Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 25

Standard deviation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Two sigma" redirects here. For the hedge fund company, see Two Sigma Investments.

Standard deviation From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: <a href=navigation , search For other uses, see Standard Deviation (disambiguation) . "Two sigma" redirects here. For the hedge fund company, see Two Sigma Investments . Cumulative probability of a normal distribution with expected value 0 and standard deviation 1. In statistics and probability theory , the standard deviation ( SD ) (represented by the Greek letter sigma, σ ) measures the amount of variation or dispersion from the average . A low standard deviation indicates that the data points tend to be very close to the mean (also called expected value); a high standard deviation indicates that the data points are spread out over a large range of values. The standard deviation of a random variable , statistical population , data set, or probability distribution is the square root of its variance . It is algebraically simpler though in practice less robust than th e average absolute deviation . A useful property of the standard deviation is that, unlike the variance, it is expressed in the same units as the data. Note, however, that for measurements with percentage as the unit, the standard deviation will have percentage points as the unit. In addition to expressing the variability of a population, the standard deviation is commonly used to measure confidence in statistical conclusions. For example, the margin of error in polling data is determined by calculating the expected standard deviation in the results if the same poll were to be conducted multiple times. The reported margin of error is typically about twice the standard deviation — the half-width of a 95 percent confidence interval . In science, researchers commonly report the standard deviation of experimental data, and only effects that fall much farther than two standard deviations away from what would have been expected are considered statistically significant normal random error or variation in the measurements is in this way distinguished from causal variation. The standard deviation is also important in finance, where the standard deviation " id="pdf-obj-0-20" src="pdf-obj-0-20.jpg">

Cumulative probability of a normal distribution with expected value 0 and standard deviation 1.

In statistics and probability theory, the standard deviation (SD) (represented by the Greek letter sigma, σ) measures the amount of variation or dispersion from the average. [1] A low standard deviation indicates that the data points tend to be very close to the mean (also called expected value); a high standard deviation indicates that the data points are spread out over a large range of values.

The standard deviation of a random variable, statistical population, data set, or probability distribution is the square root of its variance. It is algebraically simpler though in practice less robust than theaverage absolute deviation. [2][3] A useful property of the standard deviation is that, unlike the variance, it is expressed in the same units as the data. Note, however, that for measurements with percentage as the unit, the standard deviation will have percentage points as the unit.

In addition to expressing the variability of a population, the standard deviation is commonly used to measure confidence in statistical conclusions. For example, the margin of error in polling data is determined by calculating the expected standard deviation in the results if the same poll were to be conducted multiple times. The reported margin of error is typically about twice the standard deviationthe half-width of a 95 percent confidence interval. In science, researchers commonly report the standard deviation of experimental data, and only effects that fall much farther than two standard deviations away from what would have been expected are considered statistically significantnormal random error or variation in the measurements is in this way distinguished from causal variation. The standard deviation is also important in finance, where the standard deviation

For a finite set of numbers, the standard deviation is found by taking the square root of the average of the squared differences of the values from their average value. For example, consider a populationconsisting of the following eight values:

For a finite set of numbers, the standard deviation is found by taking the <a href=square root of the average of the squared differences of the values from their average value. For example, consider a population c onsisting of the following eight values: These eight data points have the mean (average) of 5: First, calculate the difference of each data point from the mean, and square the result of each: Next, calculate the mean of these values, and take the square root: This quantity is the population standard deviation, and is equal to the square root of the variance . This formula is valid only if the eight values we began with form the complete population. If the values instead were a random sample drawn from some larger parent population, then we would have divided by 7 (which is n −1) instead of 8 (which is n ) in the denominator of the last formula, and then the quantity thus obtained would be called the sample standard deviation. Dividing by n −1 gives a better estimate of the population standard deviation than dividing by n . As a slightly more complicated real-life example, the average height for adult men in the United States is about 70 inches, with a standard deviation of around 3 inches. This means that most men (about 68 percent, assuming a normal distribution ) have a height within 3 inches of the mean (67 – 73 inches) – one standard deviation – and almost all men (about 95%) have a height within 6 inches of the mean (64 – 76 inches) – two standard deviations. If the standard deviation were zero, then all men would be exactly 70 inches tall. If the standard deviation were 20 inches, then men would have much more variable heights, with a typical range of about 50 – 90 inches. Three standard deviations account for 99.7 percent of the sample population being studied, assuming the distribution is normal (bell- shaped). " id="pdf-obj-2-11" src="pdf-obj-2-11.jpg">

These eight data points have the mean (average) of 5:

For a finite set of numbers, the standard deviation is found by taking the <a href=square root of the average of the squared differences of the values from their average value. For example, consider a population c onsisting of the following eight values: These eight data points have the mean (average) of 5: First, calculate the difference of each data point from the mean, and square the result of each: Next, calculate the mean of these values, and take the square root: This quantity is the population standard deviation, and is equal to the square root of the variance . This formula is valid only if the eight values we began with form the complete population. If the values instead were a random sample drawn from some larger parent population, then we would have divided by 7 (which is n −1) instead of 8 (which is n ) in the denominator of the last formula, and then the quantity thus obtained would be called the sample standard deviation. Dividing by n −1 gives a better estimate of the population standard deviation than dividing by n . As a slightly more complicated real-life example, the average height for adult men in the United States is about 70 inches, with a standard deviation of around 3 inches. This means that most men (about 68 percent, assuming a normal distribution ) have a height within 3 inches of the mean (67 – 73 inches) – one standard deviation – and almost all men (about 95%) have a height within 6 inches of the mean (64 – 76 inches) – two standard deviations. If the standard deviation were zero, then all men would be exactly 70 inches tall. If the standard deviation were 20 inches, then men would have much more variable heights, with a typical range of about 50 – 90 inches. Three standard deviations account for 99.7 percent of the sample population being studied, assuming the distribution is normal (bell- shaped). " id="pdf-obj-2-15" src="pdf-obj-2-15.jpg">

First, calculate the difference of each data point from the mean, and square the result of each:

For a finite set of numbers, the standard deviation is found by taking the <a href=square root of the average of the squared differences of the values from their average value. For example, consider a population c onsisting of the following eight values: These eight data points have the mean (average) of 5: First, calculate the difference of each data point from the mean, and square the result of each: Next, calculate the mean of these values, and take the square root: This quantity is the population standard deviation, and is equal to the square root of the variance . This formula is valid only if the eight values we began with form the complete population. If the values instead were a random sample drawn from some larger parent population, then we would have divided by 7 (which is n −1) instead of 8 (which is n ) in the denominator of the last formula, and then the quantity thus obtained would be called the sample standard deviation. Dividing by n −1 gives a better estimate of the population standard deviation than dividing by n . As a slightly more complicated real-life example, the average height for adult men in the United States is about 70 inches, with a standard deviation of around 3 inches. This means that most men (about 68 percent, assuming a normal distribution ) have a height within 3 inches of the mean (67 – 73 inches) – one standard deviation – and almost all men (about 95%) have a height within 6 inches of the mean (64 – 76 inches) – two standard deviations. If the standard deviation were zero, then all men would be exactly 70 inches tall. If the standard deviation were 20 inches, then men would have much more variable heights, with a typical range of about 50 – 90 inches. Three standard deviations account for 99.7 percent of the sample population being studied, assuming the distribution is normal (bell- shaped). " id="pdf-obj-2-21" src="pdf-obj-2-21.jpg">

Next, calculate the mean of these values, and take the square root:

For a finite set of numbers, the standard deviation is found by taking the <a href=square root of the average of the squared differences of the values from their average value. For example, consider a population c onsisting of the following eight values: These eight data points have the mean (average) of 5: First, calculate the difference of each data point from the mean, and square the result of each: Next, calculate the mean of these values, and take the square root: This quantity is the population standard deviation, and is equal to the square root of the variance . This formula is valid only if the eight values we began with form the complete population. If the values instead were a random sample drawn from some larger parent population, then we would have divided by 7 (which is n −1) instead of 8 (which is n ) in the denominator of the last formula, and then the quantity thus obtained would be called the sample standard deviation. Dividing by n −1 gives a better estimate of the population standard deviation than dividing by n . As a slightly more complicated real-life example, the average height for adult men in the United States is about 70 inches, with a standard deviation of around 3 inches. This means that most men (about 68 percent, assuming a normal distribution ) have a height within 3 inches of the mean (67 – 73 inches) – one standard deviation – and almost all men (about 95%) have a height within 6 inches of the mean (64 – 76 inches) – two standard deviations. If the standard deviation were zero, then all men would be exactly 70 inches tall. If the standard deviation were 20 inches, then men would have much more variable heights, with a typical range of about 50 – 90 inches. Three standard deviations account for 99.7 percent of the sample population being studied, assuming the distribution is normal (bell- shaped). " id="pdf-obj-2-25" src="pdf-obj-2-25.jpg">

This quantity is the population standard deviation, and is equal to the square root of the variance. This formula is valid only if the eight values we began with form the complete population. If the values instead were a random sample drawn from some larger parent population, then we would have divided by 7 (which is n−1) instead of 8 (which is n) in the denominator of the last formula, and then the quantity thus obtained would be called the sample standard deviation. Dividing by n−1 gives a better estimate of the population standard deviation than dividing by n.

As a slightly more complicated real-life example, the average height for adult men in the United States is about 70 inches, with a standard deviation of around 3 inches. This means that most men (about 68 percent, assuming a normal distribution) have a height within 3 inches of the mean (6773 inches) one standard deviation and almost all men (about 95%) have a height within 6 inches of the mean (6476 inches) two standard deviations. If the standard deviation were zero, then all men would be exactly 70 inches tall. If the standard deviation were 20 inches, then men would have much more variable heights, with a typical range of about 5090 inches. Three standard deviations account for 99.7 percent of the sample population being studied, assuming the distribution is normal (bell- shaped).

Definition of population values[edit]

Let X be a random variable with mean value μ:

Definition of population values <a href=[ edit ] Let X be a random variable with mean value μ : Here the operator E denotes the average or expected value of X . Then the standard deviation of X is the quantity (derived using the properties of expected value ) . In other words the standard deviation σ ( sigma ) is the square root of the variance of X ; i.e., it is the square root of the average value of ( X − μ ) . The standard deviation of a ( univariate ) probability distribution is the same as that of a random variable having that distribution. Not all random variables have a standard deviation, since these expected values need not exist. For example, the standard deviation of a random variable that follows a Cauchy distribution is undefined because its expected value μ is undefined. Discrete random variable [ edit ] In the case where X takes random values from a finite data set x , x , each value having the same probability, the standard deviation is ... , x , with or, using summation notation, If, instead of having equal probabilities, the values have different probabilities, let x have probability p , x have probability p , case, the standard deviation will be ... , x have probability p . In this " id="pdf-obj-3-15" src="pdf-obj-3-15.jpg">

Here the operator E denotes the average or expected value of X. Then the standard deviation of X is the quantity

Definition of population values <a href=[ edit ] Let X be a random variable with mean value μ : Here the operator E denotes the average or expected value of X . Then the standard deviation of X is the quantity (derived using the properties of expected value ) . In other words the standard deviation σ ( sigma ) is the square root of the variance of X ; i.e., it is the square root of the average value of ( X − μ ) . The standard deviation of a ( univariate ) probability distribution is the same as that of a random variable having that distribution. Not all random variables have a standard deviation, since these expected values need not exist. For example, the standard deviation of a random variable that follows a Cauchy distribution is undefined because its expected value μ is undefined. Discrete random variable [ edit ] In the case where X takes random values from a finite data set x , x , each value having the same probability, the standard deviation is ... , x , with or, using summation notation, If, instead of having equal probabilities, the values have different probabilities, let x have probability p , x have probability p , case, the standard deviation will be ... , x have probability p . In this " id="pdf-obj-3-29" src="pdf-obj-3-29.jpg">

(derived using the properties of expected value).

In other words the standard deviation σ (sigma) is the square root of the variance of X; i.e., it is the square root of the average value of (X μ) 2 .

The standard deviation of a (univariate) probability distribution is the same as that of a random variable having that distribution. Not all random variables have a standard deviation, since these expected values need not exist. For example, the standard deviation of a random variable that follows a Cauchy distribution is undefined because its expected value μ is undefined.

Discrete random variable[edit]

In the case where X takes random values from a finite data set x 1 , x 2 , each value having the same probability, the standard deviation is

...

, x N , with

or, using summation notation,

Definition of population values <a href=[ edit ] Let X be a random variable with mean value μ : Here the operator E denotes the average or expected value of X . Then the standard deviation of X is the quantity (derived using the properties of expected value ) . In other words the standard deviation σ ( sigma ) is the square root of the variance of X ; i.e., it is the square root of the average value of ( X − μ ) . The standard deviation of a ( univariate ) probability distribution is the same as that of a random variable having that distribution. Not all random variables have a standard deviation, since these expected values need not exist. For example, the standard deviation of a random variable that follows a Cauchy distribution is undefined because its expected value μ is undefined. Discrete random variable [ edit ] In the case where X takes random values from a finite data set x , x , each value having the same probability, the standard deviation is ... , x , with or, using summation notation, If, instead of having equal probabilities, the values have different probabilities, let x have probability p , x have probability p , case, the standard deviation will be ... , x have probability p . In this " id="pdf-obj-3-90" src="pdf-obj-3-90.jpg">

If, instead of having equal probabilities, the values have different probabilities,

let x 1 have probability p 1 , x 2 have probability p 2 , case, the standard deviation will be

...

,

x N have probability p N . In this

Continuous random variable <a href=[ edit ] The standard deviation of a continuous real-valued random variable X with probability density function p ( x ) is and where the integrals are definite integrals taken for x ranging over the set of possible values of the random variable X . In the case of a parametric family of distributions , the standard deviation can be expressed in terms of the parameters. For example, in the case of the log-normal distribution with parameters μ and σ , the standard deviation is [(exp( σ ) − 1)exp(2 μ + σ )] . Estimation [ edit ] See also: Sample variance Main article: Unbiased estimation of standard deviation It has been suggested that portions of this section b e moved into Unbiased estimation of standard deviation . ( Discuss ) One can find the standard deviation of an entire population in cases (such as standardized testing ) where every member of a population is sampled. In cases where that cannot be done, the standard deviation σ is estimated by examining a random sample taken from the population and computing a statistic of the sample, which is used as an estimate of the population standard deviation. Such a statistic is called a n estimator , and the estimator (or the value of the estimator, namely the estimate) is called a sample standard deviation, and is denoted by s (possibly with modifiers). However, unlike in the case of estimating the population mean, for which the sample mean is a simple estimator with many desirable properties ( unbiased , efficient , maximum likelihood), there is no single estimator for the standard deviation with all these properties, and unbiased estimation of standard deviation is a very technically involved problem. Most often, the standard " id="pdf-obj-4-2" src="pdf-obj-4-2.jpg">

Continuous random variable[edit]

Continuous random variable <a href=[ edit ] The standard deviation of a continuous real-valued random variable X with probability density function p ( x ) is and where the integrals are definite integrals taken for x ranging over the set of possible values of the random variable X . In the case of a parametric family of distributions , the standard deviation can be expressed in terms of the parameters. For example, in the case of the log-normal distribution with parameters μ and σ , the standard deviation is [(exp( σ ) − 1)exp(2 μ + σ )] . Estimation [ edit ] See also: Sample variance Main article: Unbiased estimation of standard deviation It has been suggested that portions of this section b e moved into Unbiased estimation of standard deviation . ( Discuss ) One can find the standard deviation of an entire population in cases (such as standardized testing ) where every member of a population is sampled. In cases where that cannot be done, the standard deviation σ is estimated by examining a random sample taken from the population and computing a statistic of the sample, which is used as an estimate of the population standard deviation. Such a statistic is called a n estimator , and the estimator (or the value of the estimator, namely the estimate) is called a sample standard deviation, and is denoted by s (possibly with modifiers). However, unlike in the case of estimating the population mean, for which the sample mean is a simple estimator with many desirable properties ( unbiased , efficient , maximum likelihood), there is no single estimator for the standard deviation with all these properties, and unbiased estimation of standard deviation is a very technically involved problem. Most often, the standard " id="pdf-obj-4-19" src="pdf-obj-4-19.jpg">

and where the integrals are definite integrals taken for x ranging over the set of possible values of the random variable X.

In the case of a parametric family of distributions, the standard deviation can be expressed in terms of the parameters. For example, in the case of the log-normal distribution with parameters μ and σ 2 , the standard deviation is [(exp(σ 2 ) 1)exp(2μ + σ 2 )] 1/2 .

Estimation[edit]

It has been suggested that portions of this section b <a href=e moved into Unbiased estimation of standard deviation . ( Discuss ) " id="pdf-obj-4-64" src="pdf-obj-4-64.jpg">

It has been suggested that portions of this section bemoved into Unbiased estimation of standard deviation. (Discuss)

   

One can find the standard deviation of an entire population in cases (such as standardized testing) where every member of a population is sampled. In cases where that cannot be done, the standard deviation σis estimated by examining a random sample taken from the population and computing a statistic of the sample, which is used as an estimate of the population standard deviation. Such a statistic is called anestimator, and the estimator (or the value of the estimator, namely the estimate) is called a sample standard deviation, and is denoted by s (possibly with modifiers). However, unlike in the case of estimating the population mean, for which the sample mean is a simple estimator with many desirable properties (unbiased, efficient, maximum likelihood), there is no single estimator for the standard deviation with all these properties, and unbiased estimation of standard deviation is a very technically involved problem. Most often, the standard

deviation is estimated using the corrected sample standard deviation (usingN 1), defined below, and this is often referred to as the "sample standard deviation", without qualifiers. However, other estimators are better in other respects: the uncorrected estimator (using N) yields lower mean squared error, while using N 1.5 (for the normal distribution) almost completely eliminates bias.

Uncorrected sample standard deviation[edit]

Firstly, the formula for the population standard deviation (of a finite population) can be applied to the sample, using the size of the sample as the size of the population (though the actual population size from which the sample is drawn may be much larger). This estimator, denoted by s N , is known as the uncorrected sample standard deviation, or sometimes the standard deviation of the sample (considered as the entire population), and is defined as follows: [citation needed]

deviation is estimated using the <a href=corrected sample standard deviation (using N − 1), defined below, and this is often referred to as the "sample standard deviation", without qualifiers. However, other estimators are better in other respects: the uncorrected estimator (using N ) yields lower mean squared error, while using N − 1.5 (for the normal distribution) almost completely eliminates bias. Uncorrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] Firstly, the formula for the population standard deviation (of a finite population) can be applied to the sample, using the size of the sample as the size of the population (though the actual population size from which the sample is drawn may be much larger). This estimator, denoted by s , is known as the uncorrected sample standard deviation , or sometimes the standard deviation of the sample (considered as the entire population), and is defined as follows: where are the observed values of the sample items and is the mean value of these observations, while the denominator N stands for the size of the sample: this is the square root of the sample variance, which is the average of the squared deviations about the sample mean. This is a consistent estimator (it converges in probability to the population value as the number of samples goes to infinity), and is the maximum-likelihood estimate when the population is normally distributed. However, this is a biased estimator , as the estimates are generally too low. The bias decreases as sample size grows, dropping off as 1/ n , and thus is most significant for small or moderate sample sizes; for the bias is below 1%. Thus for very large sample sizes, the uncorrected sample standard deviation is generally acceptable. This estimator also has a uniformly smalle r mean squared error than the corrected sample standard deviation. Corrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] When discussing the bias, to be more precise, the corresponding estimator for the variance , the biased sample variance : equivalently the second central moment of the sample (as the mean is the first moment), is a biased estimator of the variance (it underestimates the population variance). Taking the square root to pass to the standard deviation introduces " id="pdf-obj-5-34" src="pdf-obj-5-34.jpg">

where

deviation is estimated using the <a href=corrected sample standard deviation (using N − 1), defined below, and this is often referred to as the "sample standard deviation", without qualifiers. However, other estimators are better in other respects: the uncorrected estimator (using N ) yields lower mean squared error, while using N − 1.5 (for the normal distribution) almost completely eliminates bias. Uncorrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] Firstly, the formula for the population standard deviation (of a finite population) can be applied to the sample, using the size of the sample as the size of the population (though the actual population size from which the sample is drawn may be much larger). This estimator, denoted by s , is known as the uncorrected sample standard deviation , or sometimes the standard deviation of the sample (considered as the entire population), and is defined as follows: where are the observed values of the sample items and is the mean value of these observations, while the denominator N stands for the size of the sample: this is the square root of the sample variance, which is the average of the squared deviations about the sample mean. This is a consistent estimator (it converges in probability to the population value as the number of samples goes to infinity), and is the maximum-likelihood estimate when the population is normally distributed. However, this is a biased estimator , as the estimates are generally too low. The bias decreases as sample size grows, dropping off as 1/ n , and thus is most significant for small or moderate sample sizes; for the bias is below 1%. Thus for very large sample sizes, the uncorrected sample standard deviation is generally acceptable. This estimator also has a uniformly smalle r mean squared error than the corrected sample standard deviation. Corrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] When discussing the bias, to be more precise, the corresponding estimator for the variance , the biased sample variance : equivalently the second central moment of the sample (as the mean is the first moment), is a biased estimator of the variance (it underestimates the population variance). Taking the square root to pass to the standard deviation introduces " id="pdf-obj-5-38" src="pdf-obj-5-38.jpg">

are the observed values of the sample items and

deviation is estimated using the <a href=corrected sample standard deviation (using N − 1), defined below, and this is often referred to as the "sample standard deviation", without qualifiers. However, other estimators are better in other respects: the uncorrected estimator (using N ) yields lower mean squared error, while using N − 1.5 (for the normal distribution) almost completely eliminates bias. Uncorrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] Firstly, the formula for the population standard deviation (of a finite population) can be applied to the sample, using the size of the sample as the size of the population (though the actual population size from which the sample is drawn may be much larger). This estimator, denoted by s , is known as the uncorrected sample standard deviation , or sometimes the standard deviation of the sample (considered as the entire population), and is defined as follows: where are the observed values of the sample items and is the mean value of these observations, while the denominator N stands for the size of the sample: this is the square root of the sample variance, which is the average of the squared deviations about the sample mean. This is a consistent estimator (it converges in probability to the population value as the number of samples goes to infinity), and is the maximum-likelihood estimate when the population is normally distributed. However, this is a biased estimator , as the estimates are generally too low. The bias decreases as sample size grows, dropping off as 1/ n , and thus is most significant for small or moderate sample sizes; for the bias is below 1%. Thus for very large sample sizes, the uncorrected sample standard deviation is generally acceptable. This estimator also has a uniformly smalle r mean squared error than the corrected sample standard deviation. Corrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] When discussing the bias, to be more precise, the corresponding estimator for the variance , the biased sample variance : equivalently the second central moment of the sample (as the mean is the first moment), is a biased estimator of the variance (it underestimates the population variance). Taking the square root to pass to the standard deviation introduces " id="pdf-obj-5-42" src="pdf-obj-5-42.jpg">

is the mean

value of these observations, while the denominator N stands for the size of the sample: this is the square root of the sample variance, which is the average of the squared deviations about the sample mean.

This is a consistent estimator (it converges in probability to the population value as the number of samples goes to infinity), and is the maximum-likelihood estimate when the population is normally distributed. [citation needed] However, this is a biased estimator, as the estimates are generally too low. The bias decreases as

sample size grows, dropping off as 1/n, and thus is most significant for small or

moderate sample sizes; for

deviation is estimated using the <a href=corrected sample standard deviation (using N − 1), defined below, and this is often referred to as the "sample standard deviation", without qualifiers. However, other estimators are better in other respects: the uncorrected estimator (using N ) yields lower mean squared error, while using N − 1.5 (for the normal distribution) almost completely eliminates bias. Uncorrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] Firstly, the formula for the population standard deviation (of a finite population) can be applied to the sample, using the size of the sample as the size of the population (though the actual population size from which the sample is drawn may be much larger). This estimator, denoted by s , is known as the uncorrected sample standard deviation , or sometimes the standard deviation of the sample (considered as the entire population), and is defined as follows: where are the observed values of the sample items and is the mean value of these observations, while the denominator N stands for the size of the sample: this is the square root of the sample variance, which is the average of the squared deviations about the sample mean. This is a consistent estimator (it converges in probability to the population value as the number of samples goes to infinity), and is the maximum-likelihood estimate when the population is normally distributed. However, this is a biased estimator , as the estimates are generally too low. The bias decreases as sample size grows, dropping off as 1/ n , and thus is most significant for small or moderate sample sizes; for the bias is below 1%. Thus for very large sample sizes, the uncorrected sample standard deviation is generally acceptable. This estimator also has a uniformly smalle r mean squared error than the corrected sample standard deviation. Corrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] When discussing the bias, to be more precise, the corresponding estimator for the variance , the biased sample variance : equivalently the second central moment of the sample (as the mean is the first moment), is a biased estimator of the variance (it underestimates the population variance). Taking the square root to pass to the standard deviation introduces " id="pdf-obj-5-72" src="pdf-obj-5-72.jpg">

the bias is below 1%. Thus for very large

sample sizes, the uncorrected sample standard deviation is generally acceptable. This estimator also has a uniformly smallermean squared error than the corrected sample standard deviation.

Corrected sample standard deviation[edit]

When discussing the bias, to be more precise, the corresponding estimator for the variance, the biased sample variance:

deviation is estimated using the <a href=corrected sample standard deviation (using N − 1), defined below, and this is often referred to as the "sample standard deviation", without qualifiers. However, other estimators are better in other respects: the uncorrected estimator (using N ) yields lower mean squared error, while using N − 1.5 (for the normal distribution) almost completely eliminates bias. Uncorrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] Firstly, the formula for the population standard deviation (of a finite population) can be applied to the sample, using the size of the sample as the size of the population (though the actual population size from which the sample is drawn may be much larger). This estimator, denoted by s , is known as the uncorrected sample standard deviation , or sometimes the standard deviation of the sample (considered as the entire population), and is defined as follows: where are the observed values of the sample items and is the mean value of these observations, while the denominator N stands for the size of the sample: this is the square root of the sample variance, which is the average of the squared deviations about the sample mean. This is a consistent estimator (it converges in probability to the population value as the number of samples goes to infinity), and is the maximum-likelihood estimate when the population is normally distributed. However, this is a biased estimator , as the estimates are generally too low. The bias decreases as sample size grows, dropping off as 1/ n , and thus is most significant for small or moderate sample sizes; for the bias is below 1%. Thus for very large sample sizes, the uncorrected sample standard deviation is generally acceptable. This estimator also has a uniformly smalle r mean squared error than the corrected sample standard deviation. Corrected sample standard deviation [ edit ] When discussing the bias, to be more precise, the corresponding estimator for the variance , the biased sample variance : equivalently the second central moment of the sample (as the mean is the first moment), is a biased estimator of the variance (it underestimates the population variance). Taking the square root to pass to the standard deviation introduces " id="pdf-obj-5-94" src="pdf-obj-5-94.jpg">

equivalently the second central moment of the sample (as the mean is the first moment), is a biased estimator of the variance (it underestimates the population variance). Taking the square root to pass to the standard deviation introduces

further downward bias, by Jensen's inequality, due to the square root being a concave function. The bias in the variance is easily corrected, but the bias from the square root is more difficult to correct, and depends on the distribution in question.

An unbiased estimator for the variance is given by applying Bessel's correction, using N 1 instead of N to yield the unbiased sample variance, denoted s 2 :

further downward bias, by <a href=Jensen's inequality , due to the square root being a concave function. The bias in the variance is easily corrected, but the bias from the square root is more difficult to correct, and depends on the distribution in question. An unbiased estimator for the variance is given by applying Bessel's correction , using N − 1 instead of N to yield the unbiased sample variance, denoted s : This estimator is unbiased if the variance exists and the sample values are drawn independently with replacement. N − 1 corresponds to the number of degrees of freedom in the vector of residuals , Taking square roots reintroduces bias, and yields the corrected sample standard deviation, denoted by s: While s is an unbiased estimator for the population variance, s is a biased estimator for the population standard deviation, though markedly less biased than the uncorrected sample standard deviation. The bias is still significant for small samples ( n less than 10), and also drops off as 1/ n as sample size increases. This estimator is commonly used, and generally known simply as the "sample standard deviation". Unbiased sample standard deviation [ edit ] For unbiased estimation of standard deviation , there is no formula that works across all distributions, unlike for mean and variance. Instead, s is used as a basis, and is scaled by a correction factor to produce an unbiased estimate. For the normal distribution, an unbiased estimator is given by s / c , where the correction factor (which depends on N ) is given in terms of the Gamma function , and equals: This arises because the sampling distribution of the sample standard deviation follows a (scaled) chi distribution , and the correction factor is the mean of the chi distribution. An approximation is given by replacing N − 1 with N − 1.5, yielding: " id="pdf-obj-6-24" src="pdf-obj-6-24.jpg">

This estimator is unbiased if the variance exists and the sample values are drawn independently with replacement. N 1 corresponds to the number of degrees of freedom in the vector of residuals,

further downward bias, by <a href=Jensen's inequality , due to the square root being a concave function. The bias in the variance is easily corrected, but the bias from the square root is more difficult to correct, and depends on the distribution in question. An unbiased estimator for the variance is given by applying Bessel's correction , using N − 1 instead of N to yield the unbiased sample variance, denoted s : This estimator is unbiased if the variance exists and the sample values are drawn independently with replacement. N − 1 corresponds to the number of degrees of freedom in the vector of residuals , Taking square roots reintroduces bias, and yields the corrected sample standard deviation, denoted by s: While s is an unbiased estimator for the population variance, s is a biased estimator for the population standard deviation, though markedly less biased than the uncorrected sample standard deviation. The bias is still significant for small samples ( n less than 10), and also drops off as 1/ n as sample size increases. This estimator is commonly used, and generally known simply as the "sample standard deviation". Unbiased sample standard deviation [ edit ] For unbiased estimation of standard deviation , there is no formula that works across all distributions, unlike for mean and variance. Instead, s is used as a basis, and is scaled by a correction factor to produce an unbiased estimate. For the normal distribution, an unbiased estimator is given by s / c , where the correction factor (which depends on N ) is given in terms of the Gamma function , and equals: This arises because the sampling distribution of the sample standard deviation follows a (scaled) chi distribution , and the correction factor is the mean of the chi distribution. An approximation is given by replacing N − 1 with N − 1.5, yielding: " id="pdf-obj-6-35" src="pdf-obj-6-35.jpg">

Taking square roots reintroduces bias, and yields the corrected sample standard deviation, denoted by s:

further downward bias, by <a href=Jensen's inequality , due to the square root being a concave function. The bias in the variance is easily corrected, but the bias from the square root is more difficult to correct, and depends on the distribution in question. An unbiased estimator for the variance is given by applying Bessel's correction , using N − 1 instead of N to yield the unbiased sample variance, denoted s : This estimator is unbiased if the variance exists and the sample values are drawn independently with replacement. N − 1 corresponds to the number of degrees of freedom in the vector of residuals , Taking square roots reintroduces bias, and yields the corrected sample standard deviation, denoted by s: While s is an unbiased estimator for the population variance, s is a biased estimator for the population standard deviation, though markedly less biased than the uncorrected sample standard deviation. The bias is still significant for small samples ( n less than 10), and also drops off as 1/ n as sample size increases. This estimator is commonly used, and generally known simply as the "sample standard deviation". Unbiased sample standard deviation [ edit ] For unbiased estimation of standard deviation , there is no formula that works across all distributions, unlike for mean and variance. Instead, s is used as a basis, and is scaled by a correction factor to produce an unbiased estimate. For the normal distribution, an unbiased estimator is given by s / c , where the correction factor (which depends on N ) is given in terms of the Gamma function , and equals: This arises because the sampling distribution of the sample standard deviation follows a (scaled) chi distribution , and the correction factor is the mean of the chi distribution. An approximation is given by replacing N − 1 with N − 1.5, yielding: " id="pdf-obj-6-42" src="pdf-obj-6-42.jpg">

While s 2 is an unbiased estimator for the population variance, s is a biased estimator for the population standard deviation, though markedly less biased than the uncorrected sample standard deviation. The bias is still significant for small samples (n less than 10), and also drops off as 1/n as sample size increases. This estimator is commonly used, and generally known simply as the "sample standard deviation".

Unbiased sample standard deviation[edit]

For unbiased estimation of standard deviation, there is no formula that works across all distributions, unlike for mean and variance. Instead, s is used as a basis, and is scaled by a correction factor to produce an unbiased estimate. For the normal distribution, an unbiased estimator is given by s/c 4 , where the correction factor (which depends on N) is given in terms of the Gamma function, and equals:

further downward bias, by <a href=Jensen's inequality , due to the square root being a concave function. The bias in the variance is easily corrected, but the bias from the square root is more difficult to correct, and depends on the distribution in question. An unbiased estimator for the variance is given by applying Bessel's correction , using N − 1 instead of N to yield the unbiased sample variance, denoted s : This estimator is unbiased if the variance exists and the sample values are drawn independently with replacement. N − 1 corresponds to the number of degrees of freedom in the vector of residuals , Taking square roots reintroduces bias, and yields the corrected sample standard deviation, denoted by s: While s is an unbiased estimator for the population variance, s is a biased estimator for the population standard deviation, though markedly less biased than the uncorrected sample standard deviation. The bias is still significant for small samples ( n less than 10), and also drops off as 1/ n as sample size increases. This estimator is commonly used, and generally known simply as the "sample standard deviation". Unbiased sample standard deviation [ edit ] For unbiased estimation of standard deviation , there is no formula that works across all distributions, unlike for mean and variance. Instead, s is used as a basis, and is scaled by a correction factor to produce an unbiased estimate. For the normal distribution, an unbiased estimator is given by s / c , where the correction factor (which depends on N ) is given in terms of the Gamma function , and equals: This arises because the sampling distribution of the sample standard deviation follows a (scaled) chi distribution , and the correction factor is the mean of the chi distribution. An approximation is given by replacing N − 1 with N − 1.5, yielding: " id="pdf-obj-6-77" src="pdf-obj-6-77.jpg">

This arises because the sampling distribution of the sample standard deviation follows a (scaled) chi distribution, and the correction factor is the mean of the chi distribution.

An approximation is given by replacing N 1 with N 1.5, yielding:

The error in this approximation decays quadratically (as 1/ N ), and it is suited forexcess kurtosis . The excess kurtosis may be either known beforehand for certain distributions, or estimated from the data. Confidence interval of a sampled standard deviation [ edit ] See also: Margin of error and Variance § Distribution of the sample variance The standard deviation we obtain by sampling a distribution is itself not absolutely accurate, both for mathematical reasons (explained here by the confidence interval) and for practical reasons of measurement (measurement error). The mathematical effect can be described by the confidence interval or CI. To show how a larger sample will increase the confidence interval, consider the following examples: For a small population of N=2, the 95% CI of the SD is from 0.45*SD to 31.9*SD. In other words, the standard deviation of the distribution in 95% of the cases can be larger by a factor of 31 or smaller by a factor of 2. For a larger population of N=10, the CI is 0.69*SD to 1.83*SD. So even with a sample population of 10, the actual SD can still be almost a factor 2 higher than the sampled SD. For a sample population N=100, this is down to 0.88*SD to 1.16*SD. To be more certain that the sampled SD is close to the actual SD we need to sample a large number of points. Identities and mathematical properties [ edit ] The standard deviation is invariant under changes in location , and scales directly with the scale of the random variable. Thus, for a constant c and random variables X and Y : " id="pdf-obj-7-2" src="pdf-obj-7-2.jpg">

The error in this approximation decays quadratically (as 1/N 2 ), and it is suited for all but the smallest samples or highest precision: for n = 3 the bias is equal to 1.3%, and for n = 9 the bias is already less than 0.1%.

For other distributions, the correct formula depends on the distribution, but a rule of thumb is to use the further refinement of the approximation:

The error in this approximation decays quadratically (as 1/ N ), and it is suited forexcess kurtosis . The excess kurtosis may be either known beforehand for certain distributions, or estimated from the data. Confidence interval of a sampled standard deviation [ edit ] See also: Margin of error and Variance § Distribution of the sample variance The standard deviation we obtain by sampling a distribution is itself not absolutely accurate, both for mathematical reasons (explained here by the confidence interval) and for practical reasons of measurement (measurement error). The mathematical effect can be described by the confidence interval or CI. To show how a larger sample will increase the confidence interval, consider the following examples: For a small population of N=2, the 95% CI of the SD is from 0.45*SD to 31.9*SD. In other words, the standard deviation of the distribution in 95% of the cases can be larger by a factor of 31 or smaller by a factor of 2. For a larger population of N=10, the CI is 0.69*SD to 1.83*SD. So even with a sample population of 10, the actual SD can still be almost a factor 2 higher than the sampled SD. For a sample population N=100, this is down to 0.88*SD to 1.16*SD. To be more certain that the sampled SD is close to the actual SD we need to sample a large number of points. Identities and mathematical properties [ edit ] The standard deviation is invariant under changes in location , and scales directly with the scale of the random variable. Thus, for a constant c and random variables X and Y : " id="pdf-obj-7-11" src="pdf-obj-7-11.jpg">

where γ 2 denotes the population excess kurtosis. The excess kurtosis may be either known beforehand for certain distributions, or estimated from the data.

Confidence interval of a sampled standard deviation[edit]

The standard deviation we obtain by sampling a distribution is itself not absolutely accurate, both for mathematical reasons (explained here by the confidence interval) and for practical reasons of measurement (measurement error). The mathematical effect can be described by the confidence interval or CI. To show how a larger sample will increase the confidence interval, consider the following examples: For a small population of N=2, the 95% CI of the SD is from 0.45*SD to 31.9*SD. In other words, the standard deviation of the distribution in 95% of the cases can be larger by a factor of 31 or smaller by a factor of 2. For a larger population of N=10, the CI is 0.69*SD to 1.83*SD. So even with a sample population of 10, the actual SD can still be almost a factor 2 higher than the sampled SD. For a sample population N=100, this is down to 0.88*SD to 1.16*SD. To be more certain that the sampled SD is close to the actual SD we need to sample a large number of points.

Identities and mathematical properties[edit]

The standard deviation is invariant under changes in location, and scales directly with the scale of the random variable. Thus, for a constant c and random variables X and Y:

The error in this approximation decays quadratically (as 1/ N ), and it is suited forexcess kurtosis . The excess kurtosis may be either known beforehand for certain distributions, or estimated from the data. Confidence interval of a sampled standard deviation [ edit ] See also: Margin of error and Variance § Distribution of the sample variance The standard deviation we obtain by sampling a distribution is itself not absolutely accurate, both for mathematical reasons (explained here by the confidence interval) and for practical reasons of measurement (measurement error). The mathematical effect can be described by the confidence interval or CI. To show how a larger sample will increase the confidence interval, consider the following examples: For a small population of N=2, the 95% CI of the SD is from 0.45*SD to 31.9*SD. In other words, the standard deviation of the distribution in 95% of the cases can be larger by a factor of 31 or smaller by a factor of 2. For a larger population of N=10, the CI is 0.69*SD to 1.83*SD. So even with a sample population of 10, the actual SD can still be almost a factor 2 higher than the sampled SD. For a sample population N=100, this is down to 0.88*SD to 1.16*SD. To be more certain that the sampled SD is close to the actual SD we need to sample a large number of points. Identities and mathematical properties [ edit ] The standard deviation is invariant under changes in location , and scales directly with the scale of the random variable. Thus, for a constant c and random variables X and Y : " id="pdf-obj-7-53" src="pdf-obj-7-53.jpg">

The standard deviation of the sum of two random variables can be related to their individual standard deviations and the covariance between them:

where and

stand for variance and covariance, respectively.

The calculation of the sum of squared deviations can be related to moments calculated directly from the data. The standard deviation of the population can be computed as:

The sample standard deviation can be computed as:

For a finite population with equal probabilities at all points, we have

This means that the standard deviation is equal to the square root of (the average of the squares less the square of the average). See computational formula for the variance for proof, and for an analogous result for the sample standard deviation.

Interpretation and application[edit]

Example of samples from two populations with the same mean and different standard deviations. Red population has mean 100 and SD 10; blue population has mean 100 and SD 50.

A large standard deviation indicates that the data points can spread far from the mean and a small standard deviation indicates that they are clustered closely around the mean.

For example, each of the three populations {0, 0, 14, 14}, {0, 6, 8, 14} and {6, 6, 8, 8} has a mean of 7. Their standard deviations are 7, 5, and 1, respectively. The third population has a much smaller standard deviation than the other two because its values are all close to 7. It will have the same units as the data points themselves. If, for instance, the data set {0, 6, 8, 14} represents the ages of a population of four siblings in years, the standard deviation is 5 years. As another example, the population {1000, 1006, 1008, 1014} may represent the distances traveled by four athletes, measured in meters. It has a mean of 1007 meters, and a standard deviation of 5 meters.

Standard deviation may serve as a measure of uncertainty. In physical science, for example, the reported standard deviation of a group of repeated measurements gives the precision of those measurements. When deciding whether measurements agree with a theoretical prediction, the standard deviation of those measurements is of crucial importance: if the mean of the measurements is too far away from the prediction (with the distance measured in standard deviations), then the theory being tested probably needs to be revised. This makes sense since they fall outside the range of values that could reasonably be expected to occur, if the prediction were correct and the standard deviation appropriately quantified. See prediction interval.

While the standard deviation does measure how far typical values tend to be from the mean, other measures are available. An example is the mean absolute

deviation, which might be considered a more direct measure of average distance, compared to the root mean square distance inherent in the standard deviation.

Application examples[edit]

The practical value of understanding the standard deviation of a set of values is in appreciating how much variation there is from the average (mean).

Weather[edit]

As a simple example, consider the average daily maximum temperatures for two cities, one inland and one on the coast. It is helpful to understand that the range of daily maximum temperatures for cities near the coast is smaller than for cities inland. Thus, while these two cities may each have the same average maximum temperature, the standard deviation of the daily maximum temperature for the coastal city will be less than that of the inland city as, on any particular day, the actual maximum temperature is more likely to be farther from the average maximum temperature for the inland city than for the coastal one.

Particle physics[edit]

Particle physics uses a standard of "5 sigma" for the declaration of a discovery. [4] At five-sigma there is only one chance in nearly two million that a random fluctuation would yield the result. This level of certainty prompted the announcement that a particle consistent with the Higgs boson has been discovered in two independent experiments at CERN. [5]

Finance[edit]

In finance, standard deviation is often used as a measure of the risk associated with price-fluctuations of a given asset (stocks, bonds, property, etc.), or the risk of a portfolio of assets [6] (actively managed mutual funds, index mutual funds, or ETFs). Risk is an important factor in determining how to efficiently manage a portfolio of investments because it determines the variation in returns on the asset and/or portfolio and gives investors a mathematical basis for investment decisions (known as mean-variance optimization). The fundamental concept of risk is that as it increases, the expected return on an investment should increase as well, an increase known as the risk premium. In other words, investors should expect a higher return on an investment when that investment carries a higher level of risk or uncertainty. When evaluating investments, investors should estimate both the expected return and the uncertainty of future returns. Standard deviation provides a quantified estimate of the uncertainty of future returns.

For example, let's assume an investor had to choose between two stocks. Stock A over the past 20 years had an average return of 10 percent, with a standard deviation of 20 percentage points (pp) and Stock B, over the same period, had

average returns of 12 percent but a higher standard deviation of 30 pp. On the basis of risk and return, an investor may decide that Stock A is the safer choice, because Stock B's additional two percentage points of return is not worth the additional 10 pp standard deviation (greater risk or uncertainty of the expected return). Stock B is likely to fall short of the initial investment (but also to exceed the initial investment) more often than Stock A under the same circumstances, and is estimated to return only two percent more on average. In this example, Stock A is expected to earn about 10 percent, plus or minus 20 pp (a range of 30 percent to −10 percent), about two-thirds of the future year returns. When considering more extreme possible returns or outcomes in future, an investor should expect results of

as much as 10 percent plus or minus 60 pp, or a range from 70 percent to −50

percent, which includes outcomes for three standard deviations from the average return (about 99.7 percent of probable returns).

Calculating the average (or arithmetic mean) of the return of a security over a given period will generate the expected return of the asset. For each period, subtracting the expected return from the actual return results in the difference from the mean. Squaring the difference in each period and taking the average gives the overall variance of the return of the asset. The larger the variance, the greater risk the security carries. Finding the square root of this variance will give the standard deviation of the investment tool in question.

Population standard deviation is used to set the width of Bollinger Bands, a widely adopted technical analysis tool. For example, the upper Bollinger Band is given as x + x . The most commonly used value for n is 2; there is about a five percent chance of going outside, assuming a normal distribution of returns.

Financial time series are known to be non-stationary series, whereas the statistical calculations above, such as standard deviation, apply only to stationary series. To apply the above statistical tools to non-stationary series, the series first must be transformed to a stationary series, e

Standard Deviation and Variance

Deviation just means how far from the normal

Standard Deviation

The Standard Deviation is a measure of how spread out numbers are.

Its symbol is σ (the greek letter sigma)

The formula is easy: it is the square root of the Variance. So now you ask, "What is the Variance?"

Variance

The Variance is defined as:

The average of the squared differences from the Mean.

To calculate the variance follow these steps:

Work out the Mean (the simple average of the numbers)

Then for each number: subtract the Mean and square the result (the squared difference).

Then work out the average of those squared differences. (Why Square?)

Example

You and your friends have just measured the heights of your dogs (in millimeters):

The heights (at the shoulders) are: 600mm, 470mm, 170mm, 430mm and

300mm.

Find out the Mean, the Variance, and the Standard Deviation.

Your first step is to find the Mean:

Answer:

600 + 470 + 170 + 430 + 300

Mean =

5

=

1970

5

= 394

so the mean (average) height is 394 mm. Let's plot this on the chart:

Now we calculate each dog's difference from the Mean:

Now we calculate each dog's difference from the Mean: To calculate the Variance, take each difference,

To calculate the Variance, take each difference, square it, and then average the result:

Now we calculate each dog's difference from the Mean: To calculate the Variance, take each difference,

So, the Variance is 21,704.

And the Standard Deviation is just the square root of Variance, so:

Standard Deviation: σ = √21,704 = 147.32 nearest mm)

...

= 147 (to the

And the good thing about the Standard Deviation is that it is useful. Now we can show which heights are within one Standard Deviation (147mm) of the

Mean:

Mean: So, using the Standard Deviation we have a "standard" way of knowing what is normal,Standard Deviation Calculator . But ... there is a small change with Sample Data Our example was for a Population (the 5 dogs were the only dogs we were interested in). But if the data is a Sample (a selection taken from a bigger Population), then the calculation changes! When you have "N" data values that are:  The Population : divide by N when calculating Variance (like we did)  A Sample : divide by N-1 when calculating Variance All other calculations stay the same, including how we calculated the mean. Example: if our 5 dogs were just a sample of a bigger population of dogs, we would divide by 4 instead of 5 like this: " id="pdf-obj-15-4" src="pdf-obj-15-4.jpg">

So, using the Standard Deviation we have a "standard" way of knowing what is normal, and what is extra large or extra small.

Rottweilers are tall dogs. And Dachshunds are a bit short them!

...

but don't tell

Mean: So, using the Standard Deviation we have a "standard" way of knowing what is normal,Standard Deviation Calculator . But ... there is a small change with Sample Data Our example was for a Population (the 5 dogs were the only dogs we were interested in). But if the data is a Sample (a selection taken from a bigger Population), then the calculation changes! When you have "N" data values that are:  The Population : divide by N when calculating Variance (like we did)  A Sample : divide by N-1 when calculating Variance All other calculations stay the same, including how we calculated the mean. Example: if our 5 dogs were just a sample of a bigger population of dogs, we would divide by 4 instead of 5 like this: " id="pdf-obj-15-18" src="pdf-obj-15-18.jpg">

But

...

there is a small change with Sample Data

Our example was for a Population (the 5 dogs were the only dogs we were interested in).

But if the data is a Sample (a selection taken from a bigger Population), then the calculation changes!

When you have "N" data values that are:

The Population: divide by N when calculating Variance (like we did)

A Sample: divide by N-1 when calculating Variance

All other calculations stay the same, including how we calculated the mean.

Sample Variance = 108,520 /

4

= 27,130

Sample Standard Deviation = √27,130 = 164 (to the nearest mm)

Think of it as a "correction" when your data is only a sample.

Formulas

Here are the two formulas, explained at want to know more:

if you

The "Population Standard Deviation":

Sample Variance = 108,520 / 4 = 27,130 Sample Standard Deviation = √27,130 = 164 (toStandard Deviation Formulas if you The " Population Standard Deviation": The " Sample Standard Deviation ": Looks complicated, but the important change is to divide by N-1 (instead of N ) when calculating a Sample Variance. *Footnote: Why square the differences? If we just added up the differences from the mean cancel the positives: ... the negatives would 4 + 4 - 4 - 4 = 0 4 So that won't work. How about we use absolute values ? " id="pdf-obj-16-33" src="pdf-obj-16-33.jpg">

The "Sample Standard Deviation":

Sample Variance = 108,520 / 4 = 27,130 Sample Standard Deviation = √27,130 = 164 (toStandard Deviation Formulas if you The " Population Standard Deviation": The " Sample Standard Deviation ": Looks complicated, but the important change is to divide by N-1 (instead of N ) when calculating a Sample Variance. *Footnote: Why square the differences? If we just added up the differences from the mean cancel the positives: ... the negatives would 4 + 4 - 4 - 4 = 0 4 So that won't work. How about we use absolute values ? " id="pdf-obj-16-40" src="pdf-obj-16-40.jpg">

Looks complicated, but the important change is to divide by N-1 (instead of N) when calculating a Sample Variance.

*Footnote: Why square the differences?

If we just added up the differences from the mean cancel the positives:

...

the negatives would

Sample Variance = 108,520 / 4 = 27,130 Sample Standard Deviation = √27,130 = 164 (toStandard Deviation Formulas if you The " Population Standard Deviation": The " Sample Standard Deviation ": Looks complicated, but the important change is to divide by N-1 (instead of N ) when calculating a Sample Variance. *Footnote: Why square the differences? If we just added up the differences from the mean cancel the positives: ... the negatives would 4 + 4 - 4 - 4 = 0 4 So that won't work. How about we use absolute values ? " id="pdf-obj-16-59" src="pdf-obj-16-59.jpg">
4 + 4 - 4 - 4 = 0
4 + 4 - 4 - 4
= 0

4

So that won't work. How about we use

?

|4| + |4| + |-4| + |-4| 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = 4Mean Deviation ) , but what about this case: |7| + |1| + |-6| + |-2| 7 + 1 + 6 + 2 = 4 4 = 4 Oh No! It also gives a value of 4, Even though the differences are more spread out! So let us try squaring each difference (and taking the square root at the end): √ 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = √ 64 = 4 4 4 √ 7 + 1 + 6 + 2 = √ 90 ... = 4.74 4 4 That is nice! The Standard Deviation is bigger when the differences are more spread out just what we want! In fact this method is a similar idea to distance between points , just applied in a different way. And it is easier to use algebra on squares and square roots than absolute values, which makes the standard deviation easy to use in other areas of mathematics. Return to Top " id="pdf-obj-17-2" src="pdf-obj-17-2.jpg">

|4| + |4| + |-4| + |-4|

  • 4 + 4 + 4 + 4

=

  • 4 4

=

4
4
|4| + |4| + |-4| + |-4| 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = 4Mean Deviation ) , but what about this case: |7| + |1| + |-6| + |-2| 7 + 1 + 6 + 2 = 4 4 = 4 Oh No! It also gives a value of 4, Even though the differences are more spread out! So let us try squaring each difference (and taking the square root at the end): √ 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = √ 64 = 4 4 4 √ 7 + 1 + 6 + 2 = √ 90 ... = 4.74 4 4 That is nice! The Standard Deviation is bigger when the differences are more spread out just what we want! In fact this method is a similar idea to distance between points , just applied in a different way. And it is easier to use algebra on squares and square roots than absolute values, which makes the standard deviation easy to use in other areas of mathematics. Return to Top " id="pdf-obj-17-19" src="pdf-obj-17-19.jpg">

That looks good (and is the

), but what about this case:

|4| + |4| + |-4| + |-4| 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = 4Mean Deviation ) , but what about this case: |7| + |1| + |-6| + |-2| 7 + 1 + 6 + 2 = 4 4 = 4 Oh No! It also gives a value of 4, Even though the differences are more spread out! So let us try squaring each difference (and taking the square root at the end): √ 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = √ 64 = 4 4 4 √ 7 + 1 + 6 + 2 = √ 90 ... = 4.74 4 4 That is nice! The Standard Deviation is bigger when the differences are more spread out just what we want! In fact this method is a similar idea to distance between points , just applied in a different way. And it is easier to use algebra on squares and square roots than absolute values, which makes the standard deviation easy to use in other areas of mathematics. Return to Top " id="pdf-obj-17-30" src="pdf-obj-17-30.jpg">

|7| + |1| + |-6| + |-2|

  • 7 + 1 + 6 + 2

=

  • 4 4

=

4
4

Oh No! It also gives a value of 4, Even though the differences are more spread out!

So let us try squaring each difference (and taking the square root at the end):

|4| + |4| + |-4| + |-4| 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = 4Mean Deviation ) , but what about this case: |7| + |1| + |-6| + |-2| 7 + 1 + 6 + 2 = 4 4 = 4 Oh No! It also gives a value of 4, Even though the differences are more spread out! So let us try squaring each difference (and taking the square root at the end): √ 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = √ 64 = 4 4 4 √ 7 + 1 + 6 + 2 = √ 90 ... = 4.74 4 4 That is nice! The Standard Deviation is bigger when the differences are more spread out just what we want! In fact this method is a similar idea to distance between points , just applied in a different way. And it is easier to use algebra on squares and square roots than absolute values, which makes the standard deviation easy to use in other areas of mathematics. Return to Top " id="pdf-obj-17-52" src="pdf-obj-17-52.jpg">

4 2 + 4 2 + 4 2 + 4 2 = 64

= 4
= 4
  • 4 4

 
√ 7 + 1 + 6 + 2 = √ 90 ... = 4.74

7 2 + 1 2 + 6 2 + 2 2 = 90

  • ...

=

4.74

 
 
  • 4 4

That is nice! The Standard Deviation is bigger when the differences are more

spread out

just what we want!

 

In fact this method is a similar idea to

, just applied

in a different way.

 

And it is easier to use algebra on squares and square roots than absolute values, which makes the standard deviation easy to use in other areas of mathematics.

   

Find Standard Deviation in Excel 2013: STDEV function

Step 1: Type data into a single column. Step 2: Click an empty cell. Step 3: Type “=STDEV(A1:A100)” — where A1:A100 is the cell locations of your data and then click “OK.”

Find Standard Deviation in Excel 2013: Data Analysis

Step 1: Click the “Data” tab and then click “Data Analysis.” Step 2: Click “Descriptive Statistics” and then click “OK.” Step 3: Click the Input Range box and then type the location for your data. For example, if you typed your data into cells A1 to A10, type “A1:A10″ into that box Step 4: Click the radio button for Rows or Columns, depending on how your data is laid out. Step 5: Click the “Labels in first row” box if your data has column headers. Step 6: Click the “Descriptive Statistics” check box. Step 7: Select a location for your output. For example, click the “New Worksheet” radio button. Step 8: Click “OK.”

STDEV

Estimates standard deviation based on a sample. The standard deviation is a measure of how widely values are dispersed from the average value (the mean).

Syntax STDEV(number1,number2, ) ...

Number1, number2, ...

are 1 to 30 number arguments

corresponding to a sample of a population. You can also use a single array or a reference to an array instead of arguments separated by commas.

Remarks

STDEV assumes that its arguments are a sample of the

population. If your data represents the entire population, then compute the standard deviation using STDEVP. The standard deviation is calculated using the "n-1" method.

Arguments can either be numbers or names, arrays, or

references that contain numbers. Logical values and text representations of numbers that you

type directly into the list of arguments are counted. If an argument is an array or reference, only numbers in that

array or reference are counted. Empty cells, logical values, text, or error values in the array or reference are ignored. Arguments that are error values or text that cannot be translated into numbers cause errors.

If you want to include logical values and text representations

of numbers in a reference as part of the calculation, use the STDEVA function. STDEV uses the following formula:

 If you want to include logical values and text representations  of numbers in aHow to copy an example A 1 Strength 2 1345 3 1301 4 5 1368 6 1322 7 1310 8 9 1370 10 1318 " id="pdf-obj-20-14" src="pdf-obj-20-14.jpg">

where x is the sample mean AVERAGE(number1,number2,…)

and n is the sample size.

Example

Suppose 10 tools stamped from the same machine during a production run are collected as a random sample and measured for breaking strength.

The example may be easier to understand if you copy it to a blank worksheet.

 

A

1

Strength

2

 

1345

 

3

 

1301

4

 

5

1368

 

6

1322

7

1310

8

     

9

1370

10

1318

 
     

11

1350

 

1303

 

1299

Formula

Description (Result)

 

=STDEV(A2:A11)

Standard deviation of breaking strength

(27.46391572)

There are a total of six different built-in functions for calculating standard deviation in Excel, so it can be confusing when deciding which function to use.

The main differences between the Excel standard deviation functions are:

whether the sample standard deviation or the population standard deviation is calculated.

whether text and the logical values, supplied as a part of an array (or stored in a supplied range of cells) are ignored or are treated as having values. Details of the differences are outlined in Table 2 below. Also, Excel 2010 has renamed two of the standard deviation functions from older versions of Excel. However, to maintain compatibility with older versions, Excel 2010 has also kept the old named functions, which it stores in its list of "Compatibility" functions.

Functions for Calculating Standard Deviation in Excel

The following table provides a description of the different types of standard deviation function. This will help you to decide which of the functions should be used when calculating a standard deviation in Excel.

       

Function

Version of Excel

Population or Sample Standard Deviation

Treatment of text & logical values

       
  • 2010 Sample

 

Ignored

(new function in Excel 2010 - replaces the old STDEV function)

 
   
       
  • 2003 & 2007

Sample

Ignored

(kept in Excel 2010 for compatibility, but may be discontinued in future versions of Excel)

 
   
       

2003, 2007 & 2010

Sample

Assigned values (see Table 2)

       
  • 2010 Population

Ignored

(new function in Excel 2010 - replaces the old STDEVP function)

 
   
       
  • 2003 & 2007

Population

Ignored

 

(kept in Excel 2010 for compatibility, but may be discontinued in future versions of Excel)

 

2003, 2007 & 2010

Population

Assigned values (see Table 2)

STDEV.S vs. STDEVA and STDEV.P vs. STDEVPA

The STDEV.S and STDEVA functions, and the STDEV.P and STDEVPA differ only in the way they handle text and logical values that are supplied as a part of an array or range of cells.

For example, if a range of cells containing the logical value TRUE is supplied to the STDEV function, this will return a different result to the same range of cells supplied to the STDEVA function.

The treatment of text and logical values supplied to the standard deviation functions is shown in the following table:

Table2: Treatment of text & logical values supplied to Excel standard deviation functions

     

Argument Type

STDEV.S, STDEV, STDEV.P & STDEVP

STDEVA & STDEVPA

     
     

Logical values, within arrays or reference arguments

Ignored

ARE counted (TRUE=1, FALSE=0)

     
     

Text (including empty text "", text representations of numbers, or other text), within arrays or reference arguments

Ignored

Counted as zero

     
     

Empty Cells

Ignored

Ignored

     

Logical values or text representations of numbers, typed directly into the list of arguments

ARE counted (TRUE=1, FALSE=0)

ARE counted (TRUE=1, FALSE=0)

   
     

Text that cannot be

#VALUE! error

#VALUE! error

interpreted as a number, typed directly into the list of arguments
interpreted as a number,
typed directly into the list of
arguments