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M. S.

RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY


BANGALORE-54
(Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)

SYLLABUS
(For the Academic year 2013 - 2014)

VII & VIII Semester B. E.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

M.S. RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY


BANGALORE 54
(Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)

Programme Educational Objectives (PEOs)


The B.E. Chemical Engineering Program at M. S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology aims
to provide a strong foundation of scientific and technical knowledge in a state of art
learning ambience. It equips the graduates with problem solving abilities, teamwork,
and communication skills necessary throughout their careers. They are consistent with
the following Educational Objectives:
1. To provide a strong foundation and understanding of the fundamental principles of
mathematics, science, and engineering enabling graduates to pursue their careers as
practicing chemical engineers in Chemical and Allied Engineering Industries.
2.

To produce graduates who are prepared to pursue their post graduation and
Research in the fields of Chemical Engineering and Petrochemicals, Material Science,
Biotechnology, Nanotechnology, Environmental Engineering, any emerging allied
areas and Business.

3. To produce graduates who posses skills with contemporary grounding in


professional responsibility, ethics, global and societal impact of engineering
decisions to assume professional leadership roles and administrative positions.
4.

To provide students with opportunities to participate in various multidisciplinary


teams and to develop and practice written and oral communication skills.

Programme Outcomes (POs)


The Chemical Engineering Graduates of MSRIT are expected to have the following
abilities/ qualities.
a. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and

Engineering

fundamentals.
b. An ability to design and conduct experiments, and to analyze and interpret
experimental results with working knowledge of chemical process safety.
2

c. An ability to design systems, components, or processes to meet specified


objectives within all the realistic constraints such as economic, environmental,
social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
in chemical engineering.
d. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve

complex

chemical engineering

problems.
e. An ability to use techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for
engineering practice.
f. An ability to understand the professional, societal and ethical responsibility
g. An ability to work as a member of multidisciplinary teams, and have an
understanding of team leadership.
h. To have good written and oral communication skills.
i. An ability to understand the impact of engineering solution in a global, economic
and societal context.
j.

An ability to have motivation and engage in lifelong learning.

k. An ability to have knowledge of recent happenings/contemporary issues.


l. To have the knowledge of project management and finance requirements and
able to write project proposals.

Principal

Prof. S.Y. Kulkarni

Vice-Principal

Prof. N.V. R. Naidu

Registrar (Academics)

Prof. T.V. Suresh Kumar

Registrar (Administration)

Sri Ramesh Naik S.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


Professor and Head
Faculty
3

Prof. G.A. Shareef

Sri V. Venkatesham

Sri S. Swaminathan
Sri Ravi Sadasivan
Sri K.A. Badarinarayana
Dr. Archna
Dr. G. M. Madhu
Dr. Brijesh
Smt. Rajeswari M.
Kulkarni
Sri Ramasivakiran Reddy
Sri J. Koteswara Rao
Smt. V Sravanthi

Sub Groups

A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.

S.No.
A
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

CHPE043

Subject Title
Credits Semester Category
TRANSPORT OPERATIONS
Momentum Transfer
3:1:0
III
Core
Process Heat Transfer
3:1:0
IV
Core
Mechanical Operations
3:1:0
IV
Core
Mass Transfer-I
3:1:0
V
Core
Mass Transfer-II
3:1:0
VI
Core
Transport Phenomena
3:1:0
VIII
Core
VII
Elective
4:0:0
Novel Separation Techniques

CHPE044

Multicomponent Distillation

CHOE03
CHOE04

Modeling of Transport Processes


4:0:0
VII
Heat and Mass Integration
4:0:0
VII
PROCESS ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

8
9
10
B

Sub.Code
CH304
CH403
CH404
CH502
CH602
CH801

Transport Operations
Process Engineering and Technology
Process Analysis and Design
Management and Communications skills
Environmental and Sustainable technologies
Laboratories and Project Work

4:0:0

VII

Elective
Elective
Elective

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

CH501
CH505
CH601
CH603

Chemical Engineering
Thermodynamics
Chemical Reaction Engineering -I
Chemical Process Industries
Chemical Reaction Engineering-II
Biochemical Engineering

CHPE011

Petroleum Technology

CH402

10
11
12
13
14

V
V
VI
VI
VI

Core
Core
Core
Core
Elective

4:0:0

VI

Elective

4:0:0

VII

Elective

4:0:0

VII

Elective

4:0:0

VII

Elective

4:0:0

VII

Elective

4:0:0

VII

Elective

4:0:0

VII

Elective

4:0:0

VII

Elective

4:0:0

VII

Elective

Pulp and Paper Technology


4:0:0
VIII
Introduction to Nanotechnology
4:0:0
VIII
PROCESS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
Chemical Process Calculations
3:1:0
III
Computational Methods in
V
1:1:0
Chemical Engineering
Process Control
3:1:1
VII
Process Equipment Design &
VI
2:0:1
Drawing
Process Integration & Simulation
3:0:1
VII
4:0:0
VII

Elective
Elective

CHPE021

Natural Gas Engineering &


Transportation

CHPE023

Composite Materials

CHPE024

Advanced Thermodynamics

CHPE031

Principles of Food Processing and


Preservation

CHPE032

Advance Bioprocess Engineering

CHPE033

Electrochemical Technology

CHPE041

Polymer Processing Technology

CHPE042

Interfacial Phenomenon and Surface


Engineering

16
CHPE053
17
CHPE054
C
1
CH303
2
CH506
3
4

CH702

5
6

CH701

3:1:0
3:0:0
3:1:0
3:0:0
4:0:0

Pharmaceutical Technology

15

Core

CHPE013

8
9

IV

CH604

CHPE034

3:1:0

Process Optimization

CHPE035

Modeling of Chemical Processes

CHPE052

Scale Up of Chemical Processes


5

Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Elective

4:0:0

VII

Elective

4:0:0

VIII

Elective

D
1
2
3
4

AL601
CH703
HSS802
CHPE025

5
CHPE055

E
1
2
3
4
5

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Research Methodology and Report


Writing

4:0:0

VIII

Elective

VI

Elective

VI

Elective

CHPE014

Environmental Impact Assessment

4:0:0

CHPE022

Non-Conventional Energy Sources &


Technology

4:0:0

CHPE051

Solid Waste Management


4:0:0
VIII
LABORATORIES AND PROJECT WORK
Momentum Transfer laboratory
0:0:2
III
Heat Transfer laboratory
0:0:2
IV
Mechanical Operations laboratory
0:0:2
IV
Computational Methods in
V
0:0:2
Chemical Engineering laboratory
Environmental Engineering
V
0:0:2
laboratory
Mass Transfer Laboratory
0:0:2
VI
Chemical Reaction Engineering
VI
0:0:2
Laboratory
Process Equipment Design &
VI
2:0:1
Drawing
Process Simulation Laboratory
3:0:1
VII
Process Equipment Drawing
0:1:2
III
Computational Methods
V
0:0:1
Laboratory
VII
0:0:2
Design Project

F
1
2
3
4

Operations Research

ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGIES


CH305
Material Science
3:0:0
III
Core
Plant Utilities, Safety & Energy
V
Core
CH503
4:0:0
Audit
Environmental Engineering and
V
Core
CH504
3:0:0
Management
V
Elective
4:0:0
CHPE012
Green Technology

6
7

MANAGEMENT AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS


Intellectual Property Rights
2:0:0
VI
Core
Economics and Entrepreneurship
3:0:0
VII
Core
Principles of Management
3:0:0
VIII
Core
4:0:0
VI
Elective

CHL304
CHL403
CHL404
CHL506
CHL50
CHL602
CHL601
CH604
CH701
CH306
CHL506
CH704

Elective
Lab
Lab
Lab
Lab
Lab
Lab
Lab
Lab
Lab
Lab
Lab
Lab

13
14
15

CH701

Process Control Laboratory

CH705

Inplant training/ Industrial visit

CH803

Project Work

0:0:1
-0:0:12

VII

Lab

VII

--

VIII

Lab

SCHEME OF TEACHING AND EXAMINATION VII SEMESTER B.E. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (2013-14)

Sl Subject
No. Code

Title of the Subject

Teaching
Credits Teaching hours/week
(L:T:P) Dept.
L
T
P

End Exam
(Hrs)

Marks
CIE SEE Total

CH701

Process Integration &


Simulation

3:0:1

CH

03

50

50

100

CH702

Process Control

3:1:1

CH

03

50

50

100

CH703

Economics and
Entrepreneurship

3:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CHPE03x

Elective Group C

4:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

CHPE04x

Elective Group D

4:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

OE-I

Open Elective-I

3:0:0

AL

03

50

50

100

CH704

Design Project

0:0:2

CH

03

50

50

100

CH705

Inplant training/
Industrial visit

Compulsory for completing the course


25

20

Elective Group C
Principles of Food Processing and
CHPE031
Preservation

Elective-Group D
CHPE041

Polymer Processing Technology

CHPE032

Advance Bioprocess Engineering

CHPE042

Interfacial Phenomenon and Surface


Engineering

CHPE033

Electrochemical Technology

CHPE043

Novel Separation Techniques

CHPE034

Process Optimization

CHPE044

Multicomponent Distillation

CHPE035

Modeling of Chemical Processes

CHPE045

Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering

Open Electives Offered


CHOE03

Modeling of Transport Processes

CHOE04

Heat and Mass Integration

SCHEME OF TEACHING AND EXAMINATION VIII SEMESTER B.E. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (2013-14)

Sl.
No.

Subject
Code

Credits
Teaching
Title of the Subject (L:T:P
Dept.
)

Teaching
hours/week
L

End
Exam
(Hrs)

Marks

CH801

Transport
Phenomena

3:1:0

CH

03

CIE
50

CHPE05x

Elective Group E 4:0:0

CH

03

50

50

100

HSS802

Principles of
Management

3:0:0

AL

03

50

50

100

CH803

Project Work

0:0:12

CH

24

03

100

100

200

10

24

23

Elective Group E
CHPE051

Solid Waste Management

CHPE052

Scale Up of Chemical Processes

CHPE053

Environmental Impact Assessment

CHPE054

Introduction to Nanotechnology

CHPE055

Research Methodology and Technical Report Writing

10

SEE
50

Total
100

Legend: CH- Chemical Engineering Department, AL- Other departments, L-Lecture, T-Tutorial, P-Practical, CIEContinuous Internal Evaluation, SEE-Semester End Examination.

11

PROCESS INTEGRATION AND SIMULATION


Sub Code
:
CH701 Credit
:
3:0:1 CIE :
50 Marks
Contact Hrs :
42
Lab Hours :
14
SEE :
50 Marks
Process Heat Transfer (CH403 ), Mass Transfer-1 (CH502 ),
Prerequisite Subjects :
Mass Transfer II (CH602 )
Course Coordinator(s): Dr G.M. Madhu
Course Objectives: The student will
1. Study the need for integration and pinch technique for direct recycle problems.
2. Learn graphical techniques for direct recycle and synthesis of mass exchange networks.
3. Learn algebraic approach for direct recycle and Heat integration technologies.
4. Learn graphical and algebraic methods for Heat and Power integration.
5. Learn Optimization by mathematical approach to direct recycle and synthesis of mass & heat
exchange networks..
6. Learn mathematical Techniques for mass integration, Initiatives and applications and few
Case studies.
7. Have hands on practical training on application software used in chemical process industry
like HYSYS, ASPEN PLUS
Course contents:
Unit I
Introduction to Process Integration: Graphical Techniques. Overall mass targeting.
Unit II
Synthesis of Mass Exchange Network: Graphical approach. Direct recycle strategies.
Unit III
Visualization Strategies: for development of mass integrated system. Algebraic approach to
targeting direct recycles
Unit IV
Algebraic Approach: to targeting mass exchange. Network. Recycle strategies using property
integration.
Heat Integration: Synthesis of Heat Exchange Networks (HENs), Heat Exchange Pinch
Diagram, Screening of Multiple Utilities Using the Grand Composite Representation
Unit V
Combined heat and power integration.
Optimization: Mathematical approach to direct recycle.
Text Books:
1. Robin Smith, Chemical Process Design & Integration , Wiley, 2005.
2. Mahmoud. M., El Hawalgi, Process Integration, Elsevier, 2006.

Reference Book:
12

1. Kemp I.C, Pinch Analysis and Process Integration - A user guide on process integration for
efficient use of energy, 2nd Edition, Butterworth Heinneman, 2006.
SIMULATION LABORATORY
1.
2.
3.
4.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

Introduction to suggested software available (flow sheeting)


Simulations Studies of flash drum, Distillation Column, CSTR, PFR, Heat Exchanger.
Simulation Studies of pump, compressor, cyclone, heater.
Process simulation study involving mixing, reactor, distillation, heat exchanger for any of the
following;:
Ethylene Glycol from Ethylene oxide
Atmospheric distillation of crude oil
Propylene Glycol from Propylene oxide
Aromatic stripper with recycle stream (Benzene, Toluene, Xylene)
Styrene from Ethyl Benzene

Softwares Suggested: HYSYS, CHEMCAD, DESIGN-II, ASPEN PLUS, gPROM, UNISIM


Text Books:
1. Luyben , W.L., Process Modeling Simulation and Control for Chemical Engineering, ,2nd
Edition, McGraw Hill, 1990.
Reference Books:
1. Fogler, H.S., Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2001.
2. Smith, J. M. and Vanness, H.C., Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, 5th
Edition, Mc Graw Hill, 1996.
3. Himmelblau, Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical Engineering, 7th Edition ,
Pearson.

Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching, Power point presentations, laboratory work.
Course Outcomes: The student will be able to
1. Explain the need for Mass and Heat integration in chemical industries.
2. Calculate the minimum amount of heat required in heat integration and minimum
quantity of fresh reactant require in mass integration by graphical and algebraic methods..
3. Calculate the minimum fresh solvent required in mass exchange networks by graphical
and algebraic methods.
4. Optimize of mass and heat integration problems by Linear programming method.
5. Simulate any chemical process equipment and process for design and optimization.
Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:
What
To
Frequency
Max
whom
Marks
13

Evidence
collected

Course
Outcomes

Direct
Assessment
Methods

Indirect
Assessment
Methods

Internal
Students Thrice
Assessme
(Average of
nt Test
the best two
will be
computed)
Lab Test
Once
Assignme
Two
nt
(Average of
Two)
Standard
End of
S
course
E examinati
(Answer any
E on
5 of 10
questions)
Students
Students Middle of
feedback
the course
C
I
E

End of course
survey

25

Blue Books

1 to 4
Outcomes

20
05

Blue Books
Assignment
reports

4
2 and 4

100

Answer
scripts

1 to 4
Outcomes

Feedback
forms

1 & 3,
delivery of
the course
1,2,3, 4 & 5
effectivenes
s of delivery
of
instructions
and
assessment
methods

End of
course

Questionnai
re

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
00
00
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
20
20
Create
00
00
00

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes:


Course
Programme Outcomes
Outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
1
x
x
x
2
x
x
x
x
x
3
x
x
x
x
4
x
x
5
x
x
x
14

i
x

x
x
x

x
x

k
x
x
x
x
x

PROCESS CONTROL
Sub Code
Credit

: CH702
: 3:1:1

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinator: S. Swaminathan
Objectives: The student will
1. Understand a control system with various input functions, characteristics and
transfer functions
2. Know the behaviour of a control system for I and II order type
3. Understand different closed loop systems and Controllers (P, I, D and On Off
modes)
4. Study the transient response of above control systems
5. Learn the stability criteria - Routh and Bode root locus diagrams
6. Study advanced control techniques: (Cascade Control, Ratio control, Feed
forward)
7. Have practical training on control systems and their behaviour. Also have hands
on experience in handling automatic control systems of industrial importance.
Course content:
Unit I
First order systems: Thermometer, level, mixing tank, STR: Linearisation: I order
systems in series. Response for various input forcing functions.
Second order systems: Characteristics. Transfer functions. Response for various
input forcing functions. Transportation lag.
Unit II
Control System: Basic components, Servo and Regulator control.
Controllers: P,I,D and on-off modes. Controller combinations.
Final Control Elements: Valves, actuators, valve positioners,
characteristics.
Close Loop: Block diagram. Closed loop transfer function.

15

valve

Unit III
Transient response of servo and regulator control systems with various controller
modes and their characteristics.
Unit IV
Stability: Stability of linear control systems. Routh Test. Frequency Response
Bode diagrams, Bode criterion.
Control system Design by Frequency Response:. Gain and Phase margins.
Ziegler Nichols rules.
Root Locus: Root locus techniques, plotting.
Unit V
Controller tuning: Ziegler Nichols method, Cohen & Coon method.
Process Identification
Advanced Control Techniques: Introduction to Cascade Control, Ratio control, Feed
forward control, Adaptive control.

PROCESS CONTROL LABORATORY


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.

Thermometer
Single tank - Step Response
Non Interacting Tanks Step Response
Interacting Tanks Step Response
Pressure Tank
U Tube Manometer
Single tank - Impulse Response
Non Interacting Tanks Impulse Response
Interacting Tanks Impulse Response
Level/Flow/Pressure/pH/Temperature control P controller
Level/Flow/Pressure/pH/Temperature control PI controller
Level/Flow/Pressure/pH/Temperature control PD controller
Level/Flow/Pressure/pH/Temperature control PID controller
Valve characteristics.
Flapper Nozzle System
Valve Positioner.

Note: Minimum 10 experiments from the above are to be conducted.


Text Books:
16

1. Cougner, D.R., Process System Analysis and Control, 2nd Edition, McGraw
Hill, 1991.
2. Stephanopolous, G., Chemical Process Control- An Introduction to Theory and
Practice, Eastern Economy Edition, 2008.
Reference Book:
1. Harriott, Process Control, Tata McGraw Hill, 1982.
Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching, Power point presentations, laboratory work.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What
To
Frequency
Max
whom
Marks
Internal
Students Thrice
25
Direct
CIE
Assessment
(Average of
Assessment
Test
the best two
Methods
will be
computed)
Lab
Once a week
15
Experiments
during the
term
Lab Test
Once
05
Assignment
SEE

Indirect
Assessment
Methods

Standard
examination

Students feedback

End of course survey

Once
End of
course
(Answer any
5 of 10
questions)
Students Middle of
the course
End of
course

05
100

Evidence
collected
Blue Books

Record Note
Book

Course
Outcomes
1,2,3,5

1,2,3

Blue books

2,3

Assignment
reports
Answer
scripts

1,2,3,5

Feedback
forms

1 & 3,
delivery of
the course
1,2,3 & 4,
effectiveness
of delivery of
instructions
and
assessment
methods

Questionnai
re

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components such as:
Remembering
:
20%
Understanding
:
30%
17

2,3 and 5

Applying
Analysis
Evaluation
Create

:
:
:
:

20%
15%
10%
05%

Outcomes: The student will be able to


1. Explain the fundamentals of control systems
2. Analyze simple I and II order systems
3. Derive and understand the behaviour of different controllers
4. Develop the stable control systems for different situations
5. Understand the behaviour of advanced control techniques
6. Take up the operation of a control system of an industry
Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes:
Course
Programme Outcomes
Outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
1
x
x
2
x
x
x
x
x
3
x
x
x
x
x
4
x
5
x
x
x
x
6
x
x
x
x
x
x

18

i
x
x
x
x
x
x

j
x

k
x

x
x
x
x

x
x

ECONOMICS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP


Sub Code
Credit

: CH703
: 3:0:0

CIE
SEE
Contact Hrs

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks
: 42

Prerequisites: This subject requires the basic knowledge of Engineering Mathematics


Course Coordinator(s): Sri J. Koteswara Rao
Course Objectives: The student will

1. Learn basics of Cost estimation, Working Capital and Capital Investment and understand the
time value of money
2. Study depreciation methods and learn tax calculation methods
3. Learn the methods of estimation of profitability of an industry
4. Study the procedures adopted for Replacement and Selection from Alternatives.
5. Learn the importance of Cash flow diagrams and Break-even analysis.
6. Study the types of reports and inculcate Report writing skills along with its organization.
Course contents:
Unit I
Cost Analysis: Factors involved in project cost estimation, methods employed for the estimation
of the capital investment. Estimation of working capital. Time value of money and equivalence.
Unit II
Depreciation And Taxes: Depreciation calculation methods. Equivalence after taxes, Cost
comparison after taxes.
Unit III
Profitability: Methods for the evaluation of profitability. Break-even analysis.
Unit IV
Entrepreneur: Meaning of Entrepreneur; Evolution of the Concept, Functions of an
Entrepreneur, types of Entrepreneur, Entrepreneurship qualities, entrepreneurship development.
Small Scale Industry: Definition; Characteristics; Need and rationale: Scope; role of SSI in
Economic Development. Advantages of SSI. Steps to Start and SSI Government policy
towards SSI; Different Policies of S.S.I., Impact of Liberalization, Privatization, Globalization
on S.S.I., IPR for entrepreneurs.

Unit V
Institutional Support: Different Schemes; TECKSOK; KIADB; KSSICE; KSIMC; DIC Single
Window Agency: SISI; NSIC; SIDBI; KSFC.
19

Preparation Of Project: Meaning of Project; Project Identification; Project Selection; Project


Report; Need and Significance of Report; Contents; formulation; Guidelines by Planning
Commission, Identification & evaluation of Business Opportunities: Market Feasibility Study;
Technical Feasibility Study; Financial Feasibility Study & Social Feasibility Study.
Text Books:
1. Peters and Timmerhaus, Plant Design and Economics for Chemical Engineers, McGraw Hill.
2. Charantimath, P.M., Entrepreneurship Development Small Business Enterprises, Pearson
Education, 2006.
Reference Books:
1. Desai, V., Dynamics of Entrepreneurial Development & Management, Himalaya Publishing
House.
2. Schweyer, H. E., Process Engineering Economics, McGraw Hill, NY.
3. Gupta, C.B., Kanka, S.S., Entrepreneurship & Small Business Management, S. Chand &
Sons, 2007.
4. James L.Riggs,David D. Bedworth, Sabah U. Randhawa : Economics for Engineers 4e , Tata
McGraw-Hill
Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching, Power point presentations, laboratory work.
Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:

Frequency

Max
Marks

Evidence
Collected

Course
Outcome

Thrice (Average
Of The Best Two
Will Be
Computed)

30

Blue Books

1, 2 & 3

Once

10

Question Paper
Cum Answer
Scripts

2, 3 & 5

Assignment

Once

10

Blue Books

1, 2, 3 & 4

Standard
Examination

End Of Course
(Answer 5 From
10 Questions)

100

Answer Scripts

1, 2, 3 & 5

To
Whom

SEE

Surprise Test

Students
Feedback
End Of Course
Survey

Students

CIE

Internal
Assessment

Students

Indirect
Assessment
Methods

Direct Assessment Methods

What

Middle Of The
Course

Feedback Forms

2, 3 & 5
(Delivery of
the course)

End Of Course

Questionnaire

1, 2, 3 & 5
(**)

** Effectiveness of delivery of instructions and assessment methods

20

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
such as:
Remembering
:
15%
Understanding

25%

Applying

20%

Analysis

20%

Evaluation

15%

Create

05%

Course Outcomes: The student will be able to


1. Estimate various costs involved in a process industry
2. Evaluate the tax burden of an establishment
3. They will be ready with tools to estimate profitability of a company
4. Find the replacement costs of an equipment and select best one from different alternatives
5. Compute break even period for an investment and rate of return
Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes:

Learning
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5
6

a
x
x

d
x
x

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h

x
x
x

21

i
x
x
x
x
x
x

j
x
x
x
x
x
x

k
x
x

l
x
x
x

x
x

PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PROCESSING &


PRESERVATION
Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE031
: 4:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinators: Ramasivakiran Reddy, Rajeswari M Kulkarni
Objectives: The student will
1. Learn characteristics of foods, perishability of unmodified foods and objectives
of preservation and processing of foods
2. Gain knowledge on Low temperature Preservation of foods and storage and
post-storage handling of foods, along with freezing techniques
3. Study High temperature methods of preservation of foods by heat treatment
4. Learn methods of Preservation by Dehydration with all relevant technological
aspects
5. Study all other information and methods of preservation of food by the addition
of agents, radiation and hurdle technology of preservation
Course content:
Unit I
Basic consideration: Aim and objectives of preservation and processing of foods,
characteristics of tissue and non-tissue foods, degree of perishability of unmodified
foods, causes of quality deterioration and spoilage of perishable foods,
Intermediate moisture foods, wastage of foods.
Unit II
Low temperature Preservation of foods:
Chilling temperatures:
Considerations relating to storage of foods at chilling temperature, applications and
procedures, controlled and modified atmosphere storage of foods, post-storage
handling of foods.
Freezing temperature: Freezing process, slow and fast freezing of foods and its
consequences, other occurrences associated with freezing of foods. Technological
aspects of pre-freezing, Actual freezing, frozen storage and thawing of foods.
Unit III
22

High temperature preservation of foods: Basic concepts in thermal destruction


of microorganisms-D, Z, F, values Heat resistance and thermophilisms in microorganisms. Cooking, blanching, pasteurization and sterilization of foods. Assessing
adequacy of thermal processing of foods, general process of canning of foods,
spoilages in canned foods.
Unit IV
Preservation by Dehydration: Principles, technological aspects and applications
of evaporative concentration processes, freeze concentration and membrane
processes for food concentrations. Principles, technological aspects and
applications of drying and dehydration of foods, cabinet, tunnel, belt bin, drum,
spray, vacuum, foam mat, fluidized bed and freeze drying of foods.
Unit V
Other techniques in preservation: Principles, technological aspects and
applications of sugar and salt, anti-microbial agents, biological agent, no ionizing
and ionizing radiations in preservations of foods. Hurdle technology.
Text Books:
1. Potter, N.N. and Hotchkiss, J.H., Food Science, 5th Edition, CBS Publishers and
Distributors, 2006.
2. Sivasankar, B., Food Processing and Preservation, Eastern Economy Edition,
2005.
3. Jay, J.M., Modern Food Microbiology, 4th Edition, CBS Publishers and
Distributors, 2005.
Reference Books:
1. Shakuntala, N., Manay and Shadaksharamurthy, M., Foods: Facts and
Principles, 3rd Edition, New Age International, 2008.
2. Parker, R. Introduction to Food Science, 3rd edition, Cengage learning, 2001.
3. Subbulakshmi, G., and Udupi, S.A.,, Food Processing and Preservation, 1st
Edition, New Age International ,2006.
4. John M DeMan, Principles of Food Chemistry, 3rd Edition, Springer Verlag,
1999.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

To
whom

Frequen
cy
23

Max
Mar
ks

Evidence
collected

Course
Outcomes

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

C
I
E

SE
E

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
nt
Quiz
one

30

Blue Books

1 to 5
Outcomes

10

Standard
examinati
on

100

Assignmen
t reports
Exam
Papers
Answer
scripts

1,2,
3,4and 5
1 to 5
Outcomes
1 to 5
Outcomes

Students
feedback
End of course
survey

End of
course
(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

24

10

Feedback
forms

1 to 3,
delivery of
the course
Questionna
1 to 6
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
20
20
Understanding
30
10
10
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
00
00
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student should be able to
1. Know different characteristics of food along with the processing and preservation
methods
2. Apply the knowledge of unit operations in food processing & preservation of
different kinds of food.
3. Explain low temperature preservation systems and for storage of foods
4. Explain high temperature preservation of foods by heat treatment
5. Preserve foods by applying Dehydration technology
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes
Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5

a
x
x
x
x
x

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

25

x
x

j
x
x
x
x
x

ADVANCE BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING


Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE032
: 4:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Biochemical Engineering


Course co-ordinators: V. Venkatesham, Rajeswari M Kulkarni
Objectives: The student will
1. Learn the design principles of biological reactors, like chemostat with &
without recycle including multistage operation.
2. Gain knowledge on Batch and continuous Sterilization of Reactors and media
for fermentation
3. Have the idea on structured and Unstructured Models of Cell Growth Kinetics
4. Learn methods of estimation of transport properties in fermentation processes
5. Learn methods of immobilization of enzymes
6. Understand the multiphase reactor systems used in bioprocess industry
including Plant and animal cells and also mixed culture systems
7. Know the methods of Biological Waste Treatment. technology of some
important Industrial Bioprocesses.
Course content:
Unit I
Design and analysis of biological reactors: Review of bio reactors-chemostat
with
& without recycle, multistage operation. Sterilization of Reactors.
Sterilization of Medium (Batch and continuous). Cell Growth Kinetics: Review of
Unstructured Models and Introduction to Structured models of Cell Growth.
Unit II
Transport phenomena in bioprocess systems: Overall Kla Estimation, and power
requirements (review) for sparged and agitated vessels. General heat and mass
transfer correlations applicable to biological systems.
Enzyme Immoblisation: Review of methods. Immobilised enzyme kinetics:
Effects of diffusion and reaction on kinetics of immobilized enzymes, Effect of
other environmental parameters like pH and temperature. Immobilized Cells:
Formulations, Characterization and Applications.
26

Unit III
Multiphase bioreactors: Packed, fluidized and trickle bed reactor. Bubble column
reactor, design equations with their applications.
Fermentation Technology: Animal and Plant Cell Reactor Technology.
Mixed Cultures: Introduction. Major Classes of Interactions: Simple Models
describing mixed cultures, Industrial utilizations of mixed cultures.
Unit IV
Biological Waste Treatment: Methods, Conversion of waste water to useful
products.
Industrial Bioprocess: Anaerobic process: lactic acid, acetone-butanol
production. Aerobic Processes: Citric Acid, Bakers Yeast, High fructose corn
syrup production.
Unit V
Introduction to Genetic Engineering (GE): Aim. Techniques. Achievements and
prospects of GE;Translation & Transcription of genetic code. DNA Replication
and Mutation and Alteration of cellular DNA. Viruses and Phages. Genetic
manipulation: Plasmids. Recombinant DNA Technology.
Text Book:
1. Bailey and Ollis, Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals, 2nd Edition, McGraw
Hill, 1976.
2. Shuler M L and Kargi F, Bioprocess Engineering, 2 nd Edition, Prentice Hall,
2002.
Reference Books:
1. Aiba, S., Biochemical Engineering, Academic Press, London, 1965.
2. Atkinson, A., Biochemical Reactors, Pion Ltd, London. 1975.
3. Pelczar, Microbiology Concept and Application, 5th Edition, McGraw Hill,
2001 Reprint.
4. Doran, P.M., Bioprocess Engineering Principles, Academic Press.
5. Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:
6.
What
To
Frequenc Max
Evidence
whom
y
Mark collected
s
Internal
Student Thrice
30
Blue Books
Direct
C
Assessment s
(Average
Assessmen I
Test
of the best
t
E
two will
Methods
be
computed)
27

Course
Outcomes
1 to 9
Outcomes

SE
E

Indirect
Assessmen
t
Methods

Assignment

Two

10

Quiz

one

10

Standard
examinatio
n

End of
course
(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions)
Middle of
the course

100

Students feedback

End of course
survey

Student
s

End of
course

7.

28

Assignment
reports
Exam Papers
Answer
scripts

Feedback
forms
Questionnair
e

1 to 9
2 to 9
Outcomes
1 to 9
Outcomes

1 to 4,
delivery of
the course
1 to 9
effectivenes
s of delivery
of
instructions
and
assessment
methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
20
20
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
00
00
Create
00
00
00

Outcomes: The student should be able to


1. Know different design methodologies of bioreactors
2. Design batch and continuous sterilization systems for air, media and reactors
3. Use the models for the design of biological reactors
4. Estimate different transport properties required for the design procedures
5. Immobilize the enzymes or cells for their multiple usage
6. Handle multiphase reactor systems
7. Apply different methods for the purification biological waste streams
8. Apply the technology for different process industries involving biological materials
9. Have some insight into the developing field of genetic Engineering
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

b
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

c
x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

d
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x
x

29

j
x
x

x
x

k
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

l
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

ELECTROCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY
Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE033
: 4:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinator: K.A. Badarinarayana
Objectives: The student will
1. Learn the Fundamentals: Faradays laws, mechanism of conduction in solids,
fluids, ionic melts, metals and semiconductors.
2. Study different electrode processes and their kinetics along with double layer
theory
3. Learn applications of Potentiometry and ion-selective electrodes and
Polarography.
4. Study mechanisms of Electrode deposition of metals and alloys
5. Learn use and principles of working of different cells: Primary, Secondary and
Fuel Cells.
6. Study the methods of Corrosion and its prevention.
7. Learn methods of Electro winning, Environmental electrochemistry. Bio-electro
chemistry with typical examples
Course content:
Unit I
Introduction to theoretical aspects: Faradays laws, mechanism of conduction in
solids, liquids and gases and in ionic melts. Conduction in metals and
semiconductors.
Unit II
Reversible electrodes and potentials, electrode processes and electrode kinetics.
Various types of overpotentials. Polarisation. Butler-volmer for one electron and
mute electron steps. Models of electrical Double layer.
Unit III
Applied aspects: Potentiometry and ion-selective electrodes. Polaroraphy.
Unit IV
Electrode deposition of metals and alloys.
Primary, Secondary and Fuel Cells.
30

Unit V
Corrosion and its prevention. Electro winning. Electro organic and inorganic
synthesis (and some typical examples). Environmental electrochemistry. Bioelectro chemistry.
Text Books:
1. Bockris, J.O.M., & Reddy, A.K.N., Modern Electrochemistry, Vol.1 & 2,
Plenum, New York.
2. Kuhn, Industrial Electrochemical Processes, Elsevier, Amsterdam.
Reference Books:
1. Lingane, J.J., Electro Analytical Chemistry, John Wiley, New York.
2. Potter, E.C., Electrochemistry, Principles and Applications, Cleaverhume Press,
London.
3. Baizer, M.M., Marcel Dekker, Organic Electrochemistry, John Wiley, New
York.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

C
I
E

SE
E

To
whom

Frequen
cy

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
nt
Quiz
one
Standard
examinati

End of
course
31

Max Evidence
Course
Mar collected Outcomes
ks
30 Blue Books
1 to 7
Outcomes

10
10
100

Assignmen
t reports
Exam
Papers
Answer
scripts

1,2,
3,4and 5
1 to 7
Outcomes
1 to 7
Outcomes

on

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

Students
feedback
End of course
survey

(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

32

Feedback
forms

1 to 4,
delivery of
the course
Questionna
1 to 7
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
00
00
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
20
20
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student should be able to
1. Explain different fundamental laws of electro chemical technology
2. Derive different kinetic theories of electrode processes
3. Apply potentiometric and polarographic principles to practical systems
4. Design a simple methodologies for metals and alloys deposition on surfaces
5. Put into practice Primary, Secondary and Fuel Cells
6. Apply the principles of corrosion and its prevention to different environmental
conditions in a chemical process industry
7. Understand and explain the principles involved in Environmental electrochemistry.
Bio-electro chemistry
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

33

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

b
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x
x

34

x
x

x
x

j
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

PROCESS OPTIMIZATION
Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE034
: 4:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinator: Brijesh, Ramasivakiran Reddy
Objectives: The student will
1. Learn to develop mathematical model for problems.
2. Study concepts of optimization for unconstrained function.
3. Learn numerical methods to optimize problems.
4. Study multivariable optimization.
5. Learn linear programming and its applications.
Course content:
Unit I
The Nature and Organization of Optimization Problems: Scope and Hierarchy,
Applications, General procedure, obstacles.
Developing models for optimization: Classifications of models, building models,
selecting functions to fit empirical data, factorial experimental design, degrees of
freedom.
Unit II
Formulation of objective function: Economic objective function, time value of
money in objective function.
Basic concepts of optimization: Function continuity, NLP programming,
convexity and its application, quadratic approximation, conditions for extremum of
an unconstrained function.
Unit III
Optimization of unconstrained function: One dimensional search: Numerical
methods for optimization a function with one variable, scanning and bracketing
procedure, polynomial approximation methods.

Unit IV
35

Unconstrained multivariable optimization: Methods using functions values


only- Random search, grid search, univariate search, simplex search, conjugate
search. Methods using first derivative-steepest descent, conjugate gradient.
Newtons method, Quasi Newtons method.
Unit V
Linear Programming and its applications: Geometry of linear programs,
Simplex algorithm, Barrier method, Sensitivity analysis, Linear mixed integer
program.

Text Book:
1. Edgar, T.F., Himmelblau, D.M., Ladson, L.S., Optimization of Chemical
Processes, Mc Graw Hill
Reference Book:
1. Rose, L.M., Applications of Mathematical Modeling to Process Development
and Design, Applied Science Publishers Ltd., London.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

C
I
E

SE
E

To
whom

Frequen
cy

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
nt
Standard
End of
examinati
course
on
(Answer
any 5 of
10
36

Max Evidence
Course
Mar collected Outcomes
ks
30 Blue Books
1 to 4
Outcomes

20
100

Assignmen
t reports
Answer
scripts

1,2, 3,4
1 to 4
Outcomes

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

Students
feedback
End of course
survey

questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

Feedback
forms

1 to 2,
delivery of
the course
Questionna
1 to 4
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
10
10
10
Understanding
20
20
20
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
10
10
10
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student will be able to
1. Develop mathematical models for chemical engineering problems.
2. Optimize functions with single variable using numerical methods.
3. Optimize multivariable problems using numerical methods.
4. Understand linear programming and their applications.
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

37

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

38

x
x
x
x
x

x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

MODELING OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES


Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE035
: 4:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Heat Transfer, Momentum transfer, Mass Transfer, Chemical


Reaction Engineering
Course co-ordinators: Brijesh, V. Sravanthi
Objectives: The student will
1. Study the principles of model building and precautions
2. Learn the approach to solution by the method of shell balances and a review of
continuity equation, energy equation, equation of motion, transport equation of
state equilibrium and Kinetics.
3. Learn the classification of mathematical models
4. Develop the models and solutions by applying above methods to the basic
Chemical engineering problems in mass, heat and momentum transfer.
5. Develop models for the cases involving reaction with diffusion in a tubular
reactor, with heat transfer in a packed bed reactor and reactors in series.
6. Study the procedures for flow sheeting, Property estimation, tearing and flow
sheeting, Modular and Equation-solving approach (Elementary treatment only).
Course content:
Unit I
Modeling: Models and model building, principles of model formulations,
precautions in model building, Fundamental laws: Review of shell balance
approach, continuity equation, energy equation, equation of motion, transport
equation of state equilibrium and Kinetics, classification of mathematical models.
Unit II
Mathematical Modeling and Solutions to the Following: Basic tank model
Level V/s time. Multi component flash drum. Batch Distillation Vapor
composition with time. Batch Reactor. Solvents extraction (steady & unsteady
state), stirred tank (steady state and unsteady state), multistage gas absorption,
multistage distillation.
Unit III
39

Models in heat transfer operation: Heat conduction through cylindrical pipe


(steady & unsteady state), cooling of tanks, unsteady state heat transfer by
conduction.
Models in fluid flow operation: Fluid through packed bed column, flow & film
on the outside of a circular tube.
Unit IV
Models in Reaction Engineering: Chemical reaction with diffusion in a tubular
reactor, chemical reaction with heat transfer in a packed bed reactor, reactor in
series.
Unit V
Introduction to flowsheeting: Property estimation, tearing and flowsheeting,
Modular and Equation-solving approach (Elementary treatment only).
Text Books:
1. Luyben , W.L., Process Modeling Simulation and Control for Chemical
Engineering, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill, 1990.
2. Babu, B.V., Process Plant Simulation, Oxford Press.
Reference Books:
1. Fogler, H.S., Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, 2nd Edition, Prentice
Hall, 2001.
2. Smith, J. M. and Vanness, H.C., Introduction to Chemical Engineering
Thermodynamics, 5th Edition, MGH 1996.
3. Himmelblau, D.M., Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical
Engineering, Pearson, 7th Edition.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

C
I
E

To
whom

Frequen
cy

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
40

Max Evidence
Course
Mar collected Outcomes
ks
30 Blue Books
1 to 5
Outcomes

Assignme
nt
SE
E

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

Standard
examinati
on

Students
feedback
End of course
survey

Two
End of
course
(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

41

20

Assignmen
t reports

2, 3,4and
5

100

Answer
scripts

1 to 5
Outcomes

Feedback
forms

1 to 3,
delivery of
the course
Questionna
1 to 5
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
10
10
10
Understanding
20
20
20
Applying
40
30
30
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
00
00
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student should be able to
1. Apply the shell balance method and similarly use the continuity & transport
equations to simple chemical engineering problems
2. Develop the models for practical engineering problems of mass transfer
3. Develop the strategies for development of models for momentum and heat transfer
applications
4. Apply the methods for the transport problems involving reactions also.
5. Apply tools for flow charting, parameter estimation and modular approach
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes
Course
Programme Outcomes
Educational a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5
6

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

42

x
x

x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

POLYMER PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY


Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE041
: 4:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinator: Ravi Sadasivan
Objectives: The student will
1. Student learn about the different classification of polymer and rubbers and their
strength properties
2. He develops and awareness of melt processing as well as low temperature
casting process for thermosplastics and thermosets.
.
3. He develops a understanding of various shape forming process like injection
moulding, extrusion compression moulding, thermoforming, film blowing etc
based on end use requirement.
4. He is capable of developing mathematical formulations for through put for a
given requirement.
5. He is capable of subjecting the plastic materials to appropriate test for
suitability for a given application.
Course content:
Unit I
Principles of processing of polymers: Melt processing of thermoplastics.
Classification of processes. Thermoset plasting processing, crystallization,
orientation & shrinkage, co polymers blendings, compounding for engineering
application, stress strain behavior, WLF equation, practical assessment for long
term behavior.
Unit II
Polymer extrusion: Requirements of Polymer for extrusion. Single screw and
double screw plasticating extruder zones in extrusion, breaker plates, extruder
screw, power calculation. PVC extruder. Die and calibration equipment prime
mover for extrusion, co extrusion, extrusion coating, extrusion film blowing
reactive extrusion. Extrusion blow moulding for PET bottles, wire drawing-PVC,
spinning various types and applications. Application of various extruded
products. Rheological aspects of extrusion and extrusion defects. Operational and
43

maintenance of extrusion equipments.


Unit III
Injection moulding: Polymer characteristics for injection moulding. Reciprocating
screw injection moulding. Single impression mould. Multi impression moulds.
Cooling requirements in moulds. Hot runner moulds, gate, mould clamping force
calculations. Control of pressure, temperature and time of injection thermostat and
fiber reinforced polymer injection moulding, sandwich moulding and injection
blow moulding. Rheological aspects and defects of injection. Comparision of
injection moulding and extrusion of injection. Operational and maintenance of
injection moulding equipments. Reaction injection moulding. Applications.

Unit IV
Compression moulding: Applications. Principles. Comparison with other
processing methods. Derivation of compression mould thickness or compaction
force. Transfer moulding.
Calendering: Characteristics of polymer for calendering. Principles and operation
of calendaring. Derivation of film thickness and pressure required for rollers.
Guage control during calendaring. Application of PVC calendered products.
Unit V
Thermoforming: Basic principles. Vacuum forming. Pressure forming.
Description of operations. Product design. Application. Derivation of
thermoformed product thickness.
Rotational moulding: Principles. Operation & applications. Thickeness. Cooling
calculations.
Testing of plastics: Thermal, electrical, optical, mechanical properties testing.
Text Books:
1. Johnes, M., Principles of Polymer Processing, Chapman and Hall, 1989.
2. Crawford, R.J., Plastic Engineering, 3rd Edition, Butterworth-Hienemann, 1998.
Reference Books:
1. McCrum, N.G., Buckley, C.P., Principles of Polymer Engineering, Oxford
Press, 1988.
2. Manas Chandha, Polymer Materials Vol 1,2 & 3, Springer.
Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:

44

What

Direct
Asses
sment
Meth
ods

C
I
E

Intern
al
Asses
sment
Test

To
wh
om

Freq
uenc
y

Stu
dent
s

Thric
e
(Aver
age
of the
best
two
will
be
comp
uted)
Two

Assig
nment
S
E
E

Indire
ct
Asses
sment
Meth
ods

Stand
ard
exami
nation

Students
feedback

End
of
cours
e
(Ans
wer
any 5
of 10
questi
ons)
Middl
e of
the
cours
e
End
of
cours
e

Stu
dent
s

End of
course
survey

45

M
ax
M
ar
ks
30

Eviden
ce
collect
ed

Cours
e
Outco
mes

Blue
Books

1 to 5
Outco
mes

20

Assign
ment
reports

2,
3,4and
5

10
0

Answer
scripts

1 to 5
Outco
mes

Feedba
ck
forms

1 to3,
deliver
y of
the
course
1 to 5
effecti
veness
of
deliver
y of

Questio
nnaire

instruc
tions
and
assess
ment
metho
ds
Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
TestTest-3
2
Remembering
Understanding
Applying

20
20
30

00
10
20

00
10
20

Analysis
Evaluation
Create

30
00
00

40
20
00

40
20
00

Outcomes :
1. Student is able to assess and use requirement a choose a suitable polymer for a material of
fabrication
2. Student will be able to study a product design and production rate and choose an
appropriate shaping operation
3. Student would be capable of testing the manufactured product for a suitability
4. Student would be capable of making modification to moulds and dies for product
development
5. Student would be capable of suggesting packaging solutions

Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

46

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5

Programme Outcomes
b
c
d
e
f

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

INTERFACIAL PHENOMENA AND SURFACE


ENGINEERING
Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE042
: 4:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinator: Brijesh, Ramasivakiran Reddy
Objectives: The student will
1. Learn the basic concepts of interface with examples
2. Study the generalized equation for excess pressure across different surfaces
3. Learn different methods of interfacial tension measurement
4. Learn concepts of Kinetics of spreading, contact angle hysteresis.
5. Study the concepts of electrical aspects of surfaces
6. Study different types of surfactants , thermodynamic and mass transfer
considerations.

Unit I
Introduction: Concept of Interface and its formation with examples. Mechanical
and Thermodynamic approaches to Interface. Equivalence in the concepts of
47

surface energy and surface tension. Applications.


Excess Pressure: Generalized equation for excess pressure across a curved
surface- the equation of Young and Laplace. Pressure jump across cylindrical
surface, flat surface. Vapor pressure of a drop Solubility of drops. Ostwald
ripening. Capillary condensation. Super saturation. Nucleation.
Unit II
Measurement of Interfacial tension: Capillary rise method. Drop weight method,
Wilhemy plate method, du nuoy method. Methods based on shape of static drops
or bubbles. Dynamic methods-Flow and capillary waves.
Thermodynamics of Interfaces: Thermodynamic treatment of interfaces. Free
energy at interface. Temperature dependence of the surface tension. Effect of
pressure on interfacial tension. Effect of curvature on surface tension.
Thermodynamics of binary systems-Gibbs Equation. Surface excess concept.
Verification of Gibbs equation. Gibbs monolayers.
Unit III
Wetting fundamentals and contact angles: Work of adhesion, cohesion. Criteria
for spreading of liquids. Kinetics of spreading. Lens formation- three phase
systems. Youngs equation. Neumann triangle. Theories of equilibrium contact
angles. Contact angle hysteresis.
Unit IV
Electrical aspects of surfaces: The electrical double layer. Stern treatment of
electrical double layer. Free energy of a diffused double layer. Repulsion between
two plane double layers. Colloidal dispersions. Combined attractive and electrical
interaction-DLVO theory. Kinetics of coagulation.
Unit V
Surfactants: Anionic and non ionic. Other phases involving surfactant aggregates.
Surface films of insoluble surfactants. Thermodynamics of microemulsions. Phase
behaviour of oil-water-surfactant systems. Effect of composition changes.
Applications of surfactants-emulsions and detergency.
Introduction to interfaces in motion: Linear analysis of interfacial stability.
Damping of capillary wave motion by insoluble surfactants. Stability and wave
motion of thin liquid films-foams. Interfacial stability for fluids in motion.
Text Books:
1. Miller, C.A. & Niyogi, P., Interfacial Phenomena, Equilibrium and Dynamic
Effects, Marshel Deckder, 1985.
48

2. Adamson, A.W., Physical Chemistry of Surfaces, John Wiley, 5th Edition.


Reference Books:
1. Millet, J.L., Surface Activity, 2nd Edition, Van Nostrad, 1961.
2. Gorrett, H.E., Surafce Active Chemicals, Pergemon Press, 1974.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

C
I
E

SE
E

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

To
whom

Frequen
cy

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
nt
Quiz
one
Standard
examinati
on

Students
feedback
End of course
survey

End of
course
(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

49

Max Evidence
Course
Mar collected Outcomes
ks
30 Blue Books
1 to 6
Outcomes

10
10
100

Assignmen
t reports
Exam
Papers
Answer
scripts

Feedback
forms

2, 3,4and
5
1 to 6
Outcomes
1 to 6
Outcomes

1 to 4,
delivery of
the course
Questionna
1 to 6
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen

t methods
Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
10
10
10
Understanding
30
30
30
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
00
00
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student should be able to
1. Explain mechanical and thermodynamic approaches to interface
2. Derive the equation for excess pressure across different surfaces
3. Explain different methods of interfacial tension measurement.
4. Explain concepts of Kinetics of spreading, contact angle hysteresis.
5. Explain aspects of electrical aspects of surfaces
6. Explain thermodynamic and mass transfer considerations of surfactants
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes
Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5
6

a
x
x
x
x
x
x

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

50

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

NOVEL SEPARATIONS TECHNIQUES


Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE043
: 4:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinator: V. Sravanthi, Rajeswari M. Kulkarni
Objectives: The student will
1. Learn the fundamentals of adsorptive separations and modeling
2. Study the Pressure swing & thermal swing adsorption, Counter current
separations.
3. Study the basic concepts and design procedures of chromatographic columns.
4. Learn different membrane separation technological processes and their design
5. Study the surfactant based separations
6. Learn super critical fluid extraction process with examples
7. Study the principles of electric, magnetic and centrifugal separation processes.

Course contents:
Unit I
Adsorptive separations: Review of fundamentals. Mathematical modeling of
column factors. Pressure swing & thermal swing adsorption. Counter current
separations.
Unit II
Chromatography: Chromatography fundamentals. Different types. Gradient &
affinity chromatography. Design Calculations for chromatographic columns.
Unit III
Membrane separation processes: Thermodynamic considerations. Mass transfer
considerations. Design of RO &UF. Ion selective membranes. Micro filtration.
51

Electro dialysis. Pervaporation. Gaseous separations.


Unit IV
Surfactant based separations: Fundamentals. Surfactants at inter phases and in
bulk. Liquid membrane permeation. Foam separations. Micellar separations.
Super critical fluid extraction: Thermodynamics and physico chemical
principles. Process description. Application. Case Study.
Unit V
External field induced separations: Electric & magnetic field separations.
entrifugal separations and calculations.Other Separations: Separation by thermal
diffusion, electrophoresis and crystallization.

Text Books:
1. Rousseu, R.W., Handbook of Separation Process Technology, John Wiley &
Sons.
2. Seader.J.D., Separation Process Principles, 2nd edition, John Wiley & Sons.

Reference Books:
1. Kirk-Othmer, Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, 5th Edition,2007.
2. Wankat, P.C., Rate Controlled Separations, Springer, 2005.
3. Wankat, P. C., Large Scale Adsorption Chromatography, CRC Press, 1986.
4. Sourirajan, S. & Matsura, T., Reverse Osmosis and Ultra Filtration Process
Principle, NRC Publication, Ottawa, 1985.
5. McHugh, M. A. & Krukonis, V. J., Supercritical Fluid Extraction, Butterworth,
1985.

Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching and Power point presentations.
Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:
What
To
Frequency
Max
whom
Marks
Internal
Students Thrice
30
Direct CIE
Assessme
(Average of
Assess
nt Test
the best two
ment
will be
Metho
computed)
ds
52

Evidence
collected
Blue Books

Course
Outcomes
1,3,4

SEE

Indire
ct
Assess
ment
Metho
ds

Assignme
nt
Standard
examinati
on

Students feedback

Once
End of
course
(Answer any
5 of 10
questions)
Students Middle of
the course

05
100

Assignment
reports
Answer
scripts

1 and 4

Feedback
forms

1 & 3,
delivery of
the course

2,3 and 4

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
such as:
Remembering
:
15%
Understanding
:
25%
Applying
:
20%
Analysis
:
20%
Evaluation
:
15%
Create
:
05%

Outcomes: The student should be able to


1. Explain different types of adsorptive separations and derive the equations for
the same.
2. Explain about pressure swing and thermal swing adsorption
3. Design the chromatographic columns
4. Develop design equations for membrane separation processes such as RO&UF.
5. Explain concepts of surfactant based separations
6. Explain physico chemical aspects and applications of Super critical fluid
extraction
7. Explain the applicability of electric, magnetic and centrifugal separation
processes for practical situations.
Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes:
Course
Programme Outcomes
Outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
1
x
x
x
x
x
2
x
x
x
x
x
x
3
x
x
x
4
x
x
x
x
x
x
5
x
x
x
6
x
x
x
7
x
x
x
x
x
x
53

i
x

x
x
x
x

x
x

k
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

MULTICOMPONENT DISTILLATION
Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE044
: 4:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Thermodynamics, Mass Transfer-II


Course co-ordinator: V. Venkatesham, S. Swaminathan
Objectives: The student will
1. Study the criteria for phase equilibra and thermodynamic relations.
2. Study the process of multicomponent distillation and numerical methods
applied to estimate parameters.
3. Study various methods of multicomponent distillation.
4. Study reactive distillations and numerical methods applications to estimate the
parameters.

Course content:
Unit I
Phase Equilibria:
For Multi component distillation. Thermodynamic
relationships for multi component mixture, prediction of phase equilibria.Use of
fugacities and activities. Introduction to the method of convergence characteristics.
The Theta method for converging temperature. Profile-Development & application
to conventional distillation columns. The 2N Newton-Raphson methodIntroduction and the Algorithm. The method of successive approximations.
Unit II
Methods of multicomponent distillation: Azeotropic and extractive distillation
process- qualitative characteristics and applications.
Unit III
Phase behaviours at constant pressure: Homogeneous and Heterogeneous
azeotropes.

Unit IV
54

Reactive Distillation: Distillation accompanied by chemical reaction. Application


of the theta method of convergence in reactive method. Formulation of N[r+2]
Newton Raphson method.
Unit V
Complex Mixture: Determination of minimum number of stages required to effect
a specified separation.
Optimum and economic design of distillation column for the complex mixtures.
Text Books:
1. Holland, C.D., Fundamentals of Multicomponent Distillation, Prentice Hall,
1969.
Reference Books:
1. King, C.J., Separation Processes, McGraw Hill, 1980.
2. Kai Sundmacher, Achim Kienle, Reactive Distillation, Wiley, 2003.
3. Billet, R., Distillation Engineering, Chem. Publ. Co. NY,1979.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

C
I
E

SE
E

To
whom

Frequen
cy

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
nt
Quiz
one
Standard
examinati
on

End of
course
(Answer
any 5 of
55

Max Evidence
Course
Mar collected Outcomes
ks
30 Blue Books
1 to 5
Outcomes

10
10
100

Assignmen
t reports
Exam
Papers
Answer
scripts

2, 3,4and
5
1 to 5
Outcomes
1 to 5
Outcomes

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

Students
feedback
End of course
survey

10
questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

Feedback
forms

1 to 3,
delivery of
the course
Questionna
1 to 5
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
10
10
10
Understanding
20
20
20
Applying
30
30
30
Analysis
30
30
30
Evaluation
10
10
10
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student will be able to
1. Predict phase equilibria and determine thermodynamic properties
2. Apply numerical methods to determine parameters for multicomponent distillation
3. Understand different types of multicomponent distillation
4. Understand reactive distillation and applications
5. Determine the number of stages for multicomponent distillation.
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

56

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x

57

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN CHEMICAL


ENGINEERING
Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE045
: 4:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinator: V. Venkatesham, S. Swaminathan
Objectives: The student will study
1. Basic laws for formulation of mathematical models
2. Methods to solve the chemical engineering problems on ordinary differential
equations
3. Methods of solving partial differential equations related to chemical
engineering
4. Applications of numerical techniques, finite differences and laplace transforms
in chemical engineering
Course content:
Unit 1
Mathematical Formulation of the Physical Problems: Applications of laws of
conservation of mass, energy. Statement of the problem. Modeling. Examples and
problems.
Unit II
Ordinary Differential Equations: Formulations of ordinary differential equations
involving chemical engineering problems. Solutions- Equations of first order and
first degree. Solutions - Equations of first order and second degree. Bernoulli
equation. Euler equation. Simultaneous linear differential equations.
Unit III
Partial Differential Equations: Formulations of partial differential equations
involving chemical engineering problems. Solutions. Fourier series.

Unit IV
58

Numerical Methods: Solutions of ordinary differential equations for chemical


engineering problems. Solutions of partial differential equations for chemical
engineering problems. .
Unit V
Finite Differences: Difference operator, linear difference equations, analysis of
stage-wise, Processes.
Laplace transforms and their applications to chemical engineering.
Text Books:
1. H.S. Mickley, T.K. Sherwood and C.E.Reed, Applied Mathematics in Chemical
Engineering, 3rd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 1999.
2. S. Pushpavanam, Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering, Eastern
EconomyEdition, 2004.
Reference Books:
1. V.G. Jenson & G.V. Jeffreys, Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering,
Academic Press, London, 1977.
2. L.M. Rose, Applications of Mathematical Modeling to Process Development
and Design, Applied Science Publishers Ltd., London, 1998.
Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:
What

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

C
I
E

SE
E

To
whom

Frequen
cy

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
nt
Standard
examinati
on

End of
course
(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
59

Max Evidence
Course
Mar collected Outcomes
ks
30 Blue Books
1 to 3
Outcomes

20

Assignmen
t reports

1 to 3

100

Answer
scripts

1 to 3
Outcomes

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

Students
feedback
End of course
survey

Studen
ts

)
Middle
of the
course
End of
course

60

Feedback
forms

1 to 2,
delivery of
the course
Questionna
1 to 3
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
10
10
10
Understanding
20
20
20
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
30
30
Evaluation
10
20
20
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student will be able to
1. Formulate mathematical models for chemical engineering problems
2. Apply numerical methods to find the solutions to complex problems in chemical
engineering
3. Analyze chemical engineering problems through solutions to mathematical models
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes
Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4

x
x
x
x

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

OPEN ELECTIVE-I
Sub Code
Credit

: OE-I
: 3:0:0

(To be taken in other department)


61

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

DESIGN PROJECT
Sub Code
Credit

: CH704
: 0:0:2

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Chemical Process Principles, Process Equipment Design


Course co-ordinator: Archna
Objective: The student will
1. Plan and design of a process
2. Apply the mathematical, computational engineering and economics knowledge
for practical design problems
3. Understanding the principle of working in teams and the concept of team
leadership
4. Learn flow sheeting and designing of plants
5. Improve report writing skills

A group of students will be assigned a case study, or an analytical problem to be


carried out under the supervision of a guide. The group shall not contain more than
four students. Guides are allocated in the beginning of the seventh semester and the
problem on design of an equipment or process is identified. The project group
should complete design project and submit the report at the end of seventh
semester. The project be evaluated by the guide and a faculty committee to award
the CIE marks.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
C
Assessme I
nt
E
Methods

Presentati
ons
Viva

To
whom

Frequen Max
cy
Mar
ks
Studen Once
30
ts
One
62

20

Evidence
collected

Course
Outcomes

Report

1 to 5
Outcomes

--

1 to 5

Presentati
on and
viva
Indirect Students
Assessme feedback
nt
Methods
End of course
survey
SE
E

One

Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

100

Answer
scripts

1 to 5
Outcomes

Feedback
forms

1 to 3,
delivery
of the
course
Questionna 1 to 5
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery
of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
00
00
00
Understanding
20
20
20
Applying
30
30
30
Analysis
20
20
20
Evaluation
20
20
20
Create
10
10
10
Outcome : The student should be able to
1. Students should carry out literature review for any process in chemical engineering
2. Write material and energy balance for a process
3. Carry out computational and economic analysis
4. Write precise project reports with appropriate reference
5. Present the work progress from time to time with the results obtained

Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

63

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5

Programme Outcomes
b
c d
e
f

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

64

x
x
x
x
x

INPLANT TRAINING / INDUSTRIAL VISIT


Sub Code
Credit
Prerequisites

: CH705
: 0:0:0
: Nil

CIE : ---SEE : ----

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinator: All faculty
Course objective: The student will
1. Get exposed to practical aspects in chemical industry
2. Learn to understand working environment in chemical industry
3. Learn safety aspects and environmental concerns
Students are required to carry out training in a chemical industry for not less than
two weeks or Visit at least five chemical industries between sixth and seventh
semester. They are required to submit a report on the same.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Report
Direct
C
Assessmen I submissio
n
t
E
Methods

To
whom

Frequenc
y

Student
s

Once

65

Max Evidenc Course


Mark
e
Outcome
s
collected
s
00
Report
1 to 3
Outcomes

Blooms Level
Remembering
Understanding
Applying
Analysis
Evaluation
Create

00
40
40
10
00
10

Course outcome: The student will be able to


1. Understand practical aspects in chemical industry
2. Understand working environment in chemical industry
3. Understand safety aspects and environmental concerns
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes
Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

x
x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x

66

x
x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x

x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x

OPEN ELECTIVES OFFERED BY THE DEPARTMENT


MODELING OF TRANSPORT PROCESSES
Sub Code
: CHOE03
CIE
: 50 Marks
Credit
: 3:0:0
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Fluid mechanics, Heat transfer


Course Coordinator(s): V. VENKATESHAM
Course Objectives: The student will
1. Learn the mechanisms and Laws transport phenomena, Effect of temperature and pressure on
transport properties
2. Study velocity distributions in laminar flow for simple fluid flow situations by shell balances
3. Study temperature distributions in solids and in laminar flow for simple heat transfer
situations by using shell balances
4. Study Concentration distributions in laminar flow for simple mass transfer situations by
using shell balances
5. Learn and derive transport equations in all dimensions and apply them to solve above
physical situations.
6. Study the analogies between Momentum, Heat and Mass Transport and apply these to
common engineering problems
Unit I
Introduction: Introduction to mass balances - Emptying tank problem; Basic laws of transport
processes: Newtons law of viscosity (NLV); Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluids; Fouriers
law of heat conduction (FLHC); Ficks law of diffusion (FLD); Effect of temperature and
pressure on transport properties; Numerical problems on the applications of NLV and FLHC.
Unit II
Velocity Distribution in Laminar Flow: Different Flow situations, Steady state Shell
momentum balances, Boundary conditions applicable to momentum transport problems, Flow
over a flat plate, Flow through a circular tube, Flow between parallel plates and a slit. Numerical
problems using the equations derived in the above situations.
Unit III
Steady State Shell Energy Balances: General Boundary conditions applicable to energy
transport problems of chemical engineering. Heat conduction through compound walls. Overall
heat transfer coefficient.
Temperature Distribution in Solids and in Laminar Flow: Different situations of heat
transfer: Heat conduction with internal generation by electrical and viscous sources. Heat
67

conduction in a cooling fin; Numerical problems using the equations derived in the above heat
transfer situations.
Unit IV
Concentration Distributions in Laminar Flow: Numerical problems on FLD; Steady state
Shell mass balances. General Boundary conditions applicable to mass transport problems;
Diffusion through stagnant gas and liquid films. Equimolar counter diffusion. Numerical
problems.
Unit V
Analogies between Momentum, Heat and Mass Transport: Applications of Reynolds,
Prandtl analogies.
Equations of Change: Equation of continuity Equation of motion; Navier Stokes equation and
application
Text Book:
1. Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, John Wiley, 1994.
Reference Books:
1. Welty, Wicks and Wilson, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transport, 3rd
Edition, John Wiley, 1983.
2. Mujumdar, A.S., Advances in Transport Processes, Vol 1, Wiley Eastern Ltd., 1980

Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching, Power point presentations


Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:
What
To
Frequency Max
Evidence Course
whom
Marks collected Outcomes
Internal Studen Thrice
30
Blue
Direc CIE
Assess ts
(Average
Books
1,2,3, 4 &
t
ment
of the best
5
Asses
Test
two will be
smen
computed)
t
Meth
Assign
Two
10
Assignm 1,2, 3, 4 &
ods
ments/
ent
5
reports
End of
100
course
(Answer
any 5 of 10
questions)
Students feedback Studen Middle of
SEE

Indir

Standar
d
examina
tion

68

Answer
scripts

1,2, 3,4 &


5

Feedback delivery

ect
Asses
smen End of course
t
survey
Meth
ods

ts

the course

forms

End of
course

Question
naire

of the
course
effectiven
ess of
delivery
of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components such as:
Remembering
:
15%
Understanding
:
25%
Applying
:
20%
Analysis
:
20%
Evaluation
:
15%
Create
:
05%
Course Outcomes: The student should be able to
1. Explain different fundamental laws of transport and know the behaviour of transport
properties to changes in operating conditions
2. Derive mathematical equations by shell balance technique for different practical flow
situations
3. Derive mathematical equations by shell balance technique for different practical heat transfer
problems
4. Derive mathematical equations by shell balance technique for different practical mass
transfer situations
5. Apply transport equations to any kind of physical problem and develop mathematical
equations representing the physics

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes:


Course
Programme Outcomes
Outcomes
a b c
d e
f
g
h i
1
x
2
x x
x
x
3
x x x
x
4
x x x
x x
x x
x
5
x x
x
x x
x

69

j
x
x
x

x
x
x

HEAT AND MASS INTEGRATION


Sub Code
Credit

: CHOE04
: 3:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Heat transfer, Mass transfer-I, Mass transfer-II


Course co-ordinator: G.M. Madhu
Objectives: The student will
1. Study the need for integration and pinch technique for direct recycle
problems.
2. Learn graphical techniques for direct recycle and synthesis of mass exchange
networks.
3. Learn algebraic approach for direct recycle and Heat integration technologies.
4. Learn graphical and algebraic methods for Heat and Power integration.
5. Learn Optimization by mathematical approach to direct recycle and synthesis of
mass & heat exchange networks..
6. Learn mathematical Techniques for mass integration, Initiatives and
applications and few Case studies.

Unit I
Introduction To Process Integration: Graphical Techniques. Overall mass
targeting.
Unit II
Synthesis Of Mass Exchange Network: . Graphical approach. Direct recycle
strategies.
Unit III
Visualization Strategies: for development of mass integrated system. Algebraic
approach to targeting direct recycles.
Unit IV
Algebraic Approach: to targeting mass exchange. Network. Recycle strategies
using property integration.
70

Unit V
Heat Integration : Synthesis of Heat Exchange Networks (HENs), Heat Exchange
Pinch Diagram, Screening of Multiple Utilities Using the Grand Composite
Representation
Text Books:
1. Smith, R., Chemical Process Design & Integration , Wiley, 2005.
2. Mahmoud. M., El Hawalgi, Process Integration, Elsevier, 2006.
Reference Book:
1. Kemp, I.C, Pinch Analysis and Process Integration - A User Guide on Process
Integration for Efficient Use of Energy, 2nd Edition, Butterworth Heinneman,
2006.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

Indirect
Assessme
nt

To
whom

Frequen
cy

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
nt
End of
SE Standard
course
E examinati
on
(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Students
Studen Middle
feedback
ts
of the
course
C
I
E

71

Max Evidence
Course
Mar collected Outcomes
ks
30 Blue Books
1 to 4
Outcomes

10
100

Assignmen
t reports
Answer
scripts

Feedback
forms

1 to 4
1 to 4
Outcomes

1 to 2,
delivery of
the course

Methods

End of course
survey

End of
course

72

Questionna
ire

1 to 4
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
00
00
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
20
20
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student will be able to
1. Explain the need for Mass and Heat integration in chemical industries.
2. Calculate the minimum amount of heat required in heat integration and minimum
quantity of fresh reactant require in mass integration by graphical and algebraic
methods..
3. Calculate the minimum fresh solvent required in mass exchange networks by
graphical and algebraic methods.
4. Optimization of mass and heat integration by Linear programming method.
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes
Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

73

x
x

x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x

TRANSPORT PHENOMENA
Sub Code
Credit
Prerequisite

: CH801
: 3:1:0
: Nil

CIE
SEE
Contact Hrs

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks
: 70

Pre-requisite: Momentum transfer, Heat transfer, Mass transfer


Course Coordinator(s): Rajeswari.M.Kulkarni, V. Venkatesham
Course Objectives: The student will
1. Learn the mechanisms and Laws transport phenomena, Effect of temperature and
pressure on transport properties
2.
Study velocity distributions in laminar flow for simple fluid flow situations by shell
balances
3.
Study temperature distributions in solids and in laminar flow for simple heat transfer
situations by using shell balances
4.
Study Concentration distributions in laminar flow for simple mass transfer situations by
using shell balances
5.
Learn and derive transport equations in all dimensions and apply them to solve above
physical situations.
6.
Study the analogies between Momentum, Heat and Mass Transport and apply these to
common chemical engineering problems

Course contents:
Unit I
Introduction: Momentum Energy and Mass Transport Newtons law of viscosity (NLV).
Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluids. Fouriers law of heat conduction (FLHC). Ficks law of
diffusion (FLD).Effect of temperature and pressure on transport properties of fluids. Numerical
problems on the application and use of NLV, FLHC and FLD.
Unit II
Velocity Distribution in Laminar Flow: Steady state Shell momentum balances, Flow over a
flat plate, Flow through a circular tube and Annulus, Flow between parallel plates and a slit.
Numerical problems on the above situations.
Flow of falling film on outside of a circular tube, annular flow with inner cylinder moving, Non
Newtonian flow in a tube and over flat plate (Power law and Bingham fluids)

Unit III
74

Temperature Distribution in Solids and in Laminar Flow:

Steady State Shell Energy

Balances, Different situations of heat transfer: Heat conduction with internal generation by
electrical, nuclear, viscous energy sources. Heat conduction in a cooling fin: Forced and free
convection heat transfer. Numerical problems.

Unit IV
Concentration Distributions in Laminar Flow: Concepts and definitions on transport
velocities in a multicomponent system, Steady state Shell mass balances. Diffusion through
stagnant gas and liquid films (isothermal and non isothermal films). Equimolar counter diffusion.
Numerical problems.
Diffusion with homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction. Diffusion into falling film Forced
convection mass transfer.

Unit V
Analogies between Momentum, Heat and Mass Transport: Reynolds, Prandtls and Chilton
& Colburn analogies. Numerical problems.
Equations of Change: Equation of continuity Equation of motion; Navier Stokes equation.
Application of these equations in solving simple steady state problems previously discussed.

Text Book:
1. Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, John Wiley, 1994.
Reference Books:
1. Welty, Wicks and Wilson, Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat and Mass Transport, 3rd
Edition, John Wiley, 1983.
2. Mujumdar, A.S., Advances in Transport Processes, Wiley Eastern Ltd., 1980.
Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching, Power point presentations

75

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What
To
Frequency
Max
whom
Marks
Direct
CIE
Internal Student
Thrice
30
Assess
Assessme
s
(Average of
ment
nt Test
the best two
Metho
will be
ds
computed)
Open
Once
10
book test
Assignm
two
10
ents
SEE
Standard
End of
100
examinat
course
ion
(Answer
any 5 of 10
questions)
Indire Students feedback Student
Middle of
ct
s
the course
Assess
ment
End of course
End of
Metho
survey
course
ds

Evidence
collected
Blue
Books

Course
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5,6

Blue
Books
Assignme
nt reports
Answer
scripts

5 and 6
1,2and 3
1,2,3,4,5
and 6

Feedback
forms

1,2 & 3,
delivery of
the course
Questionn 1,2,3 ,4,5,6
aire
effectivenes
s of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessment
methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
such as:
Remembering
:
10%
Understanding
:
30%
Applying
:
25%
Analysis
:
20%
Evaluation
:
10%
Create
:
05%
Course Outcomes: The student should be able to
1. Explain different fundamental laws of transport and know the behaviour of transport
properties to changes in operating conditions
2. Derive mathematical equations by shell balance technique for different practical flow
situations
3. Derive mathematical equations by shell balance technique for different practical heat
transfer problems

76

4. Derive mathematical equations by shell balance technique for different practical mass
transfer situations
5. Apply transport equations to any kind of physical problem and develop mathematical
equations
6. Explain and apply different analogies to common chemical engineering problems

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes:


Course
Programme Outcomes
Outcomes
a
b
C
d
e
f
g
h
i
1
x
x
x
x
2
x
x
x
x
x
3
x
x
x
x
x
4
x
x
x
x
x
5
x
x
x
x
x
6
x
x
x
x

77

k
x

l
x

x
x

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT


Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE051
: 4:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Environmental Engineering Management


Course co-ordinator: Ramasivakiran Reddy, Ravi Sadasivan
Objectives The student will
1. Study the material flow in society and generation of solid waste source
2. Understand clarification of solid waste on characterization of the same
3. Understand the sense of onsite handling storage and collection systems
including transportation
4. Understand processing technologies with mechanical volume reduction and
thermal volume reduction corporate land filling, deep well injections.
5. Learn to estimate material recovery a energy recovery from a given waste data
using case standing
Course content:
Unit I
Introduction: Definition, characteristics and perspectives of solid waste. Types of
solid waste. Physical and chemical characteristics. Variation of composition and
characteristics. Municipal, industrial, special and hazardous wastes.
General aspects: Overview of material flow in society. Reduction in raw material
usage. Reduction in solid waste generation. Reuse and material recovery. General
effects on health and environment. Legislations.
Unit II
Engineered systems: Typical generation rates. Estimation and factors effecting
generation rates. On site handling. Storage and processing. Collection systems and
devices. Transfer and transport.

Unit III
Processing Techniques: Mechanical volume reduction. Thermal volume
reduction. Component separation. Land filling and land forming. Deep well
injection.
78

Unit IV
Material recovery: Mechanical size alteration. Electromagnetic separation.
Drying and dewatering. Other material recovery systems. Recovery of biological
conversion products. Recovery of thermal conversion products.
Energy recovery: Energy recovery systems and efficiency factors. Determination
of output and efficiency. Details of energy recovery systems. Combustion
incineration and heat recovery. Gasification and pyrolysis. Refuse derived fuels
(RDF).
Unit V
Case studies: Major industries and management methods used in typical industries
Coal fired power stations, textile industry, oil refinery, distillery, sugar industry,
and radioactive waste generation units.
Text Books:
1. Howard S. Peavy, Environmental Engineering, McGraw Hill International
Edition, 1986.
2. Dutta, Industrial Solid Water Management and Land Filling Practice, Narose
Publishing House, 1999.
Reference Books:
1. Sastry C.A., Waste Treatment Plants, Narose Publishing House, 1995.
2. Lagrega, Hazardous Waste Management, McGraw Hill, 1994.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What
Direct
Assessment
Methods

C
I
E

Internal
Assessment
Test

Assignment
Quiz
SEE Standard
examination

To
Frequency
whom
Students Thrice
(Average
of the best
two will be
computed)
Two

Max
Evidence
Marks collected
30
Blue Books

Course
Outcomes
1 to 5
Outcomes

10

2, 3,4and 5

one

10

End of
course
(Answer
any 5 of 10
questions)

100

79

Assignment
reports
Exam Papers
Answer
scripts

1 to 5
Outcomes
1 to 5
Outcomes

Course

Indirect
Assessment
Methods

Programme Outcomes

Students feedback

Students Middle of
the course

Feedback
forms

1 to 2,
delivery of
the course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
20
20
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
00
00
Create
00
00
00

Outcomes : The student should be able to


1. Apply his knowledge of characterization of waste and develop a suitable
management plan
2. Assess the cost of transportation laboratory processing of solid waste
3. Identify hazardous nature of waste if any and can suggest suitable dumping methods.
4. Suggest processing waste for material for energy recovery.
5. Develop a management plan for land filling composting deep well injection for non
recoverable waste
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

End of course
survey

End of
course

80

Questionnaire

1 to 5
effectiveness
of delivery
of
instructions
and
assessment
methods

Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5

c
x
x
x
x
x

e
x
x
x
x
x

f
x
x
x
x
x

h
x
x
x
x
x

81

j
x
x
x
x
x

k
x
x
x
x
x

l
x
x
x
x
x

SCALE UP OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES


Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE052
: 4:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course co-ordinator: S. Swaminathan, V. Sravanthi
Objectives: The student will
1. To acquire knowledge of proto types, models, principle of similarity
2. Study the physical, static, dynamic, thermal and chemical similarity
3. Understand the principle of dimensional analysis and develop differential
equation based on physical and chemical laws
4. Understand the regime concept and criteria for static dynamic process and
extrapolate the process taking into account boundary effect
5. Learn to develop scale up techniques for chemical engineering unit operations
and process for both batch a continuous process.
Course content:
Unit I
Introduction: Concept of prototypes, models, scale ratios, element. Principles of
similarity: Geometric similarity. Distorted similarity. Static, dynamic, kinematics,
thermal and chemical similarity with examples.
Unit II
Dimensional analysis: (Review of Rayleighs, Buckingham methods),
Differential equation for static systems, flow systems, thermal systems, mass
transfer processes, chemical processes-homogeneous and heterogeneous.
Unit III
Regime concept: Static regime. Dynamic regime. Mixed regime concepts. Criteria
to decide the regimes. Equations for scale criteria of static, dynamic processes,
Extrapolation. Boundary effects.

Unit IV
82

Scale up: Mixing process, agitated vessel, Chemical reactor systemsHomogeneous reaction systems. Reactor for fluid phase processes catalysed by
solids. Fluid-fluid reactors.
Unit V
Stagewise mass transfer processes. Continuous mass transfer processes. Scale up
of momentum and heat transfer systems. Environmental challenges of scale up.
Text Books:
1. Bisio, A., Kabel, R.L., Scale up of Chemical Processes, John Wiley & Sons.
2. Johnstone and Thring, Pilot Plants, Models and scale up method in Chemical
Engineering.
Reference Book:
1. Ibrahim and Kuloor, Pilot Plants and Scale up Studies, IISc.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What
Direct
Assessment
Methods

C
I
E

Internal
Assessment
Test

Assignment
Quiz
SEE Standard
examination

Indirect
Assessment
Methods

Students feedback

End of course
survey

To
Frequency
whom
Students Thrice
(Average
of the best
two will be
computed)
Two
one

Max
Evidence
Marks collected
30
Blue Books

Course
Outcomes
1 to 5
Outcomes

10

2, 3,4and 5

10

End of
course
(Answer
any 5 of 10
questions)
Students Middle of
the course
End of
course

83

100

Assignment
reports
Exam Papers
Answer
scripts

Feedback
forms
Questionnaire

1 to 5
Outcomes
1 to 5
Outcomes

1 to 3,
delivery of
the course
1 to 5
effectiveness
of delivery
of
instructions
and
assessment
methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
20
20
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
20
20
Create
00
00
00

Outcomes : The student should be able to


1. Capable of studying any given chemical process and develop flow chart
2. Develop scale up equations based on physical and chemical laves to design
appropriate equipment
3. Test the scale up design and suggest the design of equipment
4. Capable of addressing the problems related to environmental challenges
5. Capable of assessing the material and energy requirements
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5

b
x
x
x
x
x

c
x
x
x
x
x

Programme Outcomes
f
g
h
i

e
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

84

j
x
x

k
x
x
x
x
x

l
x
x
x
x
x

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE053
: 4:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Environmental Engineering Management


Course coordinator: Ravi Sadasivan
Objectives: The students will
1. Learn to establish a need for impact assessments with respect to legislation and
regulation.
2. Learn to discuss the methodologies of collection of data and apply cost benefit
analysis.
3. Learn to elucidate the contents of impact assessment report for developmental
projects with industry specific examples.
4. Learn to formulate environmental management plans, life cycle assessments,
waste and environmental audit.
5. Learn to emphasize clean/cleanup technologies, waste reductions at source and
clean synthesis.
6. Be made aware of legal procedure to get clearance from legal authorities.

Unit I
Introduction and need for impact assessment. Legislation and pollution control
acts and Regulations.
Methodologies-collection of data and analysis, cost benefit analysis.
Unit II
Applications of Impact assessment methods in specific developed projects,
advantages and disadvantages of different methods, Applicability of specific
methods with examples.

Unit III
85

Impact assessment report contents for the developmental projects like thermal
power projects, refinery process and chemical process industries.
Unit IV
Ranking of impacts, concepts and contents of environmental management plan.
Environmental audits, waste audit, life cycle assessment, industrial symbiosis.
Unit V
Clean technology Option: Clean technology: Clean technology and clean up
technology, material reuse, waste reduction at source and clean synthesis.
Text books:
1. Unwin, EIA, theory and practice, Hyman Ltd., 1988.
2. Larry W. Carter, EIA, Mc Graw Hill book Co., 1997.
Reference Books:
1. Environmental Health and Safety Auditing Handbook, McGraw Hill, Inc., New
York, 1994.
2. Clean Technology and Environment, Edited by RC Kirkwood and A J Longley,
Chapman & Hall, 1995.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

C
I
E

SE
E

To
whom

Frequen
cy

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
nt
Quiz
one
Standard
examinati

End of
course
86

Max Evidence
Course
Mar collected Outcomes
ks
30 Blue Books
1 to 6
Outcomes

10
10
100

Assignmen
t reports
Exam
Papers
Answer
scripts

2, 3,4and
5
1 to 6
Outcomes
1 to 6
Outcomes

on

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

Students
feedback
End of course
survey

(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

Feedback
forms

1 to 4,
delivery of
the course
Questionna
1 to 6
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
10
10
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
10
10
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: On successful completion of this course the students will be able to
1. Explain the need for environment and ecology of terrestrial atmospheric and marine
system.
2. Explain interconnectedness and consequences of all human activities and need of
clean technology.
3. Explain perspective of short term and long term impact of human activities.
4. Collect data analyze and prepare a report of impact assessment.
5. Explain legal procedure to get clearance from legal authorities.
6. Explain alternative cleaner technologies and advantages of employing them.
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

87

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5
6

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

88

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

INTRODUCTION TO NANOTECHNOLOGY
Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE054
: 3:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, Material Science


Course coordinator: G.M. Madhu
Objectives: The students will study
1. Applied thermodynamic principles
2. Concept of free energy and ideal solutions
3. Determination of thermodynamic equilibrium
4. Various methods of producing nanomaterials
5. Methods of analysis
6. Nanolithography and nanomanipulation
Course content:
Unit I
Overview to Thermodynamics: The first and second laws of thermodynamics.
Thermodynamic functions, heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy. Phase equilibrium in
one component system, real gases, the interactions between gases. Ehrenfest
classification of phase transition, the physical liquid surface; surface tension,
curved surfaces, capillary action.
Theory of Solution and related topics: Liquid mixtures: free energy as a function of
composition, ideal solutions and excess functions.
Equilibrium Electrochemistry; electrochemical cells, Methods for calculation of
thermodynamic equilibrium. Electrochemical processes.
Unit II
Fabrication of Nanomaterials by Physical Methods: -Inert gas condensation, Arc
discharge, RFplasma, Plasma arc technique, Ion sputtering, Laser ablation, Laser
pyrolysis, Ball Milling, Molecular beam epitaxy, Chemical vapour deposition
method and Electro deposition.
Unit III
Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), TEM
and EDAX analysis, X-ray diffraction.
89

Unit IV
Optical Microscope and their description, operational principle and application for
analysis of nanomaterials, UV-VIS-IR Spectrophotometers, Principle of operation
and application for band gap measurement.
Unit V
Nanolithography and nanomanipulation, E beam lithography and SEM based
nanolithography and nanomanipulation, Ion beam lithography, oxidation and
metallization. Mask and its application. Deep UV lithography, X-ray based
lithography.
Reference Books:
1. Mark James Jackson, Microfabrication and Nanomanufacturing, CRC Press,
2005.
2. Principe, E. L., Gnauck, P. and Hoffrogge, P., A Three Beam Approach to
TEM Preparation Using In-situ Low Voltage Argon Ion Final Milling in a FIBSEM Instrument Microscopy and Microanalysis, 11: 830-831 Cambridge
University Press, 2005.
3. Shaw, L.L., Processing & properties of structural nano materials, John Wiley
and Sons, 2010.
4. Narayanan, K.V., Textbook of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics,
Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, New Delhi, 2001.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
Assessme
nt
Methods

C
I
E

SE
E

To
whom

Frequen
cy

Internal Studen Thrice


Assessme
ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
nt
Standard
End of
examinati
course
90

Max Evidence
Course
Mar collected Outcomes
ks
30 Blue Books
1 to 5
Outcomes

20
100

Assignmen
t reports
Answer
scripts

2, 3,4and
5
1 to 5
Outcomes

on

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

Students
feedback
End of course
survey

(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

Feedback
forms

1 to 3,
delivery of
the course
Questionna
1 to 5
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
20
20
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
30
30
Analysis
30
30
30
Evaluation
00
00
00
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student will be able to
1. Understand the underlying thermodynamic principles
2. Determine the thermodynamic equilibrium
3. Understand the methods of fabrications and applications of nanomaterials
4. Understand principle and operations of applied analytical instruments
5. Understand lithography and its applications.

Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

91

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5

x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x

x
x

x
x
x
x
x

Programme Outcomes
e
f
g
h
i
x
x

92

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND TECHNICAL


REPORT WRITING
Sub Code
Credit

: CHPE055
: 4:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course coordinator: G.M. Madhu, Archna
Objectives: The students will study
1. Theoretical insight and skills required to plan, implement, analyse, and report a
scientific experiment.
2. Scientific writing, reviewing, and presentation of texts.
Course content:
Unit I
Research Methodology: Introduction, Defining the research problem, research
design.
Unit II
Method of data collection: Sampling design. Measurement and scaling
techniques, methods of data collection, sampling fundamentals.
Unit III
Data Analysis: Processing and analysis of data, Testing of Hypotheses
parametric), Chi-square test, Analysis of variance and covariance.
Unit IV
Data Analysis: Testing of hypotheses (non-parametric), Techniques of
multivariate analysis.
Unit V
Report writing and Presentation: Interpretation of results and report writing.
Text Books:
1. Kothari, C.K., Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques, 2nd
Edition, 2012 Reprint.
93

2.

Bhattacharya, D.K., Introduction to Research Methodology, Excel Books


India, 2009.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

To
whom

Frequen Max
cy
Mar
ks
Internal
Studen Thrice
30
Direct
C
Assessme ts
(Average
Assessme I
nt Test
of
the
nt
E
best two
Methods
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
20
nt
End of 100
SE Standard
examinati
course
E
on
(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Studen Middle
Indirect Students
ts
of
the
Assessme feedback
course
nt
Methods End of course
End of
survey
course

94

Evidence
collected

Course
Outcomes

Blue Books 1 to 3
Outcomes

Assignmen 1 to 3
t reports
Answer
1 to 3
scripts
Outcomes

Feedback
forms

1 to 2,
delivery of
the course
Questionna 1 to 3
ire
effectiven
ess
of
delivery of
instruction
s
and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
00
00
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
20
20
Analysis
30
40
40
Evaluation
00
20
20
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The student will be able to
1. Explain and apply techniques for scientific writing and research methodology to
prepare the writing of a scientific report.
2.

Perform investigation using methods, explain and take position on the results as
well as summarize related work

3.

Apply the knowledge in scientific writing and research methodology and use the
knowledge to write a scientific report.

Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

Course
Educational a
Objectives
1
2

Programme Outcomes
b
c d
e
f

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

x
x

95

PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
Sub Code
Credit

: HSS802
: 2:0:0

CIE : 50 Marks
SEE : 50 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course coordinator: K.A. Badarinarayana, Ravi Sadasivan
Objectives: The students will study
1. Principles of management and its functional area.
2. Objectives of planning and steps involved.
3. Types of organization, departmentation and span of control.
4. Process of selection and recruitment.
5. Leadership and motivation.
6. Coordination and control systems.
Course content:
Unit I
Management: Introduction: Meaning nature and characteristics of Management,
Scope and functional areas of management Management as a science, art or
profession Management & Administration Roles of Management, Levels of
Management.
Unit II
Planning: Nature, importance and purpose of planning process Objectives
Types of plans (Meaning only) Decision making Importance of planning
Steps in planning & planning premises Hierarchy of plans.
Unit III
Organizing And Staffing: Nature and purpose of organization Principles of
organization Types of organization Departmentation Committees
Centralization Vs Decentralization of authority and responsibility Span of control
MBO and MBE(Meaning only). Nature and importance of Staffing Process of
Selection & Recruitment (in brief).

Unit IV
Directing & Controlling: Meaning and nature of directing Leadership styles,
Motivation Theories, Communication Meaning and importance.
96

Unit V
Directing & Controlling: Coordination, meaning and importance and Techniques
of Co ordination. Meaning and steps in controlling Essentials of a sound
control system Methods of establishing control (in brief).
Text Books:
1. Tripathi, P.C., Reddy, P.N., Principles of Management, Tata McGraw Hill.
2. Koontz , H., Principles of Management, McGraw Hill, 2004.
Reference Books:
1. Lusier, R., Thomson, Management Fundamentals Concepts, Application,
Skill Development.
2. Robbins, S., Management, Pearson Education/PHI, 17th Edition, 2003.

Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:


What

Direct
C
Assessme I
nt
E
Methods

SE
E

Frequen Max
cy
Mar
ks
Internal
Studen Thrice
30
Assessme ts
(Average
nt Test
of the
best two
will be
compute
d)
Assignme
Two
10
nt
Quiz
one
10
Standard
examinati
on

Indirect Students
Assessme feedback

To
whom

End of
100
course
(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
97

Evidence
collected

Course
Outcomes

Blue Books 1 to 6
Outcomes

Assignmen
t reports
Exam
Papers
Answer
scripts

2, 3,4and
5
1 to 6
Outcomes
1 to 6
Outcomes

Feedback
forms

1 to 4,
delivery of

nt
Methods
End of course
survey

course

the course

End of
course

Questionna 1 to 6
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

98

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Test-1
Test-2
Test-3
Remembering
20
20
20
Understanding
20
10
10
Applying
30
40
40
Analysis
30
20
20
Evaluation
00
00
00
Create
00
00
00
Outcomes: The students will be able to
1. Understand the role of management and its functions.
2. Understand importance and steps in planning.
3. Understand authority and responsibility, process of recruitment.
4. Explain leadership and motivation theories.
5. Understand modes and barriers in communication.
6. Explain importance and methods of control systems.
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

Course
Educational
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5
6

Programme Outcomes
b
c d
e
f

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x

x
x

99

PROJECT WORK
Sub Code
Credit

: CH803
: 0:0:12

CIE : 100 Marks


SEE : 100 Marks

Pre-requisite: Nil
Course coordinator: Archna
Objective: The student will
1. Identify the upcoming areas of chemical engineering.
2. Plan experimental or theoretical work using multidisciplinary knowledge
3. Apply the mathematical, computational engineering and economics knowledge
for practical problems
4. Usage of various instrumental techniques
5. Interact with industry and research canters
6. Understanding the principle of working in teams and the concept of team
leadership
7. Learn flow sheeting and designing of plants
8. Improve report writing skills
Course content:
A group of students will be assigned a case study, or an analytical problem to be
carried out under the supervision of a guide. The group shall not contain more than
four students. Guides are allocated in the beginning of the seventh semester and the
problem on design of an equipment or process is identified. The students are
required to give a comprehensive presentation in the form of seminar on the project
work during the semester and submit the report at the end of the semester. During
the semester performance of the students are evaluated by the guide and faculty
committee to award the CIE marks. The final project report will be evaluated and
examined at the end of the eighth semester for SEE marks.
Assessment and Evaluation vis--vis Course Outcomes:
What

To
whom

Frequen Max
cy
Mar
ks
100

Evidence
collected

Course
Outcomes

Direct
C
Assessme I
nt
E
Methods
SE
E

Presentati Studen Twice


on and
ts
Viva
Vivavoce

Indirect Students
Assessme feedback
nt
Methods End of course
survey

50

End of
100
course
(Answer
any 5 of
10
questions
)
Studen Middle
ts
of the
course
End of
course

101

Report

1 to5
Outcomes

Report

1 to 5
Outcomes

Feedback
forms

1 to3,
delivery of
the course
Questionna 1 to 5
ire
effectiven
ess of
delivery of
instruction
s and
assessmen
t methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
such as:
Blooms Level
Remembering
10
Understanding
10
Applying
30
Analysis
20
Evaluation
10
Create
20
Outcome : The student should be able to
1. Carry out literature review for the upcoming areas of chemical engineering
2. Write protocols for the experiments to be carried out for the area under study
3. Carry out computational and economic analysis
4. Write precise project reports with appropriate reference
5. Present the work progress from time to time with the results obtained
Mapping of Course Outcomes with Programme Outcomes

Course
Educational a
Objectives
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Programme Outcomes
b
c d
e
f

x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x

102

x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x

x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x