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Volume 11

STORY

February 1971

Humber 2

ISOTIIKI® M

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It

seemed

to

several

seconds

hover

like

a

in

midair

for

ball

of

fire.

Then it disappeared behind the beauti ful range of hills to the north of Sinoia.

Ivan Martin and I were

on our way

to

visit an African family and were amazed at such a sight. What was it?? We still

don't

know.

Other sightings of a spiritual nature have been amazing as well. Where are

they from?? We do know!! It is the power of the Holy Spirit working through the

Word of God causing them. For example,

during the first week of December, the church at Mangula had arranged with us to hold a week of training classes con cerning the church. Ivan and I had alter

nated nights going to teach. We were amazed at the responsiveness of those who attended. They were eager to learn;

and,

as

the

church

in

the

Bible

was

presented to them, it was wonderful to

see

the

pieces

fit

together

in

their

minds. Some, with a denominational background, seemed amazed that there

was

a

"church"

that could be as much

African as anything else; for it had its

origin from the great Spirit of Creation whom their forefathers had recognized

and searched for almost since the begin

ning of time itself — a church that was

not

from men.

Another

wonderful

event

was

wit

nessed

around

the

bed

of

a

man

who

had malaria. Two of the European men

were calling on him and wanted to have

by Ziden Nutt

Mm.

House

of

worship

;Xm

built

by

local

individual members? Several baptisms have been performed and growth in the youth meeting and Bible school has

been

evident.

It

Other sightings

are

was

June

30,

1970.

thrilling also.

Several

of

us

eagerly

looked

an object in the

for

the

appearance

of

sky.

We soon sighted

the giant plane as it soared down and taxied to the airport at Salisbury. Again, the Spirit was involved; for the Lord

people in Magondi village.

 

of Harvest had raised up the Ivan Martin family to come labor in the field here

times. To the

surprise of the

man who

in the area of Sinoia. Both Ivan and Jo

made the

request as

well as

the sick

Anne have been a blessing to the Afri

person,

that he

the

man refused on

didn't

feel

qualified

the

basis

and

just

didn't know how to say things right. As

a result,

the first man

said to

the one

in

bed,

"I

guess

you'll

have

to

pray

for

yourself."

 

it

So,

was

to

save

further embarrassment,

promptly

done.

It

seemed

as

though

things

were

going

backwards,

but

the

Spirit

took

hold

and

began to happen. Several of the

things

men of

the Sinoia church are doing the Sunday

evening services, and the man in charge the following Sunday was the one who

had refused to pray! The beginning of the service was difficult, but having

apologized mainly to the Lord for refus

ing an opportunity to pray

week, he said, "Let's pray."

The other one, soon afterward in a

church business meeting, said, "I think

that past

can

work

Then

with

both

whites

and blacks.

on

the 3rd

of

January 1971,

another sighting was

made

of a plane

making the return of the Dale Marshall

family

a

reality.

For

just

over

eight

months they had been in the U.S.A. Now they returned to a work which they had

taken

is

the

over in

December of 1966.

Dale

first full-time evangelist of the

mission to live in Sinoia, and all Chris

tians

here

"longed"

for

his

and

his

family's

return. This speaks in a won

derful way of their first terra's service.

The first glimpse of the village was impressive. No "missionary" had been

there, but standing in a prominent place was the house of worship. In several

areas of Rhodesia this is not uncommon.

Though it may generally be true in Africa that a school is the center of a village,

as

one

has

written,

work

in

several

prayer. One of the men, a man who had

it's

about

time

I

started

to

pray

as

areas

of Rhodesia

has

not been

estab

never prayed in public, called on the

well."

Would

you

please

pray

for

the

lished in

that way.

For several years,

other who had had public prayer a few

growth

of

this

congregation

and

its

(Co72linued on page 8)

IT WAS

THE

FIRST TIME

It was

the first

time diat I had ever

preached where the people could not understand English. The interpreter was excellent; but, oh, how. 1 wished I could speak their language. There was

much

them

It was the first time that 1 had ever met in a church with a thatched roof or

with no building at all. I have now met with churches whose normal meeting

told

more

I

would

like

to

have

that I could not.

place

is

under

a

tree

or

in

front

of

someone's home; but the same feeling of love and fellowship is there.

It was the

taken

of

die

first time that I had par

emblems

of

communion

with baby chicks

scurrying around my

feet; but the same devotion to God and

His Son was It

was

there.

the

first

time

I

had

ever

placed something equivalent to the American quarter in the offering plate and given five to ten times more than

anyone else present and felt that I had

sacrificed

else

there.

much

less

than

anyone

had

It was the first time that I had ever

to

so

a

woman

come

me

who

felt

humble she thought she had to come on

her knees.

And when

I

understood how

•*!

••

-«»

The Ivan Martin family.

this woman has been such a pillar in the church and how that everywhere

she has moved where there has not been

a church,

she

has

that I should have

in front

of her.

started

one,

I

felt

been

on my knees

It was the first time that lhad been

in a church service with about 75

peo

ple there and taken perhaps a third of

them down to the river to baptize them.

Yes, it was the first time that 1 had

been

only

in

a

church

service and been

die

white

person

there,

and

been

mobbed

by young

to

shake my hand.

people just wanting

These are some of the experiences

that

have

month

in

been

mine

Rhodesia.

I

during

our

have

never

first

seen

a people that were so gentle, kind and

polite as the African people. It is quite an experience not being able to speak

to them, but by action and looks express

to

them

one's

love

and concern

and in

turn

feel

the

warm

Christian

love

and

fellowship being returned. We consider

it

people.

a

real privilege

to

work with

these

whAt A chAnce

Ivan Martin

When I first came to Rhodesia,

the

church attendance at Nyamazanga farm

numbered about 20, and all

but

two of

these were children. We were very dis

couraged about the prospects of the church on that farm. There was just no

one

our

to

lead

the

congregation

in

absence.

The European farmer, too, was quite

concerned. He

is

not

a

member

of

the

church; but he does attend our European

services

the

in

reasons

Sinoia

he

frequently.

for

One of

attending is

gives

our great interest in

his

African work

ers. He

is

we

hope

a very religious person and

he

will

soon

become

fully

obedient in baptism. At different times

we talked at length with him about the

condition

of

the

church

on

his

farm;

but

We prayed about it, asking for God's guidance. We were thrilled at His answer

we

could

not

find

any

solution.

a

few

farmer,

days

came

later.

to

us

Mr.

with

Coetzer,

the

two requests.

His

African

foreman

wanted

to

become

a part of the church. We were overjoyed

at this, butMr. Coetzer's second request

was

send this man to town for a

the

first of its

kind. He

wanted

week

to

to be

taught

by

our

African

evangelists

that

farm.

he

could

lead

Mr.

Coetzer

the

also

church

said

on

that

so

the

he

would pay

the man's

salary just as if

he

more than happy to comply with the

request.

farm. We were

were working on

the

In

short,

the

man

was

baptized,

taught for a week, and then went back

to

the

farm

to

attendance has

lead

the

church.

Church

increased

to

about 50,

with the majority of these being adults. The people have built their own grass

church

building;

and

the

that

six.

and

we

The

were

with

church

is

prospering.

them,

now

Most of

the credit for

last Sunday

we

baptized

enthusiastic

this

change

should be given to the European farmer who had such a great concern for the spiritual well-being of his African workers. Most European farmers show some concern for their African help.

They provide a school if they can; and most of them are glad to have the Bible taught to the work force and their fami

lies.

But

Mr.

Coetzer

has

been

out

standing

in

He

provides

his

a

cooperation

stock

tank

with

us.

and

hauls

water to

tizing at die church building rather than

it

so

that we

can do

the

bap

having

to

travel

some

distance

to

a

muddy stream. We believe that his con

cern

for

revived it

the

church

from death

in

causing it to

be

a

on

his

farm

has

and

will

go far

strong church in

the years to come. Truly a great change has taken place at Nyamazanga,

TAe Central Africa

Story

is published

monthly for the Central Africa Mission, Churches of Christ by Mission Services

Association

at

509

West

Jefferson,

Joliet, Illinois. Second Class Postage

paid at Joliet, Illinois 60434.

Volume

n

Feb. 1971

Number 2

Central Africa Story

THE

HOSPITAL CALL

(Editor's note:

Tie ideas expressed in

this article, while having little to do with "foreign" missions, have much to do with the mission of the church in every land and with all people. Com passion for the physically ill is a virtue which each Christian must prac tice in his own life and encourage in

the

lives

of others.

That compassion,

and rules.

yourself

Before visiting,

familiarize

with

them!

Routines

have

been

established

both

for

convenience

and for good hospital care. Stopping at

the nurses'

station first to inquire may

save time and agony. Generally, the condition of the patient will be told, if

possible,

occupied

and

whether

the

presently.

Knock

patient

first

on

is

a

however,

must

be

governed

by

sound

closed

door;

barging

into

the

middle

Biblical

principles

and

good

common

of an enema is hardly comforting! Obey

sense, as Dr.

Van Curen so well points

out.

Apparently,

the

ideas

expressed

in this article have been forming in the mind of Dr. Van Curen for a number of

years

and

we

because he has

will

all

be

the

richer

now put them in print.)

As

a

minister,

some

of

uncomfortable moments

were

my most

before

the

huge imposing doors of hospitals, antic-

pating

vantage

a

sick

call.

A

has

greatly altered

me will never erase

more

much

point now

comfortable,

but still

the memory of my first night as

tor,

a doc

be

when

I

prayed

no

one

would

sick enough to come to the emergency

room

where

I

alone

stood between

life

and death. There have

been

very few

nights

since

that one, that have kept

me so busy or so extensively occupied.

Our Master spent so much time with the

sick and dying; and our own Christian

witness in

this area can mean so much

that we should not neglect the perfect

ing of this important ministry of healing.

I have found it important as a doctor and as a minister to prepare for each visit to the sick room carefully. Let me

offer the following advice concerning proper procedure for visiting the sick.

Begin

by

examining

yourself.

Strange

as it may sound, if you

are

sick, don't

call on

a real setback

the sick! Your cold may prove

to an already sick man.

Pause and meditate before entering the

sick

room.

We

are

so

often

at

a

loss

for words; but it is most distressing to the composure of many to see a friend

in a hospital bed — pale skin,

sunken

eyes, disheveled hair, and with feeding

tubes

in

his arms. All of

the sights of

the hospital room are strange and cause

concern and worry for a friend. As you meditate, pray for your sick friend, because it may be inappropriate to pray later in the hospital room itself. Then pray for yourself, that whatever you

say

will

be

comforting and medicinal,

and not disturbing and detrimental. Every hospital has visiting hours

"No Visiting"

signs. There are

many

valid reasons for you

to pray at home,

or even in

the waiting room, instead of

in

the

sick

room

if this

is

the doctor's

orders.

P--*

t

Dr. Jim Van Curen and family

I

edge

it

is

am

convinced

that a

little

knowl

about the illness, particularly if

a

longstanding one,

should be a

part of every calling card. 1 have a very

dear

friend

church

and

who

was

an

who almost

elder

in

the

lost all hope

because of a stroke. Because few peo

ple

understood

his

illness,

ability

to

understand

rapid

and

his

speech,

most people thought he could not hear

well,

and

yelled

everything

at

him.

right

word,

him and made a lonely discouraged man even more depressed. A little compas

sion and a very little knowledge could

have

calling on

Because

they

solved

he

could

simply

the

not

find

the

stopped

entire

problem,

and,

I'm convinced, hastened his

recovery.

Taking

along

something

pleasant

and

generally

brief

for

a

the

good

patient

idea

to

but

read

read

material first yourself, and if it is

least

bit

depressing,

don't

leave

is

die

the

it.

by Jim Van Curen, M.D.

Flowers are nice and add happiness to

a room, but the allergic patient may be

driven from the room by them. Food is

the doctor

never to be

brought unless

asks you to bring

it! I'll never forget

the

pleasant 406-pound

lady

I found

eating

a

chocolate

covered

cherry,

after we had dieted her for

Her minister had

two weeks.

that such was

known

her favorite and brought her a box! Most

patients are on some special diet; and

it

the hospital

is

possible

to prolong

stay

or

even

complicate

and

confuse

riie

case

with

even

the

most harmless-

appearing

sign

may

food.

A "Nothing by Mouth"

not include

communion,

but

the presence of the sign deserves your

inquiry. Some

patients have carefully-

measured diets, and giving them a drink from their own pitcher may confuse

the

the

record.

The last thing to do before you enter

room

is

to

glance

at your watch.

Rest and quiet are

every

important parts of

your call

patient's

therapy, and

should

never

take

longer

than

10-15

minutes.

Remembering

Master Physician

that

and

Christ

that

He

is

is

the

by

your side, enter the patient's room with

confidence. Do not be loud and boister

ous, but be quiet and cheerful. Be happy,

but

not

falsely

so.

Overdoing

cheer

can cause the patient to wonder if you

might

illness

not

know

that

eve-,

something

about

his

he

doesn't

know.

Never argue with or excite the patient,

and always remember that you are mak ing the call, and should regulate the

conversation. Asking questions requires the patient to answer. Don't tell the

and sickness

patient of all

the

death

at church this week, or linger on these

thoughts at all. The patient has enough secret worries of his own without your

suggesting more.

too

Although you

think the

room is

hot or too cold, too dark or too light, or

too cluttered with signs, don't try to regulate any of these. Amazingly,

from

visitors

opening

air

have

done

in

to

everything

shutting

rooms,

all

off

in

windows

the

the

conditioning

spirit of helpfulness!

Before removing

a sign,

you

should

know

that

such

action could confuse nurses or aides,

and

cause

a

bad

medical

accident.

It

upon

is

poor

tact indeed

your

good

or

bad

to comment

experiences

(Continued on page 8)

THREE CENTS AND DECISION

by

James S. Frasure, M. D.

She placed in my hand

three cents

which was her greatest token of thanks,

Sarah

was

grateful

for

the

treatment

she

had

received

for

a

knee

which

months,

had

but

successful

been painful and stiff for

was

now

normal

after

the

removal of a cyst. She expressed happy

surprise

that she had

been

well at Mashoko Christian

treated so

Hospital. I

now

miss

her

cheerful

"hello"

when

I

go into Ward 12 for rounds. Her gift was

meager, but the thought far outweighed the three small coins. This, fortunately, is one of the pleasant experiences of practicing medicine in a developing

society. Unfortunately, there are not always

happy

results

for

sick

patients.

Our

greatest problems

during

this

time

of

the

year

are

seven years

of

with

age,

the

young,

under

who get measles

and diarrhea. These two diseases claim

more

young

lives

each

year

than

any

other diseases. Coupled with malnutri

tion,

which

is

becoming

worse

as

a

result of poor crops last year and little

these diseases are real

killers of young lives. Until education

has

rain this year,

brought our patients

to

a

level of

understanding

where

they

grasp

what

can be done to control disease, all the

modern medicine and money at our dis

posal will not obliterate these problems.

One of the discouraging experiences that I have these days is typified by a

conversation

with

a

father

and

mother

The

and

death while trying to recover from

about

child

their

was

one-year

hovering

old

child.

life

between

malaria

and

diarrhea.

She

had

been

this

way

for

two

days.

Intravenous

fluids, injections, and around-the-clock

care

were

given

to

the

child.

The

mother, sensing an apparent futility in

our efforts, asked if she might take the

child

hours

home.

and

them

she

I

told

die

if

The

father

arrived

in

12

requested

that

the

the

child

same

was

thing.

sure

to

left

the

hospital.

They

expressed their sorrow at the prospect

of death

but insisted

that

the

child be

taken to the local nyangn (witch doctor) for his medicine. Our experience is rife with the efforts of the nyangas to cure disease, and I explained to the parents that this is a futile course. They finally

consented

for

the

child

to remain

a

bit

longer. The parents do not hold any ill

feeling toward me for insisting that the child stay. There is going to be a slow

course

to

recovery.

The problem that presents itself is

apparent.

At

what

time

must I insist

that a patient not be allowed to leave

the

hospital and at what

consent?

The

decision

time

is

must I

difficult

because of the vast disparity of knowl

edge and belief between the doctor and

(Continued on page 8)

r.;

Leaders of Magondi Church examine tracts for distribution. In the

background is the mobile unit of Good News Productions.

DRIVING

RHODESIAN

STYLE

by Ivan Martin

When

we

first arrived in Rhodesia,

I expected driving to be a little difficult.

The difficulties exceeded ray fondest expectations. To make things even worse. 1 did most of my driving in Ziden Nutt's Ford pickup with the steering wheel on the wrong side for over here where everyone drives on the left side

of the road.

traffic where

When 1 was driving in

I

could

follow

the

car ahead,

I

could

remember to stay on, what was for me, the wrong side of the road, but when driving in the country, I would invari

ably

go

to

the

right when

I

was

sup

posed to be left. This proved at times to be frightening to me and amusing

at others.

One day, I was driving out to a farm

to

talk with

the

teacher of a

school we

I went

to the right and the other driver did not

are

managing. As

I

met

a car,

know what to do; but he

finally went to

his right. About that time I realized my mistake and pulled back to the left

which

left

us

on

a

collision

course.

We both decided to change sides of the

road at the same time, so we were still

on

a

collision course. I finally pulled

to

ihe

left and stopped. He

pulled up

alongside, and I suppose he was ready to give me a healthy piece of his mind.

When he found out that I was just out from America, he was quite amused. The traffic in Salisbury is, in some

ways, worse than in most cities I have

been in in

the United States. There

are

not enough traffic lights, drivers make

U-turns in

the middle of the block, and

pedestrians frequently cross the street

without going to the corner. To give an

idea of what I mean, one man here told me that my chances of getting hit and

killed in

Salisbury

were

much

than

bush

being

killed by snakebite

country!

greater

in

the

After five months here, 1 am a little

more

confident in

my driving;

but the

many pedestrians and bicycle riders on the main roads still worry me. As some one here has said, "They are an acci dent waiting to happen." And there are

still times that I find myself sailing merrily down the right side of the road.

One can only guess where my mind

is!

Problems I Face as a JHIisslonary Doctor

in Regards to the Great Commission,

(SECOND OF THREE PARTS)

by James S, Frasure, M.D,

The second phase, the strengthening

and consolidation phase, is usually the

most long-range, meaningful phase. We

all are familiar with the enthusiasm that is stirred when an effective evan

gelist comes to our congregation and gets us all really "on fire" for the Lord.

But we are also familiar with the super ficial appeal that this has and its short

life. What determines the success or

failure of such a dramatic start or resur

gence is the state of the people or work one' year, five years, or 20 years later. From this initial good start has there been sufficient follow dirough with in- depth teaching, utilization of facilities, continuation of on-the-job stability of

is

leadership?

This

successful

stage

two

without which

stage one becomes

a hollow shell — a monument to super ficial planning. Fortunately, the Lord

has, and is, sparing us from this trag

edy at present.

the problem that

More specifically,

has faced me is, what am

I

to

do

with

my skills as a Christian doctor in phase

two development? The day-to-day work as a doctor in the hospital witnessing

to the patients

indirectly is

essential

for the continuation of the medical work

here, I am also actively teaching medi cine and surgery in the nursing school,

but no Biblical doctrine or principles.

Weekend mission and village preaching

is done. But the question which haunts

me is are my efforts being used wisely

for the Lord? Some will say, and have

said,

that

I

am

to

continue

with

the

good work. I am grateful for this encour agement; but is this really what I should be doing to help the Lord establish a

meaningful

Christ

in

the

hearts

and

lives of the people with whom I come

into contact? My evaluation of my work is that I am going through a period of

maturation

and

questioning

which

at

present makes my work a "holding force" for the missionary effort here. But if my work is a "holding force," for what

is it a "holding force?"

experienced person

to

Is

it for a more

return

and take

up the interrupted, incorapleted task he

has set for himself to achieve, for me

to return now that I have gained invalu

able experience and determine a course

of action, for a new person to come and

stumble along until he "finds himself,"

February 1971

or

for

a

combination

of

some

of

the

aforementioned proposals? My point is thatno work should be a "holding force."

It should have meaningful, long-range direction and daily, useful relevance

to

community it serves and trains.

the

What

do

I

think

that

phase

two

development entails? I have called this

the strengthening and consolidation phase. To me, this is the most difficult

phase in many respects; for it is often

the

most

subjective

when

evaluating

results. The missionary is to be involved

in the "building up" of the church. This,

of

necessity,

involves

teaching

who are

sincerely

already Christians

and

interested

in

knowing

about

Christ.

The

young

church

those

those

more

that,

has been founded in phase one now must mature. I must submit myself to the laborious, tedious, often-routine

task

year

daily Christian life becomes at times,

out,

of

in

teaching

and year

day

in

out.

and

The

day

joy

of my

as

for

the

most

devout of Christians,

a "drag."

But even at times like this,

I must continue with this teaching and not drop it when some new, more excit ing stimulus jolts my imagination. This

teaching must be done in and around my work as a doctor working in a hos pital. At Mashoko the teaching of our nursing students as future pillars in the church should be a priority. Helping

in the instruction of local church lead ers should be done. To some extent

this is being done but not nearly to die advantage it could be. 1 think that all

missionaries

teaching

the

should

be

developing

involved

in

church. If we

are to be messengers of His, our words

and our actions must speak as one and

equally as loud. However, 1 cannot act unilaterally in this teaching; for it

should be coordinated with other efforts at the station and with other mission

aries involved in teaching and develop ing the church. The often-sad aspect of

our present approach is that we have our

tried to develop this teaching on a uni

basis. Together we must be more

Dr. Bill Nice prepares to examine the list of over 600 who gave to build Chidamoyo Christian Hospital. Nearby (not in picture) hang two plaques which

fied

list all who contributed more than $300.

fully

aware of where

our efforts

to serve.

we are

going

in

The third phase, or withdrawal, is

one

that

we

must look

forward

to with

enthusiasm.

All

too

often

we

fail

to

see this

more as

phase as a positive step but

a

retreat in

the face

of failure

to

establish

the

church,

or

of govern

mental opposition, or of lack of person

nel,

or

cannot

for

look

some

other

cause.

forward

with

joy

If

to

we

this

time

of withdrawal,

we

are

misunder

standing

our

role

as

missionaries

in

the

must

New

be

Testament

tradition.

This

evaluated

from

two aspects.

There is the time when the foreign mis

sion

truly

time

ceases

to

exist

and

the

is

or

work

is

the

of

they

indigenous.

when

There

also

groups

individuals

individuals

should withdraw when

have completed their work and the new group or individual has come to perpet

uate the positive ongoing of the mis sion enterprise. Both cases of with

drawal

are

difficult

to

assess

as

to

when they should be done. We should

not be afraid to face this prospect of withdrawal, regardless of our personal

emotional

attachments

oo

a

work

or

station. Again, this should be a phase of mission enterprise that utilizes the best of our thoughts and plans in a

coordinated

effort.

What

role

our

vision

of

It

is used as

does

medicine

play

in

the

mission

enterprise?

a

tool

of mission expan

sion for the reason of entry into foreign

countries and areas within those coun

tries. It is also used

reasons

hospitals

means

of

of

relieving

clinics

and

providing

for

humanitarian

suffering.

are

used

employment

The

as

a

and

Page 5

PROBLEMS I FACE AS A MISSIONARY

training for

the

community

they serve.

Medicine

can

show

Christian

love

and

concern

in

action.

I

think

all

of these

(continued from page 5)

essary and to determine more impor tantly if our present facilities are ful

filling

their

primary

goal

of

actually

arc

justifiably

important.

But

limits

extending the kingdom of God.

 

must

be

set upon

these

reasons

with

The

obvious

humanitarian

outreach

the

we

exception of the

set these limits?

last one. How do

Presently no one

does except on individual bases which vary from person to person. Medicine undoubtedly has contri buted to the welcoming of the Central Africa Mission into many areas in Rho

desia, Even the promise of it has been

use

and

helpful.

medicine

In

to

what

way

should

we

implement

expansion

increased

witness?

The

building

of

hospitals is not as realistic or practical

now as

it

ernment is

was five years ago. The gov

controlling more

tightly the

expenditure of monies on hospital con

struction

and

the

location

of

these

hospitals. Thus, the need for large outlays of money for phase-one devel opment is not needed. Clinics are a

source of expansion of which we have

not taken such advantage. It has been

shown by those involved in clinic work

that significant inroads evangelistically

can

be

tional

made

without expensive

overhead.

This

should

addi

be

as

much a community project as possible in establishing these clinics, whether they be mobile or permanent. Our reason

for

entry does

not always

have

to

be

a work. As adventuresome as a new medi

new

the

establishment

of

medical

cal

work

sounds

to

churches

and mis

sionaries, it is not as

sometimes portrayed. Many developing

necessary as

countries,

of which

need doctors

to

fill

Rhodesia

is

positions in

one,

their

outlying hospitals and clincis. These are facilities already provided with salaries to go along with them. Why cannot we continue to take advantage of fully provided facilities and use this means as a basis of making inroads into the hospital patients and employ

ees

as well as

the

rest of the commun

ity? The incomes from this type of work could have the secondary benefit of

helping the mission station hospitals. This type of expansion should not be done, however, at the expense of the mission station hospital. Again this

type of expansion should have approval

of the group it affects most and with long-range implications fully explored. We need to assess our present medical

nec-

work to determine if expansion is

of medicine is

tied closely to the other

reasons mentioned above. The question that haunts my work is how far should

1 go in my effort

to give

fort?"

I have

come

to

a

"aid and com

medical

work,

as have nearly all the other doctors in

Central

African

Mission,

with

little

more than the barest essentials of medi

cal

knowledge

assume

a

task

and

that

budding

skills

to

literally

encom

passes all aspects of medicine. From a purely medical standpoint, this is an impossible situation. Learned col

leagues in the States are appalled that

anyone in his right mind would attempt

such

a

task. They suggest long addi

tional years of training before plunging

into the unknown; for much of the medi

cine that is practiced in

bush was

years of

training. Fortunately, our basic training has been adequate more than 95% of

the

our

never

even mentioned in

the

time.

The

work

has

not folded

but

actually contributed in a positive way

to

medical

care.

Even

from

our

brief

history of medical missions, it can be

seen that extensive post-graduate train

ing is not essential for the basic medi

cine

we

practice.

I

am

not

implying

that further post-graduate training would

not

be

helpful,

essential.

but

that

it

is

not

Many have said,

and are

saying in

missions throughout the world, that the

best of medical care and treatment

should

in

be

made

available

to

those

developing

not accept

my training

"nth"

countries.

this

I

personally

Even

to

think

do

concept.

me

though

of the

forces

degree of diagnostic efforts and

treatment

for

my

patient,

this

is

more

ideal

bush

than

realistic.

medicine

is

The

situation

different

from

in

the

more sophisticated society of the cities. The vast majority of the Africans I see in the hospital do not appreciate die

different aspects

of

modem medicine.

They come

that

they

to

feel

us

asking for

we

can

give

treatment

whether

their diseases be complicated diag nostic problems and/or complicated

treatment problems

treatable

diseases.

or

the

Most

simplest of

of

the

time

the

hospital

consultation

is

for

the

second

sickness.

source

of

The

first

DOCTOR

one

is

the

administers

native

medicine

his

medicine

in

man

the

who

form

of cuts, potions, and lotions. This is confirmed by an observation that almost

100% of the mothers who bring children

with

given

child

to me

diarrhea

or

had

to

the

someone

muti (medicine).

hospital

either

else

give

the

This

indicates

that their real faith

is

not in

out

medicine. They come to a hospital as a last resort. Also the patients are

concerned primarily with apparent good

health.

surgery

cancer

because

fungating

The

of

man

his

of

who

arm

has

a

refuses

fear,

ignorance,

supersti

tion,

and

the

fact

that his

wound

is

causing minimal discomfort. He finally

consents

to

amputation

when

his

arm

becomes

a

source

of

discomfort,

but

then

it

is

too

late

for

a

cure.

All

I

have really done is make his last days more comfortable. The man is very

grateful for what I have been able

do. But my training indicates that I

to

have not given

him

the

best treatment

available. The patients do not demand

the

ask

best

in

available in medicine. They

indirect

ways

our

that

from medicine of

that

we

do

best with what we have. Even with

we are bringing them

the 14th century to middle 20th century.

(To be concluded in next issue)

Village woman grinds corn into meal

for the family staple, sadza.

Little Things I Like At Mashoko

By Emma Stoll

Hearing the deep bass of the secondary boys in church on

Sunday morning

The sound from the distance on a crisp, clear morning of the

nursing students at morning hymns

Realizing, after listening to our African ministers preach, the depth of their faith and comprehension of things spiritual.

Squeezing through the door on certain summer evenings to keep

. Jumping in bed and snapping out the lights before they join you

out the flying white ants .

.

you

there

.

.

.

Hearing the hum of their thousands of fluttering wings against

the screens and sweeping up drifts of the gossamer things

next morning

.

Walking across the mission on a misty morning after a rain and trying to avoid crunching one of the hundreds of chongololas

lazing in the path.

Watching the kids grow and discover and climb and explore and

play with bugs

.

.

.

Overhearing through the window the laughter and scurrying of

little boys playing football The ever more-mature prayers they say at mealtime.

Saving ice in order to get together for homemade ice cream after a

sweltering, wilting day

The excitement the kids exude on movie night Taking along popcorn to eat Serving cake and tea to our African friends The hearty taste of sadza served up with polite formality in the village.

Having Don come in from the post office with a handful of blue

letters or a box with string around it The fun of opening them

Rocking Jane in the evening to the bubbling sound of the tree

.

.

.

frogs or the rhythmn of the drums.

The peaceful resignation of an old African woman holding a baby

on the edge of a noisy gathering

The patience and longsuffering of these people

Seeing their genuine joy upon encountering you

Knowing that our being here has helped bring some precious souls

to the Lord,

The training class at Mangula.

MISSIONARY ADDRESSES AND FORWARDING AGENTS

HI

I

Vt

MInSON

Mr. and Mr-.

Juhn

t»|

6qi

FA

?1?6

ftnoOes/.i

Ut. dfio Uff.

Route 2

E'rwst A.

St.

Joseoh. niiuois 61673

Mr.

nn.\ Mr-.

M. rts

R.O.

6d« 2026

QuIuiN.iye. RhOde&«.k

FA

Jo Ann Shea ins CricksOP RoJd

Columbui, Ohio

43227

^U•.,

Oo' i3, P.C.

Luoane. Rneflesia,

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FA Mrs.

Florence Henry

371? CrestAOcs Di. N.W.

CdPton. Ohto 44 'Is

Mrs.

40

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thilr-

Nbrtn

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Ur.

if\a, Buldw.iyo, Rhodcsii

ond

Mrs. WilldrO Rjid

R.R. 1

LooeoDlee, Mlinoii C28S7

Mrs,

\

FA

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Forwotding Agent

OF

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On hriovgh

R

Recrvif pteparing to come to

Mr. and ^1i-.

P.O. Bos 231

Fl. Viciotia. Rnodesia

FA Mr.

lh««iiii-

Hiuimun

Pe.vson Jr.

and Mrs. J. R.

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and Mrs. Richard

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Mr. umlMr-. Vaiitr I

I ngt

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P.O. Bo*

122

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Unger

Box 244

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Mr. «a«l Mr-. I>r

Box 461 Fort Victoria. Rnodesu

Van

IKtr

FAUr

arujttrs

tester L

Bjoiem

6626 $E

Portland

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Oregon 97266

Mr. anri

Mr-.

|iilir> Valiant***

P.O. Box 765 Cwcio, Rhodesia

The Aiichofate

 

South

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Mr.

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Kitkcjidy, ScoUanO

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York 14031

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Bo*

103

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MII'IN) \

M.I.I A

MISSMN

 

P.O. Boi 96

Chiredzt. Rhodesia

i

IMinMO^O MIS.*40N

Mt— Mart

U\t((rn Ml

P.O. Box 330

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Mr.

anJ Mr-. MriM'»* ViimM'rman 01

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P.O. Box 113

Moberly, Missouri 66270

Nif. and Mr-.

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Mrs.

Wallace Storey

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Ur.

Jack u.

Biilfen

Atlanta Christian College

East Point. Ceoigia 30Q44

llr. aii.l

Mr».

IKitHJ

4;ruhtiK

FA

IK.

Mr.

E.

A.

Grubos

R.R. 2

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709 East lltn Sliect

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Fi«|rAi|ilf KltflifUali

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IK.

aail Mr-.

lalV<*r

h'artmi^

B04

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Mt

 

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tiiaH.-i.

 

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PA Mr.

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and Mrn. John

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rlim (M

Kentucky Christian College Grayson. Kentucky 41143

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FA

Uis.

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Onve

Letington. KerMuCky

40SC4

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Ml. and Mrs. R.R. 2

Waterloo, Indiana 46793

Ker>n«1h Reed

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and Mr-. 79i«*miaji PitnUtloa

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S.

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604

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Mt.

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and Mr-.

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PA

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E

Nrvel

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Mr

FA

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II.

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Mr.

152 East Drive

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and Mis. A.

L.

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P

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N.VI.IMtl

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