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Pride and Prejudice

by
Jane Austen

PLEASE DO YOU OWN WORK, DO NOT PLAGIARIZE OR USE MATERIAL FROM


ANOTHER SOURCE

This assignment is designed to study the characters of the novel. It includes individual and group
projects.
The book is assigned on 10/18/2013. Here is a link to an online version of the book:
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1342
This novel study consists of comprehension questions, an essay, and a visual timeline project
both individually and in groups. Please pay attention to DUE DATES.

Yes that does mean you __________________________.


(fill in the blank if the shoe fits)

Table of Contents
Table of Contents ......................................................................................................................................... 1
Due Dates ...................................................................................................................................................... 2
I. Close Reading ............................................................................................................................................ 2
II. CHARACTERIZATION............................................................................................................................ 3
IV. Novel Questions ..................................................................................................................................... 4
V. Essay Stylistic Requirements .................................................................................................................. 8
Group Project Rubric ................................................................................................................................. 10
Essay Rubric ............................................................................................................................................... 11

Student assignment
Students will collect character information
1) Students receive a copy of the novel by Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice.
2) Students receive a flow chart of characters
3) Students maintain a focus upon character and setting.
Due Dates
1. Close Reading
2. First Impression
3. Volume 1
4. Volume 2
5. Volume 3
6. Group Project turn in
7. AP test

10/25/2013
11/01/2013
11/08/2013
11/22/2013
12/03/2013
12/03/2013
12/04/2013

Questions (individual)
Short Essay (individual)
Questions (group)
Questions (group)
Questions (group)
Timeline (group)
All by your lonesome

I. Close Reading
Individually, close read the first three chapters, paying particular attention not only to dialogue,
but to the words of the narrator as they reveal assumptions about the culture in which the story is
set.
For example the first sentence says the following: It is a truth universally acknowledged
that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife. Respond to the
questions below:
I.
II.

III.

Is the narrator correct in assuming that all wealthy single men need to find a wife? Why
or why not? Explain.
Does the narrator believe this statement? By contrast, how can the characterization of
Mrs. Bennet at the end of the first chapter (The business of her life was to get her
daughters married. . .) be supported by the womans word and actions?
To what extent does the narrator reflect the general attitudes of most people living in the
Bennets community? Is it credible that after the ball, everybody hoped that [Darcy]
would never come there again (why/why not). How important is public opinion in the
setting of the novel.
Remember these are more than yes and no questions, so please explain

Due: 10/25/2013 100 points assignment grade, must be typed

II. CHARACTERIZATION
Part 1: First Impressions (Austens original title of the novel was First Impressions).
Directions: After reading the first four chapters, create a separate entry of your first impressions
of Mr. Bennet, Mrs. Bennet, Jane, Elizabeth, Bingley, and Darcy.
Individually, write a 3-4 page essay on your first impressions of these six characters. Focus on
each character and the interactions between characters. Utilize at least one quote per character,
either indirectly or directly stated. You should double space this essay and follow format
guidelines. PLEASE DO YOU OWN WORK, DO NOT PLAGIARIZE OR USE MATERIAL
FROM ANOTHER SOURCE
Due: 11/01/2013 (100 points assignment grade, must be typed)
Group Project
Part 2: Character Study (100 points assignment grade at each check point)
Directions: Each group of 2 students is assigned a couple in the novel:
Group 1: Jane and Mr. Bingley,
Group 2: Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy,
Group 3: Mr. and Mrs. Bennet,
Group 4: Charlotte Lucas and Mr. Collins, and
Group 5: Elizabeth, Lydia and Wickham.

Students collect details about the relationship of the couple and how it develops and changes
over time. Each group creates a timeline that visually shows the changes by your analysis. Points
along the timeline (see below) indicate the characters:
1) Setting, mood, tone, atmosphere and
2) General feelings about each other.
A simple example and rubric follow on the next page.
Due: 12/03/2013 (assessment grade 100 points/each member receives the same grade)

IV.

Novel Questions
Pride and Prejudice Questions

Directions: Respond to the question below and submit to the teacher upon the date due.
Include the names of both students on the submitted work.
VOLUME I Due 11/08/2013 (questions are assignment grades)
CHAPTERS 1 AND 2
No questions
CHAPTERS 3 -6
1. Despite Bingleys appearance as a most eligible bachelor, what is revealed about his
family, his age, and his inexperience?
2. How is Elizabeths fun at Darcys expense different from his own behavior toward her
and her friends and family?
3. Do you agree with Mrs. Lucass distinction between pride and vanity and her conclusion
that Darcy has a right to feel proud?
4. Why might Miss Bingley be eager to criticize the Bennet girls and their mother?
5. What is revealed about the characters of Mary and Elizabeth by their piano performance?
6. What effect does Elizabeths teasing have on Darcy? Is Elizabeth intentionally trying to
provoke Darcys attention? Note his continued attraction, despite her inferiority.
CHAPTERS 7 -12
1. What influences Elizabeths opinion of the Bingleys?
2. What does Darcy consider an accomplished woman? What does this reveal about him?
3. How does Darcy react to Miss Bingleys comments about the Bennets?
4. How does Darcy characterize his own faults? (How does he reveal more about himself?)
CHAPTERS 13-16
1. How do the members of the Bennet family respond differently to Collins letter
announcing his intention to visit Longbourn?
2. What is meaningful about Mr. Bennets attention to Collins talent of flattering with
delicacy? How does Mr. Bennet seem to toy with the younger man, playing on his ego?
3. What motivates Collins to seek a wife from among the Bennet girls?
4. How does Wickham differ from Collins in his self estimation?
5. Why is Wickhams candor concerning his situation and his relationship with Darcy
surprising? Are his revelations appropriate? Why or why not? What keeps him from
talking even more openly?

CHAPTERS 17- 22
1. How does Janes desire to see the good in everyone differ from Elizabeths judgments?
2. In what way does Elizabeths family embarrass her at the ball? Is she justified in her
reactions?
3. Why might Elizabeth be the least dear daughter to her mother? Could her fathers
preference have provoked this response?
4. How might Collins reasons for marriage be judged today? Why does he have trouble
taking Elizabeths rejection seriously? What does he purport to offer her?
5. Why would the Lucases reaction to their daughters engagement be considered socially
inappropriate?
6. Why does Charlotte accept Collins proposal? What motivates her? Is this a worthy
motive or not?
VOLUME II Due 11/22/2013
CHAPTERS 1-3
1. Does Elizabeth apply the same careful judgment to Wickham as she does to Darcy? Why
or why not?
2. How does Mrs. Gardiner give advice in such a way that it is not resented? How is Mrs.
Gardiners approach different from Mrs. Bennets?
3. How does Elizabeth know she was never actually in love with Wickham? What influences
his change of affection?
CHAPTERS 4-9
1. What is Collins motive in showing off what he has to Elizabeth?
2. Why does Lady Catherine de Bourgh condescend to spend so much time with those she
considers beneath her?
3. How does Darcy compare his social skills to Elizabeths piano skills? What does
Elizabeths response say about her?
CHAPTERS 10-14
1. If Elizabeth dislikes Darcy so strongly, why does she weep after turning down his
proposal?
2. How does Darcys letter make her reconsider her own behavior and judgments?
CHAPTERS 15-19
1. How do Elizabeths comments about Darcy at dinner cause Wickham concern?
2. What does the author reveal in Chapter 19 about the nature of the Bennet marriage?

VOLUME III Due 12/03/2013


CHAPTERS 1-3
1. What accounts for Darcys civil behavior toward Elizabeth and the Gardiners?
2. How does this affect Elizabeth?
CHAPTERS 4-6
1. What does Lydia risk by eloping with Wickham? Would society today still compel Lydia
and Wickham to marry?
2. How might Mr. Bennets earlier actions have prevented this scandal? Is Mr. Bennet
responsible for his youngest daughters behavior? In what ways?
CHAPTERS 7-11
1. Why does Gardiner remain silent about the financial agreements with Wickham?
2. Why would Darcy attend a wedding he must find deplorable?
3. How would Mr. Bennets feelings change if he knew who was actually responsible for the
marriage arrangements?
CHAPTERS 12-19
1. How do Elizabeths character traits assist in her conversation with Lady Catherine?
2. In what way are the character traits for which Lady Catherine prides herself, sincerity
and frankness, more negative than positive?
3. In Chapter 16, during the conversation that marks the turning point in their relationship,
how do Elizabeth and Darcy explain to one another (and themselves) their changes of heart
after their first impression and after Darcys awkward first profession of affection for
Lizzie?

Basic Example of the Timeline


Create a chart/timeline representing the stages in each couples relationship. The chart is
created and maintained over the life of the novel. Use a poster board to track the progress.

Events

Pride and Prejudice


Character Couples
By Your Name (s)

Timeline of
sequenced
changes

Netherfield Park:
Initial chapters
show that Darcy
and Elizabeth are
very cold to each

SETTING
Austen sketches the settings of the novel very briefly, leaving it to readers to visualize the places
in which the events occur.
Netherfield Park, Bingleys residence
Pemberley House, Darcys estate
The Derbyshire countryside
Rosings, the home of Lady Catherine
Other settings include Longbourn, Hansford, and Meryton.

V. Essay Stylistic Requirements

Consistently applied essay writing requirements are important so that students and instructors
can create and understand each individuals writing.
1. Include a thesis statement and a conclusion
2. No emailed papers are accepted
3. Proof your work before submitting (proof, proof, proof)
General MLA Guidelines

Type your paper on a computer and print it out on standard, white 8.5 x 11-inch paper.
Double-space the text of your paper, and use a legible font (e.g. Times New Roman).
Whatever font you choose, MLA recommends that the regular and italics type styles
contrast enough that they are recognizable one from another. The font size should be 12
pt.
Leave only one space after periods or other punctuation marks (unless otherwise
instructed by your instructor).
Set the margins of your document to 1 inch on all sides.
Indent at least 5 spaces the first line of paragraphs one half-inch from the left margin.
MLA recommends that you use the Tab key as opposed to pushing the Space Bar five
times.
Create a header that numbers all pages consecutively in the upper right-hand corner, onehalf inch from the top and flush with the right margin. (Note: Your instructor may ask
that you omit the number on your first page. Always follow your instructor's guidelines.)
Use italics throughout your essay for the titles of longer works and, only when absolutely
necessary, providing emphasis.
If you have any endnotes, include them on a separate page before your Works Cited page.
Entitle the section Notes (centered, unformatted).

Quotes

Utilize quotes that derive from the source used in class. If you copy quotes from the
internet, insure that they represent the same version as they book read in class.
Format quotes by using quotation marks ().
Format multiple line quotes with quotation marks and then use a forward slash (/) to
indicate a new line. Example: These lines are shown in the book such as

Formatting the First Page of Your Paper

Do not make a title page for your paper unless specifically requested.
In the upper left-hand corner of the first page (1 inch from the top),
o List your name, date, the course, and the period.
8

In the upper right-hand corner of the first page (1/2 inch from the top),
o Enter your last name, followed by a space with a page number; number all pages
consecutively with Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, 4, etc.), one-half inch from the top
and flush with the right margin. (Note: Your instructor or other readers may ask
that you omit last name/page number header on your first page. Always follow
instructor guidelines.)
Double space again and center the title. Do not underline, italicize, or place your title in
quotation marks; write the title in Title Case (standard capitalization), not in all capital
letters.
Use quotation marks and/or italics when referring to other works in your title, just as you
would in your text: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas as Morality Play; Human Weariness
in "After Apple Picking"
Double space between the title and the first line of the text.

First Page Example

Student last name 1


Name
Date
Period
English IV AP
Title

First Page Format (continued)


This information on first page only:

Name

Student last name and page number

Date

Period

English IV AP

Name: _______________________ Date: ____________ Period: ____________


Name: _______________________

Group Timeline Project Rubric


Category

Possible
Points

Actual
Points

Early Turn in by 12/02/2013

10

_________

Rubric sheet

10

_________

Flow, time line easy to read

10

_________

Creative

20

_________

Attractive, neat and colorful:

20

_________

10 couple events and

10

_________

Settings identified of events

10

5 quotations reflective of characters 20

_________

Potential Point Total:

_________

110 points

Extra Credit: Turn in by 12/2/2013 by the beginning of your class period for 10 extra points
(yes you could end up with 110 points).

10

Names:_______________________ Date: ____________ Period: ____________

Essay Rubric
Three pages max
Essay 100 points (test grade)

Category
Turn in this rubric with essay

Possible
Points
10

Actual
Points
________

Formatting

20

________

20

________

50

________

First Page
Heading
Font
Page numbering
Overall construction of essay
1 inch borders,
Integrate quotes into essay
(At least one quality quote per character)
Incorporate characters into writing
Introduction: thesis statement is clear
Body paragraphs support introduction
Conclusion supports essay (ties it all
together)
Potential Point Total

100

11

________

Reading Journal Example: Here is an example of how to organize the Reading Journal:
Darcy
Page
Setting
13
Netherfield
Park

Quote/Response
Which do you mean?'' and turning round, he looked for a moment at
Elizabeth, till catching her eye, he withdrew his own and coldly said,
``She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; and I am in no
humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted
by other men. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles,
for you are wasting your time with me.''
Mr. Bingley followed his advice. Mr. Darcy walked off; and Elizabeth
remained with no very cordial feelings towards him. She told the story
however with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful
disposition, which delighted in any thing ridiculous.

Page
24

Setting
Netherfield
Park

Analysis: His cutting comments, especially about Elizabeth make me


understand why the local citizens dislike him almost at once. Mr.
Darcys tone is cold and to Elizabeth and to the people of the country
side.
Quote/Analysis
Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an
object of some interest in the eyes of his friend. Mr. Darcy had at first
scarcely allowed her to be pretty; he had looked at her without admiration
at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise. But
no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she had
hardly a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered
uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes. To
this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying. Though he had
detected with a critical eye more than one failure of perfect symmetry in
her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and
pleasing; and in spite of his asserting that her manners were not those of
the fashionable world, he was caught by their easy playfulness. Of this
she was perfectly unaware; -- to her he was only the man who made
himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome
enough to dance with.
Analysis: By revealing Darcys increasing interest in Elizabeth after first
dismissing her, Austen hints that something more may develop. Darcys
tone isnt any warmer than before, but he seems more human.

Mr. Bennet
Page
107

Setting
Bennets
House

Quote/Analysis
Mr. Bennet tells his daughter, An unhappy alternative is before you,
Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents
Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins,
and I will never see you again if you do (107).
12

Analysis: Rather than presenting her with a dilemma, he is actually


surprising his wife and relieving Elizabeth by making clear his distaste
for such a marriage. Elizabeth smiles at her fathers agreement with her
decision, but her mother is excessively disappointed. These lines
remind the reader that Mr. Bennet often takes his daughters side in
disagreements against his wife as he uses a light hearted self-amusing
tone. He supports her rejection of the proposal, preferring Elizabeths
happiness to a miserable security

13

Vocabulary
Included are 5 vocabulary worksheets. Use the words on this list to help you prepare for tests on the
following dates
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Vocabulary 1
Vocabulary 2
Vocabulary 3
Vocabulary 4
Vocabulary 5

2/21/2013
2/29/2013
3/07/2013
3/21/2013
4/01/2013

14

Stop

I. Close Reading
Close read the first three chapters, paying particular attention not only to dialogue but to the
words of the narrator as they reveal assumptions about the culture in which the story is set.
Distinguish between verifiable facts and assumptions and to note these in your reading
journals.
For example the first sentence says the following: It is a truth universally acknowledged
that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.
1) Is the narrator correct in assuming that all wealthy single men need to find a wife? Why
or why not?
2) Does the narrator believe this statement? By contrast, how can the characterization of
Mrs. Bennet at the end of the first chapter (The business of her life was to get her
daughters married. . .) be supported by the womans word and actions?
3) To what extent does the narrator reflect the general attitudes of most people living in the
Bennets community? Is it credible that after the ball, everybody hoped that [Darcy]
would never come there again (10). How important is public opinion in the setting of the
novel.

III. Theme to Title


Record in your reading journals references to pride and prejudice in the novel and note the
character to whom the reference is made and the character making the observation, if applicable,
and their interpretation of the connotation of the words as they are used.
Here is an example: Darcy was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and
everybody hoped that he would never come there again (Vol 1, Ch. 3, p. 10). Connotation:
Darcys arrogance offends the local citizens he snubs.

Focusing on the Literary Elements


SETTING
Austen sketches the settings of the novel very briefly, leaving it to readers to visualize the places
in which the events occur. The class is divided into groups of 2-3. Each group will have one
specific location in the novel. Each group collects details from the text as they read so the group
can produce visual representations, such as drawings or models.
Netherfield Park, Bingleys residence
Pemberley House, Darcys estate
The Derbyshire countryside
Rosings, the home of Lady Catherine
15

Other settings students may select include Longbourn, Hansford, and Meryton.
POINT OF VIEW
1. Locate evidence of Austens choice of point of view for this story.
2. During the close reading of the first four chapters, locate the passage at which the protagonist
(or heroine) of the story is pinpointed. Discuss:
1. How does Austen shift the focus to Elizabeth? (10)
2. Why does the author wait to introduce Elizabeth herself until the second chapter?
3. What clues in earlier dialogue hinted at Elizabeths importance in the story?
Part 2 Group Work Special Focus: students will be in groups and be assigned a character for
detailed study (200 pts)
Austen provides few details of the characters physical characteristics. Elizabeth, notes Darcy at
first, is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me (11), and only later does he remark on
her pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman (25). Darcy is described as a fine, tall
person, handsome features, noble mien (10). Instead, the characters become real through their
dialogue, thoughts, and actions.
1. Each group is assigned one of the characters (such as Elizabeth, Jane, Darcy, Mrs.
Bennet, Lydia, Wickham, Collins, Charlotte Lucas, Lady Catherine de Bourgh) to build a
character sketch based on the characters actions, words, thoughts, the responses of others
to the character, and the narrators description. You may use a graphic organizer, filling
in the different kinds of details posted in separate quadrants. Here are examples of how to
define a character:
What the character says
What the character thinks
What the character does
What other characters say about the character

Stop
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Individual
Elizabeth
Darcy
Jane
Mr. Bingley
Mrs. Bennet
Mr. Bennet
Lydia

Couple
Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy
Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy
Jane and Mr. Bingley
Jane and Mr. Bingley
Mr. and Mrs. Bennet
Mr. and Mrs. Bennet
Lydia and Wickham
16

8. Wickham
9. Collins
10. Charlotte
Lucas

Elizabeth and Wickham


Charlotte Lucas and Mr. Collins
Charlotte Lucas and Mr. Collins

17