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l) Vaishnava: Pancharatra and Vaikhanasa Brahmanulu: Among the

Vaishnavities, the strict vegetarians and highly educated people also are given the
approximate status of brahmins in Andhra Pradesh. They adhere to either the
medieval Tenkalai or Vadakalai and Agaama scriptures. One section
follows Vaikhanasa scriptures and other the Pancharaatra, dealing mainly with
temple ritual. They run large temple establishments very efficiently. They rose to
prominence
during
Vijayanagar
times.
They
are
followers
of panchasanskara, ekayanayajussakha and katyayanasutra. These Vaishnavite
Brahmins are spread mainly in Karnataka and Andhra, and to some extent in
Tamilnadu also. Vaikhanasa subcaste belongs to this group. The great
Vaishnavite reformers like Ramanujacharya, Ramananda (north India), Madhva
(all over south India), Vallabhacharya (found among velanadu, gujarat, rajasthan
and UP), Nimbaarka, etc. Not all the followers of these Vaishnavite reformers are
Brahmins. Some of these Vaishnavites include Acharis, Iyengars and velanadu
vaideekulu. These Vaishnavas are also known as Andhra Vaishnava.
m) Draavidulu: Draavids, who seem to be north Indian Brahmins who arrived
in coastal Andhra. Dravidas are further divided into subcastes like
Aaraamadravidulu,
Perurudravidulu,
Ryalidravidulu,
Divili
Brahmins,
Pudurudravidulu, Tummagunta Brahmins etc based on the locations they
settled. Some of these Dravida Brahmins belong to Rigveda school and some
belong to Krishnayajurveda school. The Telangana Vaidiki Brahmin caste to
which Goutamiputra Satakarni beloged to is a Dravida Brahmin caste (?). This
group belongs to Rigveda school. For more on.

n) Madhvulu: Madhvas are the followers of Sri Madhvacharya, (a k. a. srimad


Anandateertha), the 13th century saint-philosopher of Karnataka, India (see
also http://www.madhva.org and http://www.madhva.net). They were prominent in
the last days of Vijayanagar (1500's). Raghavendraswami was a famous guru of
this caste. They are found all over Karnataka, south Maharashtra, Tamilnadu and
Andhra and have very strong roots in Maharashtra and the north.
o) Velanati Vaidikulu16e: The Velnadus are most numerous class of Vaidiki
Brahmins. Vallabhachari, who in the 15th century attained great success as
prophet, and whose descendants are worshipped almost as gods still Rajputana,
Gujarat and Maharashtra was a member of this caste. The Velnadus are most
numerous in the Godavari and Krishna districts. Colonies of this caste are found in
the
erstwhile
Mysore
State
(Karnataka),
except
Kadur.

p) Telaganyulu or Telaganadu Vaidikis: The Telaganya Vaidikis are as


numerous as the Velnadus and found mostly in Telangana, chiefly in
the
Northeaster
part
of
erstwhile
Hyderabad
Kingdom.
q) Venginati Vaidikulu: The Venginadus are chiefly found in the districts of
Godavari and Vizianagaram, formerly known as the Vengi Country.
r) Kaasalnati Vaidikulu: The Kasalanadu derive their name from Kosala, the
ancient name of Oude, from where they migrated to Kalinga Country, where they
are
found
now.
s) Muraknati Vaidikulu: Murakanati Vaidikis are found mostly in the country
sounth of the River Krishna. They are numerous in Karnataka.
t) Gouda Brahmins are teachers and priests. They belong to Sukla Yajurveda
and Kanva madhyandina sakha and have the family names such as Joshi, Ojjhulu
etc.
u) Adisaivulu: They belong to Krishna Yajurveda school. These Saiva Brahmins
are further devided into several castes such as Kanchisaivulu, Antarvedisaivulu,
Balajipetasaivulu,
Tiruvalngadusivulu,
Sakteya
Brahmins
etc.
v) Saivulu: The Saivite Brahmins follow the Saiva aagamas. However, they
study Vedas also and belong to Krishna Yajurveda school. One of the sects of
these
saivite
Brahmins
is
called Aradhyas,
related
toPanditaradhyas of Sivakaviyugamu (Era of Saiva poets) of 12th century. They
generally run Saiva and Shakti shrines, often very large, and famous ones like
Kalesvaram, Vemulavada, Srisailam, Kalahasti, etc. They have a link to Kashmir
Saivism, Varanasi and Jyotirlinga shrines all over India like Kedarnath. The rituals
they follow are different from the smaartas. Aradhyas are in fact semiconverted
Lingayats. They following Basava and attach great importance to Linga
worship. However, they adhere to Brahminism, recite Gayatri prayers and marry
Smaarta Brahmins. Although Lingayat Saiva religion attempted to dismatle the
tribal differences, the Lingayats adhere to their original castes naturally. Thus
Aradhyas remain designated to be Brahmins, just like other castes in Lingayat
religion (followers of Basava) today, e.g., various Jangamas.