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R E L A T I O N S

OPENING CEREMONY
SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES
CRAIG DUFF
Craig Duff is an award-winning video journalist and documentary television
director, producer and writer, specializing in multi-platform storytelling
and solo journalism. Before joining Medill in 2012, he was the director of
multimedia and chief video journalist for TIME, where he oversaw video and
other multimedia projects for the magazines digital platforms and TIME.com.
He and his team at TIME won an Emmy award for new approaches in news and
documentary programming for a series he created and produced that explored
the stories behind several iconic photographs. Duff also served as an adjunct
associate professor at Columbia Universitys School of International and Public
Affairs and as a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton University, where he
taught a seminar on multi-platform journalism. He also spent a year in Egypt,
where served as a Knight International Journalism Fellow, training professional
broadcast reporters and graduate students at the Center for Electronic Journalism
at the American University in Cairo. Previously, Duff worked with The New
York Times on several television documentaries and was a lead video journalist
on the original VJ team as the paper first ventured into producing original video
content on NYTimes.com. His documentaryNew York Times Reporting: Arctic
Rush was awarded the National Association of Science Writers 2006 Science and
Society Award. Duff began his career at CNN where he was a senior producer
in the networks Environment Unit and an executive producer of cultural
newsmagazine programs. He also produced several documentaries for the series
CNN Presents, including hours on military aircraft, wildland firefighting and life
aboard an aircraft carrier during wartime. During his years at CNN and Turner
Broadcasting, Duff received numerous awards, including a national Emmy,
two Cable Ace Awards, the National Headliner Award, a Genesis award, three
awards from the Environmental Media Association, and festival honors from the
Houston, Chicago, Columbus and National Educational Film Festivals.

KEITH RICHBURG
Keith Richburg has been a Washington Post reporter for more than three
decades, with 20 years overseas as a foreign correspondent, and half of that time
in Asia, particularly China. That has given him the privilege of a ringside seat for
some of historys most fascinating moments, and the chance to meet some of the
worlds most pivotal players.
Richburgs first foreign assignment was Manila, beginning in 1986 during the
heady days after the fall of Ferdinand Marcoss dictatorship. Richburgs five-year
stint in Southeast Asia took me regularly to Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and
Singapore, and most frequently to Vietnam, then largely closed to outsiders.
Richburgs second tour was in Africa, which produced a book, Out of America;
A Black Man Confronts Africa (Basic Books, 1997) that won critical acclaim.
Richburg spent much of my time, until the end of 1994, covering the famine and

civil war in Somalia, and the Rwanda genocide. His Africa reporting won several awards,
including a George Polk Award for international reporting, and he was a Pulitzer finalist.
Richburg returned to the U.S. in 2005 as the Foreign Editor of The Post, directing foreign
coverage and a staff of 20 correspondents, and later, as Bureau Chief in New York City.
From New York, he covered the fall of former New York governor Eliot Spitzer, the
2008 financial crisis with the collapse of Bear Stearns, the Bernard Madoff scandal, and
he helped cover the 2008 presidential campaign, including traveling with the Obama
campaign.
At the end of 2009, Richburg was once again in China, ostensibly to help cover President
Obamas first trip to Beijing. Richburg would wind up staying for three years, through
the Communist Partys 18th Party Congress at the end of 2012 that would usher in a
new leadership lineup. Richburg holds a BA in political science from the University of
Michigan, and an MSc in international relations/comparative government from the
London School of Economics.

BUSINESS PLENARY
WILLIAM HOLT
Dr. Overholt is currently Senior Research Fellow at Harvards Kennedy School
of Government. He was Director of the RAND Corporations Center for Asia
Pacific Policy. He served as Head of Strategy and Economics at Nomuras regional
headquarters in Hong Kong from 1998 to 2001. Before that, he was Managing
Director and Head of Research at Bank Bostons regional headquarters in
Singapore. For 18 years he was at Bankers Trust, managing a country risk team
in New York from 1980 to 1984 and then serving as regional strategist and Asia
research head based in Hong Kong from 1985 to 1998.
From 1971 to 1979 Dr. Overholt worked at the Hudson Institute, where he
directed planning studies for the U.S. Department of Defense, Department of
State, National Security Council, National Aeronautics and Space Administration,
and Council on International Economic Policy.
Dr. Overholt is the author or principal co-author of seven published
or forthcoming books, including most recently Asia, America and the
Transformation of Geopolitics (Cambridge University Press, 2008). His book,
The Rise of China (W.W. Norton, 1993), had nine foreign editions) and won the
Mainichi News/Asian Affairs Research Center Special Book Prize. The others are
Political Risk (Euromoney, 1982); and (with William Ascher) Strategic Planning
and Forecasting (John Wiley, 1983). He is principal co-author of: Asias Nuclear
Future (Westview Press, 1976) and The Future of Brazil (Westview Press, 1978).
With Zbigniew Brzezinski, he founded the semi-annual Global Assessment in
1976 and edited it until 1988. He expects to publish Dictatorship, Democracy,
Development: Asian Lessons for China and America later in 2013
Dr. Overholt received his B.A. (magna, 1968) from Harvard and his Master of
Philosophy (1970) and Ph.D. (1972) from Yale.

DANIEL NADLER
Daniel is currently a Visiting Scholar at the United States Federal Reserve.
His research there includes tracking the asset allocation strategies of major
institutional investment funds.
Daniels academic macro-economic research on sovereign bond markets has
been covered across the global financial media, including The Wall Street
Journal, and his writings and analysis of stock markets have been featured in
Bloomberg. His recent article in Bloomberg, Strong Dollar Advocates Make
a Weak Case discussed a mathematical model he created that successfully
predicted every intermediate S&P 500 market bottom and top since 2008, and
which had never before appeared in the financial media. At 28, Daniel was one of
the youngest people ever to be published in VOX, which features research from
leading economists around the world. His research for VOX was coauthored
with Harvard Economics Professor Alberto Alesina.
Daniels forthcoming book with Harvard Government Professor Paul Peterson,
The Global Debt Crisis (2013), for Brookings Institution Press, explores how
Federal systems around the world are uniquely affected by the global sovereign
debt crisis, and outlines policy recommendations to better confront the crisis.
Daniel and Professor Peterson recently published a widely reviewed article on
this subject in a special edition of the University of Chicago Law Review, which
was cited by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist George F. Will.
Internationally, Daniels economic research and analysis has been translated into
over a dozen languages.
Daniels other major area of research centers around the political use of Internet
technology and social media, and he recently authored a chapter on the subject
that appeared in The Unheavenly Chorus: Political Voice and the Promise of
American Democracy (Kay Lehman Schlozman, Sidney Verba & Henry E.
Brady), which was published in 2012 by Princeton University Press. His research
on the use of social media in the 2012 Presidential Election, Which candidates
do the public discuss online in an election campaign?: The use of social media by
2012 presidential candidates and its impact on candidate salience was recently
published in a special edition of Government Information Quarterly.
Outside of academia Daniel is an internet entrepreneur and inventor. In 2012,
Daniel was profiled on CNNs Whats Next, a program featuring forwardlooking thinkers in the fields of tech, science and social change and the big
ideas and events that will help shape our collective future.

HEALTH PANEL
YUANLI LIU
Dr. Yuanli Liu, a health economist serving on the faculty of the Department
of Global Health and Population at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH),
has been teaching and conducting research in the areas of health policy and
health system analysis since 1994 at Harvard. He has been closely involved in
helping inform Chinas policy making process for series of reforms and strategic
developments in its health sector since 1993, including the most recent work
on Healthy China 2020 developing Chinas first 10-year strategic plan for
effectively combating diseases and improving population health and Critical
Review of Chinas Pharmaceutical Regulation System commissioned by the
SFDA. Since 2006, Dr. Liu has been serving as the founding director of HSPH
China Initiative, which has conducted high impact programs in healthcare reform
research, leadership development and policy dialogues. Dr. Liu also served on
the United Nations Millennium Development Taskforce on HIV/AIDS, Malaria,
TB, and Access to Basic Medicines. He consulted for many international agencies
including the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, UNDP, UNICEF, WHO as
well as global corporations. He is also Adjunct Professor of Tsinghua University
in Beijing and currently serves on the Experts Committee of Health Policy and
Management, the Chinese Ministry of Health.

Panji Hadisoemarto
Panji is currently a doctoral candidate at the Department of Global Health and
Population, Harvard School of Public Health. In addition to his role with HSPH,
Panji is also a faculty member of Padjadjaran University School of Medicine
in Bandung, Indonesia. He has worked with the US Naval Research Unit 2 in
Indonesia, and coordinated two large studies on dengue hemorrhagic fever
in the city of Bandung. Currently, he is a recipient of the HSPH Presidential
Scholarship, and is currently working on a doctoral dissertation that will gauge
the need for a dengue vaccine in Indonesia and show how a vaccine program
can be developed alongside with other control methods to obtain the maximum
impact for controlling dengue. Under the mentorship of Professors Marcia
Castro and Marc Lipsitch, he is building a mathematical model that will be useful
to assist dengue control policy making in Indonesia, and that could be adapted to
other dengue endemic countries.

Kavita Sivaramakrishnan
Dr Sivaramakrishnan has expertise in the history of medicine in South Asia and
researches the politics of global health. Her book, Old Potions, New Bottles
explores the changing agenda and mobilization of indigenous medicine and its
practitioners in twentieth century India. Her current research interests focus
on how aging populations have been historically constructed as a problem on
a global scale and the evolution of the norms, evidence and practices that have
made them visible as a singular, international agenda over past decades. She
is also working on the making of knowledge about the plague as an endemic
disease during the decades of international health, and on a conceptual history

of disease categories. Her collaborative research includes ongoing projects on the


making of cardiovascular disease and the politics of expertise in India, changing
notions of hazards and panics and on the role of history and memory relating
to past epidemics and scientific interventions. She is also the PI in a project on
Healthy Aging in India, supported by Pfizer and is conducting this through
the institutional support provided by the International Longevity Center at the
Mailman School. She teaches courses on population aging, the lifecourse, on
globalization and health and on plagues and pandemics at the Mailman School
and at the History Department in Columbia University.

ARTHUR KIM
A native of California, Dr. Kim received his undergraduate degree from Yale
University and his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. He trained in
internal medicine and infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital and
did postdoctoral training in immunology at the Partners AIDS Research Center.
His longstanding clinical and research interests are related to the understanding
of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, particularly in special populations such as
those with acute infection, injection drug users, and co-existing HIV infection.
He has co-authored over 50 original publications and review articles on a wide
variety of topics including immunological, virologic, and clinical aspects of HCV.
At present, he is on staff at MGH where he directs the Viral Hepatitis Clinic
in the Division of Infectious Diseases and is Assistant Professor of Medicine at
Harvard Medical School. He receives funding from the National Institutes of
Health to examine immune and genetic correlates of natural clearance of HCV,
to identify acute HCV in the MA state prisons. He serves on several local and
national guideline committees and has given numerous talks on local, regional,
national and international levels.

JESSICA HABERER
Jessica Haberer, MD, MS, received her medical degree from Yale University and
a masters degree in Health Services Research from Stanford University. She
completed an internship and residency in Internal Medicine at the University
of California, San Francisco. After finishing her training, Dr. Haberer worked
for the William J. Clinton Foundation HIV/AIDS Initiative in Beijing, China,
where she served as a Clinical and Research Advisor to the Chinese Center
for Disease Control andPrevention/ National Center for AIDS, Division of
Treatment and Care. Upon returning to the United States, she joined the faculty
in the Department ofMedicine at the University of California, San Francisco
as a Clinical Educator. Dr. Haberer developed in interest in adherence to HIV
antiretroviral therapy (ART) while in China and began studying multiple
measures of ART adherence among children and adults in developing settings.
Dr. Haberer joined the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Medicine
and Center for Global Health, as well as the Harvard Institute for Global Health,
in 2008, where she is actively involved in the study of wireless adherence and
health status monitoring technologies and strategies for developing settings, as
well as adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV infection.

EDUCATION PANEL
STEPHAN ELLENWOOD
Dr. Steve Ellenwood is the current Faculty Director of the Center for Character
and Social Responsibility. Professor Ellenwood served on the original advisory
board for the CCSR (formerly known as the Center for the Advancement of
Ethics and Character founded in 1989). Professor Ellenwoods new role with
the CCSR follows three decades of serving as the Chair of the Department of
Curriculum and Teaching at Boston Universitys School of Education. Dr.
Ellenwoods areas of professional expertise and research include law-focused
social studies education, intercultural education, and character education.

LARS OJUKWU
Bachelor of Economics and Bachelor of Chinese Language (Williams College)
Lars has worked in international education off and on since 2005. Concentrating
his efforts in East Asia (particularly Taiwan and China), he has used his time
abroad studying the culture as well as the language itself. His classroom
experience comes in the form of working with all ages outside of the traditional
track (eg. foreign business language acquisition, test prep, writing seminars) and
has served all age groups from Kindergarten to Business Professionals. Having
graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy and gaining insight into American
Secondary Boarding Institutions, Lars is currently working as a research associate
for the Cambridge Institute of International Education, providing schools with
support for properly building international student programs. He also lived and
worked in Taiyuan, Shanxi China from 2008 - 2012.

CHARLOTTE MASON
Charlotte Mason was the co-founder and director of The China Exchange
Initiative (CEI) in Newton, Massachusetts, from 1999 to 2012. CEI was formed
in 1999 and funded by the Freeman Foundation to create exchange programs,
educational partnerships, and shadowing programs for school administrators
between schools in the U.S. and China. CEI continues to create networks of
schools in states and regions in the U.S. and China. In 2000, Charlotte Mason
co-chaired the National Commission for Asia in the Schools to increase the
quality and quantity of instruction about Asia in schools throughout the United
States. Mason was a teacher in Newton, Massachusetts, and an exchange teacher
at the Beijing-Jingshan School in 1989. Upon her return from China in 1989, she
served as co-chair of the Newton-Beijing Jingshan School Exchange Program,
which was founded in 1979, and which continues to thrive. Over a period of
twenty-five years, as a frequent visitor in many kinds and levels of schools in
China, and, then, over a period of thirteen years, as Director of CEI, working
with hundreds of Chinese and U.S. principals in CEIs shadowing programs in
both China and the U.S., she has observed and collected data about the relative
strengths (and weaknesses) of schools in China and the U.S. At Boston University,
she is planning to do a comparative study of schools in the U.S. and China at
pre-college levels. She will compare mission statements, student experiences, the
roles and perceptions of teachers and school leaders, the aim (and relevance) of
curricula, and the ability of the schools to meet the expectations of society.

SCOTT SOLBERG
V. Scott Solberg, PhD is Associate Dean of Research at Boston University. Dr.
Solberg is an active member in the Society for Vocational Psychology, a Section in
Division 17 (Society for Counseling Psychology) of the American Psychological
Association. He is also a member of International Association for Educational
and Vocational Guidance, National Career Development Association and
currently serves on the editorial boards of the Career Development Quarterly
and an ad-hoc reviewer for the Journal of Vocational Behavior and Journal of
Career Development. Dr. Solberg has published more than 40 professional
articles, chapters, monographs and technical reports that focus on career
development for youth including how to promote optimal youth development
and college and career readiness through the use of individualized learning plans
and resiliency-based curriculum. He has served in leadership roles with the
Milwaukee Partnership Academy and Milwaukee Public Schools Small Schools
reform movement and is author of Success Highways, a proven resiliency
development curriculum for middle and high school students.

WILLIAM WEI
Dr. Wei is a fellow and senior scientist of Harvard University. He is also the cofounder and president of the American International Institute. Previously he
was Executive Director of Harvard-MIT Data Center at Harvard University and
Chief Technology Officer of Harvards Institute for Quantitative Social Science.
William earned his Ph.D. in Marine Studies from University of Delaware, and
was trained at Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a postdoctoral fellow. He
also worked as a senior research analyst at the School of Public Health of Boston
University.
Influenced by his parents and teachers, as well as many scholars whom he worked
with at Harvard and MIT, William has developed strong interest in traditional
Chinese philosophy and the comparative study of Eastern and Western cultures.
He established and hosted the East Meets West Forum in Harvard Neighbor
Program at Harvard University, and served as a board member for one of the
largest weekend Chinese language schools. He also helped create and serves on
the board of a nonprofit organization that promotes sustainable global prosperity
through innovation, education, and culture exchange. William has given talks
and workshops at Harvards China Education Symposium, Newton Chinese
Language School, and the Arts and Literature Group of the Greater Boston
Chinese Culture Association. He also wrote a book chapter regarding moral
education in an upcoming book Re-envisioning High Education.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP PANEL
RICHARD CAVANAGH
Richard E. Cavanagh rejoined the Harvard Kennedy School Faculty in 2007,
where he teaches entrepreneurial management courses. He serves as the nonexecutive Chairman of the BlackRock Closed End Funds, whose board he
joined in 1994, and recently retired as Chairman of the non-profit Educational
Testing Service (ETS). He is currently a Director/Senior Advisor to the Fremont
Group, a Director of The Guardian Life Insurance Company, a Trustee of
Volunteers of America, and an Overseer of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
Over two decades, he has served on the boards of five other multinational public
companies in the U.S. and Europe. His board service has included experience
as a non-executive chair, a lead independent director, and he has chaired audit,
compensation, executive and governance committees. For 12 years, Cavanagh
was President and CEO of The Conference Board Inc., the global research and
business membership group. Mr. Cavanagh joined The Conference Board in
November 1995 after serving as Executive Dean of Harvards Kennedy School of
Government for eight years. Earlier he spent 15 years with McKinsey & Company
Inc., the international management consulting firm. He led McKinseys efforts
to reorganize the nations bankrupt railroads into Conrail at the time the
largest industrial reorganization in history. From 1977-1979, Cavanagh held
senior posts at the White House Office of Management & Budget where he led
a Government-wide effort to improve cash management that saved $12 billion.
He also directed the Presidents Reorganization Project for domestic programs.
He is co-author (with Donald K. Clifford, Jr.) of the best-selling management
book, The Winning Performance, published in 13 national editions. Cavanagh
was educated at Wesleyan University (where he is a Trustee Emeritus) and at the
Harvard Business School. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations
and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

MEDIA PANEL
CRAIG DUFF
Craig Duff is an award-winning video journalist and documentary television
director, producer and writer, specializing in multi-platform storytelling
and solo journalism. Before joining Medill in 2012, he was the director of
multimedia and chief video journalist for TIME, where he oversaw video and
other multimedia projects for the magazines digital platforms and TIME.com.
He and his team at TIME won an Emmy award for new approaches in news and
documentary programming for a series he created and produced that explored
the stories behind several iconic photographs. Duff also served as an adjunct
associate professor at Columbia Universitys School of International and Public
Affairs and as a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton University, where he
taught a seminar on multi-platform journalism. He also spent a year in Egypt,
where served as a Knight International Journalism Fellow, training professional
broadcast reporters and graduate students at the Center for Electronic Journalism
at the American University in Cairo. Previously, Duff worked with The New
York Times on several television documentaries and was a lead video journalist
on the original VJ team as the paper first ventured into producing original video

content on NYTimes.com. His documentaryNew York Times Reporting: Arctic


Rush was awarded the National Association of Science Writers 2006 Science and
Society Award. Duff began his career at CNN where he was a senior producer
in the networks Environment Unit and an executive producer of cultural
newsmagazine programs. He also produced several documentaries for the series
CNN Presents, including hours on military aircraft, wildland firefighting and life
aboard an aircraft carrier during wartime. During his years at CNN and Turner
Broadcasting, Duff received numerous awards, including a national Emmy,
two Cable Ace Awards, the National Headliner Award, a Genesis award, three
awards from the Environmental Media Association, and festival honors from the
Houston, Chicago, Columbus and National Educational Film Festivals.

Lin YANG
Lin Yang is a senior research associate at the China Public Policy Case Research
Program at Harvard Kennedy School, where she develops series of case studies
on the public policymaking and government innovations at different levels in
the contemporary and transitioning China. Previously, she was a bilingual TV
news anchor and reporter for international news at China Central Television,
where she anchored numerous unprecedented live breaking news events in
Chinas broadcasting history, including the live coverage of the 2003 Iraq war,
the SARS epidemic, the first Round of Six party talks, and the launch of Chinas
first manned spacecraft. She has also interviewed numerous world political and
business leaders. In 2006, she was with CNN Washington bureau.
Yangs professional experiences also includes work with international agencies
and think tanks in New York City, and advisory positions for investment banks
in New York City and local government agencies in China.

MELINDA HENNEBERGER
Melinda Henneberger is a political writer for the Washington Post, where she
writes a column and oversees the papers She the People blog. She is spending
this semester at the Harvard Kennedy School, where she is a fellow at the
Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, where her research
project is on political risk, and the underestimated danger of running a toocareful campaign.
She founded and was editor-in-chief of AOLs Politics Daily, and for 10 years was
a reporter for The New York Times, where she was a Washington correspondent
and the Rome bureau chief. She has also worked for New York Newsday and the
Dallas Morning News, and has written for Newsweek, GQ, Readers Digest, Slate,
the New York Times Magazine, More, Commonweal and the National Catholic
Reporter. She lives in Maryland with her husband, Washington Post reporter Bill
Turque, and their 17-year-old twins.

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SECURITY & DIPLOMACY


PANEL
OLIVIER GUILLARD
Olivier Guillard (born in 1967) is Senior Fellow (Asia), working these last 8
years for the French think tank IRIS (www.iris-france.org), Institut de Relations
Internationales et Stratgiques (Paris). Doctor in International Public Law
(University of Paris), Olivier Guillard is as well partner in a consulting firm
(Crisis Consulting ; www.crisis.fr) since 2002, Director of information in charge
of country risk assessments and crisis management in Asia, for several of the
largest French firms. Previously (1996-2002), Olivier GUILLARD worked for the
Ministry of Defence as geopolitical expert, with an expertise mainly dedicated to
south Asian affairs. Olivier Guillard is lecturer in various places in France (Saint
Cyr Military Academy; a business school in Bordeaux; at the IRIS institute in
Paris) and abroad (Notre-Dame University, Beirut, Lebanon). During his Ph. D
years, Olivier Guillard worked as an intern for the French Ministry of Foreign
Affairs (General Consulate in Hamburg) and for the United Nations (UNIDIR,
Geneva ; UN Information centre in Paris ; UNESCO, Paris). For IRIS, his main
tasks are to monitor what is going on on a political, military and strategic plan
in Asia, from Afghanistan in the West to Japan in the East, to write articles and
books, to attend seminars and be present in the media (radio, newspapers, TV;
around 150 interviews per year).

WILLIAM OVERHOLT
Dr. Overholt is currently Senior Research Fellow at Harvards Kennedy School
of Government. He was Director of the RAND Corporations Center for Asia
Pacific Policy. He served as Head of Strategy and Economics at Nomuras regional
headquarters in Hong Kong from 1998 to 2001. Before that, he was Managing
Director and Head of Research at Bank Bostons regional headquarters in
Singapore. For 18 years he was at Bankers Trust, managing a country risk team
in New York from 1980 to 1984 and then serving as regional strategist and Asia
research head based in Hong Kong from 1985 to 1998. From 1971 to 1979 Dr.
Overholt worked at the Hudson Institute, where he directed planning studies for
the U.S. Department of Defense, Department of State, National Security Council,
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and Council on International
Economic Policy. Dr. Overholt is the author or principal co-author of seven
published or forthcoming books, including most recently Asia, America and the
Transformation of Geopolitics (Cambridge University Press, 2008). His book,
The Rise of China (W.W. Norton, 1993), had nine foreign editions) and won the
Mainichi News/Asian Affairs Research Center Special Book Prize. The others are
Political Risk (Euromoney, 1982); and (with William Ascher) Strategic Planning
and Forecasting (John Wiley, 1983). He is principal co-author of: Asias Nuclear
Future (Westview Press, 1976) and The Future of Brazil (Westview Press, 1978).
With Zbigniew Brzezinski, he founded the semi-annual Global Assessment in
1976 and edited it until 1988. He expects to publish Dictatorship, Democracy,
Development: Asian Lessons for China and America later in 2013. Dr. Overholt
received his B.A. (magna, 1968) from Harvard and his Master of Philosophy
(1970) and Ph.D. (1972) from Yale.

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FREDERICK CARRIERE
Frederick Carriere teaches a seminar on contemporary foreign policy related
to Korea. Currently, he also is a consulting professor at Stanford Universitys
Center for International Security and Cooperation. All of Carrieres professional
experience is Korea-related, including afifteen-year career (1994-2009) as
the executive vice president of The Korea Society in New York City. Prior to
assuming that position, Carriere lived in Korea for a period of over twenty
years (1969-1993). During most of those years he was employed by the Korea
Fulbright Commission (Korean-American Educational Commission), initially
as its educational counseling officer (1979-83) and later as its executive director
( 1984-1993). In the latter role, Carriere was also responsible for all the Koreabased programs of the East West Center, the Humphrey Fellowship Program
and the Educational Testing Service. He also was president of the Royal Asiatic
SocietyKorea Branch for two years (1989-91) and a councilor for over a decade.
Other relevant professional activities include service as an instructor in the
overseas division of the University of Maryland (1980-1982) and a translator
at the Korean National Commission for UNESCO (1977-1980). Interests
and expertise: educational and cultural diplomacy; moral/ethical issues in
foreign policy; politics of East Asia; Christianity in Asia (especially Korea); the
emergence of Korean nationalism.

SHINJU FUJIHIRA
Shinju Fujihira is the Associate Director of the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations,
Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, at Harvard University, and a
Lecturer in Political Science at Tufts University. His research examines finance
and international security, impact of domestic politics on national security
strategies, and Japanese politics and foreign policy. His publications have
appeared inAsia Program Special Report (Woodrow Wilson International
Center for Scholars), Harvard Asia Quarterly, and Occasional Paper Series
(Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University). He recently participated
in the China-Japan Dialogue: Conflict Resolution in the East China Sea, and
contributed a chapter (Can Japanese Democracy Cope with Chinas Rise?) in
the forthcoming volume from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for
Scholars. His book manuscript, How Democracies Won: Financial Origins of
Great Power Rivalry, examines how states financed warfare and welfare since
the late nineteenth century. At the Weatherhead Center, Dr. Fujihira has been
an Advanced Research Fellow, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, and National
Security Fellow, John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies. He received his B.A.
in Government from Cornell University, and Ph.D. in Politics from Princeton
University.

KEI KOGA
Kei Koga is a research fellow of International Security Program at the Belfer Center
for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government,
Harvard University. Concurrently, he is a Japan-US Partnership Program Fellow
at the Research Institute for Peace and Security (RIPS) in Japan, and a nonresident SPF Fellow at Pacific Forum Center for Strategic and International
Studies (CSIS). His research interests include East Asian regional security,
particularly developments of U.S.-bilateral security networks and Association
of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)led institutions, IR theory, international
institutions, institutional changes. He has published on topics that include

12

East Asian security, U.S. and Japanese foreign policies, the U.S.-Japan alliance,
and ASEAN. Previously, he served as a research fellow at the Japan Forum on
International Relations (JFIR), assistant executive secretary at the Council on
East Asian Community (CEAC), a RSIS-MacArthur visiting associate fellow at
the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS), Nanyang Technological
University, and a Vasey Fellow at the Pacific Forum CSIS, where he researched
political and security cooperation in East Asia on traditional and nontraditional
security issues. He also taught international relations and East Asian security
at the Open University of Japan. His articles and opinions appeared in such
media as Asian Perspective, Issues & Insights, the Stanford Journal of East Asian
Affairs, the Straits Times, Asia Times On-line. He has a Ph.D. from the Fletcher
School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, an M.A. from the Elliott School
of International Affairs, George Washington University, and a B.A. from Lewis
and Clark College.

LAW PANEL
JASDEEP RANDHAWA
Jasdeep is a student at the Harvard Kennedy School studying for a Masters in
Public Policy. Her interests lie mainly in water policy and law, for which she
hopes to work in the development field in water policy. Jasdeep has previously
worked as a Law Clerk in the Supreme Court of India and as a Research Assistant
for the Government of India. She gained her undergraduate degree from the
University of Mumbais Government Law College, where she studied Law. Her
hobbies include traveling and swimming.

JIEWUH SONG
Jiewuh Song has worked for several years on the human and environmental
rights issues arising from corporate development projects in ethnic minority
regions in Burma, as both a student and staff member at the Harvard Law
Schools International Human Rights Clinic. As part of her work, she has led
research teams in submitting a petition for review to the National Human Rights
Commission of Korea on behalf of Burmese petitioners and conducting field and
policy research in Burma, Thailand, and South Korea, and has written several
field report and analysis articles in the South Korean press on human rights and
corporate accountability in Burma. A graduate of Seoul National University
and Harvard Law School, Jiewuh is currently completing a doctoral dissertation
in philosophy at Harvard University. Her dissertation examines normative
questions about human rights and global justice.

ROBERT SLOANE
After receiving his JD in 2000, Professor Robert D. Sloane worked for the
International Committee of Lawyers for Tibet (now known as Tibet Justice
Center) under the auspices of Yale Law Schools Robert L. Bernstein Fellowship
in International Human Rights. He led fact-finding missions to Nepal, India
and Tibet, wrote submissions for the U.N. Commission on Human Rights
and human rights treaty bodies, represented asylum seekers, and published
several reports and law journal articles on human rights. Professor Sloane then
served two clerkships, first for Judge Robert D. Sack of the United States Court

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of Appeals for the Second Circuit and then for Judge Gerard E. Lynch of the
United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (at the time of the United
States District Court for the Southern District of New York). He also practiced
international law at Debevoise & Plimpton in New York, where he worked on
several international arbitrations and helped to litigate the initial stages of the
Avena case before the International Court of Justice, challenging the convictions
of Mexican nationals on death row based on violations of the Vienna Convention
on Consular Relations.
Before joining Boston University School of Law, Professor Sloane served as a
visiting lecturer-in-law and Schell Fellow at Yale, where he taught international
human rights and international arbitration, and as an associate-in-law at
Columbia. He also continued to practice international law as a consultant,
working on arbitrations conducted under the auspices of the International
Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, the International Centre for the Settlement of
Investment Disputes, the International Chamber of Commerce and specialized
tribunals, as well as assisting with the preparation of expert opinions for foreign
sovereigns and multinational corporations. Professor Sloane has published in
the fields of public international law, international human rights, international
criminal law, asylum law, the laws and customs of war, international legal theory,
state responsibility, and international investment arbitration. His 2009 article
The Cost of Conflation: Preserving the Dualism of Jus ad Bellum and Jus in Bello
in the Contemporary Law of War, published in Volume 34 of the Yale Journal of
International Law, received the Francis Lieber Prize, awarded by the American
Society of International Laws Francis Lieber Society for outstanding scholarship
in the field of the law of armed conflict by an author under the age of 35. His 2007
article Prologue to a Voluntarist War Convention, published in Volume 106 of
theMichigan Law Review, received a certificate of merit from the Francis Lieber
Society based on the same criteria. Professor Sloanes current research focuses on
the uses and regulation of propaganda and ideology in international law, the law
of armed conflict, national security and foreign relations law, and international
legal theory and jurisprudence.
Professor Sloane has been a visiting professor at the University of Michigan Law
School (Spring 2010); Harvard Law School (Spring 2011), where he served as the
John Harvey Gregory Lecturer in World Organization; and the Fletcher School
of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University (2012). He continues to practice
periodically as a consultant in international investment arbitrations, public
international arbitration, and other international dispute-resolution, as well as
to carry out international human rights work on a pro bono basis, chiefly in
his capacity as chairman of the board of directors of Tibet Justice Center. In
2007, Professor Sloane received a high-level diploma in public international law
from the Hague Academy of International Law, one of only three U.S. citizens
to receive the degree in the past two decades. In fall 2012, Professor Sloane was
elected to the American Law Institute, and in 2013, he was named the R. Gordon
Butler Scholar in International Law.

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