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SpokePOV: LED Bike Wheel Images


by ladyada on March 8, 2006

Table of Contents
SpokePOV: LED Bike Wheel Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Intro: SpokePOV: LED Bike Wheel Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 1: Intro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 2: Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 3: Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 4: Lets get ready to solder! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 5: Attach battery clips - part 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 6: Attach battery clips - part 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 7: Attach programming socket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 8: Attach microcontroller socket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 9: Attach small socket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 10: Attach Latch Chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 11: Attach the LED's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step 12: Attach the resistor networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10


Step 13: Attach the 10k-ohm resistor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Step 14: Attach Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Step 15: Attach the Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Step 16: Plug in Microcontroller chip and EEPROM chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Step 17: Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Step 18: Hacking - Animations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Step 19: Hacking - More Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Step 20: Install . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Step 21: Build and connect the programming dongle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Step 22: Run the image design & download software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Author:ladyada
i r0x th' x0x & s0x
[http://www.ladyada.net more stuff here]

Intro: SpokePOV: LED Bike Wheel Images


Spoke POV is an easy-to-make electronic kit toy that turns your bicycle wheel into a customized display! The project includes a free schematic design, open source
software for uploading and editing stored bitmap images, and a high-quality kit with all the parts necessary to build your own.
Tired: A red blinker on your seatpost
Wired: Programmable full-wheel images in any color
Specifications and Features:
Can be used with road, mountain or BMX wheels!
30 LEDs on each side (22 for BMX) x 256 radial pixels
Runs on 2-3 AA batteries for 10 hours or more, assuming 3000mAh alkalines and 50% image coverage.
Can run on rechargable NiMH AA's
Comes with high-brightness red/yellow/green or blue LEDs
Automatically shuts off after 3 minutes
wxPython based software runs on any Linux or Windows or Mac with Parallel port or serial port
Design is all through-hole parts, perfect for a first time kit builder.
With one spoke, total persistence at 15mph. Two spokes, 10mph. Three spokes, 7mph. (Assuming a mountain bike wheel). Looks cool even if not completely
persistant.
Great for safe riding at night, provides excellent side visibility.
Playa-tested!
Kits & PCBs available for purchase at http://www.adafruit.com/
For more information, like how to use the software to update images, visit http://www.ladyada.net/make/spokepov
& check out more cool projects at http://www.ladyada.net/

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Step 1: Intro
These instruction assume you purchased the kit or at least the PCB. All parts are through-hole and this should be a very easy project, even for a beginner. Still, if you've
never soldered before, this tutorial is really awesome. If you're part of the new streaming-video-generation, this set of soldering mpegs may do you right:
http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/elab/soldering.htm

Image Notes
1. these are all the parts that come with the kit

Step 2: Tools
There are a few tools that are required for assembly. None of these tools are included in the kit. If you don't have them, now would be a good time to borrow or purchase
them. They are very very handy whenever assembling/fixing/modifying electronic devices! I provide links to buy them, but of course, you should get them whereever is
most convenient/inexpensive. Many of these parts are available in a place like Radio Shack or other (higher quality) DIY electronics stores.

Image Notes
1. Solder. Rosin core, 60/40. Good solder is a good thing. Bad solder leads to bridging and cold solder joints which can be tough to find. Dont buy a tiny amount,
you'll run out when you least expect it. 1lb spools are a minimum.
2. Multimeter/Oscilloscope A meter is helpful to check voltages and continuity.
3. Soldering iron. Personally, I like the WES50 (now the WES51) and the other ~$100 Wellers. One with temperature control and a stand is best. A conical or small
'screwdriver' tip is good, almost all irons come with one of these. A low quality (ahem, $5 radioshack) iron may cause more problems than its worth. YMMV.
4. Good light. More important than you think.
5. Desoldering tool. If you are prone to incorrectly soldering parts. Some people prefer desoldering braid - a spool of finely braided copper wire.
6. 'Handy Hands' with Magnifying Glass. Not absolutely necessary but will make things go much much faster.
7. Flush/diagonal wire cutters. Essential for cutting leads close to the PCB.

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Step 3: Parts
All these parts are included in the kit:
QTY----NAME----PART#-----DESCRIPTION
1 IC1 ATtiny2323 microcontroller
1 IC1* generic 20 pin socket
1 IC2 25LC080 1kbyte EEPROM
1 IC2* generic 8 pin socket
8 IC3-IC10 74HC595 serial to parallel latch
1 X1 DN6852 hall effect sensor
1 S1 SKQBAKA010 waterproof switch
1 J2 30310-6002HB programming header
4 n/a 12BH092 AA battery clips
1 R1 generic 1/4W 10Kohm 5% resistor
8 RN1-RN8 266-xxx 10-pin bussed resistor network
60 LED1-LED60 high brightness LED's
1 PCB custom silkscreened printed circuit board (PCB)

Image Notes
1. 12BH092 AA battery clips
2. R1 10Kohm 1/4W resistor
3. socket for IC1
4. custom silkscreened printed circuit board (PCB)
5. IC2 25LC080 1KByte EEPROM
6. socket for IC2
7. J2 programming header
8. IC3 - IC10 74HC595 serial to parallel latch
9. X1 DN6852 hall effect sensor
10. S1 SKQBAKA010 waterproof switch
11. LED1 - LED60 high brightness LED
12. IC1 ATtiny2323 microcontroller
13. RN1 - RN8 266-xxx (xxx resistor value) 10-pin resistor network

Step 4: Lets get ready to solder!


Get your bench set up for soldering, and place the PCB in a good board holder

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Step 5: Attach battery clips - part 1


Place the 4 battery clips in the top two battery positions, as shown. Tack them in place with solder so that when you turn the board over they wont fall out!

Image Notes
1. tacking the first clip in place

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Step 6: Attach battery clips - part 2


Now turn the board over and solder the outer tabs of the clips first and then resolder the inner tabs. Make sure theres plenty of solder: these connections are not just
electrical, they're mechanical too!

Image Notes
1. solder the inner and outer tabs of the clips.

Step 7: Attach programming socket


Put in the programming socket, make sure to align the notch with the picture on the PCB. Now turn the PCB over and hold the socket in place while you solder it in.

Image Notes
1. solder the pins while holding the socket in place with your finger.
Image Notes
1. place programming socket - note notch orientation

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Step 8: Attach microcontroller socket


Place the large socket as shown. There's a notch in the socket which should line up with the notch in the image of the socket. The notch will help you align the
microcontroller chip in properly. Turn the board over and hold the socket in with a finger, tack two corners pins to keep it in place then solder the rest of the pins.

Image Notes
1. Place large Microcontroller socket, note notch on one end of the socket and
orient as shown (notch at top of image)
2. notch in socket

Image Notes
1. done

Step 9: Attach small socket


Solder in the smaller socket just like the larger one. make sure to orient the notch as shown

Image Notes
1. the notch is facing LEFT in this image
Image Notes
1. solder the pins of the socket while holding the socket onto the board

Step 10: Attach Latch Chips


Place the 6 top 74HC595 latch chips in the proper spots, making sure to align the notches on the chip with the notches in the pictures. Tack them in place by soldering
two corner pins of each one from the top. Then turn the board over and solder all the pins.
Next, do the same with the 2 latches on the reverse side.

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Step 11: Attach the LED's


Cut the LEDs from the tape and place the first 30 into the front row. Make sure that the flat side of the LED is aligned with the flat side of the LED shown on the board.
Otherwise the LED will not light up. This is a pretty common mistake so work slowly and carefully.
When you place each LED, bend the leads out so that it wont fall out when you turn the board over.
Solder the LEDs and clip the leads, either one at a time or all at once, whichever is easiest for you.
After one side of the board is done, repeat for the other row of LEDs

Image Notes
1. place LED's making sure that the flat side lines up with the markings on the
PCB

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Image Notes
1. LED's are inserted and leads are bent over so they don't fall out while we
solder them
Image Notes
1. solder the LED's, then clip the extra wire

Image Notes
1. all done
2. all done

Step 12: Attach the resistor networks


Solder in the 8 9-SIP resistor networks. Make sure you align them correctly: one side of the resistor pack has a dot which corresponds to pin 1 which is marked with an X
in the picture on the circuit board.

Step 13: Attach the 10k-ohm resistor


Place the one 10K resistor. Bend the leads like with the LEDs and solder it in, then clip the leads off.

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Image Notes
1. 10k resistor

Step 14: Attach Button


Place the button, which will snap into place. Solder it in.

Image Notes
1. button

Step 15: Attach the Sensor


Bend the sensor so that the face points out as shown. Since the sensor has to stick out but has short leads, solder it from the top, making sure that the leads don't stick
too far through on the other side. See the picture to the left.

Image Notes
1. attach sensor, face pointing out as shown

Step 16: Plug in Microcontroller chip and EEPROM chip


Put the microcontroller in the large socket so that the notches match up. The sensor can 'lean' on the microcontroller. If you want, you can use a bit of glue to support it.
Flip the board over and place the EEPROM in the smaller socket so that the notches line up. You're done!

Image Notes
1. plug in microcontroller, lining up notches

Image Notes
1. plug in eeprom, lining up notches

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Step 17: Test


Now that you're done assembling it, you can test the board to make sure its functioning. Put two good AA batteries into the clips. Whenever the microcontroller gets
notice of a 'hard reset' it goes through a little test routine where it lights up all the LEDs in order. If none of the LEDs are lighting up, go back and check to see if you put in
any latches, batteries or the microcontroller in backwards. If just a few LEDs arent lighting up, check if they're in backwards.

Step 18: Hacking - Animations


Animations! Have a pacmac chomp while you ride...Download the animation-supported software, and make sure you have upgraded the EEPROM to hold more images. I
suggest either a 2K EEPROM (25C16P-1.8) for 2 images, or 4K (25C32P-1.8) for 4 images. You can buy these from Mouser for a few dollars a piece. You can't use just
3 frames (well, you could but the code doesnt support it). Then upload the images to seperate banks. Note that the software can't (yet) tell how big the EEPROM is so if
you only have 2 image banks, bank #3 will be the same as #1 and #4 is really #2. Then set the number of rotations to display each image, just like any other variable. OK
you're ready to rock.

Step 19: Hacking - More Colors


Wow look at all the pretty colors! The standard kit uses 2 batteries, which will work with red, orange and yellow LED's. If you want to use green, blue, white or purple
LED's you will need to add a third battery. To do that, purchase 2 more battery clips from Mouser. Before you solder them in, you have to cut a trace. I thought I'd be all
smart and put a note on the PCB about which trace to cut but I put it on the wrong side of the board. If you hold it up to a bright light you'll see the trace, or use this handy
guide:

Image Notes
1. cut this trace to use a 3-battery setup

Step 20: Install


Attach the spokepov to your bike wheel with zipties as shown.
After it is attached, place the magnet on the frame as shown. The magnet must line up with the sensor on the PCB, it may take some fiddling with the sensor and magnet
to get them in range. The range on the sensor is 1-2 centimeters.
If you are attaching more than one SpokePOV on your wheel, make sure they are lined up at an equal distance from the rim, use a ruler.

Image Notes
1. attach zip-tie here

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Image Notes
1. pull tight

Image Notes
1. another zip-tie here

Image Notes
1. more zip-ties

Image Notes
1. clip off the excess

Image Notes
1. put a rare-earth magnet here, lined up with the sensor on the PCB

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Step 21: Build and connect the programming dongle


Instructions for building the programming dongle are at http://www.ladyada.net/make/spokepov
it should be a breeze in comparison. (Note that in this image, R1 and R4 are swapped, don't make that mistake!)
Now connect it up!

Step 22: Run the image design & download software


You can import images as .bmp files, then do a little touchup before writing the image to the spokepov. For more detailed instructions on how to run the software visit
http://www.ladyada.net/make/spokepov

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

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Comments
50 comments Add Comment

view all 177 comments

SniperCzar says:

Jan 24, 2010. 11:01 AM REPLY


Anybody know a way to put this on a car wheel/legality of doing so? I would love to put this thing on the wheels of my wip EV conversion...

abadfart says:

Dec 14, 2010. 3:55 PM REPLY

i would love to do a small one on a sport bike and a el wire jacket for a tron look

chucksta says:

May 9, 2010. 6:09 PM REPLY

I'm pretty sure it depends on the state.

explosivefart says:
Can you use this on car wheels?

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Nov 23, 2010. 9:30 PM REPLY

thier says:

Oct 27, 2009. 2:35 PM REPLY


I'm having troubles when I try to Burn the programming at the microcontroller and. And the instructions that I have got here in the web site do not report
anything about the burnig process.
I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF SOMEONE FROM THE SKY, COULD HELP ME AT THE BURNIG PROCESS!
My e-mail adress is: dougfb46@hotmail.com or
dougfb46@gmail.com
Thanks by the way.

eulaliaaaa! says:

Oct 22, 2009. 8:03 AM REPLY

Sweeet! I like the pac-man and ghost thingy.

RiddleOfSphinx says:

Apr 2, 2008. 5:08 PM REPLY


Haven't read all the comments, but if this is a repeated comment then my apologies ;) Can this be modified to work on car rims as well? I'm sure I could find
a way to secure it safely, but wanted to know if it would have the same effect or if the image would be distorted due to size, RPM, etc.

darthneo says:

Sep 9, 2009. 9:48 AM REPLY

Have you tried to put them on your car wheels yet?

RiddleOfSphinx says:

Sep 9, 2009. 5:51 PM REPLY

Nope, haven't been able to buy any yet :-S

sparr says:

Dec 5, 2008. 9:01 PM REPLY


It would work just fine on car rims. The spokePOV firmware has been tested up to 100mph on a bike wheel (faster than the uC can't keep up)

RiddleOfSphinx says:

Dec 8, 2008. 3:55 PM REPLY

Hmm, I may have to try it out then, thanks :D !!

sparr says:

Dec 8, 2008. 4:08 PM REPLY


Small update. The software can handle faster. The battery clips cannot. You would want to more securely attach the batteries, possibly in an
external battery holder at the center of the wheel, to minimize strain on the board and battery clips.

RiddleOfSphinx says:

Dec 9, 2008. 3:32 PM REPLY

I think that would still be do-able for me, Thanks for the update :D

DYLEGO says:

Jan 23, 2009. 10:20 AM REPLY

another thing is you would need 4, and they do double-sided animations...

tinyboy says:

Nov 16, 2008. 7:21 PM REPLY

where i can obtain the pcb

darthneo says:

Sep 9, 2009. 9:49 AM REPLY

check http://www.ladyada.net/make/spokepov/

roadwarrior says:

Nov 19, 2008. 4:29 PM REPLY

here u go:
http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=6&products_id=6
http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=6

awang8 says:
What is the minimum speed required by this to produce a clear image?

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Mar 26, 2009. 10:46 PM REPLY

darthneo says:

Sep 9, 2009. 9:45 AM REPLY


i think i read on her site: http://www.ladyada.net/make/spokepov/ if you have 1 SpokePOV you need to be going (i think) around 14 MPH to see a clear
image, i think 2 SpokePOVs you need to be going about 10 MPH and 3 8MPH (i could be wrong)

froggy231 says:

Jul 28, 2009. 7:01 PM REPLY

is it waterproof

darthneo says:

Sep 9, 2009. 9:43 AM REPLY


You can buy some sort of spray to spray the board with that will make it somewhat water resistant, if you browse around her site you might find
something http://www.ladyada.net/make/spokepov/

godfreyandthandi says:

Aug 16, 2009. 2:19 AM REPLY

nope

gener_i says:

Jul 28, 2009. 6:58 PM REPLY

Can I used PIC micro controller instead of AVR tiny what particular PIC part number can you suggest?

darthneo says:

Sep 9, 2009. 9:41 AM REPLY

If you use a different microcontroller, you'd probably have to rewrite most of the code thats used...

PacChild says:

May 30, 2009. 7:53 PM REPLY

How Much Will All This Cost? and Can You Go To Like Any RadioShack, Or Must You Order Online D:

darthneo says:

Sep 9, 2009. 9:41 AM REPLY

you can find more info on her project (including parts and custom pcb board) here: http://www.ladyada.net/make/spokepov/

tyson.ras says:

Aug 19, 2009. 9:18 AM REPLY

What would it take for you to just build me a pair of the pac man lights and send them to me? I really serious about this.

lamborox says:

Aug 8, 2009. 7:18 AM REPLY


mine isn't being noticed by my computer I accidently soderd my micro controller on the wrong side of the circuitboard would that make a difference and do
the batteries have to be in when you program it?

godfreyandthandi says:

Aug 16, 2009. 2:20 AM REPLY

yes and yes.

wadadli says:

Jul 19, 2009. 7:45 AM REPLY

Did somebody say this is an EASY project?

godfreyandthandi says:

Aug 16, 2009. 2:20 AM REPLY

it is...

darkstar1 says:

Aug 6, 2009. 8:41 PM REPLY

Go chelsea

gener_i says:

Jul 28, 2009. 7:01 PM REPLY


Can I replaced you AVR tiny to PIC MCU which is more widely available here in the Philippines,can you recomend what kind or part number of PIC can
replaced you AVR MCU

Javin007 says:
Want.

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

Jul 6, 2009. 11:06 AM REPLY

Redgerr says:

Jul 20, 2009. 12:09 PM REPLY

count me in

james.mcglashan says:

Jul 25, 2009. 7:48 PM REPLY

me too i want

alienresident says:

Jun 18, 2009. 9:27 AM REPLY

Video link update, the link seems to have moved here


http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/telescope/soldering.htm

PacChild says:

May 30, 2009. 8:10 PM REPLY


I feel like im going to be one of the only people who wont be able to do this, yes i am that clumbsy, is there anywhere that i can buy it done already? planning
to do this summer :P

Notbob says:

Jun 12, 2009. 2:11 PM REPLY

monkey electric sells their own version http://www.monkeylectric.com/m132s.htm


But to my knowledge no one sells these pre-made.

gaias says:

Mar 9, 2009. 11:02 AM REPLY


Hi, how much current does one LED consume? I ask because the datasheet of the 74HC595 states that DC to Vcc or ground in total must be lower than 70
mA.

Derin says:

Apr 10, 2009. 10:57 AM REPLY

LED's draw 20 mA without current limiting.

gaias says:

May 23, 2009. 10:51 AM REPLY


Well, then I would not use this kit in its current state because there is a good chance of destroying the shift registers with the layout obviously used
here. An idea to improve the circuit would be to attach driving transistors to the shift registers. That could easily be done by using ULN2803
darlington arrays.

andrecitwo says:

May 15, 2009. 12:10 PM REPLY

Where can i obtain the pcb ??? im in south america(argentina). Can i make it with a pcb and the circuit ????

max1234 says:

Apr 18, 2009. 12:09 PM REPLY


Hei can any one provide me the pcb layout as I do not want to buy the kit. I want to make the whole circuit on my own. please anyonehelp me......

WOW THAT REALLY WORKS! says:

Feb 18, 2009. 2:42 PM REPLY

if u fall all the leds will break... right?

cornflaker says:

Mar 26, 2009. 4:37 AM REPLY

leds are made of plastic not glass...

theycallmeknowledge says:

Mar 20, 2009. 1:29 AM REPLY

very creative.

WOW THAT REALLY WORKS! says:

Feb 17, 2009. 4:19 PM REPLY

Ok i saw this and thought genius so im doing this as my summer project im also makeing the body be a bright bike

gzip says:

Jan 14, 2009. 10:46 PM REPLY


The project is cool but it reads more like a soldering tutorial. A little theory on the components (microcontroller, eeprom, latch, hall effect sensor, dongle, and
software) would go a long way. Otherwise all we're left with is another kit to buy.

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/

JellyWoo says:

Mar 1, 2008. 7:57 AM REPLY


what should i buy because when i click the website, you can buy Triple SpokePOV Kit + Dongle + 2 Magnets, SpokePOV Kit, SpokePOV Kit PCB,
SpokePOV Dongle Kit, High-strength 'rare earth' magnet , or SpokePOV microcontroller. Finally how much of each do I have to buy? (i am planning to do
this to both wheels.) Thanks

view all 177 comments

http://www.instructables.com/id/SpokePOV%3a-LED-Bike-Wheel-Images/