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State Senator Mario Scavello was sworn into office recently, to represent the new 40th Senatorial District
State Senator Mario Scavello was sworn into office recently, to represent the new 40th Senatorial District
State Senator Mario Scavello was sworn into office recently, to represent the new 40th Senatorial District
State Senator Mario Scavello was sworn into office recently, to represent the new 40th Senatorial District

State Senator Mario Scavello was sworn into office recently, to represent the new 40th Senatorial District covering parts of Monroe and Northamp- ton counties. The ceremony took place January 6th as the Senate convened for the 2015-16 legislative session. “I am honored and humbled to join the Senate today. I’m hope- ful for what the future holds, but fully aware of the work to be done,” Scavello said.

Prior to his election to

the Senate, Senator

Scavello served more

than a decade in the

State Senator Mario Scavello was sworn into office recently, to represent the new 40th Senatorial District
State Senator Mario Scavello was sworn into office recently, to represent the new 40th Senatorial District

House of Representa-

ton,

Jackson,

Middle

tives, representing

Smithfield,

Paradise,

Monroe County’s 176th

Pocono,

Polk,

Ross,

Legislative District.

Smithfield,

Stroud,

Senator Scavello has

Tobyhanna

and

also been a small busi-

Tunkhannock

and

the

ness owner, mayor of

boroughs of Delaware

Mount Pocono and

Water

Gap,

East

chairman of the

Stroudsburg,

Mount

Monroe County Board

Pocono

and

Strouds-

of Commissioners. Full

burg.

Bio

In

Northampton

In Monroe County, the

County,

the district

40th District consists of

consists

of

the

town-

the townships of Chest-

nuthill, Eldred, Hamil-

ships of Allen, Bush-

kill, East Allen, Forks,

Hanover, Lehigh, Lower Mount Bethel, Lower Nazareth, Moore, Plainfield, Upper Mount Bethel, Upper Nazareth and Washington and the boroughs of Bangor, Bath, Chapman, East Bangor, Nazareth, Pen Argyl, Portland, Roseto, Walnutport and Wind Gap. You can follow Sena- tor Scavello on Twitter and Facebook.

State Senator Mario Scavello was sworn into office recently, to represent the new 40th Senatorial District
State Senator Mario Scavello was sworn into office recently, to represent the new 40th Senatorial District
The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School
The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School
The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School
The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School

The First United

The

Bangor Area

following

categories:

Hope UCC Food

Methodist

Church

of

High School 1885 Club

player, coach or

Pantry is in great need

Bangor will be holding

is now accepting nomi-

supporter.

Qualifica-

of donations. Items

a

Knitting/Crochet

nations for the 2015

tions and forms can be

include any kind of

Circle the second and

1885 Club Hall of

found

on

the

drinks (in plastic

third

Wednesdays

of

Fame. Nominations can

piusxhs.org

Athletics

bottles) or drink mixes,

every month at 6pm and

be sent to Carole J.

page. Contact Mr. Joe

such as Kool-aid,

the

third

Sunday

of

Hontz at DeFranco

Disidore,

Athletic

lemonade and iced tea;

every month at

Elementary School.

Director,

at 610-588-

and all canned fruits and

12:15pm.

For

more

Forms can be found on

3291 or jdisidore

canned meats (ham,

information,

contact

the Bangor Area School

@piusxhs.org

with

tuna, chicken, spam,

Cecily

at carcher

District website under

questions. Applications

sardines, canned stew,

2011@gmail.com.

 

the Alumni section, then

are

being

accepted

chili). All donations can

Diamond Fire Com-

1885 Club.

through January 15th.

be dropped off Monday

pany is holding a

Pius X High School is

Previously

at

123

through Thursday, 8am

Chicken Pot Pie Sale.

now accepting nomina-

Broadway in Bangor,

to 1pm. All monetary

Orders must be placed

tions for the “Athletic

the

Slate

Belt

Preg-

donations may be paid

no

later

than January

Hall of Fame Class of

nancy

Support

to Hope United Church

16th. Pick-up will be on

2015.” Any alumni,

Services

is

re-tooling

of Christ, P.O. Box 425,

January 23rd from 3pm

parent, or Pius X

to

provide

a

better

Wind Gap, PA 18091.

to 6pm at the social hall,

supporter is eligible to

experience

for

preg-

Happy Birthday

110 Main St. in Walnut-

nominate an individual.

nant women and their

wishes are sent to

port. To place an order,

Candidates will be

families.

They

are

Melissa Devery, Janu-

call 610-767-8476.

considered for the

currently “virtual,” but

ary 13th; Noah Miller,

still available to help January 15th; Ryan

still

available

to

help

January 15th; Ryan

and can be reached

Sortore, January 17th;

through Facebook or by calling Life Choices at

and Brandy Meixsell Devine, January 21st.

888-749-4772.

 

We love hearing from

Diamond Fire Com-

you! Send us your

pany is holding a

birthdays, anniversa-

Superbowl

 

wings,

ries, birth announce-

hoagies, pizza and hot

ments and other

dog sale. Orders must

tidbits of information

be placed no later than

to:

January

23rd.

Pick-up

The PRESS

will be on February 1st

1 Broadway

from 1pm to 4pm at the

Bangor, PA 18013

social hall, 110 Main St.

thepressmail@

in Walnutport. To place

gmail.com

an order, call 610-767-

Dont Forget to

8476.

 

Like Us on Facebook!

The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School
The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School
The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School
Adult Fiction: Baum- buch, Charlene Ann: Stray Affections; Hall, Catherine: Days Of Susan: Samantha Learns A
Adult Fiction: Baum-
buch, Charlene Ann:
Stray Affections; Hall,
Catherine:
Days
Of
Susan: Samantha
Learns A Lesson.
Easy Fiction: Goem-
bel, Ponder: Animal

Grace; Harper, Karen:

Inferno; Hayder, Mo:

Gone; Hilderbrand, Elin: Winter Street; Howard, Linda: Night Moves; Mccreight, Kimberly: Reconstruc- tion Amelia; Rice, Luanne: Sandcastles; Santo, Courtney Miller:

Three Story House; Sittenfeld, Curtis: Prep; Trollope, Joanna:

Daughter’s-in-law.

Adult Non-fiction:

Deresiewicz, William:

Excellent Sheep; Ryan, Paul: The Way Forward. Junior Fiction: Adler,

Fair; Maris, Ron: Better Move On, Frog!

Audio Books Fiction:

Evanovich, Janet: The Heist; Evans, Richard Paul: The Mistletoe Promise;peters, Eliza- beth: The Copenhagen

Connection; Schine, Cathleen: Fin & Lady.

Audio Books Non-

fiction: Roach, Mary:

My Planet Finding Humor In The Oddest Places; Sedaris, David:

Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls Essays, Etc. Dvd’s: Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure; What About Bob?

The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School

Adult Fiction:

Revival, Stephen King; Small Blessings, Martha Woodroof; The Wolf in Winter, John Connolly; Peter Pan Must Die, John Verdon; Flesh and Blood, Patricia Corn- well; The Burning Room, Michael Connelly; The Look of Love, Sarah Jio; The Paris Time Capsule,

Ella Carey; Betrayed,

Lisa Scottoline; The

Job, Janet Evanovich;

The Boston Girl, Anita

Diamant.

Adult Large Print:

Hope To Die, James

Patterson; Pegasus,

Danielle Steel; The

Escape, David Baldacci;

Ghost Wanted, Carolyn

Hart; The Cinderella

Murder, Mary Higgins

Clark

Adult

Nonfiction:

George Washington's Secret Six, Brian Kilmeade; No Hero, Mark Owen; 41, A Portrait of My Father, George Bush; The 13th

Gift, Joanne H. Smith.

Young Adult Fiction:

The Death Cure, James Dashner; Variant, Robi- son Wells; Paperboy,

Vince Vawter; Rain Reign, Ann Martin; The Phantom Room, Patrick

Carman.

Juvenile

Fiction:

Where Do Diggers

Sleep At Night?,

Brianna Sayres; Snow-

flakes Fall, Patricia

MacLachlan; Frozen,

Disney; Snow Dog, Go

Dog, Deborah Heilig- man.

The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School
The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School
The First United The Bangor Area following categories: Hope UCC Food Methodist Church of High School
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great

The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great job they did with our holiday dinner with community families on December 20th. We served over 200 men, women and children dinner, had a visit from santa and Mrs. Clause with gifts. The children made cards for our area veterans and people in our local nursing homes. A Christmas they won’t soon forget. Elks Lodges bring so much more to their com- munities than just a building. They are places where neighbors come together, families

share

meals,

and

held a dinner for fami-

children grow up.

lies in need. We deliv-

Elks

invest

in

their

ered food baskets to our

communities

through

community families in

programs

that

help

need, baskets to local

children grow up

veterans, sponsored

healthy

and

drug-free,

eagle scout projects,

by undertaking projects

sport teams, gave thou-

that

address

unmet

sands of dollars in

needs, and by honoring

scholarships to mem-

the service and sacrifice of our veterans.

bers children, grandchil- dren and much more.

In

the past year

your

We do various fund

local

Elks

Lodge

in

raisers throughout the

Bangor served lunch to

year to raise the funds to

local veterans on Veter- ans Day and Memorial Day, hosted Drug

give back to our com- munity such as the Annual Variety Show

Awareness

Dances

for

which will be held this

area children.

We

May, the memorial golf

received a grant to have

outing, bingo’s and

a summer lunch

more.

program

through

our

Elks Care, Elks Share.

local

food

pantry

and

Are you an Elk?

The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great

The Blue Mountain Community Library would like to thank everyone who partici- pated in the Christmas Tree Fundraiser. Your donations will help the library to meet its needs and purchase new books in 2015. Are you looking for a gift idea for a book-lover or want to add to your book collection? On January 16th and 17th from 10am to 12pm, the Blue Mountain Commu- nity Library is having an after-Christmas sale in the Book Nook, located on the second floor of the library. Snow dates will be January 23rd and 24th. All items will be reduced for those two days. Please come and purchase gently used books, CDs, DVDs and puzzles. Gift certificates will be available and a free library tote bag will be given with every purchase of $10 or more. Now through January

31st, the library will be collecting yarn for the Nazarene Needlers of Bangor. All yarn dona- tions may be dropped off at the library and will be distributed to the group, which makes hand- knitted items for hospi- tals and nursing homes. The library is located at 216 S. Robinson Ave. in Pen Argyl. Hours are Monday through Satur-

day, 10am to 12pm, and Monday through Thurs- day, 6pm to 8pm. The Book Discussion Group meets the third Tuesday of each month at 6:30pm in the library and is open to anyone. The book selection for January 20th is Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty. Call Lisa at 610-863-3029 for information or visit www.bmcl.org.

The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great

The Bangor Area High School Chamber Choir under the direction of Joseph DiMinico enter- tained the Bangor Women's Club (GFWC) at their December meet- ing. The members enjoyed the lively selec- tion of music provided. The club continues their fundraising activi- ties to provide support for the Bangor Public Library and scholar- ships for local high school seniors. A collection was taken to

give to the Salvation Army. The next major fundraiser will be a Joe Corby Pizza sale begin- ning in January. January will be the GFWC Art Festival. Art, photography, craft and culinary entries from club members and

local school students

Peace Church, in John-

will be on display. Win-

sonsville

on

January

ners at this event will

20th at 12pm.

Anyone

advance to the Northeast

wishing to attend may

District Art Festival.

contact

Ellen

at

717-

The next meeting will

897-5787 for more

be held at Prince of

information.

 
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
The Bangor Elks Lodge #1106 would like to thank the members and volunteers for the great
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,

Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January

16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way, Wind Gap. FMI, email windgapfilmclub @gmail.com or find on Facebook.

East

Bangor

UM

Comm.Church Family Game Night: January

16th, 6:30pm. 136 W.

Central

Ave.,

Rt.

512,

East Bangor.

FMI, call

610-588-4453

or

visit

ebumc.org.

Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,

Annual Winter Snow- Ball Fundraising Dinner Dance: Satur- day, January 24th,

6pm-midnight. Weona Park recreation center building, Pen Argyl. BYOB event and dress is casual! FMI & tickets, contact Frank Jones at 610-863-3688 or jones. frank@penargylsd.org.

A Taste of Italy” Inter- national Dinner:

Sunday, January 25th,

,12-5pm. The High

School Youth Group of Our Lady of Victory R.

C. Church. Cherry Lane Rd., Tannersville, one mile from Route 611.

FMI call, 570-629-4572.

Boomer Angel's Adop-

tion

Day:

January

25th,

11am-2pm.

Rt.

209,

Brodheadsville

FMI,

visit

www.

BoomersAngels.com,

on

Facebook

or

call

570-350-4977.

 

Lego

Club:

January

26th,

4pm.

Catherine

Dickson

Hofman

Library, 4 Lambert Rd., Blairstown, NJ. Create your own Lego design. Snacks provided. Ages 8 & up. Registration required. FMI, call 908-

362-8335.

Wind Gap Film Club Chinese Auction Fund- raiser: January 30th,

6pm. The Wind Gap Legion, 217 N. Broad- way, Wind Gap. FMI, email windgapfilm club@gmail.com or find on Facebook.

Lancaster Bus Trip to See MOSES: March 28th, leaving Five Points Elementary at

8am, show at 11am.

Returning home approx.

7pm. Relay for Life

Fundraiser. Lunch at

Shady Maple Smorgas- bord. Reserve tickets

ASAP. Reservations &

Cancellations by March 4th, unless your ticket is

resold. FMI, call 484-

375-5161, 610-417-5550

or 610-588-7786.

Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,

Safe Haven Pet Rescue Adoption Day: Janu- ary 18th, 11am-2pm. Rt. 209, Brodheads-

ville. Safe Haven requires a pre-adoption application w/ refer- ences & a home visit prior to adoption. FMI, a list of dogs available for adoption & adoption applications, visit Safe HavenPa.org, email SafeHaven@epix.net or join on Facebook.

Safe Haven Rescue

Volunteer Meeting:

January 20th, 6:30pm.

Rt.

209,

Kresgeville.

stown, NJ at 6am for

Families First 6th

Meet the volunteers of

Washington D.C. Stand

Safe

Haven Dog

up for the the unborn.

Rescue.

FMI, a list of

Will return at 4pm.

dogs available for adop-

Those who cannot walk

tion & adoption applica- tions, visit Safe

will be dropped off at the National Shrine of the

HavenPa.org,

email

Basilica of the Immacu-

SafeHaven@epix.net or join on Facebook.

late Conception. Contact Robert or Mary Ho at

2015 March for Life:

908-382-1525 or jiaying6@ptd.net FMI or

January 22nd, 5:30am mass. Bus leaves St. Jude Church in Blair-

reservations.

Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
Wind Gap Film Club First Meeting: January 16th, 6pm. Wind Gap Legion. 217 N. Broad- way,
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two

(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two areas that emerged as key priorities for Americans in North- western Mutual’s 2014 Planning and Progress Study. The study under- scored the need for better decision making, with 60 percent of Americans stating that their financial planning needs improvement and more than half admit- ting that they do not feel financially secure. Moreover, with longev- ity and costs increasing at a steady pace, there is also likely heightened pressure to prepare for the future, especially considering that, per Bankrate research, one-third of American workers have no retire-

ment savings whatso- ever. However, as the saying goes, “the best laid plans of mice and men often go astray,” and New Year’s resolu- tions seem to prove the point. A recent Forbes magazine poll found that only eight percent of Americans actually succeed in keeping their resolutions. In fact, a different survey showed that more than 10 percent of New Year’s resolutions don’t even make it to the Super Bowl. “While the new year is a logical starting point for new endeavors, resolutions likely have a high fail rate because people tend to set lofty, unrealistic expectations or view change as a short-term goal,” said Rebekah Barsch, vice

president of planning at Northwestern Mutual. “Life is a marathon, not a sprint, and people would be better served to change their mind- set from New Year’s resolutions to solutions for a lifetime.” According to Barsch, building solid financial habits that last requires broadly changing over- all attitudes, which will then shape ongoing decision making across a broad range of finan- cial matters. To that end, instead of a “to do” list, Barsch suggests the following “don’t” list as a foundation for improving long-term financial well-being:

• Don’t put off impor- tant conversations- Northwestern Mutual research shows that Americans would rather discuss death and

intimacy than money. Overcoming this discomfort is essential, as open dialogue with partners, loved ones and professionals is the foundation for effective financial planning. And the benefits of planning are clear. According to Northwestern Mutual’s 2014 Planning and Progress Study, disci- plined financial plan- ners feel substantially more financially secure than those who consider themselves informal or nonplan- ners. • Don’t put all your eggs in one basket- While Northwestern Mutual research shows that most Americans over 25 (67 percent) have a savings account, just a fraction own stocks, bonds and real estate. Considering a

(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two

wide range of solutions to meet financial and lifestyle objectives can play an important role in strengthening overall financial security. • Don’t pass poor financial habits to your children—A strong motivation to improve your own financial behaviors is to set a positive example for your kids as early as possible. Good and bad habits have one thing in common-the earlier they start, the harder they are to break. Themint.org and themintgrad.org have information, tools and resources to help younger children and millennials, respec- tively, enhance their money smarts. For more information on financial planning, please visit NM.com.

(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two

(NAPSI)—The Ameri- can Society of Clinical Oncology, the world’s leading professional organization represent- ing physicians who care for people with cancer, announced the “Top Five Advances in 50 Years of Modern Oncol- ogy,” based on results of worldwide voting on CancerProgress.Net—A SCO’s interactive website documenting the history of progress against cancer. The “Top Five in 50” results identify pivotal discoveries in chemo therapy, prevention, molecularly targeted therapy and supportive care that have stood the test of time, and upon which further discover- ies have since been based. Federal funding played a role in many of these advances as a result of research supported by the U.S. National Insti- tutes of Health (NIH). The NIH has lost almost a quarter of its purchas- ing power in the last decade, adjusting for inflation. “Over the past five decades, NIH-funded research has trans- formed the outlook for people with cancer,” said ASCO President

(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two

Peter Paul Yu, M.D., FACP, FASCO. “These Top Five in 50 highlight transformational discov- eries that represent a shining sliver of what we have learned from a sustained investment in federally funded research. However, without greater federal investment going forward, the pace of

progress against cancer

and other diseases will be far slower.” The “Top Five Advances” were:

1.

The

first chemo-

therapy treatment that

cured

advanced

Hodgkin’s lymphoma, called MOPP, discov- ered in 1965, paving the way to 90 percent cure rates for patients with

(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two

this disease today.

testicular cancer.

  • 2. The HPV vaccine,

5.

The

1991 approval

Gardasil, approved to

of the anti-nausea drug

prevent cervical cancer

ondansetron

(Zofran)

in 2006.

that

dramatically

  • 3. The targeted drug

imatinib (Gleevec),

improved many patients’

quality of life while they

approved in 2001 to

were

going

through

treat chronic myelog-

cancer treatments.

enous leukemia.

Further

information

  • 4. A three-drug combi-

nation, PVB, developed in 1977 that led to the cure of advanced

about the Top Five Advances can be found online at www. cancerprogress.net.

(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—It is not surprising that most New Year’s resolutions revolve around health and financial matters, two
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your

(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your home. In fact, according to the Department of Energy, heating and cooling accounts for about 56 percent of the energy used in a typical U.S. home, which makes efforts to reduce energy costs that much more important. As you heat your home this winter, the experts at the York brand of heating and air condi- tioning recommend the following:

• Perform regular maintenance. Clean air filters, seal any duct leaks, make sure regis-

ters are clear of obstruc- tions and check your insulation. The Environ- mental Protection Agency (EPA) reports that improper insulation can reduce system efficiency by as much as 30 percent. • Hire a qualified technician to inspect and service your home comfort system. The technician will make sure your system is working properly and at peak efficiency. As a rule of thumb, heat pumps and oil-fired furnaces need annual tune-ups, while gas- fired equipment can be serviced every other year. • Consider replacing an

older, inefficient furnace or heat pump. A knowledgeable techni- cian will be able to recommend a new, more efficient replacement system, such as ENERGY STAR®− qualified equipment that can help save you money on energy bills. Efficiency is measured as annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) for furnaces and heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF) for heat pumps. The higher the AFUE or HSPF, the more efficient the unit and the less energy it requires to heat your home. • Adjust your thermo- stat. By lowering it just

a few degrees in cooler temperatures, you can help your heating system work less to maintain a comfortable indoor temperature. • Think about install- ing a programmable thermostat. Program- ming your thermostat to accommodate your family’s time away from home and sleep- ing schedule will help to ensure that your system is operating only when you need it. • Learn more. To learn more about efficient products that can help you conserve energy and save money, or to find a heating and cool- ing contractor near you, visit york.com.

(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your

(NAPSI)—The next time you’re looking to instantly transform a piece of wood furniture or your kitchen cabinets, try a one-step stain and clear finish product to change the look and color of your wooden piece. You can update a tired room by making over one item without removing its existing finish or replac- ing the furniture.

Consider

a

rich

dark

urethane finish on it; if

wood tone or beautiful

red

tone

family

to

refresh

a

treasure.

it does, give it a light

sanding with fine-grit

sandpaper and remove

Whether it’s a redo for

an entryway table, new life for a family heirloom or sprucing up

kitchen

project

faster

cabinets,

is

easier

the

and

to

accomplish

sanding dust. •

with a one-step product.

Test to see whether

Using

a

natural-

bristle brush, apply a one-step product such as

Minwax PolyShades

according to its applica-

tion instructions. It’s

For a beautiful finish:

available in 13 colors ranging from the light

your wood has a poly-

wood tones of Honey Pine or Classic Oak to

the deep, rich colors of Espresso or Bombay Mahogany. •

Apply

a

thin, even

coat. To deepen the

color, a second or third coat can be applied.

For

a

dramatic

change, choose a darker

color than your original

 

finish

to

really see the

difference.

 

For

more

inspiration,

visit www.minwax.com

to

see

videos

on

the

color

transformation

possibilities.

(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your

Hello fellow readers! I always feel sad when I see retired Christmas trees curbside. It feels wasteful, even though they’ve served their intended purpose, to toss them out in the trash when there is still more these beauties can do. Its true many towns have programs of gathering used Christmas trees they turn into mulch. That’s useful. But before tossing them at the curb, check with your town to find out if they have collection drives and wait for that day rather than putting them out early. It’s more respect- ful than having them blow around in the streets. Another option is to cut the branches off the trunk and use them

around your plants to

protect them from

winter damage. Better

yet, why not move your

undecorated tree outside

and keep it in the stand.

Then add heart-shaped

ornaments

for

Valentine’s Day, sham- rocks for St. Patrick’s Day, or any other wintery decorations that tickle your fancy. Maybe you’ll start a trend? Or embellish with cut dry things from your gardens as we did for our winter window boxes and have fun extending the joy. I’m

not suggesting you keep

your cut tree inside all

winter though. It’ll

become dry and a fire

hazard.

Some

like

to

adorn

their trees with bird food

such as suet and birdseed made into ornaments. Even unbut- tered strung popcorn looks charming. I would only caution that you

place your bird food tree where other critters will stay clear.

After

you’ve

enjoyed

your Valentine’s-turned- St.-Patrick’s-Day tree, turn it into an animal shelter come spring. If you have a wooded area or permission to add to

someone else’s, simply place it in a brush pile. Or, create a habitat for fish or water insects by sinking your tree in a pond; asking permission from the pond owner first of course.

Jason

from

Washing-

ton, NJ saves his tree to

use as a structure on

which to grow climbing

beans or cucumbers.

Great idea, Jason! Santa

would be proud!

Garden dilemmas?

askmarystone.com

(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
(NAPSI)—There’s no doubt that heating and cooling your home is the largest energy expense in your
Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular
Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular
Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular
Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular

Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, and other chronic, serious conditions with affordable screenings by Life Line Screening. St Elizabeth of Hungary Parish will host this community event on 1/23/2015. The site is located at 300 W Babbitt Ave in Pen Argyl. Joanne Higgins of Hanover, PA attended a Life Line Screening

Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular

and said, "I probably wouldn't be here if not for Life Line Screen- ing". Screenings can check for:

• The level of plaque buildup in your arteries, related to risk for heart disease, stroke and overall vascular health. • HDL and LDL Cholesterol levels • Diabetes risk • Bone density as a risk for possible osteo- porosis • Kidney and thyroid function, and more

Screenings are afford- able, convenient and accessible for wheel- chairs and those with trouble walking. Free parking is also available. Packages start at $149, but consultants will work with you to create a package that is right for you based on your age and risk factors .. Call 1-877-237-1287 or visit our website at www.lifelinescreening. com. Pre-registration is required.

Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular
Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular
Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular

By: Jennifer Lively

How can you tell if your child is “at risk” to use drugs or alcohol?” We hear the expression “at risk youth” but what does it really mean? How can we identify an issue with drug use before it becomes an addiction? The teenage and pre-teen years are difficult times but with awareness, an open mind and current information you may be able to gently guide your child through these rough and challenging years. Have an open mind. Anyone, and yes

even your child can be experimenting and even become addicted to drugs. Anyone. Addic- tion does not discrimi- nate. Doctors, lawyers, truck drivers, teachers and even straight A students can become addicts. It is statistically proven that the earlier a person starts using drugs or alcohol the more likely they will progress into addiction. Pay Attention. Yes, you want to encourage indepen- dence but stay involved in your child’s life. Know your child’s

friends

...

know

their

parents. Subtle but early signs that your child is at risk may start with a change in friends, change in activities, or change in attitudes. Communicate, commu- nicate, and communi- cate. Stay involved by asking questions and participating in your child’s life. Sometimes parental involvement can be the main deter- rent to drug use and dependence. Need more information? Visit a Clean Slate recovery center in Bangor.

Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular
Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular
Residents living in and around the Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania can learn about their risk for cardiovascular
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals

Ciao Amici,

When the north wind

begins

to

blow

I

am

reminded of the winter

meals Grandmom

made.

family’s

One

of

favorite

our

in

winter was pane cotto

[cooked

bread].

This

meal was very thrifty and satisfying all at the same time. You start with day old good Italian bread. Matt’s five cent loaf was the best. Don’t bother with Amedigan bread; it will disintegrate. Always start with a pot of boiling water, then add salt. Cut your bread and place it in your “skull di macaroon” [colander] into the sink to await its bath. Put the broccoli rabe in the boiling water. In a large frying pan, add your favorite olive oil, then garlic and sauté until golden. Sometimes Grandmom would also use pancetta, gancuile, bacon or salt pork in this

recipe for added richness. Once the broccoli is cooked and strained in the colander, add and mix in the bread. Serve onto a platter and add the sautéed olive oil and garlic. Ah, what humble substance for a stick- to-your-ribs kind of meal. They also enjoyed making a similar dish called Ciambotto. The same process, but the ingredients were pota- toes, cabbage, cannel- lini beans and the bread. As a youngster eating this I would remember having to wait at the dinner table to get up because of the actual weight of the meal.

When I finally stood up

to leave the table I’d see the smiles and laughter of Grandmom and

Grandpop

saying,

“What is wrong Josie, are you full?” I’d think to myself, “Next time I’ll eat slower.” But next time the same thing would happen because it was so good. Every meal, sitting around the dinner table, I could see that familiar look in their eyes; the look of love, gratitude, pride and happiness of la familia [our family]. On Monday, January 19th at 3pm I will be doing a free cooking demonstration on how to make pane cotta at the shop. Seating is limited

so call 610-588-6991 for reservations. "Il problema di mangi- are cibo italiano è di 5 o 6 giorni dopo sei affamato." "The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again." -George Miller, British writer. Con cordiali saluti, Joe My book, “Growing Up in the Butcher Shop“ is available at the shop

or on our web page. To receive menu specials and our newsletter, by join our mailing list at www.JDeFrancoandDa ughters.com. Click on Mailing List and enter your e-mail. Email us your Roseto stories, recipes and comments to portipasto@epix.net or call 610-588-6991. Store hours are 7am to 7pm, seven days a week with catering available anytime or by appoint- ment.

Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals

(NAPSI)—By follow-

ing

a

few simple tips, save time and

you money at holiday time

can

and on other year-round

gift-giving

occasions

when you buy things for

yourself and your family:

• ery”: According to

Do

a

“deal

discov-

mobile coupon app

Shopular,

which

conducted a survey of

nearly 600 savvy shop- pers, as many as 95 percent of the shoppers polled have participated in retail bargain hunting

on

their

smartphone

device-before

 

even

hitting

the

 

stores-to

research

and

discover

the best ways to save, as

shopping

truly

goes

mobile.

 

• Making a list, check-

ing

it

twice

and

then

sticking to

it

can be

a

good idea for busy fami-

lies on the go budget.

and

on a

• Convenience is the buzzword of the year for “omni-channel” shop- pers who are using all available technology

tools at their disposal- be it online, via mobile or in-store to locate hot bargains on heavy sales days—to ensure the best

Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals

possible shopping expe- rience. • Learn more: For other ways to streamline your upcoming visit to your favorite retail outlets, check out and download Shopular.com, a leading mobile couponing app, available free for Android and iPhone.

Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals
Ciao Amici, When the north wind begins to blow I am reminded of the winter meals