75
12.79
3.38
4.22
1.69
1.69

55.34
1.77
0.89
7.09
12.79
3.55
4.43
1.77
1.77

57.46
1.86
0.93
7.45
12.79
3.72
4.65
1.86
1.86

10000
5000
40000
106543.1
20000
25000
10000
10000
100000

5%

0.50%
0%
2%

ix
x

Business promotion Expenses


Other Misc. Expenses
Note: Cost escalation is taken

Table-9
CASH FLOW STATEMENT- OWNER
(DEVELOPER) PERSPECTIVE
Sl. No.
Description
A
Sources of Funds
Profit After Tax
Depreciation
Land Grant
Equity
Secured Loans
Increase in Bank Borrowings
Increase in Current Liabilities
Un secured loans from Group
Companies

12
2.4
5%

12.60
2.52

Yr-1

13.23
2.65

Yr-2

13.89
2.78

Yr-3

14.59
2.92

Yr-4

15.32
3.06

Yr-5

16.08
3.22

Yr-6

16.89
3.38

Yr-7

17.73
3.55

Yr-8

Yr-9

20000
5%

Yr-10

-283.63
179.85
200.00
795.49
1856
170.97
34

-43.45
179.85

186.51
179.85

239.33
179.85

294.19
179.85

0
0
92.67
19.55

0
0
101.51
21.42

0
0
18.16
3.75

0
0
19.07
3.94

0
0
20.02
4.13

0
0
34.45
7.19

0
0
22.74
4.70

0
0
23.87
4.93

0
0
25.06
5.18

115

190

Sub Total

3067.68

438.61

489.30

441.09

497.05

635.60 664.38

695.32

Application of Funds
Capital Expenditure
Land Grant Utilization
Increase in Current Assets
Repayment of Term Loans
Unsecured Loans Repayment
Sub Total

Yr-1
Yr-2
Yr-3
Yr-4
Yr-5
Yr-6
Yr-7
Yr-8
Yr-9
Yr-10
2557.03
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
200
280.78
161.45 176.89
30.96
32.50
34.13 59.35
38.80 40.74
42.78
371.20
371.20 371.20
371.20 371.20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
140
165
0
0
0
0
0
3409.01 532.65 548.09
542.16 568.70
34.13 59.35
38.80 40.74
42.78

CASH FLOWS- Surplus/ (Deficit)

-341.33

-94.03

-58.79

-101.06

-71.66

319.90 366.01
216.84 216.84

18.62
3.72

560.89 624.49

526.76 565.14

391.32 418.73
216.84 216.84

596.80 623.64

448.23
216.84

652.54

Income Tax Calculation


Sr. No
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L

Description
Normal Rate of Tax
MAT
PBT
Add: Depr under
companies act
Sub Total
Less: Depr under IT Act
Sub Total
Exemption u/s 80 IA
Income chargeable to Tax
Regular IT
MAT
IT Payable (Maximum of
regular IT & MAT)

Yr-1
Yr-2
Yr-3
Yr-4
Yr-5
Yr-6
Yr-7
Yr-8
Yr-9
Yr-10
33.99% 33.99%
33.99% 33.99% 33.99% 33.99%
33.99%
33.99%
33.99% 33.99%
19.54% 19.54%
19.54% 19.54% 19.54% 19.54%
19.54%
19.54%
19.54% 19.54%
-283.63
-43.45
215.90 289.34 364.26
403.75
467.20
503.97
542.62
583.24
179.85
-103.78
325.57
-429.35
-429.35
0.00
0
-83.89

179.85
136.40
282.53
-146.13
-146.13
0.00
0
-28.55

179.85
395.75
245.37
150.38
150.38
0.00
0
29.38

179.85
469.19
213.26
255.93
255.93
0.00
0
50.01

179.85
544.12
185.51
358.61
358.61
0.00
0.00
70.07

216.84
620.59
191.47
429.12
429.12
0.00
0.00
83.85

216.84
684.04
166.18
517.86
517.86
0.00
0.00
101.19

216.84
720.81
144.33
576.48
576.48
0.00
0.00
112.64

216.84
759.46
125.46
634.00
634.00
0.00
0.00
123.88

216.84
800.08
109.14
690.94
690.94
0.00
0.00
135.01

29.38

50.01

70.07

83.85

101.19

112.64

123.88

135.01

Bankers View Financials- The rows marked in purple colour below will not be considered in Bankers view
Table-8
Calculation of Earnings
Earning Before Interest, Tax and
Depreciation
EBITDA (%)
Depreciation
Note: Cost escalation is taken
Earning before Interest and Tax
Financial Expenses (Interest)
Interest on Working Capital
Interest on Term Loan
Earning before Taxation
Income Tax (MAT)
Earning After Tax

139.46

346.21

573.20

604.28

636.94

671.28

770.36

811.43

854.60

899.96

16.39
179.85
5%

25.83
179.85

30.54
179.85

30.67
179.85

30.78
179.85

30.90
216.84

31.78
216.84

31.88
216.84

31.98
216.84

32.08
216.84

-40.39
243.24
20.52
222.72
-283.63
0.00
-283.63
-33.32%

166.36
209.81
31.64
178.18
-43.45
0.00
-43.45
-3.24%

393.35
177.45
43.82
133.63
215.90
29.38
186.51
9.94%

424.43
135.08
46.00
89.09
289.34
50.01
239.33
12.15%

457.09
92.83
48.28
44.54
364.26
70.07
294.19
14.22%

454.44 553.51 594.59 637.76


50.69
56.43
59.24
62.19
50.69
56.43
59.24
62.19
0.00
403.75 497.08 535.35 575.57
83.85 107.03 118.78 130.32
319.90 390.05 416.57 445.24
14.72% 16.09% 16.37% 16.66%

683.12
65.29
65.29
617.83
141.77
476.06
16.97%

LOAN SCHEDULE
Nominal Interest Rate
Year
Beginning Debt
Interest Accrued
Loan Repayment
Interest Paid
Principal Paid
Ending Debt

12%
yr-1
yr-2
yr-3
yr-4
yr-5
yr-6
1856.00 1484.80 1113.60 742.40 371.20
222.72 178.18 133.63
89.09
44.54
222.72 178.18
371.20 371.20
1484.80 1113.60

133.63
371.20
742.40

89.09
371.20
371.20

44.54
371.20
0.00

yr-7

yr-8

yr9

yr-10

Table-9
CASH FLOW STATEMENT- BANKER'S
PERSPECTIVE
Sl. No.
Description
A
Sources of Funds
Profit After Tax
Depreciation
Land Grant
Equity
Increase in Bank Borrowings
Increase in Current Liabilities
Un secured loans from Group
Companies
Sub Total
B

Application of Funds
Capital Expenditure
Land Grant Utilization
Increase in Current Assets
Unsecured Loans Repayment
Sub Total

CASH FLOWS- Surplus/ (Deficit)

Yr-1

Yr-2

Yr-3

Yr-4

Yr-5

Yr-6

Yr-7

Yr-8

Yr-9

Yr-10

-60.91
179.85
200.00
795.49
170.97
34

134.72
179.85

294.03
179.85

311.01
179.85

330.03
179.85

319.90
216.84

366.01
216.84

391.32
216.84

418.73
216.84

448.23
216.84

0
92.67
19.55

0
101.51
21.42

0
18.16
3.75

0
19.07
3.94

0
20.02
4.13

0
34.45
7.19

0
22.74
4.70

0
23.87
4.93

0
25.06
5.18

115

190

1434.40

616.79

596.82

512.77

532.89

560.89

624.49

635.60

664.38

695.32

Yr-1
Yr-2
Yr-3
Yr-4
Yr-5
Yr-6
Yr-7
Yr-8
Yr-9
Yr-10
2557.03
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
200
280.78
161.45 176.89
30.96
32.50
34.13
59.35
38.80
40.74
42.78
0
0
0
140
165
0
0
0
0
0
3037.81
161.45 176.89 170.96 197.50
34.13
59.35
38.80
40.74
42.78
-1603.41

455.34

419.93

341.82

335.38

526.76

565.14

596.80

623.64

652.54