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VARIANT: PSIONICS IS DIFFERENT

The standard psionics system treats psionic energy and magic as mutually and equally vulnerable
to a dispel magic spell or a dispel psionics power. Spell resistance protects against powers just as it protects
against spells, while power resistance protects against spells as it does against powers. For example, a
dragon with spell resistance 18 also has power resistance 18 against any power. Likewise, spells that
protect against mind-affecting effects work against mind-affecting powers and vice versa. There are many
good reasons to treat psionics this way, but the primary one concerns game balance. The core D&D game is
already designed to handle magic in all its intricacies. Any system that strays too far from this balanced rule
foundation runs the risk of becoming a tacked-on system that is not integrated with the rest of the game.
This kind of situation can add complexity to a campaign, however. Say you are playing a character
using a new psionics system that is not integrated with magic, in a campaign designed exclusively for
magic and spellcasters. When you appear on the scene, you are the lone psionic being in your region, or
even in the world. Nothing can innately resist the alien energies of your mind (although saving throws still
work normally). Of course, whats good for the goose is good for the ganderto you, magic is the
unstoppable alien energy that you cannot dispel with your powers or resist successfully. Your only viable
options are to befriend a spellcaster or two or acquire magic items that offer some measure of protection
against magic. This section provides guidelines for differentiating between magic and psionics. Remember
that this is an optional method of dealing with psionics, one that should be embraced only by a DM willing
to do additional preparation between games to ensure balance.
Dispelling: Dispel magic has no effect when cast against any psionic power, ability, or item. Likewise,
dispel psionics is only so much noise and light when manifested against a spell, effect, or item.
Diminished Effect: Alternatively, dispel magic has a diminished effect on psionic powers, while dispel
psionics has a diminished effect on magic. When making a dispel check against the opposing energy,
the check is assessed a 4 penalty.
Mind-Affecting Spells and Powers: Spells and special abilities that protect the mind against enchantments
cannot protect against psionic versions of the same effects. For instance, elves do not gain the +2 bonus
on their Will saves against psionic charm that they do against magical charm person. Creatures
protected from telepathy powers are vulnerable to enchantments.
Diminished Effect: Alternatively, creatures gain only half their normal resistance. For instance, elves
gain a +1 bonus on their Will saving throws to resist telepathy powers.
Dead Magic/Null Psionic Areas: Antimagic field does not hinder psionics, nor does null psionics field
disrupt or suppress magic within its area.
Diminished Effect: Alternatively, psionics have a chance to be hindered in an area of dead magic, and
vice versa. Each round, an opposing effect has only a 50% chance to remain unhindered. If hindered, it
is considered suppressed for 1d4 rounds, then it becomes unhindered for the remaining duration of the
power.
Spell Resistance and Power Resistance: A demons spell resistance is no good against even minor powers
manifested by a 1st-level psionic character (although saving throws apply as normal). Especially
powerful psionic creatures have power resistance, which works against targeted powers but is useless
against targeted spells.
Diminished Effect: Alternatively, spell resistance works against powers, and power resistance works
against spells, though in both cases the power resistance and spell resistance is considered to be 10
lower than its actual value. Thus a creature with spell resistance 25 resists a power as though it had
power resistance 15.
Creature Evolution: In a world where psionic powers work but where spell resistance wont protect
against a power, powerful creatures must have both spell resistance and power resistance or quickly
become extinct. The same can be said of psionic creatures with special protection against mental
energies, but none against magic. Take advantage of the following modifications when using this
option. Similar to the diminished effect options described above, all creatures from the Monster
Manual with spell resistance 10 or higher gain power resistance equal to their spell resistance minus
10. For example, a dragon with spell resistance 18 would also have power resistance 8. All creatures in
the Monster Manual with psionic abilities gain power resistance equal to their spell resistance, if any. A
few creatures detailed in Chapter 8 of this book have power resistance. Under this option, creatures
with power resistance 10 or higher also have spell resistance equal to their power resistance minus 10.
Specialty Spells and Powers: As with creature evolution above, specialty spells and powers must exist
that allow the disparate energies to manipulate each other on a limited scale. For instance, spellcasters

could have a dispel psionics spell, but it is not nearly as powerful against powers as dispel magic is
against equivalent spells. Psions might develop a negate magic power, but it is not as potent against
spells as dispel psionics is against equivalent powers. Generally, any spells or powers that allow spells
to interact with psionics and vice versa should be of higher level and provide less effect than spells or
powers of similar name that remain within their own area of influence. Some examples follow.
Detect Psionics: This 2nd-level spell functions exactly as detect magic, except for its higher level and the
fact that it detects for psionics.
Detect Magic: This 2nd-level power functions like a standard detect magic, except for its higher level and
the fact that it detects for magic.
Negate Psionics: This 5th-level spell functions as if cast by a caster two levels lower than the casters
actual level. It is otherwise similar to dispel magic, except that it targets psionics.
Negate Magic: This 5th-level power functions as if manifested by a manifester two levels lower than the
manifesters actual level. Otherwise, it is similar to dispel psionics, except that it targets magic

VARIANT: METAMAGIC AS METAPSIONIC


As per the Epic Level Handbook, Whenever a feat concerns concerning or altering a spell in some
fashion, your psionic character must do some translation. Sometimes this translation is straightforward as
changing a few names. Translating metamagic feats to metapsionic feats requires that you read spellcraft
prerequisites as Psicraft. It also requires you to do a little math. Instead of casting a spell at a higher level, a
psionic character pays more power points. For every spell slot one level higher then the spells actual level
the metamagic feat requires, the metapsionic feat requires you to pay a power point cost equal to the
standard cost + 2. Thus a metamagic feat that increases a spells level by three levels would cost an
additional 6 power points to manifest in the metapsionic version. Likewise, when a fear such as improved
metamagic allows a spellcaster to pay one level less to use a metamagic feat, the hypothetical psionic
version (Improved Metapsionics) allows you to pay 2 power points less for a given metapsionic feat you
know.
Editor: If you accept that magic = psionics, which is the standard default position of WotC, then all
metamagic feats can be used as RAW on psionic powers. However, the editor needs to point out that
the psionic version is almost ALWAYS superior to a converted metamagic feat. Since this is the file of
variants, here are all the translated metamagic feats. Any feat that requires something that psionics
does not use (For example, Black lore of Moil is for necromantic spells only), the feat was not
translated. It is up to a DM to include these or not. It is the editors opinion that the actual RAW
metapsionic feats are just fine, but if you want to crank things up a bit, well then, go to town. Just
remember, all these feats follow the standard metapsionic feat rules, including the need to expend
psionic focus to add them to a power you are trying to manifest.
All that said, I highly recommend against using these feats in a psionics campaign. There are
dozens of feats here, some suck so bad as to not be worth considering. Some could be potentially game
breaking. I just dont know. I dont have the time to play test them, and I rather think they are ripe for
some sort of abuse. The feat that lets you use charm spells on Undead, for example. For a normal
wizard, not so bad. For a psionic PC who can apply metapsionics on the fly, the limitation isnt really a
limitation.
But maybe you want to run a high powered psionics campaign. Well then, open those floodgates
and see what happens. Or better still, keep these for the NPCs only. That way you have a few tricks up
your sleeves if you need to pull something out of your ass. Either way, let me know how it turns out so
I can update my notes. Remember, for some people, your only purpose may be to serve as a warning to
others. So let me know how it worked out for you.

BEND POWER
- DRAGON COMPENDIUM (3.5)
Cover does little to reduce the effectiveness of your power.
Power Point Cost: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: You reduce all benefits from cover for creatures affected by one of your spells. Target creatures
gain no cover bonuses to Armor Class against a bent spell, and any saving throws made by creatures in

its area of effect gain no cover bonuses. This feat does not allow your spell to affect any target that
would not normally be affected (for example, a target with total cover still cannot be affected).
Editor: How often does cover come up in your game? Use an area effect instead. Maybe a ray specialist
might want this. Is it worth a +2 adjustment to do so? A campaign specific feat if I ever saw one. There
are a few situations it might be valuable, but if you have a lazy DM who plays combat fast and loose,
this feat is worthless.

BLISTERING POWER
- PLAYERS HANDBOOK 2 (3.5)
Your fire powers sear the flesh from your enemies bones, leaving them wracked with pain.
Power Point Cost: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: This metamagic feat can be applied only to a power that has the fire descriptor. A blistering power
deals an extra 2 points of fire damage per level of the power. In addition to the powers normal effect,
any creature that fails its save against a blistering power takes a 2 penalty on attack rolls and checks
until the beginning of your next turn.
Editor: There are better feats to take. It only increases the damage by the level of the power, not by the
level of the manifester. Since so many energy powers depend on augmentation, this is worthless.

BORN OF THE THREE THUNDERS


- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You have learned to marry the power of lightning and thunder in your electricity and sonic powers.
Power Point Cost: +0
Prerequisites: Knowledge (nature) 4 ranks, Psionic Energy Substitution (electricity).
Benefit: When you cast a power with either the electricity descriptor or the sonic descriptor that deals hit
point damage, you can declare that power to be Born of the three thunders, with half its damage dealt
as electricity damage and half dealt as sonic damage.
In addition, the power concludes with a mighty thunderclap that stuns all creatures that take
damage from the power for 1 round unless they succeed on a Fortitude save, then knocks stunned
creatures prone unless they succeed on a Reflex save (both saves at the same DC as the base power).
Channeling the three thunders is costly, though, and you are automatically dazed for 1 round after
doing so. In addition, its descriptor changes to include both energy types.
Condition, Dazed: Unable to act normally. A dazed character can take no actions, but has no penalty to
AC.
Condition, Prone: Lying on the ground. An attacker who is prone has a 4 penalty on melee attack rolls
and cannot use a ranged weapon (except for a crossbow). A defender who is prone gains a +4 bonus to
Armor Class against ranged attacks, but takes a 4 penalty to AC against melee attacks.
Condition, Stunned: A stunned creature drops everything held, cant take actions, takes a 2 penalty to
AC, and loses his Dexterity bonus to AC (if any).
Editor: As far as metamagic feats go, this one doesn't have a lot of kick, and as a metapsionic, its worse.
This feat works well with odd combos, but combining metapsionic powers is a whole lot of work.

CITY POWER
- CITYSCAPE (3.5)
You can use the city itself to shape and enhance your manifesting.
Spell Level: +0
Prerequisites: Manifester level 3rd.
Benefit: You can modify any damaging power you cast to incorporate the urban environment. When
casting an offensive power with an energy subtype acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonicyou can
invest the power with a portion of the citys spirit. In most cases, this investment is gritty and
spectacular, drawing dirt, gravel, nails, and other nearby detritus into the power effect. In other cases,
the investiture is much more subtle, often merely changing the look of the power. Only half the
damage from a power with the appropriate subtype is considered energy damage, and is thus subject to
resistances or immunities. The remainder comes from the city itself, and is not subject to power or
energy resistances or immunities. This investiture only occurs for powers cast within urban

environments, defined as any area above the size of a small.


Editor: If you are a psionics guys who dwells in the city 90% of the time, then this might be of use.
Unlikely, but possible.

COERCIVE POWER
- DROW OF THE UNDERDARK (3.5)
Living foes damaged by your power become more pliable and vulnerable to your commands.
Power Point Cost: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: You can alter a power that deals damage to foes so that any living creature dealt damage by the
spell takes a 2 penalty on Will saves for 3 rounds. Penalties from multiple coercive spells do not
stack.
Editor: Useful to a mentalist, but you need a power that isnt will based to begin with.

CONSECRATE POWER
- COMPLETE DIVINE (3.5)
- BOOK OF EXALTED DEEDS (3.5)
You can imbue your powers with the raw energy of good.
Power Point Cost: +1
Prerequisites: Any good alignment.
Benefit: A power you modify with this feat gains the good descriptor. Furthermore, if the power deals
damage, half that damage (rounded down) results from divine power and cant be reduced by
resistance or immunity to energy-based attacks.
Editor: For a holy roller who needs to get through damage reduction, this isnt bad. The variable nature of
most energy attack powers means you usually can find a way around most DR or energy resistance, but
this takes it to a new level.

CORRUPT POWER
- BOOK OF VILE DARKNESS (3.0)
- CHAMPIONS OF RUIN (3.5)
- COMPLETE DIVINE (3.5)
You can transform one of your powers into an evil version of itself.
Power Point Cost: +1
Prerequisites: Any evil alignment.
Benefit: This feat adds the evil descriptor to a power. Furthermore, if the power deals damage, half of the
damage (rounded down) results directly from divine power and is therefore not subject to be reduced
by resistance or immunity to energy-based attacks.
Editor: See consecrate Power

DEAFENING SPELL
- DROW OF THE UNDERDARK (3.5)
You can modify a spell so it deafens targets.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: You can alter a spell that deals damage to foes so that any living creature dealt damage by the spell
is also deafened for 1 round. The effects from multiple deafening spells do not stack.
Condition, Deafened: Unable to hear. A deafened character takes a 4 penalty on initiative checks,
automatically fails Listen checks, and has a 20% chance of spell failure when casting spells with verbal
components.
Editor: Unless you are dealing with critters that use blindsight that depends on sound, this feat is of
dubious use. Maybe itll screw up a spellcaster. Maybe it makes hearing orders problematic. Perhaps it
would be useful against stopping a bard from buffing people by singing. All of these are a stretch. You
have better feats to take.

DECEPTIVE SPELL
- CITYSCAPE (3.5)
You can cast spells that seem to come from somewhere other than where they should.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: A deceptive spell appears to come from any direction you choose. For instance, a magic missile
might shoot from a nearby doorway, rather than from your own finger, or a lightning bolt might
emerge from the floor rather than from you. You cannot use this feat to gain a bonus to hit, to
circumvent cover, to flank, or in any other way to gain a numeric or mechanical advantage on any
attack rolls. Its purpose is to disguise the source of the spell, preventing anyone who did not actively
observe you casting it from recognizing you as its caster. You cannot apply Deceptive Spell to any
spell with a range of touch or a target of you.
Editor: If you are an illusionist, this feat ranks up there with silent spell and still spell. The ability to
misdirect and confuse your enemies, which makes it dovetail nicely with illusionist. An illusion of a
guard lightning bolting the king is so much more effective if the lightning bolt actually comes from the
guard's location. If you dont care who knows you are the ultimate badass, then this feat is worthless.

DISRUPTING SPELL
- FAITHS AND PANTHEONS (3.0)
- FIENDISH CODEX 2: TYRANTS OF THE NINE HELLS (3.5)
You can cast spells that disrupt other casters magical capabilities.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: You can alter a spell so it interferes with one or more targets supernatural and spell-like abilities,
as well as any spells they cast. A disrupting spell temporarily reduces the save DC of any spell, spelllike, or supernatural ability the affected creature or creatures can cast or use by 2. The effect of a
disrupting spell lasts for a number of rounds equal to the spells unmodified level. Multiple disrupting
spells do not stack. A disrupting spell has no effect on magic items.
Editor: A 3.0 Feat. This feat may not be allowed by your DM. It use is limited. It is far better to kill the
target casting spells you don't like, then making it easier to resist said spells.

EARTHBOUND SPELL
- PLAYERS HANDBOOK 2 (3.5)
You bind a spell into the rock and soil, leaving it there until an opponent stumbles across it. At that
time, the spell releases its energy.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: When you cast an earthbound spell, you place it within a square adjacent to you. You must specify
all effects, options, and other relevant variables when you cast the spell. The next creature to enter the
warded square triggers the spell. If the spell affects an area, that square is the center of the area or the
point at which the area begins. For a cone, line, or similar area, you must designate the direction in
which the cone or line extends. An earthbound spell that does not affect an area targets the creature that
triggered it. You cannot apply the Earthbound Spell metamagic feat to a spell with a range of personal.
An earthbound spell remains in place for 1 hour or until it is triggered. A Search check (DC 25 + the
spells level) reveals its presence, as does detect magic and similar abilities. A character with
trapfinding can make a Disable Device check (DC 25 + the spells level) to remove an earthbound spell
(as if it is a magic trap). A dispel magic effect can also remove an earthbound spell, thus preventing it
from functioning.
Editor: Far superior to Delay spell, this feat allows the caster to booby trap a corridor or archway and leave
a few surprises behind while fleeing, or while planning an ambush. An interesting variant is a cleric
using this to leave behind "healing squares" That other PCs could move into when they needed it.
Remember, defaulting to a cure spell is a spontaneous casting, thus a metamagic feat can be applied
with a full round action.
A broken way to use this feat is available to the druid. You can spontaneously cast a summon
nature's ally spell, thus allowing you to place it in a square that is triggered when entered. You can

specify that the summon creature does nothing and to await your command. It can't be summoned in
the square that was just entered, so the creature has to appear next to the square. You can choose which
square it appears in at the time you set this up. Then place another earthbound summoning spell in the
square the creature is supposed to appear in. Repeat with as many summoning spells as you wish.
Then, within the next hour, step on the first square and the chain of triggered spells will give you a line
of summoned creatures awaiting your commands.
Alas, as cool as the feat is, its worth more to a spontaneous spellcaster then one who has to
memorize. So, over all, we must make this an average feat.

ENERGIZE SPELL
- LIBRIS MORTIS (3.5)
Your spells channel positive energy to deal extra damage to undead creatures, but are less effective
against other opponents.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: Non-evil alignment.
Benefit: Your spells are infused with positive energy. An energized spell deals an extra 50% damage to
undead creatures, but deals 50% less damage to non-undead creatures and to objects. A character that
has the ability to channel negative energy to rebuke or command undead cannot select this feat.
Editor: Bang for your buck, you can't beat this for stomping undead. It's only a +1 but gives you the same
effect as Empower, but better. It doesnt matter if the damage is variable or not. You cant empower a
Heal spell, but you can energize it, assuming you are trying to kill undead with it. As a bonus, if you
frequently have to drop a Fireball on your own front line fighters, it doesn't hurt them as much if they
fail their save. Combined with empower, this would do double damage to undead for the same cost as
maximize. However, if your campaign lacks undead or only encounters it infrequently, this feat
becomes a waste of space.

ENERVATE SPELL
- LIBRIS MORTIS (3.5)
Your spells channel negative energy to deal extra damage to living creatures, but are less effective
against unliving opponents.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: Non-good alignment
Benefit: Your spells are infused with negative energy. An enervated spell deals an extra 50% damage to
living creatures, but deals 50% less damage to constructs, undead, and objects. A character that has the
ability to channel positive energy to turn undead cannot select this feat.
Editor: The flip side of Energize Spell, this feat is a weaker version of Empower. However, it stacks with
empower, which you can use as a sudden or a rod. If you are a necromancer, this spell starts to look
better and better, especially when you wish to blast your living foes with area effect and while
minimizing damage to your undead servants. Most importantly, it does 50% more damage, not 50%
more variable damage. It will work with Harm, for example, when empower wont. For the most part,
leave this one to the NPCs until you run out of good feats to take.

ENTANGLING SPELL
- CHAMPIONS OF RUIN (3.5)
Your spell releases residual eldritch power that entangles your enemies.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: The feat can be applied to any instantaneous spell that deals acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic
damage, such as fireball or lightning bolt. After the spell is cast, lingering tendrils of raw energy
persist; creatures damaged by the spell are entangled for 1 round. The spell is considered to be in effect
during this time and can be dispelled normally.
Condition, Entangled: Ensnared. Being entangled impedes movement, but does not entirely prevent it
unless the bonds are anchored to an immobile object or tethered by an opposing force. An entangled
creature moves at half speed, cannot run or charge, and takes a 2 penalty on attack rolls and a 4

penalty to its effective Dexterity score. An entangled character that attempts to cast a spell must make a
Concentration check (DC 15 + the spells level) or lose the spell.
Editor: On one hand, the idea of being able to cast burning hands over and over while my enemies just lie
there and take it is appealing. On the other, I could cast fireball and kill them on the first shot. There
are far more effective feats to take.

EXPLOSIVE SPELL
- UNAPPROACHABLE EAST (3.5)
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You can cast spells that blast creatures off their feet.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: On a failed Reflex save, an explosive spell ejects any creature caught in its area, sending it to a
location outside the nearest edge of that area, dealing additional damage and further knocking creatures
prone. Any creature moved in this manner also takes an additional 1d6 points of damage per 10 feet
moved (no additional damage if moved less than 10 feet by the effect) and is knocked prone. If some
obstacle prevents a blasted creature from being moved to the edge of the effect, the creature is stopped
and takes 1d6 points of damage from striking the barrier (in addition to any damage taken from the
distance moved before then). In any event, this movement does not provoke attacks of opportunity.
Explosive Spell can be applied only to spells that allow Reflex saves and affect an area (a cone,
cylinder, line, or burst).
Condition, Prone: Lying on the ground. An attacker who is prone has a 4 penalty on melee attack rolls
and cannot use a ranged weapon (except for a crossbow). A defender who is prone gains a +4 bonus to
Armor Class against ranged attacks, but takes a 4 penalty to AC against melee attacks.
Editor: As it stands, it's situational specific. Unless you catch someone 'just' right, you'll never line up the
perfect shot and the additional damage will never equal what you could do if you just spent the same
+2 adjustment to empower the damn thing. Also, Explosive Spell says "any creature" so, no, you can't
affect houses unless they happen to be alive ... like the dread gazebo.
Explosive spell is not all that well written. I don't think they contemplated how this would affect
you in three dimensions. Some spells might stick low to the ground, thus making it so the closest edge
would be straight up. When I think of an explosion, I think of it coming from a single point. So, to that
end, I present the non-cannon, suggested addendum to Explosive Spell. Its completely optional. Have
your DM approve.
Addendum
1. Targets too large to fit inside the area of an explosive spell, or are only partially inside an explosive
spell are immune to the explosive effects, but still affected by the spell's primary effect.
2. If you are on a corner square, you will always travel diagonally away from the point of origin.
3. The player cannot 'hook it' and try to direct the blast, nor can he put 'English' on it, nor spin, or any
way shape or form direct the blast, other then unleash it. The DM has final say on what direction the
blast takes a target.
4. Maximum damage is 10d6
Cone: You get thrown back to the far end of the cone from the point of origination. The direction is
measured from the corner of the point of origin, to the target, and then the DM makes a rough
estimate where the target lands, either randomly or by eyeballing it.
Cylinder: This is the only explosion that goes up and down. If it is located near a source of gravity, the
cylinder is always perpendicular to the gravity well. If there is no gravity (i.e. Astral Plane), then
orientation and direction of force are at the whim of the player. Some spells have a clear direction of
force (i.e. flame strike) others do not. The DM rules if a given spell has a given orientation or not. If
you are using the sculpt spell metamagic feat, you still are limited to being perpendicular to the plane
of gravity, but the direction of force is reversible according to the caster's wishes.
If its coming down, the target stays in the same square but takes 1d6 from hitting the ground if the
spell is targeting someone on a stable surface. If the target is flying, 1d6 for every 10 feet in the air
the target was flying, and an additional 1d6 if he is forced to hit the ground. If the blast is going up,
the target flies up into the air. If he can fly, he takes no damage from the explosion; he just is moved
the required distance. If there is a ceiling, he takes damage per normal explosion rules. If he can't fly,
he takes falling damage from whatever point he falls from, next round. He is assumed to be

'hovering' for one round, and then he falls at the beginning of your action in the next round. Unless
he can fly, he is considered 'prone' and cannot take any action he could not do while prone. He can
attempt a tumbling check equal to DC 20 to become 'standing' as a move action.
One could, in theory, use an explosive cylinder to propel them up to a higher level. The DM is
encouraged to make such an act a tumbling check at a DC of about 20 to remain orientated properly.
Next he needs to make a jump check to actually jump. It's a judgment call as to what the DC is.
Simply trying to get blown up through a hole in the roof might be a DC 20 jump. Running off a cliff,
jumping, then having a series of sculpted cylinder explosive fireballs go off so you can jump from
one to the next across a lava filled chasm like Mario trying to find the princess should be about a 30.
Each. Use your best judgment.
Line: Because a line is very narrow, the first target hit with the attack makes his saving throw first. If he
fails, he moves back to the end of the line, assuming there are no other targets. If there is a second
target in line, when the first target impacts the second target, the first target takes 1d6 for every 10
feet and an additional 1d6 upon impact. There is no damage to the second, at this point. The next
target then makes a reflex save. If the second target makes it, everything stops. If he fails, the first
target falls prone in the second target's square and the second target goes flying back. Repeat process
until the end.
Example: You hit someone with a widened Sculpted Line of explosive Burning hands. You catch him
right in front of you. He fails the saving throw. You just happen to be outdoors. He goes back 235
feet and you time it so he hits a tree. He should take 23d6 + 1d6 for impact, but takes 10d6 (max
damage) instead.
Example: You hit three goblins in a row with a sculpted line of explosive burning hands. 10 feet away, 40
feet away, and 100 feet away. The first fails his reflex save. He goes back 30 feet, takes 3d6 + 1d6
for impact for a total of 4d6. The second one fails his saving throw. He flies back 60 feet, takes 6d6
and another 1d6 for the impact with the third target for a total of 7d6. The third target makes his
reflex save and takes no explosive damage. The first two take the full 5d4 from the burning hands.
The third one only takes half. If the last one failed, he'd have gone back 20 feet for only 2d6, but no
impact damage.
Example: You use a widened, sculpted explosive Burning Hands in a 10' corridor thirty feet to the far
wall of a T-bone intersection. The corridor is packed 1 goblin to a square. Your Line is 10 wide and
240' long, but the corridor stops it at 30 feet. On the left side of the corridor, the first goblin saves,
nothing happens to the left side. The right side, everyone fails. Because the corridor is packed, the
right side goblins all fall back one square, taking no distance damage (less then 10 feet movement)
but all take 1d6 impact damage. Two goblins are prone in the same square up against the far wall and
cannot fight effectively until one of them exits the square. Everyone on the left takes half damage
from the burning hands. Everyone on the right takes full damage.
Example: You Widen Sculpt explosive burning hands and hit an Adult Red Dragon square in the face. He
laughs so hard he accidentally collapses the roof of the cave and kills you.
Sphere: All creatures in the area of an explosive fireball that fail their saving throws not only take full
damage but are pushed to the closest square outside the perimeter of the spells 20-foot-radius
spread.
Squares: You are thrown to the closest edge from the center of each square. Because squares are only 10
on a side, you will never take distance damage, but you can still take 1d6 of impact damage with a
wall or another creature. If you are caught between two squares and would be pushed from one to
the other, then back again, the two squares cancel each other out and the target goes no where, takes
no damage from the explosion, but will fall down and go prone.
If a square is widened to 20 feet on a side, it is possible to move 15 feet, so you could take 1d6
explosive, but if you are caught between two exploding squares, you stop inside the edge of the
square you started in and take damage based on how far you moved (5 feet or 10 feet, depending on
the point you started at), then fall prone.

FELL ANIMATE
- LIBRIS MORTIS (3.5)
Living foes slain by your spell may rise as zombies.
Spell Level: +3
Prerequisites: None

Benefit: You can alter a spell that deals damage to foes. Any living creature that could normally be raised
as a zombie and that does not possess more than double your Hit Dice, when slain outright by a fell
animated spell, rises as a zombie under your control at the beginning of your next action. Even if you
kill several creatures with a single fell animated spell, you cant create more Hit Dice of undead than
twice your caster level. The standard rules for controlling undead apply to newly created undead
gained through this metamagic feat.
Editor: For a necromancer this feat has a lot of potential, but mostly from a psychological viewpoint. You
need to target foes that are weak so you are assured of killing the target and resulting in zombies. If the
targets are that weak, then the zombies you create are unlikely to be needed. On the other hand, seeing
a fireball give rise to a hoard of crispy zombies that used to be your front line fighters is sure to give
your enemies pause. There are certainly more useful metamagic feats with a +3 level adjustment.
The one sweet spot is when you add this to something like Acid Splash, a zero level spell.
Normally Animate Dead costs 25 gp/HD. But if your acid splash is the last hp of damage, your target
rises as a zombie. The problem is timing, but it could be a cost saver.

FELL DRAIN
- LIBRIS MORTIS (3.5)
Living foes damaged by your spell also gain a negative level.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: You can alter a spell that deals damage to foes so that any living creature that is dealt damage also
gains a negative level. If the subject has at least as many negative levels as Hit Dice, it dies. Assuming
the subject survives, the negative level disappears (without requiring a Fortitude save) after a number
of hours equal to your caster level (maximum 15).
Condition, Negative Level: For each negative level gained, a creature takes a 1 penalty on all attack rolls,
saving throws, skill checks, and ability checks, loses 5 hit points, and takes a 1 penalty to effective
level. (That is, whenever the creatures level is used in a die roll or calculation, reduce its value by 1
for each negative level.) In addition, a spellcaster loses one spell or spell slot from the highest spell
level the target can cast. If two or more spells fit this criterion, the caster decides which one becomes
inaccessible.
Editor: This spell mixes different types of attacks, level drain with a damaging attack. As a rule, it is far
better to focus on one type then to spread yourself thin. That being said, combining this with a never
miss attack, like magic missile, and you can drain a wide number of targets. Level loss with no save
also tends to terrify most high-level targets. PCs tend to freak when they lose levels, because they
never know how long it is for.
Its important to note that the way this feat reads, it only gives one negative level per casting. A
spell that does damage over time (i.e. Melfs Acid Arrow) only grants the negative level on the first
round. Something like Acid Cloud would give the penalty the first time someone passed through,
regardless if it was the first round or the fifth. A wand of fell drain Magic Missiles would be a scary
thing.
Recommended Spells: Caltrops, Magic Missile, Sonic Snap

FELL FRIGHTEN
- LIBRIS MORTIS (3.5)
Living foes damaged by your spell are also shaken.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: You can alter a spell that deals damage to foes so that any creature subject to fear effects and
mind-affecting spells and abilities that is dealt damage also becomes shaken for 1 minute.
Condition, Shaken: Mildly fearful. A shaken character takes a 2 penalty on attack rolls, saving throws,
skill checks, and ability checks.
Editor: The negatives for being shaken are only -2. For a +2 level adjustment, this doesn't compare to
empower. It may have uses when combined with certain fear-based spells, but personally it seems like
too much effort. It may be worth it if you could effect a wide number of targets at the same time, or
just really need your target to fail a skill check.

FELL WEAKEN
- LIBRIS MORTIS (3.5)
Living foes damaged by your spell are also weakened.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: You can alter a spell that deals damage to foes so that any living creature that is dealt damage also
takes a 4 penalty to Strength for 1 minute. Strength penalties from multiple spells enhanced by the
Fell Weakening feat do not stack.
Editor: There is an interesting synergy when a damage spell with this feat is used in conjunction with a
Ray of Exhaustion or Ray of Enfeeblement. You can quickly reduce a target to zero strength, which is
just as good as killing them, and in some cases, better. A Bestow Curse with black lore of moil (BloM)
damage and this feat could drop someone to zero strength in one shot.
Recommended Spells: Bestow Curse (w/BloM), Ray of Enfeeblement (w/BloM), Ray of Exhaustion
(w/BloM)

FIERY SPELL
- Sandstorm 3.5
Your fire magic is bolstered, further scorching your enemies.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: A fiery spell deals an extra point (+1) of fire damage for each die of damage the spell deals. This
feat can be applied only to spells with the fire descriptor.
Example: If a 9th-level wizard with this feat casts a fiery fireball, the fireball deals 9d6+9 points of
damage. A fiery spell uses up a spell slot one level higher than the spells actual level.
Editor: Ironically, I almost want to label this one Kill It With Fire. This feat is the redheaded stepchild of
Blistering Spell. True, it adds an extra +1 damage per die, but at low levels its a trap, and at higher
levels there are better feats. Still, some mages just want to watch the world burn and with the right
feats, you can make this a +0 level adjustment. Its not totally useless, but the keyword is totally.
Leave this to the fire specialist.

FLASH FROST SPELL


- PLAYERS HANDBOOK 2 (3.5)
Your spells that use cold and ice to damage your foes leave behind a thin layer of slippery frost.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: This metamagic feat can be applied only to spells that have the cold descriptor and that affect an
area. A flash frost spell deals an extra 2 points of cold damage per level of the spell to all targets in the
area. When you cast such a spell, the area of the spell is covered with a slippery layer of ice for 1
round. Anyone attempting to move through this icy area must make a DC 10 Balance check or fall
prone. A creature that runs or charges through the area must make a DC 20 Balance check to avoid
falling.
Editor: The damage added just does not justify the cost. However, you may find the slippery layer of ice to
be useful in a limited number of circumstances. Alas, the one round duration tends to discourage me.
Your mileage may vary.

FORTIFY SPELL
- UNAPPROACHABLE EAST (3.5)
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You cast spells that more easily penetrate spell resistance.
Spell Level: Variable
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: A fortified spell is treated as having a higher caster level for the purpose of defeating a targets
spell resistance. You prepare and cast the spell in a higher-level spell slot than normal, with each

additional level giving a +2 bonus on spell penetration checks for the altered spell. Spells that are not
subject to spell resistance are not affected.
Editor: I want to make this yellow. Not quite useless, but you are only going to need it in limited situations.
If you are making use of this feat on a regular basis, you are depending on the same few spells too
much. So chances you are a spontaneous spell caster. Youd be better off taking heighten spell for the
versatility.

IMBUED SUMMONING
- PLAYERS HANDBOOK 2 (3.5)
Your summoning spells gain an element of surprise. You can summon creatures that come into
existence with the benefit of a spell such as invisibility or bulls strength. Only one summoned creature
(chosen by you) gains the benefit of the spell you choose to cast.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: Augment Summoning, Spell Focus (conjuration).
Benefit: When you cast a spell from the summoning sub-school, you can choose to grant the summoned
creature the benefit of any spell of 3rd level or lower you can cast that has a range of touch. You cast
the spell you wish to grant the creature (using a prepared spell or a spell slot) at the same time you cast
your summoning spell. The creature gains the benefit of the spell when it appears.
Editor: The one problem a high level caster has is casting all his spells. This will help you to speed up
spellcasting. Speed kills. Alas, it is best on a summon spell that will be summoning one critter.

INVISIBLE SPELL
- CITYSCAPE (3.5)
You can make your spell effects invisible.
Spell Level: +0
Prerequisites: Any metamagic feat.
Benefit: You can modify any spell you cast so that it carries no visual manifestation. All other aspects of
the spell, including range, area, targets, and damage remain the same. Note that this feat has no bearing
on any components required to cast the enhanced spell, so the spells source might still be apparent,
depending on the situation, despite its effects being unseen. Those with detect magic, see invisibility,
or true seeing spells or effects active at the time of the casting will see whatever visual manifestations
typically accompany the spell.
Example: A fireball cast by someone with this feat could be made invisible in the moment of its detonation,
but everyone in the area would still feel the full effect (including the heat), and any flammable
materials ignited by the explosion would still burn visibly with non-magical fire.
Invisible (Condition): Visually undetectable. An invisible creature gains a +2 bonus on attack rolls against
sighted opponents, and ignores its opponents Dexterity bonus to AC (if any). (Invisibility has no effect
against blinded or otherwise non-sighted creatures.) An invisible creatures location cannot be
pinpointed by visual means. It has total concealment; even if an attacker correctly guesses the invisible
creatures location, the attacker has a 50% miss chance in combat. An invisible creature gains a +40
bonus on Hide checks if immobile, or a +20 bonus on Hide checks if moving. Locating the square an
invisible creature occupies requires a Spot check (DC 40 if the creature is immobile, DC 20 if the
creature moved during its last turn), modified by appropriate factors (such as an armor check penalty
or a penalty for movement).
Editor (Invisible Attack): Combined with Still, Silent, and Eschew Materials, you can blast people from the
shadows with impunity. What I mean by that is, if you make no gesture, no sound, and no indication
that you are attacking, and the target has no means of detecting the attack, you have effectively fallen
under the rules of an invisible attack.
Editor (Punch line): Invisible Spell is so poorly-written that relying on RAW with it is a waste of time.
Either you have creatures that are invisible no matter what -- which is ridiculously overpowered for a
+0 feat and makes it one of the greatest summoning feats out there (up with Greenbound and
Rashemani Elementals) -- or god only knows how it applies. So, What we have here is a situation
where every time it is applied to a spell, you have to ask the DM what his opinion is, and just accept it.

Editor (DMs): However, this guide is made for Players and DMs, so simply saying "Ask your DM." is a
cop-out. So, I propose the following "guidelines". This is subject to approval each DM, but this is the
best that I could come up with.
Editor (Duration): A good metric for determining what exactly turns invisible is how long does the spell
last. It is invisible spell, so it stands to reason when the spell ends, so does the invisibility. Spells with
an Instantaneous duration are easy to figure out. Everything about the spell is invisible, but the next
instant after you cast it, the aftermath is quite visible. So while a spell may create something out of
nothing, if the spell has an instant duration, the resulting object is visible.
Editor (Abjuration): They create physical or magical barriers, negate magical or physical abilities, harm
trespassers, or even banish the subject of the spell to another plane of existence. if the spell has a
duration, the spell would be invisible during that time.
Editor (Conjuration): Some schools call things from other locations, or transport objects from one location
to another. Some schools create objects. If the spell merely transports the creature/object, then the
transportation has no visual manifestation, but the subject of the transportation is visible. If the spell
creates something, then the created object/creature is invisible for as long as the spell is in effect.
However, if the object does something to make it visible under the rules of the spell Invisibility (makes
an attack), then said object appears.
Editor (Divination): Divinations rarely have any sort of visual manifestation.
Editor (Enchantment): Enchantments normally have no visible manifestation.
Editor (Evocation): Most evocations are instants, but if it has a duration, it would be invisible until the
spell expired.
Editor (Necromancy): Anything a necromancy spell creates would be invisible, like a spectral hand.
However, if you are animating the dead, the spell is turning an object from one thing to another. The
object is subject to the spell, but not a manifestation of the spell. So Animated corpses would not start
out invisible.
Editor (Transformation): A spell's special effect would be invisible, like the green ray of a disintegrate
spell. The object the transformation targets is the subject of the spell, not the creation of the spell, and
would thus be visible.
Editor (Permissive Viewpoint-Invisible Critters): Some believe that if you make/summon a creature using
invisible spell, the create is invisible for the duration of the spell, regardless of any attacks the creature
does. This is subject to DM approval.
Editor (Permissive Viewpoint-Polymorph): Some DMs believe that if you do an invisible polymorph subschool spell, you turn into an invisible version of whatever you are trying to turn into. Another
viewpoint is that you look the same, but have all the perks of what you wanted to turn into. The editor
does not advocate either viewpoint, but includes them for sake of completeness. Check with your DM.
Editor (Extremely Limited Viewpoint): In this viewpoint, only spells that have a effect line can be made
invisible. Whatever is on the effect line is made invisible and remains invisible until the spell expires.
This limits the number of spells it works on, but does make it rather specific what can be made
invisible. Discuss with your DM before taking this feat.

LINGERING SPELL
- CHAMPIONS OF RUIN (3.5)
Residual eldritch energy from your spell continues to harm your enemies after the spells main effect
has expired.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: The feat can be applied to any one instantaneous spell that deals acid, cold, electricity, fire, or
sonic damage, such as fireball or lightning bolt. After the spell is cast, lingering tendrils of energy
persist, dealing 1d6 points of damage of the appropriate energy type at the beginning of your next turn
to all creatures initially damaged by the spell. The spell is considered to be in effect during this time
and can be dispelled normally.
Editor: An extra +1 to your level for an additional +1d6 on the following round, after the target may
already be dead, is a waste of a feat. It could be useful, but you have to work at it. It shows the most
use with low damage spells.
Recommended Spells: Acid Cloud, Sonic Snap.

LORD OF THE UTTERCOLD


- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
Through careful study of the Elemental Planes and their interactions with the Negative Energy Plane,
you have learned to wield the uttercold.
Spell Level: +0
Prerequisites: Knowledge (the planes) 9 ranks, Energy Substitution (cold), ability to cast a spell with the
cold descriptor.
Benefit: You can turn spells with the cold descriptor into uttercold spells. Half the damage dealt by an
uttercold spell is cold damage, and the other half is negative energy damage. The spells saving throw
remains unchanged, but creatures can apply cold resistance or immunity to cold only to the cold
portion of the damage. An undead creature can be healed by the negative energy damage of an
uttercold spell, though if it doesnt have resistance to cold, the effects of damage and healing cancel
each other out.
Editor: Good only for complex, specialized necromancer builds.

NONLETHAL SUBSTITUTION
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
- BOOK OF EXALTED DEEDS (3.5)
You can modify a spell that uses energy to deal damage to deal non-lethal damage instead.
Spell Level: +0
Prerequisites: Any other metamagic feat, Knowledge (arcana) 5 ranks.
Benefit: Choose one type of energy: acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic. You can modify a spell with the
chosen designator to deal nonlethal damage instead of energy damage. The altered spell works
normally in all respects except the type of damage dealt.
Example: A non-lethal fireball spell works in the usual way except it deals non-lethal damage instead of
fire damage.
Editor: Subdual Substitution was absorbed by this feat in 3.5. For the cost of a feat, you can take out your
enemies without killing them. How nice of you. Some may scoff, but other may remember what
happens to a pile of gold when you Fireball a target that is standing on top of it. This is the spell for
looting equipment and for people who like slitting the throats of helpless captives.

OCULAR SPELL
- LORDS OF MADNESS (3.5)
Your study of the terrible powers of the beholder has given you insight into new ways to prepare and
cast spells.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: Knowledge (dungeoneering) 4 ranks, two or more eyes.
Benefit: You can cast a spell with a casting time of 1 full round or less as an ocular spell. An ocular spell
does not take effect immediately, but is instead held in one of your eyes for up to 8 hours. You can
store only two ocular spells in this fashion, even if you have more than two eyes. Only ray spells and
spells with a target other than personal can be cast as ocular spells. When you choose, you can then
cast both of the ocular spells as a full-round action; the spells become brilliant blasts that shoot out
from your eyes. You can choose different targets for the two ocular spells. When you release an ocular
spell, its effect changes to a ray with a range of up to 60 feet. If the spell previously would have
affected multiple creatures, it now affects only the creature struck by the ray. You must succeed on a
ranged touch attack to strike your target with an ocular spell, and the target is still permitted any saving
throw allowed by the spell.
Example: Ferno, an 11th-level wizard with the Ocular Spell feat, could prepare two scorching ray spells as
ocular spells, casting them at the beginning of the day.
Editor: At high levels, casting all your spells every day starts to become a hassle. This speeds up your
spellcasting. You have to use it in eight hours, but hey, chances are you will. And on the upside, its
now silent and still for free! Add deceptive spell or invisible spell and now you can kill with a glance.
Recommended Spells: Affliction.

PIERCING COLD
- FROSTBURN (3.5)
Your cold spells are so cold that they can damage creatures normally resistant or immune to cold.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: You can only apply this metamagic feat to spells with the cold descriptor. Piercing cold spells are
so horribly cold that they are capable of damaging creatures normally unharmed by or resistant to cold.
Piercing cold spells completely ignore any resistance to cold a creature possesses, bypassing this
resistance and dealing damage to the target as if it did not possess any resistance to cold at all. They are
still entitled to whatever other defenses the attack allows (such as saving throws and spell resistance).
Creatures normally immune to cold can be damaged by piercing cold spells as well.
Piercing cold spells deal half damage to these creatures (or one-quarter on a successful saving
throw). Creatures with the cold subtype can tell that a piercing cold spell is colder than normal, but
they remain undamaged by the attack. Creatures with the fire subtype who are damaged by a piercing
cold spell take double normal damage instead of the usual +50%.
Example: Mialee casts a piercing cold cone of cold at a night hag, a creature normally immune to cold. She
makes her level check to penetrate the night hags spell resistance, but the night hag makes her Reflex
save against the spell. Mialee rolls the dice, and her cone of cold deals 42 points of cold damage; since
the night hag made her save, the damage is halved to 21 points. This damage is then halved again
(since the night hag is normally immune to cold), and 10 points of cold damage are actually dealt to the
night hag, who is both shocked and enraged at this unexpected turn of events.
Editor: Are you a cold specialist? Do you often fight creatures with cold resistance or fire subtypes? If so,
this feat is for you. Otherwise, there are more effective generalist type feats available. Basically, this is
energize spell for fire critters. So if you plan on storming an efreet stronghold, nice feat. Otherwise,
pass.
Rod: The piercing cold rod actually comes in a +2 frost dagger. I have no reason to believe that you cannot
craft this magic item without the +2 frost dagger. The costs are given for just the rod, 3,000 gp (lesser),
11,000 gp (normal), 24,500 gp (greater)

PURIFY SPELL
- BOOK OF EXALTED DEEDS (3.5)
You can charge your damaging spells with celestial energy that leaves good creatures unharmed.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: Any good alignment.
Benefit: A spell you modify with this feat gains the good descriptor. Furthermore, if the spell deals damage,
neutral creatures take half damage, or one-quarter with a successful saving throw (if allowed), while
good creatures take no damage at all. Evil outsiders affected by the spell take extra damage: The spells
damage is increased by one die type (each 1d6 becomes 1d8, each 1d8 becomes 2d6, and so on, using
the same progression as weapons increasing in size).
Example: A purified lightning bolt cast by a 7th-level wizard deals 7d6 points of electricity damage to evil
creatures, half damage to neutral creatures, and no damage at all to good creatures caught in its path.
Evil outsiders (except ones immune to electricity) take 7d8 points of damage.
Editor: If you frequently have to drop area effect spells on your allies and hate evil, this feat is a good
choice. In fact, if you are a holy crusader type in a party of good PCs, this feat is a must if you like area
effect damage. Otherwise, no.

RAPID SPELL
- COMPLETE DIVINE (3.5)
You can cast spells with long casting times more quickly.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Only spells with a casting time greater than 1 standard action can be made rapid. A rapid spell with

a casting time of 1 round can be cast as a standard action. A rapid spell with a casting time measured in
rounds can be cast in 1 round. Rapid spells with casting times measured in minutes can be cast in 1
minute, and rapid spells with casting times measured in hours can be cast in 1 hour. A spell can be
made rapid and quickened only if its original casting time was 1 round. This feat can be applied to a
spell cast spontaneously as long as its original casting time was longer than 1 round.
Editor: Originally this spell read 1 FULL round, instead of 1 round. 1 full round is the time from one
initiative in a round to right before the same initiative in the next round. Since this is identical to the
casting time of 1 round, it was changed about halfway through 3.5. We have updated the feat to reflect
this change. As for the feat itself, speed kills.
Conversion Chart
1 round = 1 standard action
2-9 rounds = 1 round
1-59 minutes = 1 minute
1-24 hours = 1 hour
1 week (8 hours/day) = 1 hour

REAPING SPELL
- CHAMPIONS OF RUIN (3.5)
The dark energy of your spell devours the soul of any creature killed by it.
Spell Level: +3
Prerequisites: Any evil alignment.
Benefit: A raise dead, reincarnate, or resurrection spell cannot return to life a creature killed by a reaping
spell, and a true resurrection spell has only a 50% chance of succeeding. A reaping spell that fails to
kill the target has no additional effect.
Editor: If you have a problem with enemies coming back from the dead on a regular basis, this feat would
be a wise investment. However, there are easier ways to do this and the cost is high. Perhaps a Bestow
Curse with black lore of moil, where the curse is to fail your next die roll. Of course, if the spell kills
you, your next die roll will be to see if true resurrection succeeds.

RETRIBUTIVE SPELL
- COMPLETE DIVINE (3.5)
You can keep a spell in reserve to use when a foe causes you harm.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: When you cast a spell modified by this metamagic feat, the spell has no immediate effect. Any
time you are dealt damage by a melee attack during the next 24 hours (or until you next prepare or
ready your spells), you can choose to cast the spell on that attacker as an immediate action. Once
activated, a retributive spell disappears (it can only affect one attacker). You can apply this feat only to
a spell that targets a creature. A retributive spell can target only the attacker that triggered it, even if the
spell would normally allow you to target multiple creatures. You can have only one retributive spell
cast at a time. Casting a second retributive spell cancels the first (eliminating it with no effect). If you
prepare or ready spells while you have a retributive spell cast, the spell dissipates with no effect.
Editor: Constantly harassed by invisible critters? A Retributive Glitterdust can ruin their day. For a mere
+1 level adjustment, you can hang a spell on you that gives you a free attack. The ability to cast more
spells per round, even if it is a triggered spell, should never be dismissed lightly. For a sorcerer, you
can renew this between combats with no effort. For evil clerics, the various inflict wounds are
spontaneous and thus you can keep a retributive spell ready with little fuss. The problem is, you cant
cast any spells until its discharged. Putting it in a purple ioun stone or a ring of spell storing and
handing it off to the non-spell casters is a wonderful use for this feat. Theyre unlikely to cast a spell in
24 hours, and you get the good vibes from your fellow PCs.

SEARING SPELL
- SANDSTORM (3.5)
Your fire spells are so hot that they can damage creatures that normally have resistance or immunity to
fire.

Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: A searing spell is so hot that it ignores the resistance to fire of creatures affected by the spell, and
affected creatures with immunity to fire still take half damage. This feat can be applied only to spells
with the fire descriptor. Creatures with the cold subtype take double damage from a searing spell.
Creatures affected by a searing spell are still entitled to whatever saving throw the spell normally
allows.
Editor: Compare to Piercing Cold. That one gives you +50% against fire; this one gives you +100%
against cold. Both suck unless you are a specialist.

SELECTIVE SPELL
- Shining South 3.5
You can screen allies from the effects of your area spells.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: Any other metamagic feat.
Benefit: You can modify an area spell so that it does not affect one designated creature within its area. All
other creatures in the spells area are affected normally. Selective Spell has no effect on target or effect
spells.
Editor: Like dropping flame strikes on your own position? This is the feat for you.

SMITING SPELL
- PLAYERS HANDBOOK 2 (3.5)
You can channel the energy of a touch spell into a weapon, causing the spell to discharge when you
strike an opponent.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: Base attack bonus +1, caster level 1st.
Benefit: You can alter a spell with a range of touch to transfer its energy from your hand to a weapon that
you hold. The next time you strike an opponent with that weapon, the spell discharges. The target takes
the normal damage and effects of a successful attack in addition to the spells effect. Once you place a
spell into a weapon, you must discharge it within 1 minute, or its energy dissipates harmlessly. You can
place a smiting spell on a piece of ammunition or a projectile, such as a sling bullet, an arrow, or a
crossbow bolt. In such a case, the spell dissipates if the attack misses. The spell cannot be placed on a
bow, crossbow, sling, or similar weapon that uses ammunition.
Editor: If you were a fighter/wizard, this feat would be handy, but take a hard look at the touch range
damaging spells. An evil cleric would have much better use for this, adding a spontaneously cast inflict
spell into his weapon before wading into battle. The problem is, that you lose an attack action setting
up the spell. The fact that you can do it up to 10 rounds before you use it helps, but there are better
things you can do during the heat of battle. Perhaps placing it into a purple ioun stone and loaning it to
the fighter might be a better use for this feat. Or better yet, for you clerics able to spontaneously cast
inflict damage, you could put this spell into some arrows and hand it off to the archer in the surprise
round.

SUDDEN EMPOWER
- MINIATURES HANDBOOK (3.5)
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You can cast a spell to greater effect without special preparation.
Spell Level: (Sudden)
Prerequisites: Any metamagic feat.
Benefit: Once per day, you can apply the effect of the Empower Spell feat to any spell you cast without
increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You can still use Empower
Spell normally if you have it.
Editor: It's cheaper then the rod, but can only be used once a day. It takes up a feat slot, where as the rod
uses money. This feat can be applied to a 9th level spell, where as the rod has to be a greater rod to do
the same thing. The Empower Spell feat can be applied to multiple spells, but it requires +2 to the
spell. The sudden can be held in reserve until needed, where as an empowered spell is using up a
higher-level slot right now. A sudden's usefulness to sorcerers, who can add feats on the fly, is dubious

at best. It's a judgment call and the part of the player and you should conceder what spells will you be
adding it to.

SUDDEN ENERGY AFFINITY


- MINIATURES HANDBOOK (3.5)
You can modify a spells energy type once per day without special preparation.
Spell Level: (Sudden)
Prerequisites: Energy Affinity.
Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Energy Affinity feat to any spell you cast, without increasing the
level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Energy Affinity feat
normally.
Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Each time it applies to a different type of energy.
Editor: The actual feat is Energy Substitution, which had no modifier to the level of the spell. With the
exception of being able to decide at the time of casting if you want to make a fireball an acid ball,
instead of deciding when you memorize it, there is no advantage to this feat. It's worthless.

SUDDEN EXTEND
- MINIATURES HANDBOOK (3.5)
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You can make a spell last longer than normal without special preparation.
Spell Level: (Sudden)
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Once per day, you can apply the effect of the Extend Spell feat to any spell you cast without
increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You can still use Extend Spell
normally if you have it.
Editor: Like Empower, it may be better just to go with the rod. However, perhaps you have some
combination that requires a rod of a different feat, and then this might be useful.

SUDDEN MAXIMIZE
- MINIATURES HANDBOOK (3.5)
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You can cast a spell to maximum effect without special preparation.
Spell Level: (Sudden)
Prerequisites: Any metamagic feat.
Benefit: Once per day, you can apply the effect of the Maximize Spell feat to any spell you cast without
increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You can still use Maximize
Spell normally if you have it
Editor: The base feat has a +3 adjustment to level, so this sudden becomes temping. Like the fact that a
maximize rod is well worth the expense, so too is this feat. For the wizard who likes to dish out the
damage, the regular empower feat would be best so you can play around with your damage spells, but
save the sudden maximize for those emergencies when you absolutely need to smack someone down.
It would suck to have a maximized Fireball, when you need a maximized cone of cold. A maximized
Mass Cure Serious Wounds can turn the tide of battle in one round. In the editor's opinion, the sudden
version of maximize is far superior to the base feat.

SUDDEN QUICKEN
- MINIATURES HANDBOOK (3.5)
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You can cast a spell with a moments thought without special preparation.
Spell Level: (Sudden)
Prerequisites: Quicken Spell, Sudden Empower, Sudden Extend, Sudden Maximize, Sudden Silent,
Sudden Still.
Benefit: Once per day, you can apply the effect of the Quicken Spell feat to any spell you cast without
increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You can still use Quicken Spell

normally.
Editor: A wonderful feat, far superior to the original. The only problem is the feats you have to buy in
order to qualify for this one. Cost wise, it's just not worth it. If you poured all your feats into getting
this and were a human, you'd have to wait until 10th level. On the other hand, being able to quicken
6th level or higher spells without a rod might be worth the cost to some people, especially in a low
magic campaign where getting a quicken rod is difficult. Personally, burn it with fire.

SUDDEN SILENT
- MINIATURES HANDBOOK (3.5)
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You can cast a spell silently without special preparation.
Spell Level: (Sudden)
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Once per day, you can apply the effect of the Silent Spell feat to any spell you cast without
increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You can still use Silent Spell
normally if you have it.
Editor: Like the rod, when you need it, you need it. It's not something that will come into play often, but
when it does, you'll be grateful. If you feel the need to get this, I suggest you follow the feat tree to get
sudden quicken.

SUDDEN STILL
- MINIATURES HANDBOOK (3.5)
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You can cast a spell without gestures or special preparation.
Spell Level: (Sudden)
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Once per day, you can apply the effect of the Still Spell feat to any spell you cast without
increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You can still use Still Spell
normally if you have it.
Editor: Does your DM like to grapple you? A sudden still dimension door can fix that, but quick. However,
the actual feat is only a +1 level adjustment. Then again, there is no still metamagic rod, so this is the
only way you'll be able to cast this on the fly. Think about the problems you run into in your campaign.
Does this come up often? If so, it may be worth it. Normally, no.

SUDDEN WIDEN
- MINIATURES HANDBOOK (3.5)
- COMPLETE ARCANE (3.5)
You can increase a spells area without special preparation.
Spell Level: (Sudden)
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Once per day, you can apply the effect of the Widen Spell feat to any spell you cast without
increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You can still use Widen Spell
normally if you have it.
Editor: Considering the cost of the widen metamagic rod this feat is not really worth it. If you find yourself
encountering large groups of NPCs and believe that having the ability to widen on the fly to be useful,
and widen rods are in short supply, then this is way better then the original feat. Walking around with
widened spells is usually a waste, considering the +3 adjustment. Once a day is far more economical.
On the bright side, this is the only sudden feat without a prerequisite.

UMBRAL SPELL
- DROW OF THE UNDERDARK (3.5)
You add the darkness descriptor to a spell you cast.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None

Benefit: You can alter a burst-, emanation-, or spread shaped spell so that it gains the darkness descriptor.
The altered spell automatically dispels any spells with the light descriptor of the spells level or lower
whose effects overlap or are within the altered spells area.
Example: An umbral lightning bolt would dispel any ongoing light spell of 3rd level or lower in the area of
the line.
Editor: Are you playing a light sensitive race? This feat is clearly a godsend for any vampires and drow.
Otherwise, a waste of time. Seriously.

WOUNDING SPELL
- LOST EMPIRES OF FAERUN (3.5)
Because you have studied the cruel arts of the Athalantan magelords of old, you know how to cast
spells that cause terrible, bleeding wounds.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: Knowledge (history) 4 ranks, Empower Spell.
Benefit: When affected by this feat, a spell that deals damage to a creature also inflicts a bleeding wound
that does not heal normally. On each subsequent round, the victim loses 1 hit point at the beginning of
your turn. The continuing hit point loss can be stopped with a Heal check (DC equal to the spells save
DC, or the save DC it would otherwise have in the case of a spell with no save), a cure spell, or a heal
spell. You cannot apply this feat to a spell that does not deal damage (such as charm person or baleful
polymorph).
Editor: Damage over time is usually a waste. Spending two levels on a spell to make a target spend the
time to heal himself from damage over time is doubly so. If he didn't die with the original spell, all this
feat will do is encourage him or his allies to break out the healing faster. If there is no healing, the
target will just attack more, knowing he needs to kill you faster. If it did kill him, then the additional
level adjustment was wasted. None of these outcomes help you. Empower the spell instead and just kill
the target on the first shot, instead of waiting for him to bleed to death.

CLAWED SPELL
- DRAGON MAGAZINE #315
The hazy image of saurian claws forms around your hands when you cast touch spells, dealing damage
in addition to the spell's normal effects.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: Ka-tainted, Weapon Focus (touch)
Benefit: Saurian claws of force appear around your hands. All clawed spells with a range of "touch" deal
+1d6 points of additional damage for every five caster levels you possess. Even non-damaging spells
or spells that do not deal hit point damage (such as touch of idiocy) prepared a clawed spell deal this
additional damage. This additional damage is a force effect and can damage incorporeal targets. An
incorporeal creature does not have the normal 50% chance to ignore the damage from a clawed spell
cast by a corporeal spellcaster.
Normal: An incorporeal creature has a 50% chance to ignore damage from spells from a corporeal source.
Editor: One, I dont know anything about Ka-tainted, except it has something to do with dinosaurs. Two,
the damage sucks. Three, you need to take weapon focus (touch). Kill it, kill it with fire.

EASY METAMAGIC [General]


- DRAGON MAGAZINE #325
One of your metamagic feats is easier to use.
Spell Level: Meta-Metamagic Feat
Prerequisite: Any other metamagic feat.
Benefit: Choose a metamagic feat you already have. When preparing or casting a spell modified by that
feat, lower the spell-slot cost by one. You can never reduce the spell-slot cost below one level higher
than the spell's actual level. For example, taking this feat for the Quicken Spell feat reduces the spell
slot cost of a quickened spell from four levels higher than the spell's actual level to three levels higher
than the spell's actual level.
Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Each time you take this feat, you must choose a new
metamagic feat.

Editor: Its not a metamagic feat, but a meta-metamagic feat. Its included because its just so useful. If you
can convince a DM to allow this feat, take it.

FELL ENERGY SPELL


- DRAGON MAGAZINE #312
You add a dose of raw necromantic energy to your beneficial spell, making it especially effective for
undead creatures.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Any numerical bonus granted by a spell modified with this feat increases by +2 for all undead
creatures it affects. This increase does not apply to factors such as range, save DC, healing, or other
numerical factors relating to a spell. Only effects described as bonuses gain this benefit.
Editor: I suppose if I was a necromancer with a herd of zombies, this might be useful. Its more for special
optimized necromancer builds.

FORCEFUL SPELL
- DRAGON MAGAZINE #358
Your spells slam their targets with irresistible force.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Only spells that target one or more creatures can be made forceful. An opponent struck by a
forceful spell must make a Fortitude save at the same DC as the spell or be knocked prone and stunned
for 1 round. If the spell affects more than one target, the forceful effect affects only one target (of your
choice).
Condition, Prone: Lying on the ground. An attacker who is prone has a 4 penalty on melee attack rolls
and cannot used a ranged weapon (except for a crossbow). A defender who is prone gains a +4 bonus
to Armor Class against ranged attacks, but takes a 4 penalty to AC against melee attacks.
Condition, Stunned: A stunned creature drops everything held, cant take actions, takes a 2 penalty to
AC, and loses his Dexterity bonus to AC (if any).
Editor: What makes this feat not totally suck, is the fact that it works on spells that dont cause damage.
Knock someone down with a charm person. Use a cure light wounds. Your enemy is bound to say they
wave the saving throw.

GHOST-TOUCH SPELL
- GHOSTWALK (3.0)
You know how to tune your damaging spells to affect ghosts without harming other creatures.
Spell Level: +0
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: A ghost-touch spell affects only ghosts and does no damage to other creatures. Ghosts are affected
whether incorporeal or manifested fully and do not have the benefit of their incorporeal miss chance.
This metamagic feat works only on spells that deal damage. Damaging spells with additional effects
not related to damage (such as the ability of a wall of ice to function as a barrier) still affect non-ghosts
(but if a non-ghost passed through an opening in the wall of ice, he would not take any damage from
the spell).
Example: A ghost-touch fireball cast by a 5th-level wizard deals 5d6 points of fire damage to ghosts, but is
harmless to any other creatures in the area.
Editor: I would totally approve this feat, because it sucks.

GUIDED SPELL
- DRAGON MAGAZINE #307
Your spells zero in on a specific target.
Spell Level: +3
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Only those spells delivered by a ranged touch attack can be guided. Choose a target within range

before casting a guided spell. A guided spell ignores up to nine-tenths cover or concealment as it
moves over, under, or around barriers, seeking that target. If a guided spell misses on its initial attack,
it persists for a number of rounds equal to one-third your level (rounded down), making another ranged
touch attack on your initiative each round against that target until it hits or the guided duration ends. If
the target or you move out of the range of the spell, if the target gains total cover or concealment from
your position, or if the line of effect for the spell is blocked, the guided spell duration immediately
ends. You do not need to concentrate on a guided spell while it is attacking.
Editor: GAH! A +3 level adjustment to make sure my range touch attacks HIT, eventually. I like it, but Id
never use it. That said, Id totally allow this feat if someone wants to take it, just because maximize is
far better.

PIERCING SPELL
- DRAGON MAGAZINE #315
By twisting the protective nature of Ka, your spells can pierce another's defenses.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: Ka-tainted.
Benefit: This feat can only be applied to spells that require a touch attack (either melee or ranged). Piercing
spells ignore a target's deflection bonus, if any, to Armor Class.
Editor: One, its another ka-tainted feat. Two, touch attack is usually quite easy to begin with.

RAY BURST
- DRAGON ANNUAL #5 (3.0)
You change the effect of a ray spell to a 30-foot radius burst centered on yourself.
Spell Level: +3
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: A ray burst hits all targets (friend or foe) within 30 feet. Targets within 30 feet are allowed a
Reflex save to avoid the burst. Any targets that do not avoid the effect are treated as if they were hit by
the ray spell. Any target with 100% cover with respect to the caster is not affected.
Editor: Well, its like chain spell, except it works on all rays and includes you as a target. Dumb.

RAY CONING
- DRAGON ANNUAL #5 (3.0)
You expand a ray spell to a 30-foot cone.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: All targets in the area of effect receive Reflex saves to avoid the effect, but are otherwise affected
as if they were hit by the ray spell.
Editor: Absolutely awesome. Once its area of effect you can use sculpt spell to make it into all sorts of
interesting shapes. Explosive spell dovetails nicely, as well. This feat is so awesome I recommend that
no DM allow it into his game. Sorry ray specialists, but I can see this feat allowing some rays that
should never be allowed to have multiple targets turn into a wave of death. Reach Vampiric Touch
turned into a cone would be a deadly 7th level spell. Reach Cure Light Wounds turned into a cone could
heal far more targets then the mass version. Maybe at +3, Id allow it. Your DM may disagree.

RAY EXTENSION
- DRAGON ANNUAL #5 (3.0)
You maintain a ray spell for an additional round.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: Noneji
Benefit: When the extended ray spell is cast, you can use your next action to attack with the same ray. You
can designate either a different target or the same target. A successful ranged touch attack is required
for the second target. If any other actions are taken, or the spell is disrupted before your next action,
then you lose the extended spell (though any previous effects remain).
Editor: I love this feat. Its repeat spell for rays only, except that it also eats up a second action. So it isnt

really repeating, its effectively twice cast. I personally would make it a +2, but I dont really have a
problem with it. Now that I think about it, its closer to Echoing Spell the way Id have liked it to be.
There are far more useful general feats, but a ray specialist could do worse.

RAY SPLITTING
- DRAGON ANNUAL #5 (3.0)
You can attack three adjacent targets with a ray spell.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: A split ray can hit three targets. A successful ranged touch attack is needed for each target, and
each roll incurs a -4 penalty to hit. A target cannot be attacked more than once with a given spell.
Editor: At first glance I want to ban this as broken. Its the same cost as split ray, but read it closely. All
three targets must be standing next to one another. They can only be hit once. It doesnt actually say
you get extra rays. It doesnt say that you can attack more the three adjacent targets. So if you have
dreams of using this with Scorching Ray and hitting 12 targets, youd be wrong. In fact, ray splitting
Scorching Ray would be worthless against three targets. The way its written, youd only hit each target
once, then the fourth ray would go to waste. You know, Im going to go out on a limb and say this one
is a balanced feat.

RELICGUARD SPELL
- DRAGON MAGAZINE #347
Your spells do not damage objects.
Spell Level: +0
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: A relicguarded spell has no effect on objects. It cannot target an object and any object caught
within its area is immune to its effects, even if a creature holding the item is affected. Creatures
immune to spells that do not affect objects (such as constructs and undead) are also immune to a
relicguarded spell.
Editor: You could do the exact same thing with nonlethal substitution, except that the damage to a target
wouldnt be fatal. I guess you need to weigh your options. If you like treasure, this is an excellent,
well-balanced feat. Nonlethal damage would have better use in a public place. If your DM loves to
destroy enemy equipment when you fireball them, this feat is for you.

SLIMY SPELL
- DRAGON MAGAZINE #358
Your spells douse opponents with a nauseating slime.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Only spells that target one or more creatures can be made slimy. An opponent struck by a slimy
spell must make a Reflex save at the same DC as the spell or be covered in a temporary layer of slime
that renders the target nauseated for 1 round. If the spell affects more than one target, the slimy effect
affects only one target (of your choice).
Condition, Nauseated: Experiencing stomach distress. Nauseated creatures are unable to attack, cast
spells, concentrate on spells, or do anything else requiring attention. The only action such a character
can take is a single move action per turn, plus free actions (except for casting quickened spells).
Editor: I would never take this feat. That said, I would totally allow anyone who wanted to take it, to do so.
The feat isnt bad. Its better then some one the one round metamagic feats out there, so much better I
almost say it shouldnt be +1. But that limitation that prevents it from being optimized with area of
effect spells brings the cost back down. Really, its a one round Slow to one target, which might be
something you need. After all, as you will learn, or should already know, speed kills.

SONG OF THE DEAD


- DRAGON MAGAZINE #312
- Dungeon Compendium Vol. 1

You can add such a powerful dose of necromantic energy to your mind-affecting spells that they
function against undead creatures but are useless against all others.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: A mind-affecting spell modified by this feat works normally against intelligent undead creatures.
Mindless undead (those without Intelligence scores) are still immune to its effect, and the altered spell
has no effect against living creatures or constructs. Note that use of this feat does not make mindaffecting spells affect undead if the spell's description specifies that the target must be living or a
particular creature type (other than undead). Any spells prepared with Song of the Dead become
necromancy spells.
Editor: This spell either rocks my self-centered necromantic world, or it sucks. I cant make up my mind. A
+1 level adjustment to be able to affect undead with a subclass of spells they are normally immune to
would be wonderful, if you couldnt just mind control them with rebuke undead or control undead
spells already. Maybe you have a weird combo in mind. The editors official stance, until someone
presents me with a combo that makes this feat broken beyond belief is, Id allow it in game.

TRANSFER SPELL
- DUNGEON MAGAZINE #307
You can transfer a touch spell to another creature for delivery.
Spell Level: +2
Prerequisites: None
Benefit: Only a spell with a range of touch can be transferred with this feat. You cast a transferred spell
normally and then touch the creature to which the spell is to be transferred. That creature is not
affected by the spell; instead, one of its empty hands (or a natural attack) is "armed" with the spell as
you normally are after casting the spell (including the duration the creature can hold the charge, the
number of recipients, and the instances in which the spell is wasted). The spell is discharged with the
first successful touch attack or attack the creature makes with that empty hand (or natural attack). The
creature does not provoke an attack of opportunity when making the touch attack. Duration and effect
remain based on you, the original caster. If you cast another spell, the transferred spell is cancelled.
Editor: I can see this feat becoming abused fairly easily, if it were not for the last line in the above
paragraph. My question is, what happens when you put this feat in a wand? Im not casting another
spell, Im activating a wand. Scrolls, definitely no. Wands, after reading what spell trigger items are, I
also say no. But you could store 1st level spells in an oil. Frankly, for the added hassle, Id go with
smiting spell instead. But if a DM wants to allow this, I say go for it.

VIOLATE SPELL
- BOOK OF VILE DARKNESS (3.0)
The character can transform one of his spells into an evil spell, and the wounds the spell inflicts are
tainted with the foulest evil.
Spell Level: +1
Prerequisites: Any evil alignment
Benefit: This feat adds the evil descriptor to a spell. Furthermore, if the spell deals damage, half of the
damage dealt is vile damage. For example, a violated lightning bolt cast by an 8th-level wizard deals
8d6 points of damage: 4d6 points of electricity damage and 4d6 points of vile electricity damage (but
creatures immune to electricity take no damage).
Special: A character may take this feat multiple times, choosing a different spell each time.
Editor: Kill it. Kill it with fire. This feat sucks. I suppose if you had a very specific build in mind where
you needed Evil descriptor on a specific spell, then yes, use it. It isnt a metamagic feat in my opinion.
Its a meta-spell feat. Clearly it didnt make the cut to 3.5 for a reason. That said, if a DM wants to
allow it, go for it. Its a trap, and no player should take it. Youd be doing them a favor by banning it.