You are on page 1of 291

City Development Plan (CDP)

Of
Khilchipur
District: Rajgarh State: Madhya Pradesh

Final CDP Report


February 2014
SUBMITTED TO:
Urban Administration & Development Department (UADD),
Government of Madhya Pradesh
Contact: Palika Bhawan, Shivaji Nagar, Nr 6th No Bus Stop,
Bhopal 462011. MP
Telephone: + 91 755 2555006, Facsimile: + 91 755 2555005, E-mail:
info@mpusp.org
PROJECT CO-ORDINATION BY:
City Managers Association, Madhya Pradesh

PROJECT PREPARED BY:


PLANNING & RESOURCES ON URBAN DEVELOPMENT
AFFAIRS (PRUDA)
R & D Wing of
ALL INDIA INSTITUTE OF LOCAL SELF GOVERNMENT
(AIILSG)
Contact: Barfiwala Bhavan, Near Bhavans College, Khanpur,
Ahmedabad-380 001.Gujarat
Telephone:+ 91-79-25602770 (direct). 25601296 Tele fax : 25601835.
E-mail : go2pruda@gmail.com, pruda@aiilsg.org

Acknowledgement
This Report on City Development Plan (CDP) is a result of over two
years collective hard work of several individuals. Firstly we wish to express
our sincere thanks to Urban Administration and Development Department
(UADD), Government of Madhya Pradesh for supporting the study at such a
right time when Madhya Pradesh is Urbanising at a fast rate and the Urban
Local Bodies of the State are facing the challenge of meeting the requirements
of the growing population with limited technical and financial resources.
Special thanks are due to Shri S.N. Mishra (Principal Secretary, UADD,
GoMP) and Shri Sanjay Kumar Shukla (Commissioner, UADD, GoMP) for
leading this massive exercise for the Urban Local bodies of Madhya Pradesh.
I would like to record a special word of thanks to Mr. M.K Shrivastava (Chief Engineer,
UADD, GoMP) who provided very valuable professional and intellectual inputs and contributed
ground level knowledge to the team working on CDP for small Urban local Body (ULB) like Rajgarh,
Khilchipur, Khujner, Khujner, Talen, Boda and Zeerapur of Rajgarh District.
Output like preparing City Development Plans for all the small ULBs in a state cannot be
generated without an excellent professional coordination support given by City Managers Association
of Madhya Pradesh (CMAMP). I would like to take this opportunity on behalf of AIILSG to all the
persons working at CMAMP specially Mr. Pravin Bhagwat (Senior Urban Planner and State
Coordinator of the exercise), Moonis Ahmed Ansari (Web Content Manager), Pushkar Pansari
(Associate (Finance), Chandan Kushwah (Office Manager) who showed a constant and tiring efforts
during the entire exercise.
We are grateful to all the Urban Local Bodies for providing excellent hospitality during our
visit to the cities; Officers and the concerned staff of ULB Department in the towns who have
cooperated and provided their valuable time (during detailed discussions in the field visits) as well as
data and information for the project (when ever required).
AIILSG would like to put on record its thanks to Shri N.B Lohani (IAS (Retd.) and Advisor
to AIILSG), Shri S.K Sharma (Regional Director, AIILSG-Bhopal), Shri K.R Sharma (Deputy
Director, AIILSG-Bhopal) and all the persons working at AIILSG Regional Centre at Bhopal who
have cooperated and provided their valuable time and research inputs to the team when ever required
for the Project.
The CDP would not get completed without the immense hard work put in by the core team
members of PRUDA Unit of AIILSG. I would like to thank and congratulate Mr. Ajay R. Agrawal
(Executive Director, PRUDA), Mr. Jay N. Padalia (Associate Project Director, PRUDA) as well as all
other team members for their tiring efforts towards completion of project.
I take this opportunity on behalf of AIILSG to express gratitude to all the people who have
been instrumental in the successful completion of the project. We have all been enriched by the
experiences gained and shared during this endeavor. We hope the report will contribute in some way
towards implementation of strategies and projects in the cities in the near future.

Ranjit S. Chavan
Director General
All India Institute of Local Self-Government (AIILSG)
Mumbai

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Abbreviation
ADB
ADP
AIILSG

LS
M
M&E

Lump Sum
Municipality
Monitoring & Evaluation

APL
ASI
ATR
BOT
BPL

Asian Development Bank


Annual Development Plan
All India Institute of Local Self
Government
Above Poverty Line
Archaeological Survey of India
Action taken Report
Built Operate Transfer
Below Poverty Line

M3
MIC
MIS
MLD
MoRTH

CAA
CBO
CDP
CDS

Constitutional Amendment Act


Community Based Organizations
City Development Plan
Community Development Society

MP
MPEB
MPHB
MPPCB

CII
CMAMP

Confederation of Indian Industries


City Managers association of Madhya
Pradesh
Chief Municipal Officer
Central
Public
Health
and
Environment Engineering Organization
District Census Handbook
Draft Development Plan
Department
of
International
Development
Directorate of Local Bodies
District Magistrate
Department of Environment
Department of Health and Family
Welfare
Environmental
Planning
and
Coordination Organization
Economically Weaker Sections
Geographical Information System

MSW
NGO

Cubic Meter
Mayor in Council
Municipal Information System
Million Liters per Day
Ministry of Road Transport and
Highways
Madhya Pradesh
Madhya Pradesh Electricity Board
Madhya Pradesh Housing Board
Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control
Board
Municipal solid Waste
Non Government Organization

NH
NP

National Highway
Nagar Panchayat

NSDP
O&M
OG

National Slum Development Policy


Operation & Maintenance
Outer Growth

OHT
OSD
PHED
PPH

Over Head Tank


Open Sewerage Disposal
Public health Engineering Department
Persons per Hectare

PPP

Public Private Partnership

PRA
PRUDA
PWD
SADA
SC
SH
ST

Scheduled Tribe

SWM

Solid Waste Management

TCPD

KL

Government of India
Government of Madhya Pradesh
Ground Structure Reservoir
Housing and Environment Department
(GoMP)
Housing and Urban Development
Corporation Ltd
Indian National Trust for Art and
Cultural Heritage
Jawahar Lal Nehru National Urban
Renewal Mission
Kilo liter

Participatory Rapid Assessment


Planning & Resources on Urban
Development Affairs
Public Work Department
Special Area Development Authority
Scheduled Caste
State Highway

KM

Kilo Meter

UADD

LCA
LIC
LPCD

Lake Conservation Authority


Life Insurance Corporation
Liters per capita per day

UDA
ULB
WRD

Town
and
Country
Planning
Department, GoMP
Town
and
Country
Planning
Organization
Urban Administration and Development
Department
Ujjain Development Authority
Urban Local Body
Water Resource Department (GoMP)

CMO
CPHEEO
DCHB
DDP
DFID
DLB
DM
DoE
DoHFW
EPCO
EWS
GIS
GoI
GoMP
GSR
H&ED
HUDCO
INTACH
JNNURM

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

TCPO

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

PRUDA-AIILSG TEAM
Name

Degree / Experience

Position Held in AIILSG

Mr. Ajay R. Agrawal

B.Arch, M.Plan (Urban Planning)

Mr. Jay N. Padalia

B.Arch, M.Tech
Regional Planning)

Mr. Ashish Deosthali

B.E Civil, M.E in Environment


Engineer

Executive
Zone)

CA Trushar Shah

Chartered Accountant

Municipal Finance Specialist,


PRUDA

Mr. Sanat Shah

B.E Civil (Retd. Engineer Gujarat Sr. Project Engineer, PRUDA


Water Supply & Sewerage Board)

Mr. Vijay Mane

Master of Social Work (MSW), Social Development Expert


Post Graduation Diploma In
Human Rights

Mr. Vijay Kulkarni

M.A
(Sociology),
M.P.S Social
development
and
(Population
Science),
PhD communications specialists
(Sociology, Biometry & Nutrition),
M. Phil (Medical Sociology),
D.L.W (Labour Welfare)

Ms. Dhara Patel

B.E CSE

Software Developer, PRUDA

Mr. Punit Patel

B.Com, M.B.A

Project Coordinator, PRUDA

Mr. Jay Patel

B.E Civil, M.Tech Infrastructure Junior Project Officer, PRUDA


Engineering & Management

Ms. Neha Gupta

B. Plan (Environment)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

(Urban

& Associate
PRUDA

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

Executive Director, PRUDA


project
Director

Director,
(South

Project Researcher, PRUDA

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Project Introduction
Background
The Need of Planning Interventions in MP
Madhya Pradesh is Urbanising at a fast rate and the Urban Local Bodies of the State are facing the
challenge of meeting the requirements of the growing population with limited technical and financial
resources. GoI as well as GoMP have initiated a number of programmes to meet the growing demands
of infrastructure and service delivery. These are the GoI schemes: Urban Infrastructure Development
Scheme for Small and Medium Towns (UIDSSMT) and Integrated Housing and Slum Development
Programme (IHSDP), the GoMP initiated DFID funded MPUSP, which links reform with investment
in infrastructure for the poor etc. Other than this there are several programmes that have been initiated
by the GoI and GOMP.
A City Development Plan (CDP) is an action plan for equitable growth in a city, developed and
sustained through public participation to improve the quality of life for all citizens. It provides a
framework and vision within which projects need to be identified and implemented. It establishes a
logical and consistent framework for evaluation of investment decisions.

City development plan is envisaged to accommodate the constantly increasing infrastructure


demand and other services.

CDP is a process by which stakeholders define their aspiration and vision for their cities with
clear priorities for actions.

CDP is a perspective urban planning exercise with institutional reforms and investment plan.

Roots of CDP emerge out of globally recommended participatory urban planning processes
like city development strategies

After the assessment of the performance of the ULBs and their capacity for exploiting the above said
resources it was felt that such a plan is essential, not only for accessing GoI / GoMP funding but also
for providing a strategic framework for converging and co-ordinating various development inputs
towards positioning the city on a development path.

Issues to be addressed in CDP


CDP will draw on the basic structure and planning process from the toolkit with a focus on integrating
the current initiatives of various organisations and schemes and developing a strategic framework for
undertaking priority developmental actions in the medium term.
The following are some issues that the CDP is envisaged to address:

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Preparation of groundwork for mobilizing funding beyond JNNURM and other existing
programmes.

Address the issue of revitalising local economic development by attracting private sector
funding.

Lack of planning culture at ULB level.

Linkage between the overall spatial planning and policy framework of Master Plan and more
importantly into the annual municipal budgeting.

Linking the investment plan of the CDP with the municipal budgets will be crucial in
ensuring the O&M and thus sustainability of the infrastructure assets created.

Outcomes of CDP
The aim of this exercise is to support various Cities/Urban Local Bodies of Madhya Pradesh in
preparing the City Development Plan (CDP) for their respective cities. Preparation of the CDP will
consist of city development strategies that come out of a structured consultative process. The process
will enable elected representatives, key staff of ULB departments, parastatal agencies and other
institutions, policy makers and the citizens to participate and plan for spatial, social and economic
development of the concern cities. A City Development Plan (CDP) will present both a vision of a
desired future perspective for the city and the ULBs strategic framework of sectoral plans translated
into actions that define on how the ULB, together with other stakeholders, intends to work towards
achieving their long-term vision in the next five years.
The CDP should provide a comprehensive medium term strategy (Vision 2035) as well as a City
Investment Plan (CIP), based on which the concerned ULB will be able to access funds under
GoI/GoMP schemes as well as from own and other sources based on priority actions and projects
identified in the CDP .The document should also provide Financial Operating Plan (FOP) to direct the
ULBs for mobilising various financial resources to implement the identified projects.

Purpose and Objectives of the Assignment


The City development Plan must adhere with the JNNURMs CDP preparation toolkit. The
inadmissible components under JNNURM should also be included in the task. The CDP should also
include Broad Master planning of the town (using GIS) and should be prepared keeping in view the
Master Plan (wherever exists) provisions as prepared by Town and Country Planning Department . It
is also expected that the CDP would provide Urban Reform Action Plan for the ULBs as envisaged
under JNNURM.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Specific Objectives

The CDP will scale up existing urban development and poverty alleviation schemes within a
comprehensive and coherent strategic planning framework in order to ensure optimal benefit
from available resources for the citizens of the ULBs.

The CDP should aim to catalyse new thinking and provoke debate through a consultative
stakeholder driven process. The vision and strategic thrusts of the CDP will be built around
the lessons and findings of a comprehensive and rigorous stakeholder consultation and
documentation process.

It is expected that the CDP will serve the requirements of the UIDSSMT and IHSDP
programmes as well as JNNURM and other development schemes.

The CDP will generate specific priority actions and projects that can be the basis for
mobilizing funding from diverse sources.

Methodology Adopted
AIILSGs Approach and Methodology
In respect to the Terms of Reference, as specified by UADD, GoMP; AIILSG,s project team broadly
sub-divided the entire activities into specific tasks forces as mentioned below. The task forces
involved a mix of experts and other supporting staff. The division and the allotment of work also
accommodated all the specifications and requirement mentioned in the toolkit provided by the
CMAMP. AIILSG will carry out a multi-task exercise to formulate the CDP in close collaboration
with the ULB. The main task in the exercise are as under:
TASK 1: INCEPTION STAGE
The purpose of this task is to review and analyse the current status and unique features of the city with
regard to the state of its development, systems and procedures, as equally its institutional and financial
context. This stage is meant to identify the strengths and weaknesses in the citys development and to
provide an understanding of what impedes service delivery and management within the existing setup and what contributes to better service provision. This task will consist of meeting with ULB /
District officials & stakeholders, Undertaking Reconnaissance Survey, Collecting of Secondary Data
regarding Demographic, geographic and economic profile of the city and Conducting a Kick off
Workshop.
TASK 2: PREPARING CITY PROFILE
The major activities for the task is to undertake a situation analysis, Demand Gap Analysis and
SWOT Analysis:

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

City Assessment / Situation Analysis

Indepth analysis of the existing situation

Present issues in city

Available Infrastructure and level of services

Level of satisfaction

Expectations of citizens from ULB Officials and meetings.

DemandSupply Gap Analysis


Considering the existing rate of growth, and expectation about the prioritized sector services, it is
proposed to assess the future needs, which will be helpful to work out project details in later stage.
The findings from the sector analysis would be used to prepare the City Profile consisting of the
assessment of the existing situation in all the sectors identified, emerging issues, SWOT analysis and
projection of the present gaps and future requirements. This will be done within the framework of
parameters relating to demography, economic base, finance, physical and environmental issues,
infrastructure, institutions and universalisation of services especially for the poor.
TASK 3: DEVELOPMENT OF CITY VISION, SECTOR GOALS AND STRATEGIES
The major activities for the task are to formulate a City Vision, Sector Prioritization and Formulation
of Development Strategy and conducting 2nd Workshop at ULB Level and 1st presentation at District
Level. The details are as under:
Development of Perspective and Vision of the City
Using the results of the first stage of analysis, combined with consultations with key stakeholders and
civil society, this stage is meant to prioritize service sectors that require immediate attention while
simultaneously developing a vision for the future development.
Prioritization of Sector
The purpose of this stage is to review and analyze the status of various services and prioritize these
sectors in consultation with the various stakeholders of the city. Past trend of infrastructure
developments activities in the town is also assessed for devising the priorities of the town.
Formulating of Development Strategy
The selection of strategy needs to be done with wideranging consultations among and with key
stakeholders. It is in this stage that strategies and interventions are identified for attaining the vision
and future development perspectives for specific sector/sectors. This stage is used to first identify the

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

options and strategies and second, to evaluate the strategies from the perspective of their contribution
to the goals and objectives.
TASK 4: PROJECT IDENTIFICATION
Based on the sector specific priorities and strategies, details of projects for various sectors are to be
worked out. Details like physical aspects and financial aspects should be detailed out elaborately. This
will supported by a Workshop at ULB and District Level & a discussion at state level.
TASK 5: PREPARING A CITY INVESTMENT PLAN (CIP)
AIILSG Team will undertake meetings with different stakeholders to determine types and sources of
financing for priority projects from internal resources, state and central governments, local financial
institutions, donors, and through public-private partnerships. The implications of each of these will be
considered.
Based on the availability of resources, logical sequencing of actions and potential for immediate
implementation, the AIILSG will prepare a City Investment Plan (CIP) in consultation with ULB that
lays out the cost and revenue estimates of all priority projects in the next five years. The preparation
of the CIP is a reiterative process requiring adjustments to individual projects as well as changes in
scheduling to make the whole package work financially.
TASK 6: PREPARING A FINANCIAL OPERATION PLAN
The City Investment plan would be supported with a Financial Operating Plan (FOP). An investment
plan and a financing strategy are an integral part of the proposal. There is a need to analyze
applicability of different model of financing through PublicPrivate Partnerships for Urban
Infrastructure Development to the proposed strategy. It should focus on need for PublicPrivate
Partnerships, publicPrivate Partnership Options and other details required for PublicPrivate
Partnership Projects.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

FLOWCHART OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE PROJECT:

-Meeting with ULB / District officials &


stakeholders
-Reconnaissance Survey
-Collection of Secondary Data

Preparing City profile &


Situation Analysis Report &
Development of strategies and
priority actions

Conduct 2nd Workshop at ULB


Level
on Development of city
vision, sector goals and
Development of strategies and
priority actions

Submission 3
Draft CDP

Conduct 3rd Level


Workshop at ULB Level
on Draft CDP

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Conduct Kick
off Workshop
at ULB Level

Submission 1
Inception
Report

-Validation of secondary Data & Datagaps Identification


-Field survey and Primary Data Collection
-Making a sectoral SWOT Analysis
-Making a Demand Supply Gap Analysis

1st Stage
presentation at
the District
Level
st
1 Stage
discussion at
the State Level

Submission 2
City Profile, Sector
Analysis, city
vision, strategy and
priority projects Report
(report on 2nd workshop)

-Preparing a City Investment Plan (CIP) and a


Financial Operating Plan
-Project costing and determination of funding sources
-Scheduling of priority actions and developing a City
Investment Plan (CIP)

2ndd Stage presentation


at the District Level
nd
2 Stage discussion at
the State Level

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

Submission 4
FINAL CDP

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Description of Deliverables As per ToR


In respect to the Terms of Reference, as specified by UADD, GoMP; the main task in the exercise are
as under:
Deliverable 1. Inception Stage
Deliverable 2. City Profile, Sector Analysis, city vision, strategy and priority projects Report (report
on 2nd workshop)
Deliverable 3. Draft CDP and city level workshop report
Deliverable 4. Final CDP report

Description of Tasks
The consultant has to carry out a multi-stage exercise to formulate the CDP in close collaboration
with the ULB. The main stages in the exercise are:
01.
02.
03.
04.
05.
06.

Inception
Assessment of existing situation (opportunities, strengths, risks and weaknesses and gaps)
Development of city vision and sector goals and strategies
Second Workshop to develop city vision and sector goals
Development of strategies and priority actions
Draft CDP: Preparing a City Investment Plan (CIP) and a financing strategy (Financial
Operating Plan)

07. Final CDP


As per Terms of Reference
Project costing and determination of funding sources
The Consultants will undertake consultations with different stakeholders to determine types and
sources of financing for priority projects from internal resources, state and central governments, local
financial institutions, donors, and through public-private partnerships. The implications of each of
these will be considered.
Scheduling of priority actions and developing a City Investment Plan (CIP)
Based on the availability of resources, logical sequencing of actions and potential for immediate
implementation, the Consultants will prepare a City Investment Plan (CIP) in consultation with ULB
that lays out the cost and revenue estimates of all priority projects in the next five years. The
preparation of the CIP is a reiterative process requiring adjustments to individual projects as well as
changes in scheduling to make the whole package work financially. The City Investment plan would
be supported with a Financial Operating Plan (FOP).

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

10

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Structure of The Report


The structure of the report generally follows the CDP toolkit prepared by the government of Madhya
Pradesh. The report was arranged in such a way that would provide readers a realistic picture of the
town under study. In a nutshell, the report is composed of 15 Chapters.
Chapter 1 provides a rich historical background of the town, information on the district, location,
regional linkages and connectivity. Moreover the chapter describes physiographic and landform of the
town which includes its topography, climate and geology giving an understanding of the influence of
nature in the commercial activities of the town.
Chapter 2 provides an understanding of the Demographic Profile of the Town. The projected
population is also covered in the same chapter.
Chapter 3 looks into the Socio-Economic Profile of the Town. The workforce participation data give
readers information on the workforce population, proportion of main and marginal workers, work
classifications and unemployment rate of the town.
Chapter 4 investigates into the Physical Planning & Growth Management of Khilchipur. The chapter
also presents a broad master planning which are crucial to infrastructure planning and development.
Chapter 5 deals with the assessment of all basic infrastructure of Khilchipur, which includes gaps
assessment, goals of improvement for horizon years. The same chapter depicts the identified projects
and strategies for future actions. This chapter covers water supply, sewerage, sanitation, solid waste
management, transport, street lighting, and heritage (if any).
Chapter 6 presents a basic slum profile of the town which depicts issues pertain to Poverty in the
Town, BPL Population and Slum Population, General Characteristics of Slums, Status of Slums,
Social Security Schemes and Beneficiaries etc. As in chapter 5, this chapter also envisages, goals,
analysis, priority projects and implementation strategies.
Chapter 7 deals with giving information on Social Infrastructure like Institutional Facility, Health
Facility, and Education Facility & Recreational & Cultural Facilities.
Chapter 8 discusses the importance of conserving urban environment and also discusses the future
actions.
Chapter 9 looks into the existing institutional framework of the local government.
Chapter 10 shows the financial performance of Khilchipur with reference to its revenue and
expenditures. The analysis of such is crucial to seeking alternative sources of income for the town.
Chapter 11 discusses and presents a road map for implementing Urban Reforms in Khilchipur
Chapter 12 wraps the whole report by presenting a investment prioritization plan for the development
of Khilchipur.
Chapter 13 describes a City Vision for future of KHILCHIPUR.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

11

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table of Contents
Abbreviation....................................................................................................................................... 2
PRUDA-AIILSG TEAM .................................................................................................................... 3

Project Introduction ................................................................................................................4


Background ........................................................................................................................................ 4
The Need of Planning Interventions in MP ...................................................................................... 4
Issues to be addressed in CDP ......................................................................................................... 4
Outcomes of CDP ............................................................................................................................ 5
Purpose and Objectives of the Assignment ........................................................................................ 5
Specific Objectives .......................................................................................................................... 6

Methodology Adopted .............................................................................................................6


AIILSGs Approach and Methodology .............................................................................................. 6
FLOWCHART OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE PROJECT: .................................................................. 9
Description of Deliverables As per ToR .......................................................................................... 10
Description of Tasks......................................................................................................................... 10

Structure of The Report ........................................................................................................11


Table of Contents ...................................................................................................................12
List of Table ............................................................................................................................19
Chapter 1: Physical Features Of The District .....................................................................24
1.1 Historic Background .................................................................................................................. 24
1.1.1 District .................................................................................................................................. 24
1.1.2 Town..................................................................................................................................... 25
1.2 District Information .................................................................................................................... 25
1.3 Town Location (Linkages and Connectivity) ............................................................................. 26
1.4 Physiographic and Landform...................................................................................................... 27
1.4.1 Topography........................................................................................................................... 27
1.4.2 Soil ....................................................................................................................................... 28
1.4.3 Hydrology & Drainage ......................................................................................................... 28
1.4.4 Groundwater ......................................................................................................................... 28
1.4.5 Surface Water ....................................................................................................................... 29
1.4.6 Seismicity ............................................................................................................................. 29
1.4.7 Climate ................................................................................................................................. 30
1.4.8 Rainfall ................................................................................................................................. 30
1.4.9 Temperature .......................................................................................................................... 31
1.4.10 Humidity ............................................................................................................................. 31
1.4.11 Winds.................................................................................................................................. 31
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

12

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

1.5 Municipal area and Planning area............................................................................................... 31

Chapter 2: Demographic Profile Of The Town ..................................................................32


2.1. Population Growth Trend .......................................................................................................... 32
2.2 Population Projection ................................................................................................................. 34
2.3. Population Density .................................................................................................................... 36
2.4. Other Demographic Indicators .................................................................................................. 36
2.4.1. Population (0-6 age group) .................................................................................................. 36
2.4.2. Scheduled caste (SC) & Scheduled Tribe (ST) Population .................................................. 36
2.4.3. Infant Mortality and Fertility Rate ....................................................................................... 37
2.5. Issues ......................................................................................................................................... 37

Chapter 3: Socio-Economic Profile of the Town .................................................................38


3.1. Sex Ratio ................................................................................................................................... 38
3.2. Literacy Rate ............................................................................................................................. 38
3.3. Average household Size ............................................................................................................ 39
3.4. Workforce Participation ............................................................................................................ 39
3.5. Industrial Activities ................................................................................................................... 42
3.6. Trade and Commerce ................................................................................................................ 42
3.6.1. General ................................................................................................................................ 42
3.6.2. Agriculture ........................................................................................................................... 43
3.7. Tourism ..................................................................................................................................... 44
3.8. Issues ......................................................................................................................................... 45

Chapter 4: Physical Planning ...............................................................................................46


4.1. Spatial Growth Trends............................................................................................................... 46
4.2. Spatial Distribution of Population ............................................................................................. 47
4.3. Municipal Level Mapping ......................................................................................................... 48
4.4. Ward Delineation Map .............................................................................................................. 48
4.5. Land Use Analysis .................................................................................................................... 48
4.5.1. Residential Density .............................................................................................................. 50
4.6. Master Plan Provisions .............................................................................................................. 50
4.7. Housing Scenario ...................................................................................................................... 51
4.7.1 Present And Future Housing Demand ................................................................................... 51
4.7.2 Illegal Colonies ..................................................................................................................... 52
4.7.3 Future Growth Possibilities................................................................................................... 53
4.8. City Specific Strategies And Action Plan .................................................................................. 53
4.9 Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years In Khilchipur ...................................... 54

Chapter 5: City Infrastructure Of Khilchipur ....................................................................56


5.1. Water Supply Of Khilchipur...................................................................................................... 56
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

13

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.1.1. Quality and Quantity of Water at Source ............................................................................. 57


5.1.2. Quality and Quantity of Water in Distribution System ........................................................ 58
5.1.3. Others Sources ..................................................................................................................... 58
5.1.4. Water Distribution Arrangements In Khilchipur .................................................................. 60
5.1.5. Internal Distribution Networks ............................................................................................ 61
5.1.6. Water Treatment Facilities ................................................................................................... 63
5.1.7. Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines............................................. 63
5.1.8. Existing Water Supply Projects ........................................................................................... 63
5.1.9. Demand And Supply Gaps (Present And Future) ................................................................ 63
5.1.10. SWOT Analysis ................................................................................................................. 64
5.1.11. Issues ................................................................................................................................. 65
5.1.12. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan ........................................................................... 65
5.2. SEWERAGE AND SANITATION in Khilchipur ..................................................................... 68
5.2.1. Existing Sewerage System ................................................................................................... 68
5.2.2. Means of Sewage Disposal .................................................................................................. 69
5.2.3. Toilet Infrastructure In Khilchipur ....................................................................................... 69
5.2.4. Wardwise Sanitation Status In Khilchipur ........................................................................... 70
5.2.5. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future) ................................................................... 71
5.2.6. Ongoing Sanitation Projects................................................................................................. 73
5.2.7. Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines............................................. 73
5.2.8. SWOT Analysis ................................................................................................................... 73
5.2.9. Issues ................................................................................................................................... 74
5.2.10. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan ........................................................................... 74
5.3. Solid Waste Management In Khilchipur.................................................................................... 81
5.3.1. Quantity of Waste Generated ............................................................................................... 81
5.3.2. Constituents of Municipal Waste ......................................................................................... 81
5.3.3. Current Practices of Solid Waste Management .................................................................... 82
5.3.4. Vehicles for Solid Waste Collection and Transportation ..................................................... 85
5.3.5. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future) ................................................................... 85
5.3.6. Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines............................................. 86
5.3.7. SWOT Analysis ................................................................................................................... 87
5.3.8. Issues ................................................................................................................................... 87
5.3.9 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan .............................................................................. 88
5.4. Existing Drainage Condition In Khilchipur ............................................................................... 92
5.4.1. Existing Drainage System .................................................................................................... 92
5.4.2. Major Water Bodies ............................................................................................................. 92
5.4.3. Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Drains .............................................................................. 92
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

14

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.4.4. Flood Prone Areas ............................................................................................................ 93


5.4.5. Flooding In Catchment Area Of Major Nallah ..................................................................... 93
5.4.6. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future) ................................................................... 93
5.4.7. Comparative Analysis With The UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines ........................................... 94
5.4.8. SWOT Analysis ................................................................................................................... 94
5.4.9. Issues ................................................................................................................................... 94
5.4.10. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan ........................................................................... 95
5.5. Existing Traffic And Transportation In Khilchipur ................................................................... 98
5.5.1. Existing Traffic & Transportation Scenario ......................................................................... 98
5.5.2. Vehicle Population ............................................................................................................... 98
5.5.3. Agencies in Traffic & Transportation .................................................................................. 98
5.5.4. Travel Characteristics .......................................................................................................... 98
5.5.5. Public Transport................................................................................................................... 99
5.5.6. Traffic Management and Circulation ................................................................................... 99
5.5.7. Inter City Bus Transportation.......................................................................................... 101
5.5.8. Intermediate Public Transport ............................................................................................ 101
5.5.9. Parking Requirements ........................................................................................................ 101
5.5.10. Traffic and Transportation Projects.................................................................................. 102
5.5.11. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future) ............................................................... 102
5.5.12. Comparative analysis with the UDPFI, other guidelines .................................................. 103
5.5.13. Swot Analysis .................................................................................................................. 103
5.5.14. Issues ............................................................................................................................... 103
5.5.15. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan ......................................................................... 104
5.6. Street Lighting & Fire Fighting ............................................................................................... 106
5.6.1. Existing Situation of Street Lights ..................................................................................... 106
5.6.2. Fire Service ........................................................................................................................ 107
5.6.3. Vehicles and Equipment for Fire Fighting and Rescue Operations .................................... 107
5.6.4. Operational Systems .......................................................................................................... 107
5.6.5. Power generation and Distribution..................................................................................... 107
5.6.6. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future) ................................................................. 108
5.6.7. Comparative Analysis With The UDPFI, Other Guidelines ............................................... 108
5.6.8. SWOT Analysis ................................................................................................................. 109
5.6.9. Issues ................................................................................................................................. 109
5.6.10. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan ......................................................................... 109

Chapter 6: Urban Poor & Their Accessibility To Basic Services ....................................113


6.1. Urban Poverty In Khilchipur ................................................................................................... 113
6.2. Information On Bpl Population And Slum Population Of Khilchipur ..................................... 114
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

15

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

6.3. Slums In The Town ................................................................................................................. 115


6.4. Location Of Slums On Town Map .......................................................................................... 115
6.5. General Characteristics Of Slums In Khilchipur ..................................................................... 115
6.6. Status Of Slums In Khilchipur................................................................................................. 116
6.7. Land Ownership & Tenure Status ........................................................................................... 116
6.8. Unidentified Slums And Homeless Population / Pavement Dwellers Of Khilchipur ............... 117
6.9. Urban Basic Services In Slums Of Khilchipur ........................................................................ 117
6.10. Social Security Schemes And Beneficiaries In Khilchipur .................................................... 121
6.11. Demand And Supply Gaps (Present And Future) .................................................................. 121
6.12. Swot Analysis........................................................................................................................ 122
6.13. Key Issues ............................................................................................................................. 122
6.14. Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years For Khilchipur ................................... 123
6.15. Identified Projects For Horizon Years For Khilchipur........................................................... 123
6.16. Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years For Khilchipur ............................... 124

Chapter 7: Social Infrastructure In Khilchipur ...............................................................126


7.1 Existing Health Facility In Khilchipur...................................................................................... 126
7.1.1 Overall Health Facilities And Medical Practitioners In Khilchipur..................................... 126
7.1.2 Basic Health Indicators Of Khilchipur ................................................................................ 127
7.1.3 Medical Facilities Provided By Municipal Body In Khilchipur .......................................... 127
7.1.4 Role Of Municipal Body In The Health Programs .............................................................. 127
7.2 Existing Educational Facility In Khilchipur ............................................................................. 128
7.2.1. Overall Education Facilities In Khilchipur......................................................................... 128
7.2.2. Basic Education / Literacy Indicators Of Khilchipur ......................................................... 129
7.2.3. Education Facilities Provided By Municipal Body ............................................................ 130
7.3 Other Infrastructures & Facilities In Khilchipur ....................................................................... 130
7.3.1. Existing Recreational & Cultural Facilities In Khilchipur ................................................. 130
7.3.2. Existing Public Amenities And Services In Khilchipur ..................................................... 130
7.3.3. Existing Sports Facilities In Khilchipur ............................................................................. 131
7.4 Comparative Analysis With The Udpfi Guidelines .................................................................. 131
7.4.1 Demand & Gap Assessment For Health Infrastructure In Khilchipur ................................. 131
7.4.2 Demand & Gap Assessment For Educational Infrastructure In Khilchipur ......................... 132
7.4.3 Demand & Gap Assessment For Other Infrastructures & Facilities In Khilchipur ............. 133
7.5 SWOT Analysis Of Social Infrastructure In Khilchipur ........................................................... 135
7.6 Summary Of Key Issues ........................................................................................................... 136
7.7 Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years In Khilchipur ........................................ 136
7.8 Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur ................................................................ 137
7.9 Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years In Khilchipur .................................... 138
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

16

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 8: Environment .....................................................................................................141


8.1. Flora and Fauna ....................................................................................................................... 141
8.2. Pollution Levels ...................................................................................................................... 142
8.3. City Green Spaces ................................................................................................................... 142
8.4. Water Front Development and Conservation........................................................................... 142
8.5. Existing Environmental Regulations ....................................................................................... 143
8.5.1 Existing Environment Legislations In India ........................................................................ 144
8.6. SWOT Analysis ...................................................................................................................... 146
8.7. Issues ....................................................................................................................................... 146
8.8. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan ................................................................................. 147
8.9 Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur ................................................................ 148
8.10 Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years In Khilchipur .................................. 148

Chapter 9: Existing Institutional Framework For Development ...................................152


9.1 Background .............................................................................................................................. 152
9.2. Urban Local Body Structure .................................................................................................... 153
9.2.1 Executive Wing .................................................................................................................. 154
9.2.2 Administrative Wing........................................................................................................... 154
9.2.3 Institutions and Capacity of the Urban Local Body ............................................................ 156
9.3 Department of Housing & Environment, GoMP ...................................................................... 156
9.4 Town and Country Planning Department ................................................................................. 157
9.5. Development Authority ........................................................................................................... 158
9.6. Public Health Engineering Department ................................................................................... 158
9.7. Madhya Pradesh Housing Board ............................................................................................. 159
9.8. Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board ............................................................................... 159
9.9. Other Departments .................................................................................................................. 160
9.10. Inter - Agency Issues ............................................................................................................. 163
9.11. City Specific Strategies And Action Plan .............................................................................. 163

Chapter 10: Overview Of Municipal Finance Of Khilchipur ..........................................173


10.1 Overview Of Municipal Finance In Khilchipur ...................................................................... 174
10.2 Revenue Account Of Khilchipur ............................................................................................ 176
10.2.1 Revenue Income ............................................................................................................... 176
10.2.2 Revenue Expenditure ........................................................................................................ 179
10.3 Capital Account Of Khilchipur............................................................................................... 181
10.3.1 Capital Income .................................................................................................................. 181
10.3.2 Capital Expenditure .......................................................................................................... 182
10.4 Key Financial Indicators & Analysis Of Finance In Watsan Context ..................................... 183
10.5 Summary Of Key Financial Issues In Khilchipur ................................................................... 185
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

17

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 11: Urban Reforms ...............................................................................................187


11.1. Status of Mandatory & optional Reforms .............................................................................. 187
11.2. Reform Identification ............................................................................................................ 188
11.3 City Specific Strategies And Action Plan ............................................................................... 190

Chapter 12: Project Prioritization, CIP & Fop For Khilchipur .....................................193
12.1. Sector Wise Project Identification And Prioritisation For Khilchipur ................................... 193
12.1.1. Water Supply ................................................................................................................... 193
12.1.2. Sewerage OR Waste Water Management ........................................................................ 195
12.1.3. Sanitation ......................................................................................................................... 196
12.1.4. Solid Waste Management ................................................................................................ 198
12.1.5. Storm Water Drainage ..................................................................................................... 199
12.1.6. Traffic and Transportation ............................................................................................... 200
12.1.7. Street Lighting & Fire Fighting System ........................................................................... 202
12.1.8. Basic Services For Urban Poor ........................................................................................ 203
12.1.9. Environment .................................................................................................................... 205
12.1.10. Urban Governance ......................................................................................................... 206
12.1.11. Social Infrastructure & Other Projects ........................................................................... 207
12.2. Capital Investment Plan For Khilchipur ................................................................................ 209
12.2.1. Water Supply ................................................................................................................... 209
12.2.2. Sewerage.......................................................................................................................... 210
12.2.3. Sanitation ......................................................................................................................... 210
12.2.4. Solid Waste Management ................................................................................................ 211
12.2.5. Storm Water Drainage ..................................................................................................... 211
12.2.6. Traffic and Transportation ............................................................................................... 211
12.2.7. Street Lighting & Fire Fighting........................................................................................ 212
12.2.8. Basic Services to the Urban Poor ..................................................................................... 213
12.2.9. Environment .................................................................................................................... 213
12.2.10. Social Infrastructure & Other Projects ........................................................................... 214
12.2.11. Urban Governance ......................................................................................................... 214
12.2.12. Summary of Investment & Phasing ............................................................................... 215
12.3. FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN FOR KHILCHIPUR ..................................................... 216
12.3.1 Overview .......................................................................................................................... 216
12.3.2 Methodology adopted for preparing FOP ......................................................................... 217
12.3.3 Projection Of Municipal Fund With No Reform Scenario ................................................ 218
12.3.4. Projection of Municipal Fund with Proposed Investments ............................................... 220
12.3.5. Assumed Funding Pattern for CIP ................................................................................... 222
12.3.6. Additional Revenue Account due to Proposed Investments ............................................. 222
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

18

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

12.3.7. FOP Results with Proposed Investments.......................................................................... 226

Chapter 13: City Vision .......................................................................................................228


13.1. Summary of Sectoral Strategies............................................................................................. 228
13.2. City Vision ............................................................................................................................ 231

List of Table
Table 1.1: General Information (Rajgarh District) .............................................................................. 25
Table 1.2: Division of Rajgarh District ............................................................................................... 26
Table 1.3: Location and Regional Linkages ........................................................................................ 27
Table 1.4: Monthly Rainfall data (mm) in Rajgarh districts for the last six years ............................... 30
Table 2.1: Population Growth Khilchipur .......................................................................................... 32
Table 2.2: Composition of growth, Khilchipur (M) ........................................................................... 33
Table 2.3: Population Projections, Khilchipur (M) .......................................................................... 35
Table 2.4: Population age group of 0-6 Khilchipur ............................................................................ 36
Table 2.5: SC & ST Population Khilchipur ....................................................................................... 37
Table 3.1: Sex Ratio, Khilchipur (M) ............................................................................................... 38
Table 3.2: Literacy Rate Khilchipur ................................................................................................... 38
Table 3.3: Household & Family Size ................................................................................................. 39
Table 3.4: Workforce Classification of 2001 Khilchipur ................................................................... 39
Table 3.5: Ward wise Workforce Classification of Main Workers 2001............................................ 41
Table 3.6: Ward wise Workforce Classification of Marginal Workers 2001 ..................................... 41
Table 3.7: Trade, Commerce, Industry & Banking Khilchipur .......................................................... 43
Table 3.8: Mandi Information of Rajgarh District ............................................................................. 44
Table 4.1: Ward wise Details, Khilchipur (M) ................................................................................... 47
Table 4.2: Land availability in Khilchipur Town ............................................................................... 48
Table 4.3: Existing Land use Break up, Khilchipur (M) ................................................................ 49
Table 4.4: Existing Land use Breakup of the Developed Area, Khilchipur (M)............................. 49
Table 4.5: Residential Density Distribution, Khilchipur (M) ......................................................... 50
Table 4.6: Land Use as per UDPFI Guideline .................................................................................... 50
Table 4.7: Inappropriate Land Use / Places, Khilchipur (M).......................................................... 51
Table 4.8: Housing Gaps, Khilchipur (M) ......................................................................................... 52
Table 4.9: Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur ........................................................ 53
Table 4.10: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur ............................ 54
Table 5.1: Overview of Water Supply in Khilchipur .......................................................................... 56
Table 5.2: Water Quality of Garh Ganga River .................................................................................. 58
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

19

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.3: Water Storage Facilities in Khilchipur ............................................................................... 60


Table 5.4: Ward wise Source of water in Khilchipur .......................................................................... 60
Table 5.5: Water Connections in Khilchipur ...................................................................................... 61
Table 5.6: Ward Wise Water Connection in Khilchipur ..................................................................... 62
Table 5.7: Applicable Water Charges in Khilchipur .......................................................................... 62
Table 5.8: Recommended per capita water supply levels .................................................................... 63
Table 5.9: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Water Supply) for Khilchipur .................... 64
Table 5.10: SWOT Analysis (Water Supply) for Khilchipur ............................................................. 65
Table 5.11: Goals for Horizon Years (Water Supply) ........................................................................ 66
Table 5.12: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur ........................................................ 66
Table 5.13: Overview of the state of Infrastructure: Sewerage & Sanitation ...................................... 68
Table 5.14: Number of Toilets and Bathrooms in Khilchipur ............................................................ 69
Table 5.15: Type and number of Sanitation Facilities ......................................................................... 70
Table 5.16: Number of Public Toilets and Urinals .............................................................................. 70
Table 5.17: Ward Wise Sanitation level in Khilchipur........................................................................ 70
Table 5.18: Ward wise availability of individual toilets ..................................................................... 71
Table 5.19: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Sewerage) .................................................. 72
Table 5.20: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Sanitation) ................................................. 72
Table 5.21: SWOT Analysis (Sewerage and Sanitation) ..................................................................... 73
Table 5.22: Goals For Horizon Years (Sewerage) .............................................................................. 74
Table 5.23: Goals for Horizon Years (Sanitation) .............................................................................. 75
Table 5.24: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur ......................................................... 75
Table 5.25: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur ......................................................... 77
Table 5.26: Quantity of Solid Waste Generated .................................................................................. 81
Table 5.27: Constituents of Municipal Waste ..................................................................................... 81
Table 5.28: Wardwise Generation of Solid waste IN Khilchipur ........................................................ 82
Table 5.29: Collection of Solid Waste Management ........................................................................... 83
Table 5.30: Ward wise Solid Waste Management facility .................................................................. 84
Table 5.31: Vehicles for SWM, Khilchipur (M) ................................................................................. 85
Table 5.32: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Solid Waste Management) ........................ 86
Table 5.33: SWOT analysis (Solid Waste Management) .................................................................... 87
Table 5.34: Goals for Horizon Years (Solid Waste Management) ...................................................... 88
Table 5.35: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur ........................................................ 88
Table 5.36: Number of Household provided with drainage facility, Khilchipur Tehsil *, (Urban) 2001
............................................................................................................................................................ 92
Table 5.37: Drainage Network ............................................................................................................ 92
Table 5.38: Existing nallahs ................................................................................................................ 93
Table 5.39: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Drainage) ................................................... 93
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

20

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.40: SWOT Analysis (Drainage) ............................................................................................. 94


Table 5.41: Goals for Horizon Years (Drainage) ................................................................................ 95
Table 5.42: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur ......................................................... 96
Table 5.43: Details of Vehicles IN Khilchipur .................................................................................... 98
Table 5.44: Improper Junction Designs ............................................................................................ 100
Table 5.45: Major Roads................................................................................................................... 101
Table 5.46: Existing Road Condition ................................................................................................ 101
Table 5.47: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Traffic and Transportation) ..................... 102
Table 5.48: SWOT Analysis (Traffic and Transportation) ................................................................ 103
Table 5.49: Goals for Horizon Years (Traffic & Transportation)...................................................... 104
Table 5.50: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur ....................................................... 105
Table 5.51: Street Lighting ............................................................................................................... 106
Table 5.52: Details of ward wise electricity connection in Khilchipur.............................................. 106
Table 5.53: Number of Electric Connections .................................................................................... 108
Table 5.54: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Street Lighting) ....................................... 108
Table 5.55: SWOT Analysis (Street Lighting) .................................................................................. 109
Table 5.56: Goals for Horizon Years (Street Lighting) ..................................................................... 109
Table 5.57: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur ....................................................... 110
Table 6.1: Urban Poverty in Khilchipur ............................................................................................ 114
Table 6.2: Information of BPL and Slum Population in Khilchipur .................................................. 114
Table 6.3: Housing Conditions of slums in Khilchipur ..................................................................... 117
Table 6.4: Water Supply Conditions Of Slums In Khilchipur ........................................................... 119
Table 6.5: Sanitation Conditions Of Slums In Khilchipur................................................................. 120
Table 6.6: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Slum infrastructure) for Khilchipur ........... 121
Table 6.7: SWOT Analysis (Basic Service to the Urban Poor) ......................................................... 122
Table 6.8: Identified Goals Of Improvement Of Basic Service To The Urban Poor For Horizon Years
In Khilchipur..................................................................................................................................... 123
Table 6.9: Identified Projects of Basic Service to the Urban Poor For Horizon Years In Khilchipur 123
Table 6.10: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans of Basic Service to the Urban Poor for Horizon
Years in Khilchipur........................................................................................................................... 124
Table 7.1: Existing Health Facilities in Khilchipur ........................................................................... 127
Table 7.2: Basic health indicators in Madhya Pradesh and Rajgarh District ..................................... 127
Table 7.3: Existing Educational Infrastructure in Khilchipur ............................................................ 128
Table 7.4: Literacy Indicator in Khilchipur....................................................................................... 129
Table 7.5: Schools / Colleges per 10000 Population, Khilchipur ...................................................... 129
Table 7.6: Recreational and Cultural Facilities, Khilchipur .............................................................. 130
Table 7.7: Public Amenities and Service Availability, Khilchipur.................................................... 131
Table 7.8: Demand and Gaps for Health Infrastructure, Khilchipur (M) ........................................ 131
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

21

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.9: Demand & Gap Assessment for Health Infrastructure, Khilchipur .................................. 132
Table 7.10: Demand & Gap Assessment for Other Infrastructure & Facilities, Khilchipur .............. 133
Table 7.11: Swot Analysis Of Social Infrastructure For Khilchipur ................................................. 135
Table 7.12: Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years in Khilchipur .............................. 136
Table 7.13: Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur ..................................................... 137
Table 7.14: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur .......................... 138
Table 8.1: Important policies, legal provisions and authorities related to water pollution ................ 145
Table 8.2: SWOT Analysis (Environment) for Khilchipur (M) ...................................................... 146
Table 8.3: Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years in Khilchipur ................................ 147
Table 8.4: Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur ....................................................... 148
Table 8.5: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur ............................ 148
Table 9.1: Reservation of post in KHILCHIPUR Nagar Parishad .................................................... 154
Table 9.2: Chart of post in KHILCHIPUR Nagar Parishad............................................................. 154
Table 9.3: Institutional responsibility Matrix, KHILCHIPUR (M) ................................................... 156
Table 9.4: Goals for Horizon Years .................................................................................................. 164
Table 9.5: Status of DPR for Urban Services .................................................................................... 172
Table 10.1: Overview of Municipal Finance of Khilchipur ............................................................. 174
Table 10.2: Composition of Revenue Income of Khilchipur ............................................................. 176
Table 10.3: Composition of Revenue Expenditure of Khilchipur ..................................................... 179
Table 10.4: Composition of Capital Income of Khilchipur ............................................................... 181
Table 10.5: Composition of Capital Expenditure of Khilchipur ....................................................... 182
Table 10.6: Key Financial Indicators for Khilchipur........................................................................ 183
Table 11.1: Status of Urban Reforms, Khilchipur ............................................................................ 187
Table 11.2: Suggested Group 1 Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M) .................................................... 188
Table 11.3: Suggested Group 2 Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M) .................................................... 189
Table 11.4: Suggested Group 3 Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M) .................................................... 189
Table 11.5: Suggested Group 4 Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M) .................................................... 189
Table 11.6: Goals for Horizon Years (Municipal Reforms) ............................................................. 190
Table 11.7: City Specific Strategies & Action Plan, Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M) ..................... 192
Table 12.1: Proposed Projects for Water Supply for Khilchipur ...................................................... 194
Table 12.2: Proposed Projects for Sewerage for Khilchipur ............................................................ 196
Table 12.3: Proposed Projects for Sanitation for Khilchipur ............................................................ 197
Table 12.4: Proposed Projects for Solid Waste Management for Khilchipur ................................... 199
Table 12.5: Proposed Projects for Storm Water Drainage for Khilchipur ........................................ 200
Table 12.6: Proposed Projects for Traffic & Transportation for Khilchipur .................................... 202
Table 12.7: Proposed Projects for Street Lighting & Fire Fighting System for Khilchipur .............. 203
Table 12.8: Proposed Projects for Basic Services to the Urban Poor Khilchipur ............................ 204
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

22

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.9: Proposed Projects for Urban Environment for Khilchipur ............................................ 206
Table 12.10: Proposed Projects for Urban Governance for Khilchipur ............................................ 207
Table 12.11: Proposed Projects for Social Infrastructure & Other Projects for Khilchipur .............. 208
Table 12.12: Investment Phasing (Water Supply), Khilchipur ......................................................... 209
Table 12.13: Investment Phasing (Sewerage), Khilchipur ............................................................... 210
Table 12.14: Investment Phasing (Sanitation), Khilchipur............................................................... 210
Table 12.15: Investment Phasing (Solid Waste Management), Khilchipur ...................................... 211
Table 12.16: Investment Phasing (Drainage), Khilchipur ................................................................ 211
Table 12.17: Investment Phasing (Traffic and Transportation), Khilchipur ..................................... 212
Table 12.18: Investment Phasing (Street Lighting), Khilchipur ....................................................... 212
Table 12.19: Investment Phasing (Basic Services to the Urban Poor), Khilchipur .......................... 213
Table 12.20: Investment Phasing (Environment), Khilchipur .......................................................... 213
Table 12.21: Investment Phasing (Social Infrastructure & Other Projects), Khilchipur ................... 214
Table 12.22: Investment Phasing (Urban Governance & Municipal Reforms), Khilchipur ............. 214
Table 12.23: Summary of Investments, Khilchipur ......................................................................... 215
Table 12.24: Assumptions in Projecting Revenue Income, Khilchipur ............................................ 218
Table 12.25: Adopted Growth Rates for Projecting Revenue Income, Khilchipur........................... 219
Table 12.26: Assumptions in Projecting Revenue Expenditure, Khilchipur .................................... 219
Table 12.27: Adopted Growth Rates for Projecting Revenue Expenditure, Khilchipur ................... 220
Table 12.28: Suggested Project Cost to be developed Through PPP, Khilchipur............................. 222
Table 12.29: Additional Revenues as a result of Proposed Investments .......................................... 223
Table 12.30: Assumptions for Additional O&M expenditure due to Proposed Investments, Khilchipur
.......................................................................................................................................................... 225
Table 12.31: FOP Results, Khilchipur ............................................................................................. 226
Table 13.1: Sectoral Strategies for Khilchipur ................................................................................. 228

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

23

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 1: Physical Features Of The District


1.1 Historic Background
1.1.1 District
Rajgarh district was created May 1948, and includes the territory of the former princely states of
Rajgarh, Narsinghgarh, Khilchipur, and parts of the states of Dewas Junior and Senior (Sarangpur
tehsil) and Indore (Jarapur tehsil, now part of Khilchipur tehsil). Rajgarh was the headquarters of a
mediatised State, ruled by the Umat Rajputs and branch of the great paramara clan, they enjoyed a
Sanad Estate under the Sultans of Delhi and Mughal emperors in succession. The first capital was
Duparia, now in Shajapur District. Later on it was shifted to Dungarpur (19 Km from Rajgarh) and
then to Ratanpur (19 Km. west of Narsinghgarh) and back. Inorder to avoid disturbance by the
frequently passing Mughal armies, the Ruler of the Estate, Mohan Singh, acquired the present side,
originally known as Jhanjhanipur from the Bhils in A.D. 1640. Finally he shifted the headquarters in
the year 1645, giving the place its present name.
During the reign of Akbar (A.D. 1556-1605) a Khilat and a Sanad were granted to Udaji of Tatanpur.
At that time, Sarangpur was a Sarkar in the Subah of Malwa. Its jurisdiction extended from the
western part of present Sehore District to the eastern part of Ujjain District. Among its twentyfour
mahals many have retained their original names and are identified as Ashtah, Talain (Talen), Agra
(Agar), Bajilpur (Bijilpur), Bhorsah, Khiljipur, Jirapur, Sarangpur, Sondarsi (Sundarsi), Sosner
(Sunner) Sajapur, Kayath and Navgam (Tarana).
In 1908, Rajgarh State was divided in to seven Parganas, namely Newalganj, Biaora, Kalipith,
Karanwas, Kotra, Seogarh and Talen. Narsinghgarh State was divided into four Parganas, namely
Huzur (Narsinghgarh), Pachor, Khujner and Chhapera. The Parganas were place in the charge of a
Tahsildar each for revenue matters and magisterial work. Khilchipur State was divided into three
Paraganas. Sarangpur was as now, the tahsil headquarters of Dewas (Senior) and Dewas (Junior)
States. Jarapur was a tahsil of Mahidpur District of former Indore State. It has now been abolished and
merged in Khilchipur tahsil.
In 1645 with the permission of Rajmata, Deewan Ajab Singh defeated the Bhils in the hilly region of
Rajgarh and he constructed a Palace in 1745 which was having five main gates namely, Itwaria,
Bhudwaria, Surajpol, Panradia and Naya Darwaja. And it constitutes three very ancient temple
namely Raj Rajeshwar Temple, Chatubhujnathji Temple and Narsingh Temple, and in which Rajmata
and his 15 year old son Rawat Mohan singh was living safely. In Jhanjherpur which was capital and it
is having a palace due to which this place is known as Rajgarh and it had become famous.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

24

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

1.1.2 Town
Khilchipur is a town and Nagar Parishad of Rajgarh district in the State of Madhya Pradesh, India.
The size of the town is very small. The total area of the town is 6.47 sq km having a population of
18932. The Nagar Parishad is of rural in nature as it does depend on agriculture. The town has
agricultural based economy but mainly depend on service sector.

1.2 District Information


Rajgarh district lies on the northern edge of the Malwa plateau, and the Parbati River forms the
eastern boundary of the district, while the Kali Sindh River forms the western boundary. The district
Rajgarh is part of the Bhopal division and the district is bounded by Rajasthan state to the north and
by the districts of Guna to the northeast, Bhopal to the east, Sehore to the southeast, and Shajapur to
the south and west. Rajgarh District extends between the parallels of latitude 2327' 12" North and
2417' 20" North and between the meridians of longitude 7611' 15" and 7714' East. Rajgarh is the
headquarter town of the district which is 140 km away from Bhopal towards east and on National
Highway No. 12 connecting Jaipur and Jabalpur. It is also connected to Railway from the nearest
town of Biaora which is about 20 Kms away.
The district covers 6,154 sq. km with a population of 1, 546,54 according to the 2011 census. This
gives it a ranking of 322nd in India (out of a total of 640). The district has a population density of 251
inhabitants per square kilometre (650 /sq mi) .Its population growth rate over the decade 2001-2011
was 23.32 %. Rajgarh has a sex ratio of 955 females for every 1000 males, and a literacy rate of 62.68
%. In 2006 the Ministry of Panchayati Raj named Rajgarh one of the country's 250 most backward
districts (out of a total of 640). It is one of the 24 districts in Madhya Pradesh currently receiving
funds from the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme (BRGF).
T ABLE 1.1: G ENERAL I NFORMATION (R AJGARH D ISTRICT )
Geographical Area

6,154 sq. km

Major Rivers

River Kalisindh (Near Sarangpur), River Newaj (Near Rajgarh &


Pachore), River Parwati (Near Narsinghgarh), River Ajnaar (Near
Biaora), River Gadganga (Near Khilchipur)

Major Lakes

Parasram talab
(Near Narsinghgarh), Chidikho (Near
Narsinghgarh), Napanera (Near Biaora), Chhapidam (Near
Zirapur)

No. of Urban (Towns)

13 (Nagar palika-3 & Nagar Panchayat 10)

No. of Rural (Villages)

1,729

District Population 2011

1,546,54 (Census 2011)

Sex Ratio

955 (Census 2011)

Literacy Rate

62.68 % (Census 2011)

WPR

49.88 % (Census 2001)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

25

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

T ABLE 1.1: G ENERAL I NFORMATION (R AJGARH D ISTRICT )


Urbanization Ratio

17.33 % (Census 2001)

Household Size

5.8 (Census 2001)

Source: Census of India


At present the District is divided into five Subdivisions and seven tehsils. The following table shows
the details of area and population of each unit.
Table 1.2: Division of Rajgarh District
Sno

Sub-Division

Tehsil

Area in Sq Km

Population 2001

No. of Villages

Rajgarh

Rajgarh

1081.87

192182

387

Khilchipur

Khilchipur

0779.14

149053

335

Khilchipur

Zirapur

0845.36

161070

220

Biaora

Biaora

1155.52

227421

287

Narsinghgarh

Narsinghgarh

1326.41

295189

306

Sarangpur

Sarangpur

0902.93

229170

192

Source: www.rajgarh.nic.in

1.3 Town Location (Linkages and Connectivity)


Geographically, the town is lies between 23.39 32N and 76.48 42E with an average elevation of
439 metres (1443 feet). Contiguous to the town is the District Headquarter Rajgarh (34 kms).
The town of KHILCHIPUR lies on the Major District Road (MDR). There is no direct railway linkage
to KHILCHIPUR. The nearest railway stations are in Biaora, Pachore. KHILCHIPUR can only be
reached by road. In fact, the town is well-connected to other places of significant importance in the
state.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

26

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 1.3: Location and Regional Linkages


Latitude and Longitude

23.39 32N and 76.48 42E

Nearest City with Population of more than 5 lakhs (Less


than 200 Kms)

Bhopal, Indore & Ujjain

Nearest City with Population of more than 1 lakh (Less


than 150 Kms)

Dewas, Guna

Other Important District Towns (Less than 100 Kms)

Rajgarh, Biaora, Narsingarh, Sarangpur,


& Pachore

Nearest Railway Station

Biaora, Pachore

Nearest Bus Facility

KHILCHIPUR

Source: Census of India, 2001

1.4 Physiographic and Landform


1.4.1 Topography
The Rajgarh district lies on the northern edge of the Malwa plateau, and the Parbati River forms the
eastern boundary of the district, while the Kali Sindh River forms the western boundary. The town has
plain terrain type topography and the physiology of the town in this region is basically.

Denudatiional Landforms

Fluvial Landforms

Malwa Plateau

Kali Sindh Basin

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

27

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

1.4.2 Soil
The Soil type of Rajgarh district is mainly the medium to deep Black soil and mixed red and black
soil. In some portion of the district River alluvial soil is also found. The alluvium consists of clay, silt,
sand, gravels and pebbles.

1.4.3 Hydrology & Drainage


The Town in the Rajgarh district falls in the Ganga Basin and Chambal sub basin. The whole Rajgarh
districts fall in the Ganga Basin. The watershed areas of the Rajgarh district are Upper-Kali sind,
Lower Kali sind, Newaz, Chapi-Ghani, Upper Parbati, Ajnar Ghoraphachar and Lower Parbati . The
district is drained by few rivers Kalisindh, Newaj, Parwati, Ajnaar and Gadganga. Some important
water bodies of Rajgarh district are Parasram talab (Narsinghgarh), Chidikho (Narsinghgarh),
Napanera (Biaora) and Chhapidam (Zirapur).
The District is draining by few rivers like Kali sindh, Newaj and Kadal River and other small streams
cross the Roads. The Kali Sindh river and Kadal river is found to be perennial on observation. Other
tributaries are non perennial in nature.

1.4.4 Groundwater
The ground water availability along the town is poor. The depth of water table varies from 48.0 mbgl
-290.41 mbgl Most of the wells become dry except in monsoon season.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

28

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

1.4.5 Surface Water


The entire Rajgarh district falls in the Ganga Basin. Most of the towns are drained by few rivers like
Kali sindh and Kadal and other small streams cross the project road. The Kali sindh river and Kadal
river is found to be perennial in ground observation. Other tributaries are non perennial in nature.

1.4.6 Seismicity
The seismo-tectonic units which probably lend seismicity to the region are the Narmada rift and the
Aravalli fault system. The Narmada rift is situated about 200 km south of the Rajgarh district on the
Aravalli fault system about the same distance to the North West. The Narmada rift includes a fault
system with ENE-WSW strike. Two strong earthquakes of magnitude 6.50 and 6.25 occurred in this
belt in 1927 and 1938 respectively. The main seismo tectonic feature along with the seismic activity
in the Aravalli range is noticed on strike about NE-SW on the reverse fault, separating the Aravalli
system of rocks from the Vindhyas on the east. It is also envisaged that the eastern Aravalis take a
bend towards the south in the vicinity of Panchmahals. And then further join the E-W Satpura strike.
The trend of the eruptive centers indicating crustal weakness is close to this postulated bend of
Aravalli strike. Movements involving frequent uplift have affected this region.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

29

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

1.4.7 Climate
The climate of Rajgarh District is characterized by hot summer and general dryness except during the
south west monsoon season. The year may be divided into four seasons. The cold season, December
to February is followed by the hot season from March to about the middle of June. The period from
the middle of June to September is the south west monsoon season. October and November form the
post monsoon or transition period.

1.4.8 Rainfall
The average annual rainfall in the district for the last 6 Years is about 905.08 mm. About 95% of the
annual rainfall is received during the monsoon months, June to September, July being the rainiest
month.

Total

Dec.

103.4

370

85.1

138.6

717.3

38.5

52.9

277.6

496

337.6

4.6

1207.2

0.8

14.4 108.8

433

842.3

7.4

0.8

0.7

187

743.7

8.9

1.1

2005

15.2

2006

2007

0.3

12.7

2008

230.2

142.9 129.4
189

116.6

Oct.

1014.9

2004

Jul.

Nov.

Sept.

Aug.

Jun.

May

4.5

Apr.

55.3

ar.

19.9

Feb.

138.6 270.3 516.3

Jan.

Year

Table 1.4: Monthly Rainfall data (mm) in Rajgarh districts for the last six years

Source: India Meteorological Department, Delhi

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

30

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

1.4.9 Temperature
The normal maximum temperature during the month of May is 42.4C with minimum during the
month of January 11.3 C in Rajgarh respectively. The wind velocity is higher during the pre
monsoon period as compared to post monsoon period.

1.4.10 Humidity
During the south- west monsoon season the relative humidity generally exceeds 88% (July / August
month). The rest of the year is drier. April is the driest month of the year.

1.4.11 Winds
The maximum wind velocity is 27.0 km / hr. observed during the month of June and minimum 7.1
km/hr during the month of November.

1.5 Municipal area and Planning area


The town and country planning department of Madhya Pradesh under Sec. 13 (1), 1973 has not
undertaken / prepare Master Plan for the Town.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

31

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 2: Demographic Profile Of The Town


2.1. Population Growth Trend
Census records of 2001 revealed a negative population growth rate in Khilchipur from 1911-1921. A
steady rise and fall in Khilchipur population from the period 1931-1951 signaled the potential growth
of the town in the approaching years. Referring to below table, the population has grown more than
four-folds in the last few decades from 1961-2001 with an average annual growth rate of around
2.5%.
Table 2.1: Population Growth Khilchipur
Year

Population

Population (Lakh)

Average Annual
Growth Rate (%)

1901

5,121

0.05

1911

5,868

0.06

1.46%

1921

5,300

0.05

-0.97%

1931

5,779

0.06

0.90%

1941

6,663

0.07

1.53%

1951

6,227

0.06

-0.65%

1961

6,970

0.07

1.19%

1971

8,412

0.08

2.07%

1981

10,101

0.10

2.01%

1991

12,675

0.13

2.55%

2001

15,317

0.15

2.08%

2011*

18932

0.19

2.36%

2035 (Projected)

**

**

Source: Census of India;


'*' as per Census Provisional Figures Provided by ULB
As per 2001 census data, natural increase or the growth in the population brought about by more
births and less mortality accounted for more than a quarter (20.31%) of the total population from
1981-1991. Furthermore, it also accounted for 20.31% and 17.25% of the total population from
periods 1981-1991 and 1991-2001 respectively. The town recorded a 10 percent migration from the
town which resulted in decreased in population growth. During the next decade i.e. 2001-2011 the
town recorded a population growth of 19.09 percent which indicate an increase of 1.84 percent.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

32

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Population Growth
2011*

18932

2001

15,317

1991

12,675

1981

10,101

1971

8,412

1961

6,970

1951

6,227

1941

Population

6,663

1931

5,779

1921

5,300

1911

5,868

1901

5,121
0

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

The contribution of in-migration on population growth has not been analyzed since there were no
records available. In terms of jurisdictional change, no alterations (i.e. expansion) have been made to
Khilchipur town area from 1971-2011.
Table 2.2: Composition of growth, Khilchipur (M)
Population increase
during
Year

Population increase during

Population increase
during

1981-91

% of
total

19912001

Year

1981-91

% of
total

2574

20.31%

2642

Natural Increase

2574

20.31%

Nil

Nil

Nil

In-Migration

Nil

Nil

No
Change

Jurisdictional
Change*

No
Change

Natural Increase
In-Migration
Jurisdictional Change*

No
Change

Source: Census of India


*- the Area of Town has remained unchanged.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

33

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

2.2 Population Projection


Analyzing the population trend has been instrumental in systematically predicting the future which
shall be the base for major planning decisions. In the language of urban planning, assumptions about
the future population are fundamental in calculating demand for basic services (design population).
There are a variety of ways in which a design population can be drawn. In this report, six (6) methods
were carefully prepared viz. Geometric Increase Method, Straight Line Method, Incremental Increase
Method, Arithmetic Increase Method, Decadal Growth Rate Method and Exponential Growth
Method. Because these projections have different assumptions, their results also vary.
In making the population projections, a five-decade period from 1961-2001 has been used for demand
calculation. The periods from 1991-1951 have not been considered in drawing the projections as they
had shown both negative and erratic growth rates. Referring to the figures in table of population
growth trend, the average annual growth rate from periods 1961to 2001 is around 1.32 percent and
the town is expected to grow in relatively same trend in the future.
The usefulness of population projections depend upon how realistic their assumptions are as forecasts
are utilized in both demand calculation and cost estimation for various projects. Both project
implementers and recipients may suffer tremendously from erroneous forecasts as they might lead to
unfeasible budgeting which can influence the execution of the projects. Out of six (6) methods
identified, four (4) methods (i.e. Straight Line, Arithmetic, Geometric and Incremental Increase) were
considered to realistically calculate the demand for future sector projects based on the annual growth
rate (1.32%) of the town. Particularly, Straight Line and Arithmetic Increase methods provides
slightly lower side of the population while Geometric and Incremental Increase methods have given
slightly higher population projection figures.
The average of these four methods (2 with slightly lower and 2 with slightly higher figures) was taken
for the final population projection at various periods for Khilchipur with the assumption that like any
developing town, Khilchipur is expected to grow in the next years (at relatively the same rate) yet its
current condition does not present a great potential for an extremely significant increase in the future.
Below shows the population projections including the results of each method identified and the
average of the results given by the four considered methods.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

34

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 2.3: Population Projections, Khilchipur (M)


Year

Geometric
Increase
Method1

Arithmetic
Increase
Method 2

Straight
Line
Method

Exponential
Growth
Method3

Incremental
Increase
Method4

Decadal
Growth
Rate
Method

Average

1961

6970

6970

6970

6970

6970

6970

1971

8412

8412

8412

8412

8412

8412

1981

10101

10101

10101

10101

10101

10101

1991

12675

12675

12675

12675

12675

12675

2001

15317

15317

15317

15317

15317

15317

2011

18932

18932

18932

18932

18932

18932

18932

18932

Projected 2015

20883

19975

18953

20368

20175

20988

19997

20508

2020

23035

21019

20140

22517

21419

23268

21403

22663

2025

25409

22062

21327

24893

22662

25796

22865

25045

2030

28028

23106

22515

27519

23906

28598

24388

27677

2035

30916

24149

23702

30422

25149

31704

25979

30585

Existing

CAGR

1,2,3,5

A line graph below was drawn for the purpose of providing a clearer picture of the results from above
table. The average (7) of the results of methods 1, 2, 3 and 5 provided a more realistic picture of
future population growth in Khilchipur by considering its annual growth rate (1.32%) and at the same
time allowing possibilities for extreme growth due to unexpected factors. Realistic projections are
especially essential not only in drawing design populations but also in making appropriate cost
estimation for various projects. As resources are limited, it is important that demand calculation is
realistic enough to avoid indiscriminate spending of funds.

1
2

GEOMETRIC INCREASE METHOD: Formula: P' = P(1 + R/100)^n; Where: P' = Final population; P = Present population; R = Rate of Percentage Growth; n = No. of Decade
ARITHMETICAL INCREASE METHOD: Formula: P' = P + n.C ; C = dP/dt ; dP = P2 - P1; Where: P' = Final population; P = Present population, n = No. of Decade & C = Rate of

Change of Population

3
4

EXPONENTIAL GROWTH METHOD: Formula: P' = P.e^(R*n) Where: P' = Final population; P = Present population; R = Rate of Percentage Growth; n = No. of Decade
INCREMENTAL INCREASE METHOD: Formula: P' = P + (C + I)*n ; Where: P' = Final population; P = Present population; C = Average increase in population; I = Average

incremental increase in population; n = No. of Decade

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

35

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Population Projection KHILCHIPUR


35000
30000

30585

25000

2
3

20000

15000

10000

5000

0
2011

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2.3. Population Density


The total area of the town is 6.47 sq km or 647 hectares. The population density of the town is 2926
persons per sq. km.

2.4. Other Demographic Indicators


2.4.1. Population (0-6 age group)
According to the 2001 census, the 0-6 age group accounted for 16.47% of the total town population
(15,317) which is quite lower than that of the state level (17.87%). Out of the total 0-6 age group
population, 50.10% consists of males while 49.90 % consists of females. The sex ratio for 0-6 age
group is 996 which is considerably higher than that of the sex ratio of the entire town (973).
Table 2.4: Population age group of 0-6 Khilchipur
Details

2001

Total Population

15,317

2011*
18,932

Total 0-6 age Group Male Population

1264

50.10%

1339

51.17%

Total 0-6 age Group Female Population

1259

49.90%

1278

48.83%

Total 0-6 age Group Population **

2523

16.47%

2617

13.82%

Sex Ratio for 0-6 age Group

996

954

Source: Census of India;


'*' as per Census Provisional Figures Provided by ULB
'**'of the total population

2.4.2. Scheduled caste (SC) & Scheduled Tribe (ST) Population


Owing it to the long colonial history of India, the constitution explicitly recognizes Scheduled Castes
(SC) and Scheduled Tribes (ST) as part of the population of India and as such these groups also
possess the same rights and obligations like other citizens in the country.

After the Indian

independence in 1947, the proportion of SCs and STs in the population of India has also increased.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

36

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

According to the Census report of 2001, SCs (12.46%) and STs (2.28%) together comprise of around
14% of the total population (15317) of Khilchipur town.
Table 2.5: SC & ST Population Khilchipur
Details

2001

2011*

Growth Rate (%)

SC Population*

1908

12.46%

NA

ST Population*

349

2.28%

NA

Total Population**

15317

18932

Source: Census of India;


'*' as per Census Provisional Figures Provided by ULB
*- of the total Population

2.4.3. Infant Mortality and Fertility Rate


Planning for population stabilization activities at local levels requires information about demographic
situation particularly on the levels of fertility, infant and child mortality etc at local level. At present
in Madhya Pradesh information on fertility and mortality rate are available at District Level only.
Rajgarh district showed a higher infant mortality rate (146) in 1981 which reduced to about 125 in
1991 as per the census of India. While an estimate of IMR for 2001 is around 57 which shows a
higher influx of health programmes in the district.
Department of public health and family welfare conducted a survey in 1996 at development block
level (Tehsil). For Khilchipur Tehsil the General Marital fertility rate (163), implied total marital
fertility rate (5.13).

2.5. Issues

Lack of opportunities for gainful employment in villages and the ecological stresses is leading
to an ever-increasing movement of poor families to town of Khilchipur.

Though the population increase during the past decades is not high, but still, it leads to the increase in
the socio-economic problems like landlessness, poverty resulting in unemployment and low wages,
illiteracy, malnutrition which results in increase in the IMR ratio, low standards of living which
results in development of slums etc.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

37

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 3: Socio-Economic Profile of the Town


3.1. Sex Ratio
Sex ratio is one of the instruments to indicate gender balance in city. In case of Khilchipur Town, it
has good balanced sex ratio as compared to the District and State ratios. And from the table below it is
evident that the town has shown good progress over the decades as far as the sex ratio is concerned.
Table 3.1: Sex Ratio, Khilchipur (M)
Year

Sex Ratio

1981

922

1991

919

2001

954

2011*

973

Source: Census of India


*as per the information given by Nagar Parishad

3.2. Literacy Rate


Khilchipur has a literacy rate of 60.66 % against the District average of 51.06 %, which is higher than
average Districts literacy level. The Ratio of Male to female literacy rate is around 56:43, which is
slightly an unbalanced situation, though the town has a good sex ratio. From the last decade the male
literacy shows a declining rate of 3.68 percent. On the other hand the female literacy records an
increase in literacy.
Table 3.2: Literacy Rate Khilchipur
Population
(2001)

In %

Population
(2011)*

In %

Growth Rate
(%)

Male Literate Population**

5557

59.81%

7266

56.13%

-0.62%

Female Literate Population**

3734

40.19%

5679

43.87%

0.92%

Total Literate Population*

9291

60.66%

12945

68.38%

1.27%

Male Illiterate Population**

2282

37.87%

2331

38.93%

0.28%

Female Illiterate Population**

3744

62.13%

3656

61.07%

-0.17%

Total Illiterate Population*

6026

39.34%

5987

31.62%

-1.96%

Total Population

15317

18932

Source: Census of India; '*' as per Census Provisional Figures Provided by ULB
*- of the total Population
**- of the total Literate / Illiterate Population

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

38

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

3.3. Average household Size


A 'household' is usually a group of persons who normally live together and take their meals from a
common kitchen unless the exigencies of work prevent any of them from doing so. (From Census of
India). As per 2011 provisional census report, the total number of household is 3565. So the average
household size of Khilchipur town is 5.31 which is a little higher than that of the average state (5.2)
and district (5.5) household size.
Table 3.3: Household & Family Size
Total Population

Total Number

Size

Household

15317

2796

5.48

Family

18932

3565

5.31

Source: Census of India;


'*' as per Census Provisional Figures Provided by ULB

3.4. Workforce Participation


According to census reports, around 30.40% of the total population (4,656) entered the workforce in
2001. Workforce participation generally falls under three-fold classifications namely the primary
sector (involved in agriculture-related activities), the secondary sector (involved in industry-related
work) and the tertiary sector (involved in household industry and services type of employment). The
percentage share of main worker is more than the marginal population. It accounts about 3822 of the
total worker population which constitutes 82.09% of the total worker population those who are
employed for 180 days. In case of marginal worker there percentage share is only 17.91 % which is a
good sign for town growth. As more number of people are engaged as main worker. On the other
hand the percentage share of non worker is only 69.60% which shows a positive picture of the town.
Dependency or unemployment rate is low in the town.
Table 3.4: Workforce Classification of 2001 Khilchipur
No.

Occupation category

Population

% of total Working
Population

Main Workers (i+ii+iii+iv)

3822

82.09%

Main Cultivators

240

6.28%

ii

Main Agriculture Labourers

43

1.13%

iii

Main Household industry Worker

126

3.30%

iv

Main Other

3413

89.30%

Marginal Workers (v+vi+vii+viii)

834

17.91%

Marginal Cultivators

32

3.84%

vi

Marginal Agriculture Labourers

97

11.63%

vii

Marginal Household industry Worker

51

6.12%

viii

Marginal Other

654

78.42%

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

39

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 3.4: Workforce Classification of 2001 Khilchipur


No.

Occupation category

Population

% of total Working
Population

4656

30.40%

10661

69.60%

Total Working Population *


Non-Workers
(primary
sector
Secondary Sector + Tertiary Sector)

Source: Census of India, 2001


% of total Working Population
Non-Workers (primary sector +
Secondary Sector + Tertiary Sector)

69.60%
30.40%

Total Working Population *

78.42%

Marginal Other

6.12%

Marginal Household industry Worker

11.63%

Marginal Agriculture Labourers

3.84%

Marginal Cultivators

17.91%

Marginal Workers (v+vi+vii+viii)

89.30%

Main Other

3.30%

Main Household industry Worker


Main Agriculture Labourers

1.13%
6.28%

Main Cultivators

82.09%

Main Workers (i+ii+iii+iv)

0.00%

20.00%

40.00%

60.00%

80.00%

100.00%

Contrary to 1991 records, census data of 2001gives distribution of workers by four-fold industrial
category, viz., cultivators, agricultural laborers, household industries and other workers for each state.
Based on the same data, 82.09% of the total workforce (3822) was registered as main workers or
those who are employed for 180 days or more while the rest (834) was enlisted as marginal workers
or those employed less than the former.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

40

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 3.5: Ward wise Workforce Classification of Main Workers 2001

Ward
No.

Total
Population
of Main
Worker

Total
Population
of
Household
Industry
Main
Workers in
%

Others
%

% of Main
Worker to the
Total Working
Population

Total
Population of
Main
Cultivators in
%

Total
Population
of Main
Agriculture
Laborers in
%

ii

iii

iv

Total

3822

82.09%

6.28%

1.13%

3.30%

89.30%

278

94.24%

1.80%

0.36%

3.96%

93.88%

273

79.59%

0.73%

0.37%

7.33%

91.58%

195

49.62%

34.87%

5.64%

3.08%

56.41%

422

82.10%

1.42%

0.47%

5.69%

92.42%

251

93.66%

9.16%

0.80%

7.97%

82.07%

171

61.07%

0.00%

0.00%

7.02%

92.98%

166

98.81%

0.60%

0.00%

2.41%

96.99%

190

95.48%

1.05%

2.11%

2.11%

94.74%

165

95.38%

0.61%

0.00%

1.82%

97.58%

10

365

91.71%

5.75%

0.55%

1.92%

91.78%

11

187

96.39%

0.00%

1.07%

0.00%

98.93%

12

165

81.68%

3.64%

0.00%

0.00%

96.36%

13

157

77.72%

1.91%

1.27%

0.00%

96.82%

14

457

89.26%

3.72%

2.41%

3.28%

90.59%

15

380

73.79%

22.37%

1.32%

0.00%

76.32%

Source: Census of India, 2001


Table 3.6: Ward wise Workforce Classification of Marginal Workers 2001

Ward
No.

Total
Population
of Marginal
Worker

% of
Marginal
Worker to
the Total
Working
Population

Total
Population
of Marginal
Cultivators
in %

Total
Population of
Marginal
Agriculture
Labourers in
%

Total
Population of
Household
Industry
Marginal
Workers in %

Others %

ii

iii

iv

Total

834

17.91%

3.84%

11.63%

6.12%

78.42%

17

5.76%

5.88%

0.00%

11.76%

82.35%

70

20.41%

2.86%

1.43%

8.57%

87.14%

198

50.38%

1.52%

16.16%

1.01%

81.31%

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

41

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 3.6: Ward wise Workforce Classification of Marginal Workers 2001

Ward
No.

Total
Population
of Marginal
Worker

% of
Marginal
Worker to
the Total
Working
Population

Total
Population
of Marginal
Cultivators
in %

Total
Population of
Marginal
Agriculture
Labourers in
%

Total
Population of
Household
Industry
Marginal
Workers in %

Others %

92

17.90%

0.00%

5.43%

7.61%

86.96%

17

6.34%

5.88%

41.18%

23.53%

29.41%

109

38.93%

0.00%

11.01%

18.35%

70.64%

1.19%

0.00%

0.00%

100.00%

0.00%

4.52%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

100.00%

4.62%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

100.00%

10

33

8.29%

6.06%

30.30%

6.06%

57.58%

11

3.61%

0.00%

28.57%

0.00%

71.43%

12

37

18.32%

16.22%

18.92%

0.00%

64.86%

13

45

22.28%

0.00%

4.44%

0.00%

95.56%

14

55

10.74%

12.73%

3.64%

7.27%

76.36%

15

135

26.21%

7.41%

12.59%

1.48%

78.52%

Source: Census of India, 2001

3.5.

Industrial

Activities

An industry is a broad term which refers to manufacturing of raw materials into goods and products.
The town has no major industrial construction activities except for oil and shoes manufacturing
factories located in the town.

3.6. Trade and Commerce


3.6.1. General
The major forms of economy of the town are agriculture production, industry and Tehsil
administrations. Majority of the population is engaged in agriculture production, and small
percentages of working population are engaged in business-commercial and industrial related work.
Not surprisingly, the trade and commerce of the town are linked with their major economic sources.
Below reflects the trade and commerce as well as the banking status of Khilchipur. As per census
2001 records, the top three most important commodities exported by Khilchipur (M) were Pulses,
agriculture equipment, electrical goods groundnut oil and coriander. The large export of pulses simply
exhibits the agricultural nature of the town. The same data show that top three most important
commodities in Khilchipur were agriculture equipment, electrical goods groundnut oil and coriander.
Looking at the top three major exports and products of Khilchipur, the town is mostly involved in
agriculture, textile and manufacturing of oils, khali and shoes.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

42

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

As can be seen from the below table, the town also has 1 agricultural credit society and 1 nonagriculture credit societies (Census, 2001). As a tehsil headquarter, a number of commercial shops are
located in the town. The town enjoys a number of bazaars, clothing, mutton and vegetable markets.
Table 3.7: Trade, Commerce, Industry & Banking Khilchipur
2nd

1st

3rd

Name of three most important commodities Agriculture


imported
equipment

Electrical goods

Kirana

Name of three most important commodities Groundnut oil


exported

Coriander

Pulses

Name of three most important commodity Oil


Manufactured

Khali

Shoes

Number of Banks

Number of Agriculture Credit Societies

Number of Non-Agricultural Credit Society

Source: District Census Handbook,2001


Above all, the town is home to 2 important institutions which include 2 state government offices, 3
semi government centers and 5 banks. Due to the existence of these important institutions,
establishments and facilities in the town, people from nearby areas and district often come to the place
to get a wide range of services available (e.g. banking). Consequently, this has paved way for the
increased concentration of economic activities in the town.

3.6.2. Agriculture
Agriculture continues to be the backbone of Indian economy contributing to about 28 per cent of
national income. The source of livelihood of about 70 per cent of population is still agriculture. The
major soybean growing states in India are Madhya Pradesh (3.41 million ha), Maharashtra (60,000
ha), Rajasthan (35,000 ha), Uttar Pradesh (25,000 ha), Gujarat (20,000 ha) and other states (55,000
ha). The area and production of soybean in different states and the country show a rising trend in the
recent years. Being a new crop in Madhya Pradesh, marketing facilities have not yet been developed.
Moreover, support price declared by Government of India is based only on the cost of cultivation and
in view of lack of organized marketing the cultivators do not get remunerative prices. Thus, the
development of infrastructure in the marketing of soybean in the state of Madhya Pradesh is of great
significant.
Agricultural production and trade and commerce also play important in the economic development of
Khilchipur. Indeed, agriculture plays an important role in the development of the town. Agriculture
mandi is spread across 5.8 ha. land area. Currently the agriculture production of Khilchipur belongs to
the Class C category. The town has one sub mandi named Semlikalan. The Khilchipur mandi got

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

43

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

regularized in the year 1955. The major agricultural production of the town is oil, groundnut oil,
pluses and coriander.
Table 3.8: Mandi Information of Rajgarh District
Mandi Name

Category /
Class

Date of
Regulation

Area Yard
(Hectare)

Sub Mandi

Total Sub
Mandi

Date of
Regulation

Biaora

01-Jan-1956

7.612

Lakhanvas

05-Jun-1991

Pachour

09-Jun-1956

3.84

Udankhedi

21-Jan-1995

Jirapur

23-Jun-1956

0.728

Kurawar

10-Dec-1968

2.832

Jhadla

16-Sep-1988

Narsingarh

02-Jan-1956

9.242

Bodda

29-Mar-2000

Talen

22-Nov-2001

Ikalera

07-Jan-2001

Sarangpur

Chapiheda

18-Nov-1974

6.07

Khujner

17-Mar-1958

3.03

Kalipeeth

10-Jul-2001

Rajgarh

22-Nov-2001

Khilchipur

24-Jan-1955

5.897

Suthaliya

11-Jul-1959

3.874

Machalpur

12-May-1995

5.726

03-May-1955

5.7

Padhana

Sandavata
Karedi

Semlikalan

22-Jun-1994
22-Jan-2011

31-May-1991

10-Sep-2004

Source: Madhya Pradesh State Agriculture Marketing Board (Mandi Board)

3.7. Tourism
Festivals and religious events are of special interest to domestic and foreign tourists. Khilchipur is
most famous for the Dasheramela festival which rejoices the triumph of Lord Rama over Rawan. The
festival is celebrated in Dashera Maidan and lasts the whole day. The town is also known for Anant
Chaturdashi Chal Samaroha, which is the last day of the Hindu festival of Ganeshotsav. People
celebrate this day by making a processional walk in whole town.
The potential for a tourism project in Khilchipur can also be triggered by its excellent highway
location as with good connectivity to the district and state capital and other towns in Rajgarh. Rajgarh
district and state capital Bhopal possess a rich history and feature places of archeological eminence
which include Ganesh Mandir and Hanuman Phatak temple in Rajgarh as well as Shaukat Mahal and
Gohar Mahal architecture in Bhopal. Khilchipur serves as a convenient place for short trips because
of the presence of banks and commercial shops in the municipality.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

44

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

3.8. Issues
Madhya Pradesh has insufficient infrastructure to support and sustain increasing development effort.
The infrastructure in the state tends to be more capital intensive, partly because of its topography and
partly because of the nature of its settlement hierarchy. Almost in respect of all indicators of physical
infrastructure - per capita consumption of power, net irrigated area, length of roads and railways per
unit of area, number of banking offices per lakh of population, per capita bank deposit and credit, the
state fairs poorly. It is because of inadequate development of infrastructure, both physical and social
that the state has missed opportunities for achieving high rates of growth. Khilchipur is no exception
in this case.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

45

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 4: Physical Planning


4.1. Spatial Growth Trends
Town planning and management have consistently been linked with the analysis of land distribution,
utilization and spatial distribution of population, among others, which provides understanding of the
current issues and future challenges of town housing and infrastructure. Moreover, these insights
would allow urban planning experts to carry out necessary interventions most appropriate for the town
under study.
The town of Khilchipur is divided into two parts by a river. The eastern bank of the river is
considerably more developed than the other. Khilchipur is located on the national highway no. 12
between two major towns. The bypass highway from Indore to Bhopal traversing Khilchipur paved
way for development of the town and its outskirts which meant population growth and increased
concentration of economic activities in the area. Since the construction of the bypass highway in
Khilchipur, the town has attracted more people which consequently led to the setting up of
commercial and service-oriented establishments. The central part Khilchipur on the more developed
bank accommodates the ward units of the town of which 42% has been declared as slums. Moreover,
banks, commercial establishments such as markets and shops and other facilities are located on
National Highway on the southern part of the more developed bank. Conversely, there are not many
activities taking place on the northern bank of the river except for brick manufacturing companies
operating in the area.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

46

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

4.2. Spatial Distribution of Population


The Khilchipur Nagar Palika Parishad is divided into 15 wards. The below table shows the ward wise
details of Khilchipur. Of the total number of ward units, 6 wards have been declared as slums. Ward
wise population analysis reveals that wards no. 14 and 4 are the most populated accounting for
16.20% and 14.56% of the total population respectively. This is followed by wards 15 and 10 which
account for 10.13% and 7.94% of the total population correspondingly. The rest of the population of
Khilchipur appears to be well scattered among the wards.
Table 4.1: Ward wise Details, Khilchipur (M)
% share of

Area

Population

1167

Priyadarsni

Ward
No.

Name*

Population

Hanuman Gadh

% Share of

(in Ha)

% Share of
Area

No. of
Households

Households

6.16

39.209

6%

216

6.06

1451

7.66

40.118

6%

292

8.19

Vinoba Bhave

1393

7.36

96.553

15%

249

6.98

Dr. Ambedkar

2756

14.56

110.318

17%

500

14.03

Maulana Azad

880

4.65

4.612

1%

175

4.91

Netaji Bose

903

4.77

8.470

1%

158

4.43

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

47

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 4.1: Ward wise Details, Khilchipur (M)


Ward
No.

Name*

Population

% share of

Area

Population

% Share of

(in Ha)

% Share of
Area

No. of
Households

Households

Jawaharlal
Nehru

698

3.69

12.410

2%

120

3.37

Maharana
Pratap

621

3.28

11.228

2%

106

2.97

Tagore

645

3.41

12.025

2%

140

3.93

10

Ahilya Devi

1504

7.94

25.110

4%

293

8.22

11

Tilak

661

3.49

3.616

1%

131

3.67

12

Sanjay

654

3.45

9.259

1%

134

3.76

13

Vallabh Patel

615

3.25

8.124

1%

117

3.28

14

Mahatma
Gandhi

3067

16.20

251.027

39%

595

16.69

15

Maharani
Laxmibai

1917

10.13

14.922

2%

339

9.51

Total

18932

647.00

100.00%

3565

100.00

Source: *- Census 2011, Information given by ULB

4.3. Municipal Level Mapping


For Details Refer Maps section

4.4. Ward Delineation Map


For Details Refer Maps section

4.5. Land Use Analysis


The below table depicts the broad picture of the land use break up Khilchipur as per GIS mapping by
PRUDA AIILSG. The same table shows that Khilchipur covers a total area of 647.00 ha. Owing it
to the fact that agriculture is a major economy of the town, the largest proportion (56.00%) of the total
town area is used in agriculture, agriculture-related activities and other purposes. The data also reveals
that only 41.00% of the entire town area is developed. Moreover, other open spaces comprise the
smallest proportion (3.00%) of the total town area.
Table 4.2: Land availability in Khilchipur Town
Type of Land

Area (in Hectares)

Developed Area

265.27

41.00%

Undevelopable Land

19.41

3.00%

Agriculture / others

362.32

56.00%

Total

647.00

Source: GIS mapping by PRUDA AIILSG, 2011

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

48

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

As explained earlier, land use analysis is crucial to the understanding of the current status of a town
under investigation. Particularly, below table depicts the land use distribution of municipal area of
Khilchipur. The same table shows that the municipality covers a total area of 647.00 ha. Not
surprisingly, almost half (56.00%) of the municipal area is used for agricultural activities. Residential
land accounts for 27.00% of municipal area of Khilchipur followed by transportation and public/semipublic land accounting for 1.00% and 3.00% of the same area respectively.
Moreover, Commercial land account for 12.00% of the land. The remaining area is used for Public
Use and Services (0.85%), Recreational (0.58%) and Industrial (0.26%) purposes.
Table 4.3: Existing Land use Break up, Khilchipur (M)
Category

Area (in Hectares)

Residential

174.69

27.00%

Commercial

77.64

12.00%

Public semi-public

19.41

3.00%

Public Use / Services

6.47

1.00%

Recreational

Transportation

Agricultural

362.32

56.00%

Rivers & Water bodies

11.78

1.82%

647.00

100%

Industrial

Special area*
Total Area
Source: GIS mapping by PRUDA AIILSG, 2011

* Specify detail of which areas have been defined as special areas viz. urban villages, slum etc.
The developed area of the town is of special interest to urban planning primarily because many of the
economic activities are concentrated in this area. The below table provides us a more detailed picture
of the land use distribution of the towns developed area. The table shows that the total developed
area of Khilchipur is 265.27 ha. The same data reveal that more than half (62%) of the developed area
is of residential use. Lands used for public/semi-public and commercial purposes accounted for
7.89%, and 28.06% of the total developed area respectively. Land allocation for transportation (e.g.
widening of roads, etc.) is particularly important in attracting investments for the town. Moreover,
land for public use and services and recreational use account for only 2.33% of the total developed
area correspondingly.
Table 4.4: Existing Land use Breakup of the Developed Area, Khilchipur (M)
Category
Residential

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Area (in Hectares)

163.70

61.71%

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

49

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 4.4: Existing Land use Breakup of the Developed Area, Khilchipur (M)
Category

Area (in Hectares)

74.43

28.06%

Public semi-public

20.93

7.89%

Public Use / Services

6.18

2.33%

Recreational

Transportation

265.27

100.00%

Commercial
Industrial

Total Area
Source: GIS mapping by PRUDA AIILSG, 2011

4.5.1. Residential Density


Residential density provides a picture of how populated an area is. Below table presents the
residential density distribution of Khilchipur. Overall, there are 290 households residing in high
density area (more than 501 PPH). Additionally, 1423 households live in medium density areas (201
to 500 PPH). Finally, 1852 households dwell in low density area. Analysis of these figures suggests
that apparently, there has been decreased concentration of people in particular areas of the town which
can be explained by its developing character.
Table 4.5: Residential Density Distribution, Khilchipur (M)
Category

Details

No. of Households

High Density

more than 501 PPH

290 HH

Medium Density

201 to 500 PPH

1423 HH

Low Density

less than 200 PPH

1852 HH

Source: CONSULTANT

4.6. Master Plan Provisions


No master planning has been prepared by the Town and Country Planning department.
Table 4.6: Land Use as per UDPFI Guideline
Land use

Area In Ha

Residential

74.01

Commercial

4.30

Industrial

15.49

Public & Semi-Public

12.05

Recreational

22.38

Transport & Communication

18.93

Agriculture & Water Bodies

24.96

Source: UDPFI Guideline


Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

50

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

The following landuse were identified as inappropriate during the field survey. The proposed new
location of activity has been conceptualised during the consultation workshops.
Table 4.7: Inappropriate Land Use / Places, Khilchipur (M)
Land Use / Place

Present Location

Reason for
Relocation/ Problems

Automobile markets National Highway,

Traffic Congestion

Near Bus stand


Meat Market

On the River bank

Bus stand

On national highway, Traffic Congestion


near main market

Proposed New
Location of
Activity

New Land
Use after
Relocation
of the
Activity

Near
City
Petrol pump

Environmental Concern On National


Highway, near
crematorium
Near Stadium

and pollution

Source: GIS mapping by PRUDA AIILSG, 2011

4.7. Housing Scenario


4.7.1 Present And Future Housing Demand
One of the biggest challenges of cities and growing towns is the provision of proper housing to all
families, with special emphasis on the need fulfill the shelter demands of the underprivileged groups.
As per Census records of 2011, Khilchipur has reached a population of 18932 consisting of 3565
households. As explained in the earlier chapters, a household is defined as a group of people living
together and taking their meals from a common kitchen (Census of India 2001).
A household may contain more than a family. In an ideal setup, each family should be provided a
house with (at least) one cooking facility. This apparent sharing of kitchen and other home facilities
creates the housing gap for the town. Below table reveals the housing gap in Khilchipur. Overall, the
town has a shortage of 1889 houses as per 2001 records of Town & Country Planning Department.
As mentioned earlier, Khilchipur is home to 15 ward units and 6 or about 40% of which have been
declared as slums. Many of the families from the slums do not have proper shelters. They build
temporary houses with partitions made of poor and unsuitable materials (e.g. old plastics). Looking at
the below table, the planning department reported that there are 1919 houses which need to be
reconstructed for families from the slums. Appallingly, only 20% of the total number of houses which
should be provided to slum families has actually been reconstructed.
Meanwhile, about 108 dilapidated houses still need to be reconstructed by the local government.
These houses have proper structure although their poor condition makes them unsuitable for dwelling.
Substandard materials used in construction of the house, faulty wiring and other structural flaws,
among others, are the major reasons why these houses have been abandoned. Unfortunately, only 20%
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

51

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

of the total number of dilapidated houses has been reconstructed leading to shortage of another 22
houses for Khilchipur.
The housing scenario in Khilchipur appears to be very problematic. Addressing the housing gap in
Khilchipur is crucial to resolving a host of key problems in the town. As 40% of the town population
resides in slum, provision of proper housing to families in slum can resolve the long-standing problem
of open defecation which leads to rampant spread of diseases. A proper approach to the housing issues
in slums has also been positively linked with increased sanitation awareness and enhanced community
and family bonds.
Table 4.8: Housing Gaps, Khilchipur (M)
Details

No. of Houses

Rate of
Reconstruction

Housing Shortage

(In %)
Housing shortage till 2001

1889

20%

378

Reconstruction of Slum Houses

1919

20%

384

Reconstruction of Dilapidated Houses

108

20%

22

Total

3916

783

Source: GIS mapping by PRUDA AIILSG, 2011


Note: Entire Wards are been declared as slums.

4.7.2 Illegal Colonies


The formation of illegal colonies in India has been a critical urban planning issue as it concerns not
only the physical planning issues of the town but more importantly, it touches the issue of institutional
corruption in the system.
In an ideal setup, land developers need to create a working layout of the land intended for sale. This
means creation of appropriate spacing and efficient roads for the property in order to secure a permit
from the government. Securing permits are of paramount importance as this will serve as basis for the
government to make developments in that area which include, among others, delivery of basic
services such as electricity and water supply.
Moreover, illegal colonies are formed when deceitful developers buy an agriculture land and create a
flawed layout with minimal roads, improper spacing and lack of firewalls among other procedural
violations. Developers commit these violations with the intention to sell more lots or houses within a
given area. After the construction of houses, they are sold and registered to the buyers.
Redtapism and bribery are crucial to the flourishing of illegal colonies because they allow the
registration of plots or houses which have major legal and procedural violations. In order to have them
registered, developers bribe the government and politicians a huge sum of money enough for them to
seal their lips and give in to the demands of the perpetrators (e.g. delivery of electricity to houses).
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

52

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Another round of bribery comes into the picture during the imposition of property tax on the colonies.
Owners bribe the government officials in order to acquire property tax requirements for their
properties. Simply put, colonies subsist as they create an illusion of legitimacy with their registration
and property tax through bribery.
After the developments due construction of the bypass bridge in Khilchipur, the town has been
infested by illegal colonies especially in the central part of the more developed bank of the town. This
has made the town denser and highly congested over time.
The flourishing of colonies is of serious concern to any city as they thwart urban planning experts
from creating desired flow of roads, spaces and other important procedural requirements for the town.
Additionally, appropriate spacing between houses is important in order to prevent rapid spread of fire
and easy access of fire officials to the place. Preventing illegal colonies from thriving is a question of
political will. Colonies need to be properly identified and appropriate sanctions need to be carried out.
A strong internal bureaucratic control is required to discourage further colonies from flourishing.
[The above views are extracted from the stakeholders consultation meetings]

4.7.3 Future Growth Possibilities


The town of Khilchipur is nearer to Pachore which has primarily brought development to the city. The
construction of the bypass highway catalyzed the rapid growth of Khilchipur which meant increase in
population and investments for the town. As explained earlier, the northern part of the bank is less
developed than the other, although brick and furniture industries are located in this part of Khilchipur.
Future growth is expected in this part of Khilchipur because of the high congestion on the northern
part.
The important factors which contribute to growth of the town in future are:

Good accessibility by road and rail network

Business and commercial Activities

Available of developable vacant land

Education and Health facilities

4.8. City Specific Strategies And Action Plan


The projects identified for the sector for the period till 2035 are presented in the Table below.
Table 4.9: Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur
HORIZON

PRIORITY

DETAIL OF PROJECT

YEAR
2015

HIGH

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Preparation of Master Plan for Khilchipur

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

53

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 4.9: Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur


HORIZON

PRIORITY

DETAIL OF PROJECT

YEAR
2025

MEDIUM

Development of Model Housing Project


Development of Incremental Housing Scheme

2035

LOW

Development of Incremental Housing Scheme

2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Source: Consultants of the project

4.9 Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years In


Khilchipur
The strategies / policies / actions to be undertaken for achieving the Goals and implanting the projects
presented in the Table below.
Table 4.10: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
No
01

Strategies & Action Plan


Creation of Shelter Fund

2015

2025

2035

YES

A Shelter Fund is a dedicated fund earmarked for providing housing


to the poor. Through legislative amendments private builders may
either contribute a proportion of their land for social housing or
equivalent land cost to the shelter fund. This has been quite
successfully implemented in Madhya Pradesh. The recent report on
Affordable Housing for All by the Ministry of Urban Development
has also recommended a 0.5 per cent cess on all central government
taxes, to be credited to a dedicated shelter fund5 at the national
level. The proposed fund will be managed by the National Housing
Bank with an equivalent budgetary support so as to make a longterm impact. Similar efforts can be planned at the state/city level.
The concept of Shelter Fund has been in practice in Madhya
Pradesh since eighties. In this Private builders have the obligation
to contribute a portion of the land developed by them or cash
proportionate to the land value to the Ashraya Nidhi (Shelter Fund)
for pro-poor housing. This fund that is collected at the state level is
redistributed to provide social housing The Municipal laws in the
state has been appropriately amended to create this fund. In Madhya
Pradesh most builders prefer to contribute land value as against
land; this is creating shortage of land and the state government is
deliberating if they should make it mandatory for the builders to
contribute land only.
02

Ensuring that no building plans are sanctioned without the


earmarked land

03

Township Development through Public Private Partnership

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

5 - Report of the High Level Task Force , MoH&PA , .AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR ALL December 2008
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

54

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 4.10: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
No

Strategies & Action Plan

2015

2025

2035

Development of land and allied infrastructure forms an integrated


part of township development. In recent times, Public Private
Partnerships have proved to be a sustainable way to promote
housing for the poor. To attract investors incentives are provided by
offering additional FARs, exemption from stamp duty fees and other
such benefits. A betterment tax on properties whose value may have
improved as a result of town planning scheme undertaken by the
Council can be imposed for encouraging PPP.
04

Linking with other urban reforms

YES

YES

State Level: A large number of reforms have been initiated in India.


These include: simplification of land registration processes and
rationalisation of stamp duty fees, land titling and property tax
reforms. These have led to an increase in number of legal property
owners paying taxes, increasing revenues. So far incentives offered
under these reforms have been availed by middle and high income
groups only. State may approve innovations incentives such as
stamp duty exemptions, tax holidays, fast track building plan
approvals and registration processes to builders who agree to
earmark land for the citys poor.
ULB Level: The following reforms are mandatory for accessing
grants under the newly envisaged schemes of Rajiv Awas Yojana by
MoHUPA, GoI:
Internal earmarking within local body budgets for basic services to
the urban poor;
Provision of basic services to urban poor including security of
tenure at affordable prices, improved housing, water supply,
sanitation and ensuring delivery of other already existing universal
services of the government for education, health and social security;
and
Earmarking at least 20-25% of developed land in all housing
projects (both public and private agencies) for EWS/LIG category
with a system of cross-subsidization.
2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Source: Consultant of the Project

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

55

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 5: City Infrastructure Of Khilchipur


5.1. Water Supply Of Khilchipur
Water has constantly been deemed as a basic resource necessary to sustain life and as such should be
made accessible to all. Appallingly, water supply and access remain to be a major problem in many
developing towns in India. In particular, the level and quality of water supply has been one of the key
issues in urban planning as water fuels a host of activities necessary for the proper functioning and
future growth of the town.
Below table provides an overview of the status of water supply infrastructure for Khilchipur. At
present, the town has an available water supply reservoir of 1 MLD installed capacity while the actual
level supplied to the entire town is around 0.9 MLD. Khilchipur is sustained primarily by the
impounding reservoir on River followed by Tube wells (3), hand pump (40) and by Dug wells (8).
The great thing is that all are in working condition. Overall, the total water storage capacity installed
in the town is about 10 Lacs litres.
In terms of water coverage, 15 wards are currently covered yet only 80% of which is supplied through
public water supply, as parts of Wards No. 1, 2, 4 and 15 are occasionally supplied water through
tankers and in summer, all the wards are suuplied water through tankers. The per capita supply
released is about 52 LCPD yet actual supply after transmission and distribution losses comes only to
47 LCPD. Apparently, 10% or about a quarter of the total water supply is lost during transmission and
distribution losses due to faulty pipelines and other infrastructure failures which have built up over
time. This loss is considerable given that water is supplied for only 30 minutes in two days.
Table 5.1: Overview of Water Supply in Khilchipur
Water

Installed capacity (MGD)

1 MLD

availability

Released / Daily (MGD)

0.9 MLD

Source of water

Within city limits

-Impounding Reservoir (Ganesh


pura Stop dam) on River and
Tube wells

supply

-Dug wells (8 Nos.)****


-Hand pump (40 Nos and 10 in
working)
-Tube Wells (3 Nos.)*****
10-50 sq.km.

Nevaj Reservoir (25 Km)

50-100 sq.km.

NA

Water Storage Capacity

Total Water Storage


Installed in the Town

Water

No. of Wards Covered

coverage

Population covered by public water 80%**

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Capacity 10.00 Lacs Liters


15

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

56

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.1: Overview of Water Supply in Khilchipur


supply %
Area Covered

70%***

Per capita supply (LPCD) 6

52 LPCD
47 LPCD*

Supply duration (hrs.)


Water Losses

45 minutes in two days

Transmission and Distribution Losses 10%


%

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

5.1.1. Quality and Quantity of Water at Source


Quantity
At present, the town has an available water supply reservoir of 1 MLD7 installed capacity while the
actual level supplied to the entire town is around 0.9 MLD. Khilchipur is sustained primarily by the
impounding reservoir on River followed by five (3) Tube wells and one (40) hand pumps and by (8)
Dug wells.
The Garh Ganga River is a non-perennial river flowing through the center of the city. An impounding
reservoir of 20 mcft on the river is constructed on a river. The Garh Ganga river flowing through the
Khilchipur town is also non-perennial and ceases immediately after the rainfall. The river ceases in
the month of December. The water from the dam is utilized primarily as an irrigation tank; the water
is undoubtedly insufficient to cater the present and more so the future drinking water needs of
Khilchipur Town.
Apart from the river, there are three (3) Tube wells present in Khilchipur. There are about 40 hand
pumps which have been drilled by the Public Health Engineering Department in the town. The yield
one good tube well has been reported to be at around 10,000 liters per hour (LPH) and two (2) Tube
wells having the said average yield have been drilled in the town.
However, question of sustainability arises as it has been observed the yield of the said tube wells is
reduced by about 50% in the summer and even worse during drought period. Based on the available
Geological and Hydrological data of Khilchipur region, Tube wells cannot be considered as a
dependable & feasible source of Water Supply for the town as they are highly unreliable and prone to
contamination. Moreover, there are about 8 existing Dug Wells in the town with an average diameter
of 5 m and depth of 20 m. Similarly, the dug wells dry out during acute summer conditions.

- Liters per capita per day

- Million Liters per Day


Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

57

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Quality
In terms of quality standards, the quality of water in Khilchipur is satisfactory as they are in
acceptable ranges with reference to the parameters given by the Public Health Engineering
Department (PHED), see below table.
Table 5.2: Water Quality of Garh Ganga River
Parameters

Acceptable

Sample Results

pH

7 to 8.5

Chlorides (Mg/L)

200

30

Total Hardness

200 as CaCO3

160

Iron (Mg/L)

0.1

0.2

Fluorides

10

0.225

Manganese

0.05

Nil

Sulphates

200

08

Source: PHED, Rajgarh, MP.

5.1.2. Quality and Quantity of Water in Distribution System


At the present time, the water is supplied in 2 Zones for only thirty (45) minutes in two day. The per
capita supply released of water in Khilchipur is about 52 LCPD8 yet actual supply after transmission
and distribution losses comes only to 47 LCPD. A quarter of the total water supply (10%) is lost
during transmission and distribution due to faulty pipelines and other infrastructure failures which
have built up over time.
The quality of water after the treatment and distribution is considered Potable as per World Health
Organization (WHO) standards. However, more sophisticated means of water treatment is necessary
since common chlorination is the only method utilized.
Needless to say, improvements need to be done to reduce and accounted water as they have serious
implications on water services revenue.

5.1.3. Others Sources


Some parts of the town like Ward no 1, 2, 4 and 15 occasionally have to supply water through tankers.

- Liters per capita


Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

58

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

R E P O R T

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

59

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.1.4. Water Distribution Arrangements In Khilchipur


Service Reservoir
One Over Head Tank (OHT) of 2.5 lac liter is located in ward no 14 near the Zirapur Chok, Two
OHTs is located near the PHC which is also 2.5 Lac litre. One other OHT are located in Ward no 1
and another in ward No.3. .Below table summarizes the water storage facilities for Khilchipur (M).
Table 5.3: Water Storage Facilities in Khilchipur
Type
OHT

GSR

Capacity (in Liters)

Location

4.5 lac

10

Somvaria (ward no.1)

0.60 Lac

Waterworks (ward no.14)

2.5 Lac

Hospital Compound

2.25 Lac

Hospital Compound

0 Lac

Total

10.00 Lac

Source: Nagar Parishad, Khilchipur


Tube wells & Infiltration wells
There are two (3) tube wells fitted with power pumps and infiltration well at the zone of the
impounding reservoir. From these tube wells and infiltration well, then the water is transported to the
OHTs and then water is distributed to the adjoining areas.
Table 5.4: Ward wise Source of water in Khilchipur
Ward
No.

Ward Name

Hanuman Gadh

Priyadarsni

Vinoba Bhave

Dr. Ambedkar

Maulana Azad

Netaji Bose

Jawaharlal Nehru

Maharana Pratap

Tagore

10

Ahilya Devi

11

Tilak

Nos. of

Nos. of

Nos. of

Nos. of

Tube wells

Hand Pumps

Wells

OHT
1

- Over Head Tank

10

- Ground Structure Reservoir


Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

60

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.4: Ward wise Source of water in Khilchipur


Ward
No.

Ward Name

12

Sanjay

13

Vallabh Patel

14

Mahatma Gandhi

15

Maharani Laxmibai

Nos. of

Nos. of

Nos. of

Nos. of

Tube wells

Hand Pumps

Wells

OHT

TOTAL

40

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, 2011

5.1.5. Internal Distribution Networks


A distribution line of 20 km (Distance of stop dam to town = 9 km which is included in total length)
length covers approximately 70% of the total developed area of Khilchipur. There are different
diameters and material of the distribution networks and most them are of 1 diameter.
The condition of distribution network is important in understanding how water is lost and how water
lines can be improved to reduce unaccounted for water and increase revenue for water services. This
existing network is already more than 15 years old and has not been successful in meeting the
requirements for the proper water distribution system. Failures in the existing pipeline network system
have led to water loss of 10%.
Water Connections
Below table shows the water connection in Khilchipur. There are about 1921 water connections which
account for about 54% of the total households in the town. The town also has 79 public connections,
40 hand pumps, 15 commercial and no industrial water lines.
Table 5.5: Water Connections in Khilchipur
Type of Connection

No.

Domestic

1921

Commercial

15

Industrial

Public Taps

79

Hand pump

40

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad


About 30% of the city areas still without water supply network. Indeed, there is a need to develop a
new and well-planned distribution system for the developed areas and for one third of the city in
newly developing areas. Undoubtedly, the sustainability of water supply and sustenance of daily town
needs are contingent upon the quality and maintenance of internal distribution arrangements.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

61

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.6: Ward Wise Water Connection in Khilchipur


Ward
No.

Ward Name

Hanuman Gadh

Priyadarsni

Vinoba Bhave

Dr. Ambedkar

Maulana Azad

Netaji Bose

Jawaharlal Nehru

Maharana Pratap

Tagore

10

Ahilya Devi

11

Tilak

12

Sanjay

13

Vallabh Patel

14

Mahatma Gandhi

15

Maharani Laxmibai

Nos. of Individual

Nos. of Commercial

Nos. of Public

Connection

Connection

Connection

1921

15

79

Total
Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, 2011
Water Charges

Water charges contribute to the bulk of revenue income of the town which explains the need for
reducing unaccounted for water through improvement of the distribution network system. In the case
of Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, water charges are collected from three (3) different users per month i.e.
Domestic, Commercial and Industrial users. Domestic consumption being in Khilchipur is the major
source of urban services revenue for Khilchipur Town. Below table depicts the tariff and the number
of existing water supply connections in Khilchipur. Overall, there are about 1921* Domestic, 15
Commercial and zero Industrial connections with each unit charged Rs. 50/-, Rs. 100/-, and Rs 250/per month respectively.
Table 5.7: Applicable Water Charges in Khilchipur
Type of Connection

No.

Water Charges Collected Per Month

1921

Rs. 50 /-

Commercial

15

Rs. 100 /-

Industrial

Rs. 250 /-

Domestic

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

62

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.1.6. Water Treatment Facilities


In 2002, a treatment plant based on Rapid sand filter with a capacity of 1.5 MLD is installed on the
River bank. At present, the plant is in sound condition. However, there town is still devoid of
sophisticated means of water treatment for potable use except for common chlorination.

5.1.7. Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines


Below table shows the recommended per capita water supply quantity according to UDPFI and
CPHEEO guidelines. For one small town as Khilchipur (18,932 population), the desirable supply
level is 135 LPCD. The actual level of water supply is only 47 LPCD which means that town is not
receiving standard recommended water supply.
Khilchipur will be considered a medium town in 2035 due its growth population, so the future per
capita demand estimated is 135 LPCD.
Table 5.8: Recommended per capita water supply levels
UDPFI
Classification
towns
- Small Town
(<50.000 people)
- Medium Town
(>50.000 people)

CPHEEO

of Supply levels

Classification of towns

Supply levels

i) Absolute minimum 70 - Towns provided with piped - 70 LPCD


LPCD
water supply but without
sewerage system
ii) Desirable: 100 LPCD
i) 70-100 LPCD (Upper Cities provided with piped - 135 LPCD
limit
above
100.000 water supply where sewerage
people)
system
is
existing/
contemplated
ii) 135-150 LPCD

Source: Table 2.1 CPHEEO guidelines, 1999


Page 149, UDPFI guidelines, 1996

5.1.8. Existing Water Supply Projects


Presently, A water supply scheme having cost of Rs. 9.94 Crore and capacity of 3.5 MLD is under
approval with U.A.D.D. (the scheme is prepared under the Jal Avardhan Yojna of State Government)

5.1.9. Demand And Supply Gaps (Present And Future)


The huge infrastructure investments for a town require meticulous analysis of the existing gap and
future demand. The said analyses warrant insight as to the scale of the infrastructure which needs to
be constructed for long-term use. As cities are expected to receive greater pressure in the future due
to growth population, an accurate analysis of the existing gaps and future demand is necessary for
planning, prioritization of infrastructure and meeting costs of the particular demand. Considering the
projected population the demand & supply gaps are calculated until 2035 which is shown in below
table.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

63

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.9: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Water Supply) for Khilchipur
Details

2011

2015

2025

2035

Projected Population

18932

20508

25045

30585

Number of Households @ 5.32 HH size

3565

3862

4716

5759

Demand of Water Supply


i

Demand of Water Supply (MLD)


@ 135 LPCD

ii

2.56

2.77

3.38

4.13

Present Water Supply (MLD)

iii

Gap in Water Supply (MLD)

1.56

1.77

2.38

3.13

iv

Additional Requirement (MLD)

0.21

0.61

0.75

Treatment Facility
i

Demand (in MLD)

2.56

2.77

3.38

4.13

ii

Present Status (MLD)

1.5

1.5

1.5

1.5

iii

Gap (MLD)

1.06

1.27

1.88

2.63

iv

Additional Requirement (MLD)

0.21

0.61

0.75

Distribution Network
i

Demand Network (Km)

14.20

15.38

18.78

22.94

ii

Present Network (Km)

11

11

11

11

iii

Gap in Distribution Network


(Km)

3.20

4.38

7.78

11.94

iv

Additional
Requirement
Distribution Network (Km)

1.18

3.40

4.16

of

Other
i

Additional Requirement of meters


(Nos)

3565

3862

4716

5759

ii

Additional Requirement of Public


Taps (1 for 60 HH)

59

64

79

96

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

5.1.10. SWOT Analysis


Based on the primary survey and stakeholders consultations, sectors strengths, weaknesses,
opportunities and threats have been assessed. Below table presents the SWOT analysis done of Water
Supply sector.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

64

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.10: SWOT Analysis (Water Supply) for Khilchipur


Sector
Water Supply

Strengths

Weaknesses

Water quality at Actual


water
satisfactory level storage capacity is
Insufficient.
Water
supply
Charge is an
important source
Inefficient
of income for the
distribution system.
ULB.

Opportunities

Threats

Water Resources
Department
Projects
are
ongoing for towns
drinking
water
(Water
from
Fatehpur Dam)

Dependency on
surface
Water
sources.

Low Per Capita Willingness


of
Water Supply.
people to pay more
for better services

Tampering with
the sanctioned
connection
by
some consumers.

5.1.11. Issues

Khilchipur town is mainly depending on surface water resources.

The scarcity of water is evident from the fact that water is supplied for only 30 minutes per
every two days.

There is currently uneven distribution of water which requires the extension and
strengthening of distribution lines.

The water supply in the town is 47 LPCD after the T & D losses.

The town is devoid of scientific or sophisticated treatment of water before supply.


Chlorination is the only process which is being applied to water before supply to the citizens.
More scientific approach has to be adopted for improvement of this aspect.

There is absence of mapping and monitoring of present water supply system.

There are no inspections on delivery pressure. The town is also devoid of service level
assessment which is important to look into the overall situation of the town water supply.

Replacement of the old and faulty distribution networks should be immediately water loss
alone accounts for about a quarter of the total water released daily. This scenario both has
repercussions on municipal income as water charges are a main source of revenue income for
the town.

About 20% of the area (of the Developed area) is not covered under conventional water
supply system.

5.1.12. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


A) Goals for Horizon Years
The goals and service outcomes for the horizon period 2010-2035 are presented in the below table.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

65

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.11: Goals for Horizon Years (Water Supply)


Water Supply

2011/2012
(Current)

2015

2025

2035

Reviewing and 100% Piped Water


restructuring of Supply
DPR in line with
100% Water Metering
the CDP
Revision in Water
Tariff

100% O & M 100% Water


Cost Recovery
Supply
in
newly
Training
&
developed
Capacity
areas
Building of staff
Performance
Draft Revision in Bye
Management
Laws for Rain Water
System
Harvesting
Compulsory

Network cover for 70%


general
households

100%

100%

100%

Water supply liters 47 LPCD


per capita per day

135 LPCD

135 LPCD

135 LPCD

No. of hours of 30 min. per two 6 hr.


supply
days

12 hr.

24 hr.

Quality of Water

Safe & Good

Safe & Good

Safe & Good

Water --

50%

100%

100%

Meters for house -connections

89%

100%

100%

Non
Water

15%

15%

15%

20%

100%

Drinking
Treatment

Safe & Good

Revenue 25%

O & M
recovery
mechanism

cost 9.5%

100%

B) Strategies and Action Plan


The section into divided into subgroup i.e. Strategies for Infrastructure Augmentation /
Refurbishments, Strategies for Mobilizing Financial resources and recovery of O & M cost of the
Proposed and existing Infrastructure, Strategies for Resource or Environment Conservation and
strategies for improving urban governance highlighted as Instituting Responsive & Responsible Urban
Governance. The following are outline of the strategies and action plan that are envisaged to be
undertaken for Khilchipur Town in order to achieve the Vision and Goals.
Table 5.12: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur
Infrastructure
Augmentation of existing supply network at source and at distribution end.
Augmentation /
Water treatment Facility
Refurbishment
Upgradation and replacement of existing distribution system by 2015
Extension of distribution network within town by 2035,
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

66

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.12: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur


Provision of Community Taps and Group Connections.
Establishing Customer Connections Water Meters
Decrease non revenue water up 15% by 2015.
Mobilization of
Financial
Resources and
O & M Cost
Recovery
Mechanism

- Public Private Partnership (PPP)


The O&M of pumping stations and WTPs through a service or management
contract with the private sector who would be solely responsible for the O & M of
the system, based on an agreed annual fee, with built-in incentives for improved
performance.
The water supply system should be implemented through innovative financial
structuring, involving public, private and consumer participation.
- Operation & Maintenance Plan
The O & M Plan shall include both system maintenance, on a regular basis, and
an emergency maintenance plan. System maintenance shall include routine
maintenance, corrective maintenance & preventive maintenance. In addition to
preventive maintenance with the existing staff, unbundling of O&M operations
shall be adopted to ensure private sector participation.
- Compulsory Water Meter
Make the water meters compulsory in order to bring every service seekers into
Tax Network.
- Cost recovery through adopting differential pricing system
Differential pricing system can be adopted for various building use such as
commercial units. Charging them for what they consume creates the potential to
cost recovery and also to avoid both waste and under used.
- Tariff Revision
At present there is no tariff for the underground sewerage connection. It is
necessary to collect the connection charges and monthly tariff from the
beneficiaries. This however needs an effective Political Will.
- Bringing System Efficiency
Maximize the use of existing and future infrastructure to the fullest for sustaining
the system.

Resource
Environment
Conservation

/ - Water Auditing
Water auditing is the best practice to reduce the system losses and make the entire
supply of water accountable and reduce non revenue water. This involves leak
detection studies apart from studies on the quality and quantity of water drawl at
the consumer end and explores ways and means for effective water supply systems.
- Awareness Campaign on Water Conservation
Involve CBOs / NGOs for creating Awareness amongst the People for per capita
Water Conservation.

Instituting
Responsive
Responsible
Urban
Governance

&

- Water Supply Inventory


Carrying out a detailed inventorization and mapping of the water supply network
including details of pipe and pipe appurtenances, maintenance of service registers
etc.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

67

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.12: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur


- Streamlining Institutional Responsibilities
- Customer satisfaction through providing regular information service
performance
Keep the customer satisfied by responding to queries and complaints in a timely
manner and providing them with regular information on service performance.
- Rain Water harvesting in bye laws (Optional Reform)
It is an optional reform envisaged under the CDP as per the JNNURM toolkit. The
details can be referred in the Chapter on Urban Governance and Municipal
Reform.
[The above strategies and action plan are co-related various chapters and sections on the City
Investment Plan, Financial Operating Plan, Institutional Frameworks and Summary of Strategies
mentioned in the report]

5.2. SEWERAGE AND SANITATION in Khilchipur


Sanitation refers to the safe management and disposal of human excreta and it is a basic component
for city development. Proper sanitation facilities for citizens are a major challenge for civic
authorities. It is not only the problem of keeping city clean; it is also an economic and social problem
of raising production and promoting a good life.
The outcome of sanitation is not only the number of toilets built or kilometers of sewer laid but also
include proper use and maintenance of those facilities.
Disregard to sewerage and sanitation needs of Khilchipur can result to a host of serious problems
related to environmental degradation and health repercussions. Proper planning based on the special
needs of the town is crucial to the success of any Sewerage and Sanitation infrastructure investment.
The table below depicts the current state of Sewerage and Sanitation Infrastructure in Khilchipur.
Table 5.13: Overview of the state of Infrastructure: Sewerage & Sanitation
Wastewater Disposal

OSD11

Type of Sewerage System


Wastewater generated daily (MLD)

0.8

Disposal (underground sewerage) capacity (MLD)

NA

Present operating capacity (MLD)

NA

Households connected to underground sewerage %

NA

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

5.2.1. Existing Sewerage System


Apparently, there is no separate sewerage and storm water system in Khilchipur. Onsite Sewerage
Disposal (OSD) system exists in the town. Disposal of wastewater is being disposed off through soak
pits and septic tank. There are only open roadside gutters for wastewater drainage. The absence of
11

- Open Sewerage Disposal


Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

68

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

sewerage system creates conducive environment for the water-borne diseases exacerbated by
excessive heat during summers.
In most cases, solid waste collected on the roadsides goes into open drains. Due to the lack of proper
sewerage system, water clogging is reported to be commonplace during monsoon in the slum pockets
and old city areas increasing the development of various forms of diseases. Khilchipur has a good
natural slope and therefore most of the rainwater flows into the River. However, many areas in
Khilchipur have been reported to suffer from water clogging conditions especially during the rainy
season. Analyzing the abovementioned facts, it is urgent need to look into matter to avoid any further
delay in commissioning underground sewerage system.

5.2.2. Means of Sewage Disposal


The town has an Onsite Sewerage Disposal (OSD) sewage disposal system. The wastewater is
usually being disposed off through soak pits and septic tank.
There is no provision or wastewater or excreta treatment system for the town. As such, wastewater
and excreta flow through local drains which may simply relocate waste to another part of town
leading to increased water and air pollution as well as breeding of rats, flies, mosquitoes and other
disease-carrying organisms. Not surprisingly, households are primarily concerned only about the
cleanliness of their immediate surroundings yet they are much less worried on environmental impacts
on a broader scale. Appallingly, the absence of treatment plant puts extreme strain on the River GarhGanga as it uninhibitedly absorbs most of wastewater of the town.

5.2.3. Toilet Infrastructure In Khilchipur


Good sanitation habits begin at home as behaviors at the household could largely influence peoples
sanitation practices outside. As such, it is crucial that sanitation facilities be installed at the household
level. In Khilchipur Tehsil (Urban) having 85% sharing of population by Khilchipur Town has only
63% households having bathroom facility within premises and 50% households having toilet facility.
HOUSEHOLD LEVEL
Table 5.14: Number of Toilets and Bathrooms in Khilchipur
Type

No. of Households

% of total Households

Total Households

3565

Bathroom

2246

63.0%

Toilet

1782

50.0%

Source: ULB, Khilchipur


Whereas in Khilchipur, about 97.8% of the households have received improved sanitation facilities by
the beginning of this century either with Septic tank or Soak Pits. Out of the same, 83% are water

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

69

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

borne and about 15% are service. The below table gives details of sanitation facilities available in
Khilchipur.
Table 5.15: Type and number of Sanitation Facilities
Type of Latrines

No. of Households

% of total Households

Water Borne

2894

83%

Service

523

15%

Others

70

2%

Total

3487

97.8

Total Number of HH

3565

Source: Census of India, 2001


PUBLIC LEVEL
Provision of proper sanitation facilities and maintenance of the same for the citizens are critical issues
faced by town civic authorities. Currently, there are about six (6) Pay-and-Use toilets planned by
Nagar Parishad till date. Each public unit has a capacity of 5 toilet seats. Other than the
abovementioned, there are only 6 public urinals, majority of which are non- usable conditions.
Table 5.16: Number of Public Toilets and Urinals
Type

No. of Households

Public Pay & Use Toilets*

6 Nos.

Public Urinals

6 Nos.

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad


*- run by ULB

5.2.4. Wardwise Sanitation Status In Khilchipur


Table given below indicate ward wise sanitation facility in the town.
Table 5.17: Ward Wise Sanitation level in Khilchipur
Ward
No

Ward Name

01

Hanuman Gadh

02

Priyadarsni

03

Vinoba Bhave

04

Dr. Ambedkar

05

Maulana Azad

06

Netaji Bose

07

Jawaharlal Nehru

08

Maharana Pratap

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Nos. of Individual

Open

Nos. of

toilets

Defecation

Public Toilets

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

70

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.17: Ward Wise Sanitation level in Khilchipur


Ward
No

Ward Name

09

Tagore

10

Ahilya Devi

11

Tilak

12

Sanjay

13

Vallabh Patel

14

Mahatma Gandhi

15

Maharani Laxmibai

Nos. of Individual

Open

Nos. of

toilets

Defecation

Public Toilets

Total

12 (Public and Community)

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, 2011


The below shows the availability of individual toilet facility in each ward:
Table 5.18: Ward wise availability of individual toilets
Ward No.

Ward name

Individual toilets available (%)

Hanuman Gadh

4%

Priyadarsni

29%

Vinoba Bhave

20%

Dr. Ambedkar

28%

Maulana Azad

48%

Netaji Bose

77%

Jawaharlal Nehru

34%

Maharana Pratap

60%

Tagore

42%

10

Ahilya Devi

47%

11

Tilak

57%

12

Sanjay

51%

13

Vallabh Patel

29%

14

Mahatma Gandhi

22%

15

Maharani Laxmibai

34%

Source: Sanitation Survey

5.2.5. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future)


For Sewerage
The demand and gaps of Sewerage sector of Current and future is presented in the Table 5.11
considering 80% of supplied water as sewage.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

71

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

As per below table the current (2011) sewage generation is 2.04 MLD which will increase to about
3.30 MLD by 2035. The requirement of sewage treatment plant (STP) is calculated considering that
100% of wastewater should be treated. Construction of sewer line periodically is also calculated in
order to achieve 100% coverage for all the horizon years.
Table 5.19: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Sewerage)
Projected Population

2011

2015

2025

2035

18932

20508

25045

30585

Demand of Sewerage Treatment


i

Demand of Water Supply (MLD)

2.56

2.77

3.38

4.13

ii

Sewage generation - 80% of supplied water


(MLD)

2.04

2.21

2.70

3.30

iii

Existing Sewerage treatment (MLD)

iv

Required treatment plant capacity (MLD)

2.04

2.21

2.70

3.30

Additional
Requirement
Sewerage treatment

0.17

0.49

0.60

(MLD)

For

Demand for Sewer network on Main Road


i

Demand for Sewer network (in KM) On


Main Road

14.20

15.38

18.78

22.94

ii

Existing Sewer network (km)

iii

Gap in Sewer network (km)

14.2

15.4

18.8

22.9

iv.

Additional Requirements Sewer network


(km)

1.2

3.4

4.2

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG


For Sanitation
To fulfill the future demand of Sanitation sector it is necessary to construct 15 Public Pay & Use
Toilets considering 1 for each ward. And about 24 Public urinals needs to be constructed with a
consideration of providing 2 for each ward along with the upgradation of the existing public urinals.
Refer the below table for details.
Table 5.20: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Sanitation)
Projected Population

2011

2015

2025

2035

18932

20508

25045

30585

Demand for Public Pay & Use Toilet @ Ward Level


1

Demand for Public Pay & Use Toilet @ Ward Level

15

15

15

15

Existing Public Pay & Use Toilets

ii

Gap for Public Pay & Use Toilet

iii Additional Public Pay & Use Toilets

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

72

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.20: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Sanitation)
Projected Population

2011

2015

2025

2035

18932

20508

25045

30585

Demand for Construction & Up gradation of Public Urinals


2

Demand for Construction & Up gradation of Public Urinals

30

30

30

30

Existing No. of Public Urinals

ii

Gap

24

24

24

24

iii Additional No. of Public Urinals


Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

5.2.6. Ongoing Sanitation Projects


At present, there is no sanitation project being implemented in Khilchipur town.

5.2.7. Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines


The information of wastewater quantity generated daily is not available by ULB. But according to
UDPFI, 80% of supplied water becomes wastewater. Considering the actual quantity of demanded
water 2.56 MLD, the wastewater generation becomes 2.04 MLD. The same type of estimation has
taken into account in the calculation of future demand of sewage generation.
UDPFI also recommend small and medium town adopt low-cost sanitation technologies with the
technical assistance by the local bodies and involvement of NGOs and plan the extension of regular
sewerage facility. In line with this, it is suggested in this CDP the construction of underground
sewerage system and adoption of low-cost sanitation technologies for sanitation sector.

5.2.8. SWOT Analysis


The table below presents the SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats
analysis) of Sewerage and Sanitation sector.
Table 5.21: SWOT Analysis (Sewerage and Sanitation)
Sector
Sewerage
&
Sanitation

Strengths

Weaknesses

Good
Slope

Natural Absence
of
underground
sewerage system.
Majority of the
households have Open
filed
individual toilets defecation.
either with septic
Environment
tank or soak pits
pollution
and
Further
degradation
of
River
Garh
Ganga.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Opportunities

Threats

Tap
additional Dependency
on
resources and Grants External Grant /
from GoMP and GoI. Aid
Motivation
incentives.

through Routine transfers


of officers and
staff and change
Re-use of treated
in local leadership
sewage and sludge for
hinder
in the
Urban agriculture
continuance of the
Introduction of user Campaign.
fee charges as an
Active
addition to the income
participation and
Low maintenance of ULB
partnerships
of Pay & Use
required at all

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

73

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.21: SWOT Analysis (Sewerage and Sanitation)


Sector

Strengths

Weaknesses

Opportunities

Threats

toilet.

levels.

Lack of proper
sanitation
awareness among
citizens

Groundwater
contamination

5.2.9. Issues
Issues

The town has no sewage treatment plants for the city which is required for its sustained
growth in the long term. Indiscriminate disposal coupled with non-treatment of waste has
resulted in degradation of the Garh Ganga River.

There is an inadequate number of public sanitation facilities

Poor management and maintenance is often a serious problem with community toilet blocks
making the toilets non-usable.

Apparently, there is a lack of awareness about the health and hygiene among the people.

There is currently no collection of Sanitation Tax being done by the ULB which can be used
to improve the overall sanitation scenario of the town.

The ULBs do not have any concrete and reliable information on the sanitation condition to
calculate sanitation demands of the people.

5.2.10. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


(A-1) Goals for Horizon Years (For Sewerage)
The goals and service outcomes for the horizon period 2010-2035 are presented in the below table.
Table 5.22: Goals For Horizon Years (Sewerage)
Sewerage

2011/2012
(Current)

2015

Preparation of 50% Coverage


DPR for quick of House hold
implementation
35% Coverage
of Project
of Waste water

2025
100%
HHs

2035

Coverage

of Review
and
Monitoring
system
with
100% Coverage of
appropriate
Waste
water
benchmarks
Treatment Plant
Treatment Plant
and indicators.
100
%
Revision of ByeRecycling/Reuse
laws for use of
waste water
100 % O & M Cost
Recovery
Training & Capacity

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

74

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.22: Goals For Horizon Years (Sewerage)


Building of staff
Network cover for

--

100%

100%

100%

general households
Treatment
Disposal

and

--

35%

100%

100%

Recycling
Reuse

and

--

--

100%

100%

O & M
recovery
mechanism

cost

--

--

100%

100%

(A-2) Goals for Horizon Years (For Sanitation)


The goals and service outcomes for the horizon period 2010 -2035 are presented in the below table.
Table 5.23: Goals for Horizon Years (Sanitation)
Sanitation

2011/2012
(Current)

2015

Preparation of Implementation
City Sanitation of
City
Plan as per Sanitation Plan
National Urban
Sanitation
Policy 2008

2025

2035

100%
open 100% O & M cost
defecation free recovery
through
town
collecting the user
charges
100% O & M
Cost Recovery
Review
and
Monitoring
system
with
appropriate
benchmarks
and
indicators.

Public Pay & Use


Toilets

33%

33%

100%

100%

Public Urinals

70%

70%

100%

100%

--

--

50%

100%

O & M cost recovery

(B-1) Strategies and Action Plan (For Sewerage)


The section into divided into subgroup i.e. Strategies for Infrastructure Augmentation /
Refurbishments, Strategies for Mobilizing Financial resources and recovery of O & M cost of the
Proposed and existing Infrastructure, Strategies for Resource or Environment Conservation and
strategies for improving urban governance highlighted as Instituting Responsive & Responsible Urban
Governance. The following are outline of the strategies and action plan that are envisaged to be
undertaken for Khilchipur Town in order to achieve the Vision and Goals.
Table 5.24: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur
Infrastructure
Provision of underground sewerage network
Augmentation /
Provision of sewerage treatment plant (STP)
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

75

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.24: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur


Refurbishment
Mobilization of
Financial
Resources and
O & M Cost
Recovery
Mechanism

- Public Private Partnership (PPP)


The O&M of pumping stations and STPs through a service or management
contract with the private sector who would be solely responsible for the O & M of
the system, based on an agreed annual fee, with built-in incentives for improved
performance.
The sewerage system should be implemented through innovative financial
structuring, involving public, private and consumer participation.
- Operation & Maintenance Plan.
The O & M Plan shall include both system maintenance, on a regular basis, and
an emergency maintenance plan. System maintenance shall include routine
maintenance, corrective maintenance & preventive maintenance. In addition to
preventive maintenance with the existing staff, unbundling of O&M operations
shall be adopted to ensure private sector participation.
- Tariff Revision
At present there is no tariff for the underground sewerage connection. It is
necessary to collect the connection charges and monthly tariff from the
beneficiaries. This however needs an effective Political Will.
- Bringing System Efficiency
Maximize the use of existing and future infrastructure to the fullest for sustaining
the system.

Resource
Environment
Conservation

/ - Waste Water Treatment and Reuse (Optional Reform proposed in CDP)


With systems available for treating the waste water on the economical basis and
recycling it, especially in private colonies, hotels, hospitals, commercial and
institutional establishments, this practice can pay dividends.
Where ever septic tank overflows are discharged into drains or sewer lines, the
same can be diverted for recycling since, septic tank overflows have low BOD and
suspended solids, recycling of waste water can be a very viable option in such
areas.
The recycled water can be used for parks, gardens, horticulture, floor washing,
toilet flushing, road and parking lot washing etc. In some of the areas, even the
treated waste water from municipal sewage treatment plants can be further
treated at economical cost safely to supply water for agriculture, parks, gardens,
road and floor washing, toilet flushing in big commercial and institutional
establishments etc. This will entail a direct saving to the consumer of water and a
direct saving to the municipality, which continuously struggles to find or locate
new sources of water to meet the growing demands of the city population.
- Segregation:
Segregation of sewers from the drains to avoid contamination of drains.
- Prevention:
Prevention of entering municipal solid waste and silt in the sewer line.
- Regular sewer cleaning:
Adopt suitable methodology depending location and condition of Nallahs and
drains.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

76

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.24: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur


- IEC activities
Awareness programs on health hygiene, environmental impacts, institutional
restructuring and capacity building measures should be adopted for creating
awareness among the people for environment Conservation.
Instituting
Responsive
Responsible
Urban
Governance

&

- Creation of Database of the existing sewerage


A detailed inventory of the system can be documented periodically by the technical
staff of the ULB to update the state of the system.
- Institutional Strengthening and Capacity Building
Recruitment of trained engineering personnel for management of sewer works is
an important issue confronting the Public Works Department. It is also important
to keep them technically updated. It is necessary that periodic training should be
imparted to the operations staff of the PWD.
- System Maintenance Plan
A system maintenance plan involving the components of routine, corrective and
preventive maintenance shall be prepared.
- Improve and ensure:
Access to sanitary services for the urban poor and slum dwellers.

[The above strategies and action plan are co-related various chapters and sections on the City
Investment Plan, Financial Operating Plan, Institutional Frameworks and Summary of Strategies
mentioned in the report]
(B-2) Strategies and Action Plan (For Sanitation)
The section into divided into subgroup i.e. Strategies for Infrastructure Augmentation /
Refurbishments, Strategies for Mobilizing Financial resources and recovery of O & M cost of the
Proposed and existing Infrastructure, Strategies for Resource or Environment Conservation and
strategies for improving urban governance highlighted as Instituting Responsive & Responsible Urban
Governance. The following are outline of the strategies and action plan that are envisaged to be
undertaken for Khilchipur Town in order to achieve the Vision and Goals.
Table 5.25: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur
Infrastructure
Provision of Public Pay and Use Toilets
Augmentation /
Provision and Upgradation of Public Urinals
Refurbishment
Preparation of City Sanitation Plan
Evaluation Study and Rapid Impact Assessment
Mobilization of This is covered vide preparation of City Sanitation Plan. Refer Box No. 1 for
Financial
information on the scheme and the expected coverage.
Resources and
O & M Cost
Recovery
Mechanism
Resource
Environment

/ This is covered vide preparation of City Sanitation Plan. Refer Box No. 1 for
information on the scheme and the expected coverage.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

77

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.25: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur


Conservation
Instituting
Responsive
Responsible
Urban
Governance

This is covered vide preparation of City Sanitation Plan. Refer Box No. 1 for
& information on the scheme and the expected coverage.

[The above strategies and action plan are co-related various chapters and sections on the City
Investment Plan, Financial Operating Plan, Institutional Frameworks and Summary of Strategies
mentioned in the report]
Box No. 1: Preparation of City Sanitation Plan
The institutional arrangements provided in the National Urban Sanitation Policy, MoUD-GoI
encourages the ULBs to come up with a City Sanitation Plan involving multiple stakeholders of the
city. The following are the expected benefits from preparation of CITY SANITATION PLAN, if
prepared. The outcomes of Preparation of CITY SANITATION PLAN is as under:
-Setting Up City Sanitation Task Force
Mobilize Stakeholders: The first step in making the cities 100% sanitized is to elevate the
consciousness about sanitation in the mind of municipal agencies, government agencies and most
importantly, amongst the people of the city.
Constitute a multi-stakeholder City Sanitation Task Force comprising representatives from
Agencies directly responsible for sanitation including on-site sanitation, sewerage, water supply,
solid waste, drainage, etc including the different divisions and departments of the ULB, PHED, etc;
Agencies indirectly involved in or impacted by sanitation conditions including representatives from
the civil society, colonies, slum areas, apartment buildings, etc,
Eminent persons and practitioners in civic affairs, health, urban poverty,
Representatives from shops and establishments,
Representatives of other large institutions in the city (e.g. Cantonment Boards, Govt. of India or State
Govt. Enterprise campuses, etc.),
NGOs working on water and sanitation, urban development and slums, health and environment,
Representatives of unions of safai karamcharis, sewerage sanitary workers, recycling agents /
kabaris, etc
Representatives from private firms/contractors formally or informally working in the sanitation sector
(e.g. garbage collectors, septic tank de-sludging firms etc.)
Representatives from educational and cultural institutions
Any other significant or interested stakeholders some of the elected Members of the ULB must be
members of the Task Force.
One of the things to be considered by the Task Force is to organize a multi-stakeholder, multi-party
meeting in the preparatory stage, and take a formal resolution to make the city 100% Sanitized, and
publicize the same, with all signatories.
The City Sanitation Task Force will be responsible for
Launching the City 100% Sanitation Campaign
Generating awareness amongst the citys citizens and stakeholders

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

78

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Approving materials and progress reports provided by the implementing agency, other public
agencies, as well as NGOs and private parties contracted by the Implementing Agency, for different
aspects of implementation (see below)
Approving the City Sanitation Plan for the city prepared by the Sanitation Implementation Agency
after consultations with citizens
Undertaking field visits from time to time to supervise progress
Issue briefings to the press / media and state government about progress
Providing overall guidance to the Implementation Agency
Recommend to the ULB fixing of responsibilities for city-wide sanitation on a permanent basis
- Assign Institutional Responsibilities
One of the key gaps in urban sanitation is lack of clear and complementary institutional
responsibilities. This comprises two aspects: a) roles and responsibilities institutionalized on a
permanent basis; and b) roles and responsibilities for the immediate campaign, planning and
implementation of the Citys Sanitation Plan based on which the former can be outlined,
experimented with, and finally institutionalized. The Sanitation Task Force will recommend the
assigning of permanent responsibilities for city-wide sanitation to the ULB including the following
aspects:
The ULB to have final overall responsibility for city-wide sanitation, including devolving power,
functions, functionaries and funds to them
Planning and Financing including State Government and Govt. of India schemes
Asset creation including improvement, augmentation
Operations and Management (O&M) Arrangements for all network, on-site, individual, community
and public sanitation facilities and systems (including transportation up to final treatment and
disposal of wastes)
Fixing tariffs and revenue collections in order to make O&M sustainable
Improving access and instituting special O&M arrangements for the urban poor and un-served
populations in slum areas and in mixed areas
Adopting standards for
Environment Outcomes (e.g. State Pollution Control Board standards on effluent parameters),
Public Health Outcomes (e.g. State Health Departments),
Processes (e.g. safe disposal of on-site septage) and o Infrastructure (e.g. design standards) (PHEDs/
Parastatals ), and
Service Delivery standards (e.g. by Urban Development departments)
Adoption of Regulatory roles including environmental standards (e.g. State Pollution Control
Boards), health outcomes (e.g. Health Departments).
Measures in case specific stakeholders do not discharge their responsibilities properly
Training and Capacity Building of implementing agency and related personnel
Monitoring of 100% Sanitation involving multiple stakeholders
(Source: NATIONAL URBAN SANITATION POLICY-2008 Ministry of Urban Development
Government of India)
It is imperative for the town to prepare City Sanitation Plan as soon as possible

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

79

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

R E P O R T

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

80

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.3. Solid Waste Management In Khilchipur


Municipal Solid Waste Management is a part of public health and sanitation, and is entrusted to the
municipal government for execution. Presently, the systems are assuming larger importance due to
population explosion in municipal areas, legal intervention, emergence of newer technologies, and
rising public awareness towards cleanliness. Although SWM systems exist in Khilchipur town since
few years back, SWM has remained a major environmental issue until now. Looking into the normal
institutional setup, SWM responsibility is devolved to a health officer who is assisted by the
engineering department in the transportation work. The activity is undeniably labor intensive and in
most instances daunting as there are only 2-3 workers assigned per 1000 residents whose needs are
ever growing and changing.

5.3.1. Quantity of Waste Generated


The per capita of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) generated daily, in Khilchipur is about 250 grams.
Below table shows that a total of about 4.8 MT waste per day is generated in Khilchipur town.
Residential (55%) and Commercial Wastes (25%) (i.e. Shops and Hotels) accounted for 80% of the
total solid waste generated in Khilchipur which constitutes major source of Solid Waste generation.
Followed by Waste produced by Vegetable Markets (10%) and others (10%).
The level of vegetable waste is also very high in the town due to daily and weekly markets coming
from different regions surrounding the town.
Table 5.26: Quantity of Solid Waste Generated
Area

MT/ Day

% share of the total

Residential

2.64

55.00%

Shops and Hotels

1.2

25.00%

Vegetable Market

0.48

10.00%

Others

0.48

10.00%

Total

4.8

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

5.3.2. Constituents of Municipal Waste


Characterization studies carried out by Khilchipur Nagar Parishad in (2004) indicate that MSW
contains large organic fraction (48%) which includes mostly inert such as ash and fine earth, paper
(3.82%), along with plastic, glass and metal (0.45%). The percentage of unclassifiable constituents
(ash, wood, earth, etc.) in of the town was as high as 45.38%.
Table 5.27: Constituents of Municipal Waste
Constituents

% Share

Organic Waste

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

47.96%

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

81

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.27: Constituents of Municipal Waste


Constituents

% Share

Paper

3.82%

Plastic /Rubber

2.46%

Glass

0.06%

Metal

0.31%

Others

45.38%

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad


Table 5.28: Wardwise Generation of Solid waste IN Khilchipur
Ward
NO

Ward Name

Nos. of

Waste

Nos. of

HH

Generation (MT/Day)

Dustbins

01

Hanuman Gadh

220

0.27

02

Priyadarsni

273

0.28

03

Vinoba Bhave

262

0.31

04

Dr. Ambedkar

519

0.50

05

Maulana Azad

166

0.22

06

Netaji Bose

170

0.23

07

Jawaharlal Nehru

131

0.19

08

Maharana Pratap

117

0.17

09

Tagore

121

0.17

10

Ahilya Devi

283

0.39

11

Tilak

124

0.18

12

Sanjay

123

0.16

13

Vallabh Patel

116

0.14

14

Mahatma Gandhi

578

1.00

15

Maharani Laxmibai

361

0.52

Total

3565

4.73

24

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, 2011

5.3.3. Current Practices of Solid Waste Management


A) Waste Storage & Segregation
Containers used for household storage of solid wastes come in many forms and are fabricated from a
variety of materials. The type of the container generally reflects the economic status of its user (i.e.,
the waste generator). Generally at households the waste generated is accumulated in small containers
(often plastic buckets) until such time, that there is sufficient quantity to warrant disposal into
community bins.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

82

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Waste segregation at source is not practiced in Khilchipur. Waste segregation at source is crucial to
final treatment of waste, recycling and energy conversion considerations. Commercial sector like
restaurants, offices, hotels and the like all use the community waste bins and their wastes are also
collected along with the household wastes.
B) Primary and Secondary Collection
The collection bins and other containers used in various cities are not properly designed. It has been
observed that community bins have not been installed at proper locations resulting in poor collection
efficiency. As most of the people in Khilchipur live in slums and subsist under very poor conditions,
low level of public awareness on sanitation practices has exacerbated the situation.
Moreover, various types of vehicles are used for transportation of waste to the disposal sites.
However, sometimes these vehicles are not designed as per requirement and preventive maintenance
system is not adopted consequently reducing the lifetime of equipment for transportation. In many
urban centers, vehicles are not provided with proper garage that would protect them from heat and
rain. Inevitably, many of the vehicles used for transportation of waste have passed their life.
The below table shows the current collection practice in the town of Khilchipur. It is dismaying to
know that waste collected from half of the wards is simply dumped on roads while the waste from the
other half of the wards is usually dumped near residence areas and big establishments like a school or
a hospital.
Table 5.29: Collection of Solid Waste Management
Ward No.

No. of Bins

Ganesh Chowk

Mataji Gali

Biraja Moholla

Harijan Colony

Gandibala Bazzar

Khuti kundi

near River

Peepli Bazzar

Palace road

10

Puri Khandi Pole

11

Gopal Soni Gali

12

Badi Gali

13

Kayastha Moholla

14

Gayatri Colony

15

Pali puri, Bus stand

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Dumping location

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

83

Number of Employees

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.29: Collection of Solid Waste Management


Ward No.

No. of Bins

Total

24

Dumping location

Number of Employees
38

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad


The below table shows the availability of ward wise availability of solid waste collection facility
Table 5.30: Ward wise Solid Waste Management facility
Ward
No.

Ward name

Households who
are throwing
waste outside
(%)

Unavailability of a
place fixed by Nagar
Parishad to throw the
waste in ward (%)

Households who are


throwing waste
(generated by animal
husbandary) outside
(%)

Hanuman Gadh

93%

99%

11%

Priyadarsni

78%

28%

2%

Vinoba Bhave

100%

2%

0%

Dr. Ambedkar

96%

4%

3%

Maulana Azad

94%

5%

33%

Netaji Bose

60%

2%

0%

Jawaharlal Nehru

58%

3%

0%

Maharana Pratap

68%

6%

0%

Tagore

79%

12%

4%

10

Ahilya Devi

73%

1%

0%

11

Tilak

68%

77%

12%

12

Sanjay

92%

94%

0%

13

Vallabh Patel

87%

100%

0%

14

Mahatma Gandhi

60%

96%

0%

15

Maharani Laxmibai

58%

95%

0%

C) Processing and Disposal


The disposal sites in Khilchipur are selected on the basis of their proximity to the collection areas and
new disposal sites are normally identified only when the existing ones are completely filled. The
waste is simply dumped at such sites and bulldozers are rarely used for compaction at the disposal
site. Due to the paucity of land, it is necessary for the civic authorities to install solid waste treatment
and processing systems and implement massive recycling wherever possible. Most of the disposal
sites are unfenced and the waste picking is commonly in vogue, posing problems in the operation of
the sites.
Open firing of MSW at disposal sites is most common for reducing the volume of wastes and also for
easy rag-picking. However, open firing produces gases which may be harmful to the atmosphere
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

84

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

especially that these gases are not properly contained. As such, it is important that energy-efficient
technologies be installed to properly process solid waste and control release of harmful gases.
Details of Existing Trenching Ground of ULB
D) Reuse and Recycling
There is no waste reusing or recycling technology being used in Khilchipur.

5.3.4. Vehicles for Solid Waste Collection and Transportation


Different types of vehicles owned by the ULB are used for waste transportation as shown in below
table. At present, the total number of such vehicles is enough to collect and to transport the amount of
waste generated. The estimation of solid waste collection daily is 3.36 MT/day.
The solid waste is collected in one shift, in morning (from 5 to 9 AM).
Table 5.31: Vehicles for SWM, Khilchipur (M)
Type of Vehicle

Nos.

Trips

Capacity (ton)

Tractor

Trolley

215

--

Hand carriage
JCB
Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

5.3.5. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future)


The below table depicts the demand and gaps for SWM Sector. The current generation of solid waste
per capita is 250 grams and which will remain same as 250 grams by 2035 considering the standard
norms prescribed by the Solid Waste Management Manual issued by Ministry of Urban Development,
Govt. of India.
As per the table, the solid waste generation per day is 4.73 MT which will reach 7.65 MT by 2035. It
means an increase of almost 200% in generation. The current practices require installation of
additional collection capacity, but by 2035 additional resources need to be allocated for assuring the
100% collection Capacity.
One well-organized Door to Door Collection system requires to be implemented immediately for
covering 100% of households under the system. The household needs to be supplied with bins.
Considering the existing modes of transportation of Solid waste, additional tricycles and tractors
needs to be purchased in order to achieve 100% collection efficiency.
50% of solid waste generated which is organic by nature is compostable and the rejects i.e. Noncompostable should be treated by providing a scientifically landfill site with a dumping capacity of

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

85

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

about 2.68 MT by 2035. This estimation is made considering that 35% of waste generated in the
period 2015-2035 goes to landfill disposal. The entire picture can be summarized in the table below:
Table 5.32: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Solid Waste Management)
2011

2015

2025

2035

Projected Population

18932

20508

25045

30585

Estimated number of HH - @ 5.32 size

3565

3862

4716

5759

Solid Waste Generation


i

Solid Waste Generation Per capita (grams)

250

250

250

250

ii

Solid Waste Generation per day (MT)

4.73

5.13

6.26

7.65

iii

Solid Waste Collection Capacity per day (MT)

3.36

3.36

3.36

3.36

iv

Gap Solid Waste Collection per day (MT)

1.37

1.77

2.90

4.29

Additional Requirement
Collection per day (MT)

0.39

1.13

1.39

3565

3,862

4,716

5,759

in

Solid

Waste

Solid Waste Collection


i

Gap for Door to Door Collection (Nos)

ii

Additional Requirement in Door to Door


Collection (Nos)

--

297

854

1,043

iii

Gap of tricycles (Nos)

15

30

30

iv

Additional Requirement in number of tricycle


(Nos)
1

Solid Waste Transportation


i

Gap of tractors (Nos)

--

ii

Additional Requirement in number of tractors


(Nos)
Solid Waste Treatment and Disposal

Compostable Waste -@ 50% waste generated per


day (MT)

2.37

2.56

3.13

3.82

ii

Additional Requirement in Compostable Waste


(MT)

--

0.20

0.57

0.69

iii

Scientifically reengineered landfill (MT)

605

2620

11998

24421

iv

Additional
Requirement
reengineered landfill (MT)

--

2,015

9,378

12,423

in

Scientifically

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

5.3.6. Comparative Analysis with the UDPFI, CPHEEO Guidelines


As mentioned before, the per capita waste generated per day is 250 grams which is relatively low
compared to the UDPFI guideline reference, 200-250 grams for small towns. The manual for solid
waste management issued by Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India also recommends
the UDPFI guidelines. Both the guidelines are compared and realistic figures are taken for calculation.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

86

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.3.7. SWOT Analysis


Below table presents the SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis) of
Solid Waste Management sector.
Table 5.33: SWOT analysis (Solid Waste Management)
Sector

Strengths

Weaknesses

Solid
Waste Desire of citizens Lack of solid waste
Management
for a clean city.
management
facilities
(for
Good
Political
treatment
and
Will
and
disposal) in the city
Leadership
leading
to
Availability
of indiscriminate
workforce
for dumping of garbage
managing
the and land pollution.
sector
is
Shortage of vehicles
abundant.
for waste collection
Spatial pattern of
No
Practices
of
the town makes
Waste segregation.
possible
to
implement
and Existing
dumping
work the system sites are saturated
efficiently.
and no new ones
have been developed

Opportunities

Threats

Introduction
PPP

of Degradation of
Urban
Environment
Vermi-composting
and quality of
for Treatment of
Life.
SWM
for
generation
of
employment and
revenue
opportunities.

No
reuse
and
recycling mechanism
adopted

5.3.8. Issues
Other Issues

One of the main issues in Khilchipur is the indiscriminate disposal of waste near the river
Garh Ganga which has led to the contamination of the river over time

SWM needs of the town require immediate and urgent attention since most of the people (6
out of 15 wards) live in slums where conditions are unimaginable.

Investments for proper waste collection system as well as disposal of solid waste into
scientifically designed landfill site coupled with sophisticated waste treatment is necessary to
ensure the safety and wellbeing of the town and majority of its people. Waste should be
segregated at source so that waste can be disposed and treated accordingly.

The indiscriminate disposal of waste near the river Garh Ganga has led to the contamination
of the river. Also the dumping of waste in low lying areas has become extensive.

Practicing of open firing of garbage in the dumping sites.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

87

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Lack of treatment technology (composting, vermiculture, etc.), reuse and recycling, and
scientific landfill.

5.3.9 City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


A) Goals for Horizon Years
The goals and service outcomes for the horizon period 2010-2035 are presented in the below table.
Table 5.34: Goals for Horizon Years (Solid Waste Management)
2011/2012
(Current)

2015

2025

2035

100%
- Enforcement of Segregation
at
MSWM Rules, Source,
- Reviewing and
Solid
Waste
2000
Transportation,
restructuring of
Management
Treatment
&
DPR in line
Disposal Facility
with CDP
-100 % Door to
Door Collection - 100% O & M
cost recovery
Total
Waste
generated per day

- Enhancing PPP
Review and
Monitoring
system
with
appropriate
benchmarks and
indicators.

4.73

5.13

6.26

7.65

--

100%

100%

100%

Source Segregation
Collection

--

50%

100%

100%

Scientific Disposal
and Treatment

--

--

100%

100%

O & M
Recovery
Mechanism

--

30%

100%

100%

Door
to
Collection

Door

Cost

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG


B) Strategies and Action Plan
The section into divided into subgroup i.e. Strategies for Infrastructure Augmentation /
Refurbishments, Strategies for Mobilizing Financial resources and recovery of O & M cost of the
Proposed and existing Infrastructure, Strategies for Resource or Environment Conservation and
strategies for improving urban governance highlighted as Instituting Responsive & Responsible Urban
Governance. The following are outline of the strategies and action plan that are envisaged to be
undertaken for Khilchipur Town in order to achieve the Vision and Goals.
Table 5.35: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur
Infrastructure
Implementation of Door to Door collection System.
Augmentation /
Provision of Two system Publics Bins at ward Level at public places.
Refurbishment
Street sweeping on daily basis.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

88

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.35: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur


Introduction Multi-bin carts Tricycles.
Provision of tractor for increasing the transportation capacity.
Encouraging local level aerobic vermin composting.
Mobilization of
Financial
Resources and
O & M Cost
Recovery
Mechanism

- Private Sector Participation


Private sector participation may be considered in newly developed areas,
underserved areas and particularly in the areas where local bodies have not been
providing service through their own labour force. Some of the examples of the
areas where private sector participation can be considered are as under:
Door to door collection of domestic waste, door to door collection of commercial
waste, door to door collection of hospital waste, hotel waste, construction waste,
market waste, setting up and operation and maintenance of waste disposal facility,
setting up and operation and maintenance of waste treatment plants, supplying
vehicles on rent, supplying vehicles on lease, repairs and maintenance of vehicles
at a private garage, transportation of waste on contractual basis, etc.
- Levy of Sanitation Tax to Meet & Cost of SWM Services
The urban local body should impose adequate sanitation tax to cover the cost of
SWM services. Whereas efforts should be made to effect cost recovery from the
beneficiaries who get doorstep service, the shortfall of funds should be made good
from general sanitation tax, which should be adequately imposed, as a matter of
policy by the urban local bodies.

Resource
Environment
Conservation

/ - Promote "Reduce, Re-use and Re-cycle (R-R-R)" of Waste


- Mass Education
The communication material developed should be utilised in public awareness
programmes through variety of approaches as under.
Attractive posters with good photographs and messages with a very few words,
readable from a distance, should be prepared and displayed in various parts of the
city where awareness campaign is being taken up.
Pamphlets, hand bills can be printed giving instructions in very simple and
understandable language showing photographs in action and circulated in the
community requesting public participation.
Special hoarding may be put at strategic locations in the city carrying messages
seeking public participation. Alternatively, all Municipal-licensed hoarding
should have a space reserved at the bottom for civic messages. Such messages
should be developed and painted by professional agencies. These hoarding should
also carry the contact numbers etc.
- Community Participation
People's Participation is Essential in the Following Areas
Reduce, Reuse & Recycling (R R R) of waste.
Not to throw the waste/litter on the streets, drains, open spaces, water bodies, etc.
Storage of organic/bio-degradable and recyclable waste separately at source.
Primary collection of waste
Community storage/collection of waste in flats, multi-storied buildings, societies,
commercial complexes, etc.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

89

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.35: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur


Managing excreta of pet dogs and cats appropriately.
Waste processing/disposal at a community level (optional)
Pay adequately for the services provided.
- Encouragement to NGOs and Waste Collector Cooperatives
NGOs may fully involved in creating public awareness and encouraging public
participation in SWM planning and practice. The local body may also encourage
NGOs or co-operative of rag pickers to enter this field and organise rag pickers in
doorstep collection of waste and provide them an opportunity to improve their
working conditions and income. The local body can give incentives to NGOs in
their effort of organising rag pickers in primary collection of recyclable and/or
organic waste, and provide financial and logistic support to the extent possible.
Instituting
Responsive
Responsible
Urban
Governance

Implementation of Municipal Solid Waste (Management & Handling) Rules-2000


& of Government of India (Mandatory)
ULBs should increase the service levels to meet the norms recommended by Solid
Waste Handling Rules, 2000. For this it is advisable to carry out impact
assessment studies periodically.
- Decentralization of Administration
The ward level administration should be fully responsible for ensuring storage of
segregated waste at source, primary collection of waste, street sweeping and
taking the waste to waste storage depots, clearing debris and cleaning surface
drains and public spaces. The cleaning of each street, lane, by-lane, markets and
public space should be regularly supervised by the ward-level supervisors. The
presence of all SWM officers in the field during morning hours is most essential. A
grievance redressal system of the Ward should be put in place in each ward.

[The above strategies and action plan are co-related various chapters and sections on the City
Investment Plan, Financial Operating Plan, Institutional Frameworks and Summary of Strategies
mentioned in the report]

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

90

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

R E P O R T

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

91

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.4. Existing Drainage Condition In Khilchipur


5.4.1. Existing Drainage System
The town is primarily drained by the river Garh Ganga together with other bodies of water traversing
the area which consequently help in denuding the surface during rains. The length of river flowing in
the city area is about 3 km and it flows from southwest to northeast direction which actually cuts the
urban development in two parts.
The city of Khilchipur was planned to follow the natural drainage pattern and interconnected lakes
were built to collect the water for ground water recharge and city water requirements, with the
overflow reaching River Garh Ganga. However, the modern development of towns has ignored this
ancient practice and as such has led to serious issues.
The existing drainage system is formed only with open drains and it was designed for a rainfall of 12
mm/hr whereas average intensity is 23 and peak is 52 mm/hr. The sewerage and storm water drainage
systems are connected and about 25% to 30% of the sewage is drained into storm water drains (Open
drain).
The below table illustrates the number of households which has been provided with drainage network.
The open drainage covers about 65% of the major roads although due to the poor capacity of the
drainage system, water clogging has been reported during monsoon in the slum pockets and near the
water bodies of the town. The situation contributes to increasing risks of flooding and development of
various forms of diseases.
Table 5.36: Number of Household provided with drainage facility, Khilchipur Tehsil *, (Urban)
2001
No. of HH
Total Households

3565

Drainage Facility

2510 (70.42%)

Bathroom

2253 63.20%

Source: ULB Khilchipur

5.4.2. Major Water Bodies


Apart from the Garh Ganga River there are no other water bodies (lakes & Ponds) present in
Khilchipur.

5.4.3. Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Drains


At present, the existing length of primary drains is 10 km and of secondary drains is 3 km. As
mentioned before, the drainage system does not cover the entire town.
Table 5.37: Drainage Network
No.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Type of Drain

Existing length (in km)

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

92

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.37: Drainage Network


No.

Type of Drain

Existing length (in km)

Primary Drains

10.00

ii

Secondary Drains

3.00

Source: Khilchipur Naga Parishad

5.4.4. Flood Prone Areas


The whole town lies in the flood prone areas but the problem becomes severe during rainy season in
the inner core part where the rainwater is not able to drain immediately. This problem results in
unhealthy environment and diseases for several days.

5.4.5. Flooding In Catchment Area Of Major Nallah


The total length of Nallahs is 1.5, being 1.00 km major Nallahs and 0.50 km other Nallahs. The
following table highlights the area covered by the Nallah.
Table 5.38: Existing nallahs
No.

Nallahs

Existing length

Catchment Area Covered (in %)

Major Nallahs

1.00 km

5%

ii

Other Nallahs

0.50 km

2%

Source: Khilchipur Naga Parishad

5.4.6. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future)


The below table presents the requirement for provision of additional drain as well as Up gradation of
existing drains. The present demand (2011) of constructing the drainage network is 6.5 km and for
2035 the estimated demand is 7.4 km. whereas the existing network is only 4.5 km; the total gap
during the horizon period is 6.9 km.
Table 5.39: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Drainage)
Projected Population

2011

2015

2025

2035

18932

20508

25045

30585

Demand for Drainage on Main Road


i

Demand for Drainage on main road


(km)

ii

14.2

15.4

18.8

22.9

Existing Drainage Network (km)

10

10

10

10

iii

Gap in Drainage Network (km)

4.2

5.4

8.8

12.9

iv

Additional
Requirements
Drainage Network (km)

1.2

3.4

4.2

--

--

for
Upgradation of Drainage

De-silting and Alignment of major


drains

--

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG


Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

93

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.4.7. Comparative Analysis With The UDPFI, CPHEEO guidelines


There are no guidelines for the sector, but the calculations are made on the basis of experience of
other cities of the same sizes.

5.4.8. SWOT Analysis


Below table presents the SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis) of
Drainage sector.
Table 5.40: SWOT Analysis (Drainage)
Sector

Strengths

Weaknesses

Drainage

Adequate
natural
gradients available
for achieving self
cleansing velocities
for
open
and
underground
drainage

Opportunities

Threats

No
separated DPR has already been
sewage
and prepared
storm
water
Willingness
of
the
drains
stakeholders to bring
Poor
about positive change in
maintenance of the system and ready to
drains
bear
some
of
its
responsibility
Clogging
of
drains due to
indiscriminate
disposal of solid
waste
Violation
of
natural drainage
patterns

Reduction
in
groundwater
recharge
Disappearance
of lakes and
Nallahs.
Degradation of
River
Garh
Ganga
Water logging
on roads and
flash floods

5.4.9. Issues
The main concerns with storm water in the Towns are:

Infrastructure development has been irrespective of the natural drainage pattern

Land use planning and permissions have not been in tune with natural drainage patterns

Illegal encroachment of lakes has become rampant

The existing drainage system that covers only 10% of the town is designed for a rainfall of 12
mm/hr whereas average intensity is 23 and peak is 52 mm/hr.

Storm water drains are also used for sewage and solid waste disposal.

In addition to an already inadequate system, residents, commercial establishments and


institutions use storm water drains not just for sewage disposal but also to dispose solid waste.
In fact, 25 to 30% of the sewage is drained into storm water drains

Also, regular maintenance of the storm water drains that involves de-silting and de-clogging
is not effectively undertaken.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

94

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Consequently, this has resulted in

Immense reduction in ground water recharge

Disappearance of lakes and nallahs which were part of an existing sustainable storm water
management system for the city.

Clogging of drains due to indiscriminate disposal of solid waste

Untreated storm water and sewage drained into River Garh Ganga and similar lakes has led to
very high pollution levels of not just these water bodies but also ground water contaminating
the resource and posing serious risks to human health

Water logging on roads and flash floods in low lying areas has become common in monsoon
season leading to rapid spread of diseases.

5.4.10. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


(A) Goals for Horizon Years
The goals and service outcomes for the horizon period 2010-2035 are presented in the below table;
Table 5.41: Goals for Horizon Years (Drainage)
Drainage

2011/2012
(Current)
- Reviewing and
restructuring of
DPR in line with
CDP

Storm Water Drain


Coverage (% of road
length)

2015

2025

2035

- Construction 100%
and alignment Coverage
of
of
existing Area
Nallahs/
Drains
- Training and
capacity
building

Review
and
Monitoring system
with appropriate
benchmarks and
indicators.

65%

100%

100%

100%

of

--

100%

100%

100%

O & M cost recovery


mechanism

--

--

--

100%

Rehabilitation
Existing Drains

(B) Strategies and Action Plan


The section into divided into subgroup i.e. Strategies for Infrastructure Augmentation /
Refurbishments, Strategies for Mobilizing Financial resources and recovery of O & M cost of the
Proposed and existing Infrastructure, Strategies for Resource or Environment Conservation and
strategies for improving urban governance highlighted as Instituting Responsive & Responsible Urban

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

95

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Governance. The following are outline of the strategies and action plan that are envisaged to be
undertaken for Khilchipur Town in order to achieve the Vision and Goals.
Table 5.42: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur
Infrastructure
Preparation of Storm water Master Plan
Augmentation /
Storm Water Network Augmentation
Refurbishment
De-silting and Alignment of Existing Major Drains
Mobilization of
Financial
Resources and
O & M Cost
Recovery
Mechanism

Resource
Environment
Conservation

- Preparation of Storm water Master Plan


Detailed study of the existing city drainage system and preparation of drainage
master plan for upgrading should be carried out by the ULB.
- Operation & Maintenance Plan
Adoption of an O&M Schedule for works varying from Drain Cleaning to
Desilting, including options of using the private sector for O&M (e.g. management
contract).

/ - Interconnection between Drainage


The leading/connections between secondary and tertiary drains to primary drains
have to be improved and strengthened. The interrelation between water bodies
shall be established, at least for the existing ones, so as to treat them as a whole
system, which can be reconnected to the surface water drainage to form water
chains for rainwater harvesting.
- Conservation of Drains
The primary drains have to be conserved and shall be used as effective carriers of
storm water. The secondary and tertiary drains, mostly consisting of the road side
drains ought to be provided for all the major arterials and lined not only to drain
storm water but also to preserve the condition of the road surface.

Instituting
Responsive
Responsible
Urban
Governance

&

- Monitoring of water quality parameters


It shall be conducted on a regular basis. PWD shall take up the responsibility of
monitoring the parameters in the water bodies within its jurisdiction and shall
take preventive measures, if the results are above the permissible limits.
- Eviction and Rehabilitation of Encroachment
The canal is encroached in a number of places along its stretch. Removal of
encroachments and providing resettlement / rehabilitation as required, to
maintain the canal width.

[The above strategies and action plan are co-related various chapters and sections on the City
Investment Plan, Financial Operating Plan, Institutional Frameworks and Summary of Strategies
mentioned in the report]

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

96

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

R E P O R T

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

97

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.5. Existing Traffic And Transportation In Khilchipur


5.5.1. Existing Traffic & Transportation Scenario
Traffic on the roads has been one of the key transportation problems of any growing town or city. The
town of Khilchipur is no exception to this. Investigation into the existing traffic scenario of the town
provides insights on how well the local government is coping with and managing the growing
population and increased economic activities.
The link between transportation and the development of Khilchipur is strong and interesting. It is
because the town was primarily developed due of its location between Biora-Kota National Highway.
Inevitably, this is also the same reason why the town is facing heavy traffic and other transportation
problems.
The town can only be reached by road since there is no direct railway station to the town, the nearest
one is 45 km away (Biaora). As such, the roads are important to the town as provide service to a
number of buses, trucks and other forms of land vehicles for domestic and commercial purposes.
Additionally, as agriculture is a major economy of Khilchipur, a considerable number of trucks pass
the roads for transport of agricultural crops and goods. Naturally, the pressure on roads is immense
especially on the two major roads of Khilchipur, the Biora-Kota National Highway (NH12) and
Zirapur road.

5.5.2. Vehicle Population


Most of vehicles are buses, tractors, scooters, jeeps and cars. But there is no availability of data at city
level.
Table 5.43: Details of Vehicles IN Khilchipur
Types of Vehicles

Numbers

2 wheelers

2203

3 wheelers (Tanga)

24

4 wheelers

158

Truck

--

Bus

--

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, 2011

5.5.3. Agencies in Traffic & Transportation


There are buses by the state government as well as private agencies.

5.5.4. Travel Characteristics


The predominant mode of travel (motorized) in town is two-wheelers and private transport. A major
working population uses private transport for their workplace which is definitely not a good indication

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

98

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

for the future traffic management proposals. About 70 buses enter Khilchipur per day, 20 of which are
of Biora-Kota route. There are also a large number of taxis passing by daily.

5.5.5. Public Transport


State-transport as well as privately owned buses runs throughout Madhya Pradesh. Options, in the
form of local buses, semi-deluxe buses, deluxe buses etc, are available for commuting from one city
to the other. Most of these buses run on a daily basis. Mini buses also offer short distance services to
adjacent areas of the city. But as such Khilchipur does not have any public transport facility in the
town.

5.5.6. Traffic Management and Circulation


The Biora-Kota National Highway acts as a gateway to the town which led to the eventual
development of the town. It has been heavily congested because both Biora-Kota route travelers,
agricultural trucks for harvest transport and Khilchipur travelers meet all on the same road.
Additionally, there are many large and commercial vehicles on the road making the traffic even
greater.
However, with the increasing concentration of activities in the town and in nearby areas, traffic is still
evident and increasing even in other roads of the town.
Primarily, the traffic and congestion is greatest in the wide junction formed by the two major roads
Biora-Kota National Highway and Zirapur road as a major entrance and exit points of the town.
Another major traffic generating center of the town is the agricultural market by the Rajgarh road. A
huge number of cultivators and middle men come on a regular basis to sell their harvested crops in
Food Corporation of India offices (FCIs). Because of this, the traffic scenario becomes harsh as
people travel and cluster in this particular area.
Moreover, the bus stands located by the Biora-Kota road greatly adds up to the traffic. The bridge
located on the Biora-Kota Road is also a traffic point because of the narrowness of the bridge and
commercial activities in this transport area.
Furthermore, important centers such as government offices and educational institutions are located in
the core of the city are also one of the major traffic generating centers of the town since major
administrative and commercial activities take place in this area. Being the tehsil headquarter of
Khilchipur, the traffic scenario is expected to worsen due to the activities related to the increased
commercialization in the town.
Core Area of the City
The core area of the city are predominately consisting of narrow roads and lanes with irregular
vehicles parked haphazardly. This leads to traffic congestions on regular basis.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

99

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Accident Zones
Accident zones are those areas where collisions, ramming and hit-and-run mishaps usually take place.
These accident zones are formed by improper junction designs, blind curves and other road plan flaws
In particular, blind curves are those curves or bends in the road which can hardly be recognized as a
person is driving. These are the same curves wherein when crossing, people can hardly see the
vehicles coming.
The national highway is one of the most prominent accident zones in the town due to the heavy and
speedy traffic flow of the vehicles. Most accidents come in form of collisions causing further traffic in
the area. The Biora-Kota and Zirapur junction located in the east end of ward 14 is another accident
zone in Khilchipur due to the blind curve in the area. As reported, people can hardly see the vehicles
travelling causing hit-and-run mishaps and collision. Similarly the Narrow Bridges on Biora-Kota
National Highway road also causes major accidents in the town.
Improper Junction Designs
Accidents are considered unintended when events and other variables cannot be controlled or altered.
Most road accidents in Khilchipur could have been prevented with the proper road planning and
design. Currently, there are two (2) inappropriately designed junctions in Khilchipur. The improperly
designed junctions include (1) the wide junction of Biora-Kota National Highway and Zirapur road
Junction, (2) the junction Biora-Kota National Highway and Market road. These junctions need to be

rectified as they can cause further damage to property and injury to people.
Table 5.44: Improper Junction Designs
No.

Junction Location

Biora-Kota National Highway and Zirapur road Junction

Biora-Kota National Highway and Market road

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad


Important roads and present conditions
Proper road width and spacing are important in reducing road traffic. Unfortunately, many of the
important roads in the town are too narrow to facilitate the increasing flow of vehicles crossing the
town daily. The below table presented shows the important roads of the town and their existing
widths. There are 3 important roads in the town. Of the total, Biora-Kota National Highway is the
only road of relatively considerable width of 18 m. In fact, this width is incomparable to other major
roads in other towns. The 2 other important are extremely narrow ranging from 3 to 7.5 meters in
width. As most major economic and commercial activities take place in the core of the city, road
traffic is exacerbated by narrow roads and encroachment of commercial streets by illegal
constructions (shops, etc.).
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

100

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.45: Major Roads


No.

Name of the Road

Existing Width (in Mt)

Proposed Width (in Mt)

Vishram Grah Mahal


Road (Jail Road)

7.5

12

NH
12
Jabalpur

12

18

Jaipur

Source: UIDSSMT scheme 800m


Road Conditions
The below table shows the existing road condition and length in the town. The total road length in
Khilchipur is 17 km. Of this total road length, 30% is Kaccha while the rest (70%) is Pucca.
Table 5.46: Existing Road Condition
Type of road

Length

Percentage

Kaccha Road

5 km

70%

Pucca Road

12 km

30%

Total Road Length

17 km

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

5.5.7. Inter City Bus Transportation


The transit service to public for state capitals is no different than any other city transit, whether its a
metro or a small city. For smaller towns in Madhya Pradesh it differs in terms of the provider and the
type of facility or bus frequency available to the passengers.
The intercity bus facility covers almost all the important centers in Khilchipur Tehsil. This is provided
either by the state corporations buses or by private owners. Public state road transport corporation
bus services are also offered in town where there are no local municipal road transport authorities.
Madhya Pradesh State Road Transport Corporation provides transit services to the passengers. It runs
regular services, intercity services and interstate services connecting to the neighbouring states.

5.5.8. Intermediate Public Transport


Intermediate Public Transport (IPTs) such as shared RTVs, auto-rickshaws, three-wheelers, tempos,
shared taxi or other such vehicles providing point-to-point services are often found in the town with
no definite hierarchy. These system struggles in getting mobility demands.

5.5.9. Parking Requirements


There are no organized on-street marked parking arrangements in any of the major commercial areas
of the town. Most of the core market areas of the town are characterized by narrow roads with a high
proportion of pedestrian and slow moving traffic.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

101

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Similarly unorganized parking and shops lead to the heterogeneous crowding of vehicles and people
in clusters. The capacity of the roads is further reduced by vehicles parked on the roadsides.
The parking requirement are Calculated in section 5.5.11

5.5.10. Traffic and Transportation Projects


Currently there are no transportation projects going on in and around the town.

5.5.11. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future)


The present and future demand of roads (in km) is calculated considering the per capita demand to be
0.75mt. The current total length road is 23 km which gives a total gap of 6 km by 2035.
The consideration is also made of converting 5 km of Kaccha road into Pucca road until 2015. Also,
the widening of major important roads (total of 12 km) and improvement of junctions and accidents
areas (total of 2 nos) for a better traffic condition are also considered in the demand.
Regarding infrastructure augmentation, it is required the construction of one (1) bus terminal cum
Truck by 2025, provision of onstreet parking with pavements on major roads, total of 6 km to up
2015, and expansion of bridge over River Garh Ganga (1800 sq mt.) until 2025. This demand is also
incorporated in the draft master plan. The following table gives a highlight of the demand and gaps.
Table 5.47: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Traffic and Transportation)
2010

2015

2025

2035

18932

20508

25045

30585

14.20

15.38

18.78

22.94

17

17

17

17

-2.80

-1.62

1.78

5.94

1.18

3.40

4.16

Demand of roads
i

Demand of road (km) -@ 0.75 m per capita

ii

Present road (km)

iii

Gap (km)

iv

Additional Requirement (km)


Upgradation of roads

Upgradation of Kaccha roads (requirement


is km)

--

ii

Widening of important roads [Km]

--

12

iii

Improvement of junctions and accidents


areas (Nos)

--

Others
i

Development of bus cum Truck terminal


(nos)

--

--

--

ii

Onstreet Parking Provision with Pavements


on Major Roads (Km)

iii

Expansion of bridge over nalla

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG


Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

102

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.5.12. Comparative analysis with the UDPFI, other guidelines


The above demand are calculated as per the manual of Indian Road congress, and Service level
benchmarking for Urban Transport issued by Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India.

5.5.13. Swot Analysis


Below table presents the SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis) of
Traffic and Transportation sector.
Table 5.48: SWOT Analysis (Traffic and Transportation)
Sector

Strengths

Traffic
and Strategic location
Transportation
provides easy to
important major
cities and towns in
the state.

Weaknesses

Opportunities

Threats

Narrow and poor Proposed


Unmanageable
condition of roads
construction of traffic situation
bus
terminals
Accident zones due to
Unsafe traffic
(master plan)
improper
designed
junctions
Lack of proper Traffic
Management in city
Pressure on roads in
core area due to
encroachment,
excessive
commercialisation
and
vehicular
movement

5.5.14. Issues

Narrow streets in the core areas of the city need to be widened through proper planning and
addressing the encroachment problems

Segregation of traffic according to vehicles and giving them separate lanes is essential to
reduce traffic and congestion

Current buses are heavily loaded causing slow movement of the people and vehicles. A new
bus stand at a different location has been recommended due to the paucity of space at the
current location. Construction of bus terminals/ depots has been recommended and proposed
to be located on the road coming from Bhopal

To improve the road infrastructure in towns & cities so as to avoid congestion on urban roads.

There is a great pressure on Biaora-Kota road since other major roads are too narrow to carry
the increasing flow of vehicles coming daily.

There is a great pressure on Biaora-Kota road since other major roads are too narrow to carry
the increasing flow of vehicles coming daily. Due to increased economic activities in
Khilchipur and in adjoining towns.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

103

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Rampant encroachment of Biaora-Kota Highway and in other major roads of the town

The town lacks transport utility systems such as bus depots, terminals and parking zones to
properly facilitate movement of vehicles in the town and improve the traffic situation.

The road condition for a growing town like Khilchipur remains very poor as 70% of the roads
are made of Kutcha materials.

Improper junctions and existing blind curves in Kaal Churaha junction and Harijan Mandir
need to be rectified to prevent further accidents and mishaps.

On-street parking has led to the congestion in inner areas of the town which are usually too
narrow.

Expansion of bridge over the tributary of River Garh Ganga needs to be done.

There is a need to provide traffic lights and signals at junctions which are heavily loaded

The town developed and developing areas of the town have not been properly planned which
leades to the lack of infrastructure in these areas.

The town lacks transport utility systems such as bus depots, terminals and parking zones to
properly facilitate movement of vehicles in the town and improve the traffic situation.

The road condition for a growing town like Khilchipur remains very poor as 30% of the roads
are made of Kaccha materials.

5.5.15. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


(A) Goals for Horizon Years
The goals and service outcomes for the horizon period 2010-2035 are presented in the Table.
Table 5.49: Goals for Horizon Years (Traffic & Transportation)
Traffic & Transportation

2011/2012
(Current)

2015

2025

2035

- Strengthen
urban public
transport,
create proper
parking
facilities

Removal
of
encroachments,
restoration
and
construction
of
major roads. (As
per master plan)

Implementation
of
traffic
management
plan

100%
Cost
recovery of
the assets
created
with O &
M.

- Beautification of
major junctions
Per capita road length
Paved road to Total road
length

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

0.75 m

0.75 m

0.75 m

0.75 m

30%

60%

90%

100%

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

104

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.49: Goals for Horizon Years (Traffic & Transportation)


On-street
Parking
with
Pavements on Major Roads

--

100%

100%

100%

Usage of Alternate fuels

--

--

40%

60%

Implementation of
Management Plan

Traffic

--

--

100%

100%

Recovery

--

10%

50%

100%

O & M Cost
Mechanism

(B) Strategies and Action Plan


The section into divided into subgroup i.e. Strategies for Infrastructure Augmentation /
Refurbishments, Strategies for Mobilizing Financial resources and recovery of O & M cost of the
Proposed and existing Infrastructure, Strategies for Resource or Environment Conservation and
strategies for improving urban governance highlighted as Instituting Responsive & Responsible Urban
Governance. The following are outline of the strategies and action plan that are envisaged to be
undertaken for Khilchipur Town in order to achieve the Vision and Goals.
Table 5.50: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur
Infrastructure
In order to meet the transportation needs of urban areas the existing roads are
Augmentation / planned to be upgraded as follows :
Refurbishment
Large number of roads converges in major cities for which ring roads with access
control and bye-passes will be constructed. Service roads shall be provided along
bye-passes wherever necessary with limited number of accesses to bye-passes.
An effort should be made to construct concrete roads in town with proper
drainage system.
Construction of Truck Terminals and Transport Nagars with adequate connection
to the bye-passes to out skirts of the cities.
Construction of bus bay within the right of way of existing roads on main arteries.
Widening of Important Roads in a phased manner
Development of Parking Lots with Pavements on Major Roads
Upgradation of Kaccha Roads
Construction of additional Roads in the newly developed areas.
Improvement of Junctions and Accident Prone areas
Preparation & Implementation of Traffic Management Plan
Mobilization of
Financial
Resources and
O & M Cost
Recovery
Mechanism

- Operation & Maintenance Plan


Adoption of an O & M Schedule, including options of using the private sector for
On-street Parking, Maintenance of Green Corridors, Advertisement and signages
for O&M (e.g. management contract).
- Increase Pedestrian Movement
Involve NGOs/ CBOs for promoting safe pedestrian movement and promote use of
Non-polluting battery operated vehicles and cycles in order to reduce pollution
levels and resource conservation.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

105

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.50: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur


- Creation of Urban Green Spaces
Creating Urban Green Spaces and green corridors along the major roads and
junctions in order to improve Urban Environment.
Resource
Environment
Conservation
Instituting
Responsive
Responsible
Urban
Governance

&

- Monitoring & Evaluation


Preparing a detailed road register and designing and implementing a system to
update the same on a regular basis, including details of construction and repair /
maintenance history.

[The above strategies and action plan are co-related various chapters and sections on the City
Investment Plan, Financial Operating Plan, Institutional Frameworks and Summary of Strategies
mentioned in the report]

5.6. Street Lighting & Fire Fighting


5.6.1. Existing Situation of Street Lights
Providing full coverage by street light is important in the development of the town as it facilitates
urban movement and safeguards life and property.
The town has nearly 722 street light poles. Almost 60 poles have Vapour Lamps and the rest are
covered by Tube lights. The major streets of Khilchipur i.e. Kota Road, Rajgarh Road, Zirapur Road
and Main Market Road are covered by the street lights. However, settlements in peripheral areas of
town do not have facility of street lights. Moreover, the slum areas are not well-lighted and roads
approaching holiday camp is not fully covered making the area prone to accidents and crimes.
Table 5.51: Street Lighting
Poles with Vapour Lamp

60

Poles with Tube Light

662

Total Street Light Poles

722

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad


The table given below gives the detail of electricity connection; it indicates that town has 100%
household electricity connection. In case of street lights, there is an equal distribution of street light in
every ward.
Table 5.52: Details of ward wise electricity connection in Khilchipur
Ward No
01

Ward Name

Nos. of

Electricity

Street Lights

Connection

Hanuman Gadh

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

106

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.52: Details of ward wise electricity connection in Khilchipur


Ward No

Ward Name

02

Priyadarsni

03

Vinoba Bhave

04

Dr. Ambedkar

05

Maulana Azad

06

Netaji Bose

07

Jawaharlal Nehru

08

Maharana Pratap

09

Tagore

10

Ahilya Devi

11

Tilak

12

Sanjay

13

Vallabh Patel

14

Mahatma Gandhi

15

Maharani Laxmibai

Nos. of

Electricity

Street Lights

Connection

722

1922

Total
Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, 2011

5.6.2. Fire Service


As has been explained earlier, the growth population and economic activities in Khilchipur has led to
increase congestion, pollution, rampant encroachment and more importantly development of potential
fire-generating points all over the town. Fire fighting service is available in the town and this
responsibility has been devolved to the municipality, among other tasks.

5.6.3. Vehicles and Equipment for Fire Fighting and Rescue Operations
At present, there is only one (1) firefighting service vehicle for the entire town of Khilchipur.

5.6.4. Operational Systems


The fire fighting services is operated for the entire tehsil from Rajgarh.

5.6.5. Power generation and Distribution


Overall, the condition of electricity in the town is satisfactory. The main source of electricity in
Khilchipur town is MPSEB which covers 90% of municipal area but it serves almost hundred percent
of the population. The connection of electricity is good in terms of service reach. The town is
provided almost 1820 hours of supply although during peak season time of power is cut off for load
shedding. The below table gives details about electric connections in the town, town has bad number
of electricity connection 55%.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

107

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 5.53: Number of Electric Connections


Type of connection

Number

Domestic

1922

55%

Industrial

Commercial

722

80%

Road Lighting (Points)


Others
Source: ulb

5.6.6. Demand and Supply Gaps (Present and Future)


The demand of street lights is calculated according to length of roads. For Khilchipur town, the
spacing recommended is 35 meter between street lights poles. For the final horizon period, the
demand of street lights poles is 542 and the total gap is 75 poles considering the existing status (210
poles).
It is necessary to make Up gradation in the existing poles, converting Vapour Lamp poles into Tube
Light poles which have better light quality and very less power consumption in comparison with the
other lamp. The number of existing Vapour Lamp poles is 60 and they should be upgradated till 2015.
Table 5.54: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Street Lighting)
2011

2015

2025

2035

18932

20508

25045

30585

17.00

15.38

18.78

22.94

Demand of Street Lights


i

Length of roads (km)

ii

Demand of new street lights poles @


35 meters spacing

486

439

537

655

iii

Existing street lights (nos)

722

722

722

722

iv

Gap (nos)

-236

-283

-185

-67

Additional requirement of new street


lights Poles (nos)

-46

97

119

--

--

Upgradation of street light poles


vi

Upgradation of street light poles with


Tube Lights (nos)

--

60

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

5.6.7. Comparative Analysis With The UDPFI, Other Guidelines


There are no guidelines for the sector, but the calculations are made on the basis of experience of
other cities of the same sizes.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

108

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

5.6.8. SWOT Analysis


Below table presents the SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis) of
Street Lighting sector.
Table 5.55: SWOT Analysis (Street Lighting)
Sector

Strengths

Street Lighting

Weaknesses

Opportunities

Strategic
Inadequate number
location on street lights.
Bhopal
Indore
highway

of Busy
roads.

Threats

traffic Compromising
on safety

Movement
vehicles
throughout
and night.

of
day

5.6.9. Issues

Inappropriate maintenance and functioning of the lights. Around one-third of the street lights
are not functioning.

Underground wiring system on the main stretch of the inner roads is necessary to reduce risks
of accidents

High mask lights should be utilized on the main road junctions.

It has been observed that there are some irregularities in the timings of streetlights.

There is an inadequate number of street lights in the town of Khilchipur

Lack of firefighting service facilities and staff.

5.6.10. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


(A) Goals for Horizon Years
The goals and service outcomes for the horizon period 2010-2035 are presented in the Table below
Table 5.56: Goals for Horizon Years (Street Lighting)
Street Lighting

2011/2012 (Current)

2015

2025

2035

50%

60%

80%

100%

Upgradation of existing street light poles

--

100%

100%

100%

O & M Cost Recovery Mechanism

--

20%

50%

100%

Street light poles

(B) Strategies and Action Plan


The section into divided into subgroup i.e. Strategies for Infrastructure Augmentation /
Refurbishments, Strategies for Mobilizing Financial resources and recovery of O & M cost of the
Proposed and existing Infrastructure, Strategies for Resource or Environment Conservation and
strategies for improving urban governance highlighted as Instituting Responsive & Responsible Urban

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

109

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Governance. The following are outline of the strategies and action plan that are envisaged to be
undertaken for Khilchipur Town in order to achieve the Vision and Goals.
Table 5.57: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans for Khilchipur
Infrastructure
Provision of new street light poles
Augmentation /
Upgradation of existing street light poles.
Refurbishment
Mobilization of Refer the Case study on PPP in street lighting, Box 2 below.
Financial
Resources and
O & M Cost
Recovery
Mechanism
Resource
Environment
Conservation

Instituting
Responsive
Responsible
Urban
Governance

/ - Innovative ways for energy conservation


Introduce innovative ways of reducing energy costs by bringing together ULB and
manufacturers of Energy saving Gadgets. Initiate methods, which will minimize
investment to Khilchipur Municipal Council and introduce the BOOT concept for
energy saving in Street Lighting, with sharing from Savings method. Running a
switch-off campaign. Involve Local Neighborhoods &Provide Feedback.
Introduction of solar lighting and other non-conventional sources of energy.
&

- IEC strategy
Educate staff &address misconceptions assign responsibility &remind staff to
switch lights off. Change Lighting Use Patterns. Provide incentives for
conservation. Label Switches &Move Switches. Introduce similar savings of
energy in Public Buildings
-Monitoring and evaluation
Keep up-to-date with street lighting technology and requirements, in view of
diminishing energy resources and increasing energy costs. Benchmarking and
monitoring of energy. Replacing inefficient lamps. Reducing the number of lamps
operating. Reducing operating hours. Replacing inefficient switching
equipment. Improving maintenance practices. Improving data management. To
undertake energy audit at regular intervals.

[The above strategies and action plan are co-related various chapters and sections on the City
Investment Plan, Financial Operating Plan, Institutional Frameworks and Summary of Strategies
mentioned in the report]

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

110

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Box No. 2: Case Study on Privatisation Of Street Light Maintenance


Bangalore Mahanagara Palike (BMP) privatised the maintenance of streetlights. The contract has
been awarded to three reputed companies namely, Bajaj, Crompton and Philips. The initiative has
produced highly favourable results for the BMP as well as for the city.
Situation before the Initiative
One of the areas that was not functioning well in Bangalore was Street Lighting. Although this
facility came under the BMP it had delegated this responsibility to the KPTCL (Karnataka Power
Transmission Corporation Limited) for which it paid a maintenance cost to them.
However reports from the citizens were not encouraging.
One major cause of concern for the BMP was the unsatisfactory use of the maintenance cost being
paid by them to KPTCL. Complaints, which were numerous, were not being regularly and
systematically attended to; citizens were receiving an extremely indifferent response to their
complaints; efficiency had reached a discouraging low and the management was not functioning up to
standards.
Compounding this problem was the inclusion of 48 more wards in BMPs jurisdiction in 1998.
Providing street lights in the extended jurisdictional limits of was herculean task for BMP with staff
strength of 18 engineers. KPTCL refused to maintain streetlights in the newly acquired wards of BMP
Description of the Initiative
With the lack of automatic switch on & off equipment it was realised that function could only be
handled manually. BMP employed workmen for fixing faulty lights, issued material, and assigned
duties to them for switching street lights on and off at designated timings. This seemed to work
satisfactorily but efficiency was still not reaching the optimum level.
Evaluating the situation, officials of the BMP contacted the manufacturing companies. It was agreed
that only the leading companies in the country would be able to effectively sustain such a programme.
Five reputed companies Crompton, Bajaj, Philips, Wipro, GE came forward with their proposals.
The advantages of working with manufacturers directly were many and risks manageable, compared
to the contractor system which was thought to be `one man show
The privatisation was planned to be implemented in two phases- initially in the newly acquired 48
wards since these areas were virtually without streetlights and were experiencing high incidence of
crime.
Implementation Strategy
The first step was to prepare a loop-hole free contract that would while protecting the interests of the
BMP, also be agreeable to the private companies involved. The contract would have to be one in
which both partners achieved their desired objectives. Eventually it was the citizen who would get the
benefits.
A tender management committee consisting of engineer-in-chief, Joint Commissioner, Finance, legal
advisor, zonal Chief Engineers was set up. After the finalising groundwork the tender documents
(technical and financial) were prepared and discussions with reputed companies began. The objective
was to hand over complete maintenance to the private companies while
retaining the right to monitor their functioning.
The private companies would be paid a decided upon maintenance fee to enable them to perform
effectively. The response by the manufacturing companies was overwhelming. 5000 forms were sold
off within weeks. BMP earned Rs.0.75 million through the sale of tender applications forms alone,
thereby recovering its advertisements costs.
Five companies mentioned earlier bid for the maintenance contract of 100 wards consisting of 118
packages. 3 companies qualified in technical bids. Further meetings and negotiations during financial
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

111

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

bid process led to application of uniform rates across the various packages.
The contracts were awarded to Bajaj, Crompton and Philips who were in possession of valid license
from inspectorate of electricity.
BMP collected about Rs. 500 million by way of interest free security deposits from these companies.
The contract requires the companies to conduct regular inspections of street light functioning;
adherence to IERC Acts and KPTCL regulations; repairs and replacement of accessories; citizen
complaint redressal within 24 hours and other special conditions.
Results Achieved
All the objectives decided upon were realized as the results of the initiative were measured both
quantitatively and qualitatively.
Efficiency level reaching a 95 percent mark as compared to 45 percent
Citizen satisfaction
Reduced pilferage in material
Curtailment of large financial losses
Revenue earner
Minimum energy losses
Improved Time management of concerned staff
Ensured transparency in the system
Other states/cities studying the experiment for replication.
BMP Has Already Set An Exemplary Technical And Financial Norm In Karnataka
(Source: National Institute of Urban Affairs, New Delhi)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

112

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 6: Urban Poor & Their Accessibility


To Basic Services
Poverty is indisputably one of the most pressing concerns confronting central and local governments
all over India. Poverty is generally defined as an austere condition wherein a person or a community
suffers from extremely indigent living situation exacerbated by the long-term lack of access to basic
goods and services necessary for acceptable minimum standards of life. In a nutshell, poverty relates
to the lack of or extremely limited access to physical infrastructure and more importantly to social
infrastructure such as quality education and proper healthcare services, among others.
In 2003, United Nations reported that almost half of the worlds urban population resides in slums.
The organization generally defines the slum population as people living in extremely dilapidated and
unhygienic housing areas and without security in tenure. Identification of slum population is crucial to
the proper allocation of resources and delivery of basic services by the local government.
As far as sanitation is concerned in slum areas, the status in respect of the urban poor is even worse.
As per Census 2001, the percentage of notified and non-notified slums in India without latrines is 17
percent and 51 percent respectively. In respect of septic latrines the availability is 66 percent and 35
percent. Most of the kutcha and semi pucca houses do not have toilet facilities. The SWM mechanism
is not satisfactory in slum areas of Urban Cities and Town primarily because containers are
inadequate for disposal of waste and there is garbage spill over. Moreover, the waste collection is also
irregular and there is lack of awareness amongst the slum dwellers.
It is important to examine the status of Urban Sanitation in slum Areas with reference to its various
dimensions of sanitation. Interventions need to be worked out to improve sanitation facilities in these
areas especially the vulnerability of the poor and to enhance their assets in terms of labour, human
capital, housing, social capital and so on.

6.1. Urban Poverty In Khilchipur


Poverty remains to be one of the biggest social plagues of enormous impact challenging growing town
and cities throughout the country. The causes of poverty in the country are varied, many of which are
historically, politically and culturally entrenched. Its eradication can be extensive and the task reveals
itself to be daunting and monumental. Poverty comes in different shapes and sizes but generally it is
the condition in which a person or community suffers from multiple forms of deprivation including
extreme hunger, lack of access to basic services and social infrastructure such as healthcare, quality
education and social welfare. The face of poverty varies from one town to another depending on the
character of that particular town.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

113

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

It is important to examine poverty with reference to its various dimensions. Interventions need to be
worked out to reduce urban poverty especially the vulnerability of the poor and to enhance their assets
in terms of- labour, human capital, housing, social capital and so on.
The town of Khilchipur is composed of 15 wards, 6 of which have been declared by the local
government as slums. The below table shows the number of slum population in Khilchipur. According
to ULB the number of slum population, in 2011, is 10188 people which means that 54% of the total
population is considered slum population. This is much higher compare with the nation average of
15.16%.
Table 6.1: Urban Poverty in Khilchipur
Year

Number

% of total

Slum Population

10188

54.0%

Total HH

1968

54.0%

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

6.2. Information On Bpl Population And Slum Population Of


Khilchipur
Poverty thresholds conform to the parameters set by the national government including the below
poverty line criteria. Below poverty line is an indicator and poverty threshold used to identify people
living under an income below the acceptable limits set by the government which is considered
necessary to afford basic food requirements (excluding social infrastructure). In more operational
terms, people living below the poverty line in India are those who receive a meager wage of 10 rupees
a day in 25 days or a total of 300 rupees monthly. Undoubtedly, people subsisting below poverty line
standards should be identified so that their needs may be properly addressed.
The BPL and slum populations are considered to have special needs which need to be recognized and
addressed accordingly by the local government. Many of the people in the slums subsist below
poverty line making it difficult for them to move up the social ladder. Generally, they live in poor
housing areas and filthy environments devoid of residential security. It is with the commitment to
poverty alleviation that a town or a city can say that it is fully developing.
The identification of the BPL and slum population is one of the initial key steps in recognizing their
special needs. The below table gives details on the social composition of poverty in Khilchipur.
Table 6.2: Information of BPL and Slum Population in Khilchipur
Ward
Nos

Name of the Ward

Total
Household

Total
Population

BPL
HH

% to Total
Population
/ HH

Slum
Population

% to Total
Population
/ HH

Hanuman Gadh

216

1167

214

99%

1167

100%

Priyadarsni

292

1451

234

80%

1451

100%

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

114

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 6.2: Information of BPL and Slum Population in Khilchipur


Ward
Nos

Name of the Ward

Total
Household

Total
Population

BPL
HH

% to Total
Population
/ HH

Slum
Population

% to Total
Population
/ HH

Vinoba Bhave

249

1393

196

79%

1393

100%

Dr. Ambedkar

500

2756

430

86%

2756

100%

Maulana Azad

175

880

159

91%

0%

Netaji Bose

158

903

160

101%

0%

Jawaharlal Nehru

120

698

100

83%

0%

Maharana Pratap

106

621

37

35%

0%

Tagore

140

645

63

45%

0%

10

Ahilya Devi

293

1504

183

62%

11

Tilak

131

661

58

44%

0%

12

Sanjay

134

654

98

73%

0%

13

Vallabh Patel

117

615

103

88%

0%

14

Mahatma Gandhi

595

3067

171

29%

0%

15

Maharani Laxmibai

339

1917

402

119%

1917

100%

Total

3565

18932

2545

73%

10188

54%

1504

100%

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

6.3. Slums In The Town


The BPL and slum populations are considered to have special needs which need to be recognized and
addressed accordingly by the local government. Many of the people in the slums subsist below
poverty line making it difficult for them to move up the social ladder. Generally, they live in poor
housing areas and filthy environments devoid of residential security. It is with the commitment to
poverty alleviation that a town or a city can say that it is fully developing.
The identification of the BPL and slum population is one of the initial key steps in recognizing their
special needs. The table below gives details on the social composition of poverty in Khilchipur.

6.4. Location Of Slums On Town Map


For Details Refer Map Section

6.5. General Characteristics Of Slums In Khilchipur


Slums are generally characterized by their depressing physical and social environments. Physically,
slums usually thrive in unhygienic and less developed areas usually lacking of basic services such as
quality water, electricity, proper sewerage and sanitation and other essential facilities and
infrastructure. Due to the poverty-stricken and unsanitary condition, people continue to suffer from
malnutrition and widespread of diseases. In social terms, slums are usually characterized by urban
decay linked with high crime rate and collapse of social values.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

115

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

The following observations are derived from site visits of slums in Khilchipur. There are no sufficient
secondary data on the slums. But the following things are derived on the site visits to all wards which
were declared as slums:
- SOCIAL SET-UP: The social composition of a majority of slums comprises Scheduled Castes,
Scheduled Tribes and other backward castes. However, in some of the slums, the original settlement
housed a single caste or social group, but later, other social groups also started moving in, creating a
wider social mix.
- EMPLOYMENT: A majority of the slum population are engaged in primary activity i.e. agriculture
sector. Many also work as construction laborer, daily wage laborer. They also engaged in informal
activities such as vegetable vendor, street hawkers.
- AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME: On an average, slum households have a monthly income of
Rs. 1500 per month, the range being Rs. 600 to Rs.5000.
- HOUSING TYPE: Housing type in slums is mostly characterized by permanent, semi -permanent
and temporary structure. As per the information given by the Nagar Parishad about 70 percent of the
houses are temporary in nature and 30 percent households are permanent to semi -permanent in
nature. They have pucca house or mud house with tiled roof or thatch roof. However, few housing
units have semi -permanent or temporary structure. They have small houses with one or two room.
Most of the houses have access to basic services and these slums are easily access by road.
- HEALTH: Most slum dwellers consult private doctors due to lack of proximity to government
hospitals and perceived delay in treatment. With medicines, the average expenditure works out to Rs
100. In the poorer slum the lack of awareness of family planning practices is evident. In the poorer
slums, the lack of awareness of family planning practices is evident.

6.6. Status Of Slums In Khilchipur


No studies are available about the extent of slums status in the town. There is also no formal
notification of Slums done by ULB.

6.7. Land Ownership & Tenure Status


Land availability is a major constraint in the slums. Most slums in Khilchipur are located on
government and private lands. Government land includes land belonging to the central, state or
municipal government. Private land, on the other hand, belongs to individuals. Certain slums are
spread over adjacent government and private lands.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

116

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Though all the slum areas are on encroached public or private land, the Government has from time-totime issued the slum households (legal ownership/title of land), as part of its policy to ensure tenure
security to the poor and landless.

6.8. Unidentified Slums And Homeless Populatio n / Pavement


Dwellers Of Khilchipur
People living either in unrecognized slum settlements or on pavement lives in absence of basic
services. While the identified slums have some security of tenure and fall under the purview of
municipal service provision, the unidentified or informal slums and peri-urban settlements fall outside
the net of formal service provision. There is no available estimate of this population in the city, or the
coping strategies adopted by them.

6.9. Urban Basic Services In Slums Of Khilchipur


Information on access to services in slums within municipal limits in Khilchipur has been collected
from a variety of sources. These include primary data as well as discussions with zonal officers,
councilors of each ward, local political leaders, and local people, corroborated by site visits to certain
slums (to ascertain the authenticity of information gathered). The ULB does not follow any specific,
laid down standards for service provision to the poor in the city. The following observations are
derived from site visits of slums in Khilchipur. There are no sufficient secondary data on the slums.
- HOUSING
Due to rapid urbanization slums in city or even in towns areas are growing rapidly. Currently the
town has 6 slum pockets. In few slum pockets condition of houses is in livable condition.
Willingness to improve housing conditions is more in the slums. Though, majority of residents are not
willing to pay for services.

74

67

Somwaria
Bardi

Notified

85

73

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

117

Any interventions under


IHSDP (Y/N)

Notified

Beneficiaries under social


security schemes

Mataji
Prajapati

No. of Primary Health centres


in the slum pocket

No. of Primary school in the


slum pocket

95

No. of Temporary pattas


distributed

84

No. of Permanent pattas


distributed

No. of Kuccha houses

No. of Semi pucca houses

No. of Pucca houses

Notified

Ward No

Deepgrah/
Neelgarh

Notified/ Un-notified

Name of Slum pocket/


reference name

Table 6.3: Housing Conditions of slums in Khilchipur

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

105

71

Jaystambha
Maligali

Notified

129

100

548

522

Any interventions under


IHSDP (Y/N)

Notified

Beneficiaries under social


security schemes

Khandipole
Moipura

No. of Primary Health centres


in the slum pocket

116

No. of Primary school in the


slum pocket

71

No. of Temporary pattas


distributed

Notified

No. of Permanent pattas


distributed

No. of Kuccha houses

No. of Pucca houses

No. of Semi pucca houses

Subhash
Kalaji

Notified/ Un-notified

Name of Slum pocket/


reference name

Ward No

Table 6.3: Housing Conditions of slums in Khilchipur

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Total
- WATER SUPPLY
Water is one of the most essential services for the slum population. Public stand post, wells and hand
pumps are located within easy accessible distance from slum settlements. Apart from this some of the
slum pockets have tap water connection from Nagar Parishad. They fetch water from the wells and
hand pumps. The majority of the slum people rate water quality as good. They judge the quality by its
taste and they consider the appearance for this. Most of the slum dwellers do not treat water before
consumption. Very less percentage of people boiled or filters water before consumption. It seems the
families are not aware of the chance of transmission of germs through water. Most of the slum
population (60%) depend on the wells and tube wells for water supply, 20% of total population are
depending on the stand pipes, 10% are depending on the individual taps and rest of people (10%) are
not having water supply facility

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

118

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 6.4: Water Supply Conditions Of Slums In Khilchipur


Ward
No

Name of
Slum
pocket/
reference
name

Deepgarh/
Neelgarh

Notified

1167

1167

Mataji
Prajapati

Notified

1451

1451

Somwaria
Bardi

Notified

1393

1393

Subhash
Kalaji

Notified

2756

2756

Notified/
Individual
No. of
Ward
Slum
Unwater
Community
population population
notified
connections
taps

880

903

698

621

645

10

Khandipole
Moipura

Notified

1504

11

661

12

654

13

615

14

3067

15

Jaystambha
Notified
Maligali

Total

No. of
Hand
pumps

1504

1917

1917

18932

10188

79

40

- SEWERAGE AND SANITATION


Currently, there is an absence of integrated underground sewerage network in the town. Generated
sewerage is discharged directly into nallahs, resulting creating an insanitary condition. People have
septic and soak pit latrine with their latrine. As per the information given by the Nagar Parishad
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

119

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

officials the town has 100 percent coverage in terms of access to individual toilet facilities. But in
slums, access to individual toilet facility is 10 percent (As per IHSDP scheme-2005). Besides this,
public toilets are also located in the town. Cleaning and maintenance of individual toilets are done by
the households.
Table 6.5: Sanitation Conditions Of Slums In Khilchipur
Ward
No

Name of
Slum pocket/
reference
name

Notified/
Unnotified

Ward
population

Slum
population

Deepgrah/
Neelgarh

Notified

1167

10.43

Mataji
Prajapati

Notified

1451

10.67

Somwaria
Bardi

Notified

1393

25.69

Subhash
Kalaji

Notified

2756

29.35

Khandipole
Moipura

Notified

1504

6.68

Jaystambha
Maligali

Notified

1917

3.97

10188

86.79

No. of
Individual
toilets

No. of
Community
toilets

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Total
- SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT
Solid waste management and sweeping is done by the Nagar Parsihad. In slum pockets door to door
waste collection is in practice. Waste collection is done twice a day. These wastes are collected by
tractor and small vehicles. Streets in the slums are also sweep every day by the Nagar Parishad.
- DRAINAGE
Storm water drainage system exists in the slum areas. Drains are mostly Pucca and open. Cleaning of
these drains is done on regular basis Parishad.by the Nagar
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

120

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

- ROADS
Most of the slum pockets have proper approach road. Majority of the roads approaching these slums
are made of cement concrete road. But the width of roads in few slums is narrow.
- STREET LIGHT
Street lights are inadequate in some slum pockets.

6.10. Social Security Schemes And Beneficiaries In Khilchipur


Given the complexity of the social, economic and physical environment in which a growing number
of urban poor eke out their livelihoods, it is clear that the formulation of anti-poverty measures and
the design of slum improvement programs is a difficult issue. A review of slum improvement
programmes indicates that by improving basic infrastructure and access to municipal services, there is
a significant impact on the quality of slum residents, both poor and non-poor.
To alleviate the problems of slum dwellers and to reduce urban poverty, a number urban poverty have
been initiated and are being implemented by the ULB with assistance from the GoMP and the GoI
Some of the major slum improvement programs being implemented in Khilchipur are in the given
below:
1) Swarna Jayanti Shehri Rojgar Yojna (SJSRY)
Swarna Jayanti Shehri Rojgar Yojna (SJSRY) consists of two special schemes, viz. Urban Self
Employment Programme (USEP) and Urban Wage Employment Programme (UWEP). It is funded in
a ratio of 75:25 between the Centre and the State. Under UWEP of SJSRY, socially and economically
useful public assets, i.e. roads, drains, culverts, community centers, community latrines are
constructed in slum areas, providing wage employment to the urban poor. Under UWEP activities,
roads, drains, culverts, community centers, community latrines, etc. have been constructed in many
slum areas. This scheme is functioning in Khilchipur.

6.11. Demand And Supply Gaps (Present And Future)


For calculating the present and future housing demand for urban poor it is indispensable to figure out
the estimated BPL population, BPL household, Slum population and Slum household.
Table 6.6: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Slum infrastructure) for Khilchipur
Census Year

2011

2015

2025

2035

Projected Population

18932

20508

25045

30585

Estimated Household@ 5.31

3565

3862

4717

5760

Estimated BPL Population @11%

13514

14639

17878

21832

Estimated BPL Household @ 5.31

2545

2757

3367

4111

Slum Population @ 79%

10188

11036

13478

16459

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

121

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 6.6: Present and future demand and supply gaps (Slum infrastructure) for Khilchipur
Census Year

2011

2015

2025

2035

Estimated Slum household @ 5.31 size

1919

2078

2538

3100

Estimate Urban Poor Household not having houses for basic


services

13514

14639

17878

21832

Provision of Housing and infrastructure to BPL Household


(Nos) (20% of actual demand)

509

551

673

822

Provision of Housing and infrastructure to Slum Household


(Nos) (20% of actual demand)

384

416

508

620

Total Housing Demand

893

967

1181

1442

Housing demand

Source: by PRUDA- AIILSG

6.12. Swot Analysis


Table 6.7: SWOT Analysis (Basic Service to the Urban Poor)
Sector

Strengths

Weaknesses

Basic
Slum populations
Services to are integral part
Urban
of the city or town
Poor
developments
which can easily
be seen in the
town by provide
basic service to
them.

Opportunities

Threats

Growth of slums is Implementation


increasing day by day. of
various
schemes
by
Do not have 100%
Central and State
access
to
water
Govt.
connection
at
individual level.
Dilapidated
condition.

Slum population is
increasing with over
a period of time due
to
migration
of
people from nearby
villages.

housing

A survey of BPL
population
has
been done.
Source: by Consultant of the Project

6.13. Key Issues


Major issues in brief are given below which were evolved during the consultation workshop:

Increasing size of BPL and vulnerable population in the last three years.

Analysis of current situation reveals that the slum population has limited access to basic
services and infrastructure.

Strong level of commitment to achieve zero open-defecation appears to be lacking at the local
level.

For toilet use, water source is mainly public with open source tank /pond/ nalla being the most
prevalent source of water for toilet.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

122

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Very less attempts have been made to assess the needs and priorities of people living in slums
prior to provision of basic services.
Community Participation or involvement in slum
improvement is therefore lacking.

Uncontrolled physical development.

The major focus is on building toilets yet aspects of effective garbage disposal and
underground drainage system are being neglected, which simply upsets the benefits of
building toilets.

In most of the areas, there have been no synergistic partnerships with the NGOs and private
sectors increasing the burden on ULBmanually as well as financially.

The aspect of maintenance seems to be neglected once the toilets are built which makes them
non-usable after some time.

6.14. Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years For


Khilchipur
The goals and service outcomes for the horizon period 2010-2035 are presented in the Table below:
Table 6.8: Identified Goals Of Improvement Of Basic Service To The Urban Poor For Horizon
Years In Khilchipur
Vision Goals

(Current)

2015

2025

2035

BPL population

58%

25%

0%

0%

Slum Free City

--

100%

100%

2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Source: Stakeholders consultation

6.15. Identified Projects For Horizon Years For Khilchipur


The projects identified for the sector for the period till 2035 are presented in the Table below.
Table 6.9: Identified Projects of Basic Service to the Urban Poor For Horizon Years In Khilchipur
Horizon year
2015

Priority
HIGH

Detail of project
Conducting Slum Surveys in city
Preparation of Slum free City Plan under Rajiv Awas Yojana &
BSUP.

2025

MEDIUM

Provision of only Basic Services to the Urban Poor Households


(Phase I)
Provision of Housing with basic services to the Urban Poor
Households.

2035

LOW

Provision of only Basic Services to the Urban Poor New


Households (Phase II)

2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

123

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 6.9: Identified Projects of Basic Service to the Urban Poor For Horizon Years In Khilchipur
Horizon year

Priority

Detail of project

Source: Consultants of the project

6.16. Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years For
Khilchipur
The strategies / policies / actions to be undertaken for achieving the Goals and implanting the projects
presented in the Table below.
Table 6.10: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans of Basic Service to the Urban Poor for Horizon
Years in Khilchipur
No
01

Strategies & Action Plan


Conducting Slum Surveys in city

2015

2025

2035

YES

Carrying out biometric identification survey of slum-dwellers and


hardware for the storage of bio-metric information
Entry of data from Slum Surveys into MIS database
Development of City and Slum Base Maps using GIS - including cost
of CARTOSAT
II/latest images, spatial total station slum surveys, integration of
Slum MIS with GIS Maps.
Engagement of consultants/technical agencies/institutions for the
preparation of detailed Slum-free City Plans
02

Development of Detailed Project Reports (DPRs)

YES

DPRs would need to be prepared for slum upgrading/housing


development and access the fund under BSUP and IHSDP schemes.
03

Incremental upgrading

YES

Norms for service provision will need to be developed on an


incremental plan. This will allow urban local bodies to improve
service delivery over time, moving from community connections for
water supply, sanitation, power, etc. to household connections, while
improving the level of services such as inner area roads, street
lights, water supply quality and quantity, etc.
04

Prioritization of slums for investment

YES

As there are large numbers of slums in city, there is a need to


prioritise slums for housing/services investment.
05

Notification of slums for upgrading and provision of services

YES

YES

Slums, not currently notified, must be enlisted by the local body


through a formal process so that these become eligible for provision
of basic services. Since the process of granting land tenure will take
time, notification can help to include currently excluded/non-notified
settlements for provision of services. Most often, such slums have the
poorest level of infrastructure and highest incidence of poverty.
06

De-notification of upgraded/tenured settlements and inclusion in


property tax system

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

124

YES

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 6.10: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans of Basic Service to the Urban Poor for Horizon
Years in Khilchipur
No

Strategies & Action Plan

2015

2025

2035

Once upgraded, slums and new housing colonies must be integrated


with the city property tax system. However, the residents of these
settlements must be supported to meet property tax payments/user
charges for household services. ULBs may consider affordable
lifeline taxes and tariffs, which are deferred to beyond the repayment
of loans.
07

Measuring outcomes and impacts

YES

BSUP will significantly improve the quality of lives of slum dwellers


by providing them access to improved housing and quality services.
It will also indirectly result in increased incomes and a reduction in
the disease burden of households. It will be important for local
governments to measure this improvement as a result of the
implementation of the BSUP reform. The household survey should
be conducted periodically as part of the data gathering exercise
which measures the impact of the reforms.
2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Source: Consultant of the Project

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

125

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 7: Social Infrastructure In Khilchipur


7.1 Existing Health Facility In Khilchipur
The quality of life in any urban center depends upon the availability and accessibility of to quality
social infrastructure. Development of social infrastructure comprising education, health and medical
care, nutrition which is instrumental in contributing to substantial improvements in human resource
development which in turns, initiate and accelerate economic development. Physical quality of life
and human well-being are pivotal on the enhanced availability of these social services. These services
are keys to overall increased productivity. Investment in human development programmes, enable the
poor to help themselves and try to get fair chance of getting those rewards.
In many countries, social infrastructure is one of the fundamental requirement of making a knowledge
based citizenry and consequently a highly vigilant and dynamic society. In line with this, it is needless
to mention that proper functioning of a city is greatly depends on the quality of life and overall wellbeing of the people. The chapter describes the prominent features of the social infrastructure of
Khilchipur which will provide into its capacity to cater to the constantly growing needs of the people.

7.1.1 Overall Health Facilities And Medical Practitioners In Khilchipur


The three-tier public health system is built on the Sub-Health Centres (SHCs), Primary Health Centres
(PHCs) and specific service focused Community Health Centres (CHCs), to the district/civil hospitals;
and in the final tier, the referral hospitals. Especially, the PHC is the most critical health facility. In
MP, in the last twelve years, the number of PHCs has actually gone down, mainly because of
conversion of many PHCs into CHCs. This change has brought down the population serviced by each
CHC from over 3.6 lakh in 1994 to 2.6 lakh in 2006, thus, improving quality of care.
The health infrastructure cannot be called adequate even by Government of India norms as the
population served per PHC is significantly higher than the prescribed norm of 30000. Similarly,
number of SHCs is also less compared to the norm of 5000 population in general and 3000 population
in tribal areas. The existing health centers also face an acute shortage of quality manpower meaning
thereby that the state needs to do something innovative to improve the access and quality of health
care.
Medical or health facility is, in general, any location at which medicine is practice regularly. Medical
facility ranges from small clinic and doctors office to urgent care centers and large hospitals with
elaborate emergency rooms and trauma center. The number and quality of medical facilities in a place
is one common determine of that area prosperity and quality of life.
At present, there is only one (1) primary government hospital in Khilchipur town and 1 private
Dispensaries. In any case, the situation is extremely dire given that the town is an important
administrative centre where government offices are located. The entire health services needs of the
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

126

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

people are fulfilled by these institutions with the help of private practitioners are also present in the
town.
Table 7.1: Existing Health Facilities in Khilchipur
Particulars

Government

Private

Hospitals

Dispensary

NA

Beds in Hospitals/Dispensary

30

10

Other specialized Medical institutions

NA

Ambulance services

NA

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad,2011

7.1.2 Basic Health Indicators Of Khilchipur


At present information on health indicators are available at District or State level only. According to
Department of public health and family welfare, Madhya Pradesh performs poorly relative to most
other states. A survey conducted by Department of public health and family welfare in 2010-2011
which reveals some basic health indicators showed table.
Table 7.2: Basic health indicators in Madhya Pradesh and Rajgarh District
Indicators

Details
Madhya Pradesh

Crude Birth Rate (CBR)12


Crude Death Rate (CDR)

25.0

13

Infant Mortality Rate(IMR)

8.0

14

67

Total Fertility Rate(TFR)15

3.1
Rajgarh District

16

Infant Mortality Rate(IMR)


Total Fertility Rate(TFR)

66

17

5.1 %

Source: Annual Health Survey 2010-2011

7.1.3 Medical Facilities Provided By Municipal Body In Khilchipur


No medical facilities are provided by the ULB except some basic services.

7.1.4 Role Of Municipal Body In The Health Programs

12

Number of Births per 1000 population in a given year.

13

Number of Deaths per 1000 population in a given year.

14

Number of infants dying under one year of age in a year per 1000 live births of the same year.

15 Average number of children that would be born to a women if she experiences the current fertility pattern through her reproductive span (15-49years)
16

Number of infants dying under one year of age in a year per 1000 live births of the same year.

17 Average number of children that would be born to a women if she experiences the current fertility pattern through her reproductive span (15-49years)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

127

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

One of the main tasks for the municipal body is to create a comprehensive health program responsive
to the needs of every citizen. However, given the limited resources and manpower shortage, it can be
extremely difficult for the municipal body to carry the burden by itself. Unfortunately, the ULB has
not involved themselves actively in the health programmes supported by the state and the central
government.

7.2 Existing Educational Facility In Khilchipur


Education is one specific area where there has been substantial improvement in MP. The last decade
saw a very high jump in literacy levels from 45 per cent in 1991 to 64 per cent in 2001. This was
managed by dedicated work to increase access to adult literacy and schools, especially primary
schools. From 78794 primary schools in 1996 in undivided MP, the number of primary schools rose
to 82219 in 2000, and stood at 95517 in 200506 in new MP. Similarly, the number of middle schools
was 19058 in 1996 in undivided MP, rose to 21043 in 2000, and was 24293 in 200506 in new MP.
There has been a phenomenal increase in primary schools, and within two years between 1998 and
2000, nearly 30000 access-less habitations were provided with a school. A similar initiative for
middle schools saw a phenomenal increase in these as well.
Now, the state claims that all habitations in the state have one primary education centre within one km
radius. There is one middle school within 3 km radius of every village in the state. Although, in terms
of schools, the number appears to be adequate now, the situation, as far as other amenities in the
schools, is not very clear. Are there enough rooms in the schools? Do girls have separate toilets? Are
there blackboards and other teaching aids available in schools? Data for these parameters are not
available for recent years as data from the latest educational survey have not been released. Other
evidence does show that there is a long way to go towards ensuring adequate rooms, proper school
buildings, proper toilets, drinking water facilities and so on.

7.2.1. Overall Education Facilities In Khilchipur


Quality education necessitates enhance access to educational facilities and availability of teachers.
Although the town has sufficient number of primary school but the town lacks sufficient of higher
education facility. Below table depicts the current status of the educational infrastructure in
Khilchipur. At present, the town has 11 Primary Schools, 2 Middle School, 2 Secondary Schools and
2 Higher Secondary School in the town. The town has also no College for Higher Education, one ITI
college and one (1) polytechnic college available at Pachore which is about 56 Km from Khilchipur.
Table 7.3: Existing Educational Infrastructure in Khilchipur
Education Facility

Facility available

Nos

Remarks

SCHOOL
Primary School

Yes

11

Available

Middle School

Yes

Available

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

128

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.3: Existing Educational Infrastructure in Khilchipur


Education Facility

Facility available

Secondary Schools

Nos

Remarks

Yes

Available

Higher Secondary/ Intermediate/ Senior


secondary/ PUC (Pre university college) Yes
Junior college level

Available

Adult literacy classes/ centers

No

Available

Working womens hostel with number of seats

No

Available
at
Bhopal (155 Kms)

Commerce/Science Arts/ Law or other College


No
of Degree Level

Available

Middle College / ITI

Yes

Available

Engineering College

No

Available
at
Bhopal (155 Kms)

Polytechnics

Yes

Available
at
Pachor (56 Kms)

No

COLLEGE

Recognized Shorthand,
typewriting
vocational training institutions

&

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, 2011

7.2.2. Basic Education / Literacy Indicators Of Khilchipur


Khilchipur has a literacy rate of 68.38% which is relatively higher compared to that of the District
average literacy level of 68 percent. The ratio of male to female literacy rate is around 56:44.
Table 7.4: Literacy Indicator in Khilchipur
Indictors

Figures in percentage

Literacy Rate

68.38%

Male Literacy

56.13%

Female Literacy

43.87%

Source: Census of India, 2011


The Table below reveals the ratio of the availability of education institution per 10000 populations in
Khilchipur.
Table 7.5: Schools / Colleges per 10000 Population, Khilchipur
Type of Institution

Ratio per 10000 Population

Primary

5.81

Junior Secondary / Middle

1.06

Secondary / Matriculations

2.11

Senior Secondary

2.11

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

129

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.5: Schools / Colleges per 10000 Population, Khilchipur


Type of Institution

Ratio per 10000 Population

College

0.00

Source: Census of India, 2001

7.2.3. Education Facilities Provided By Municipal Body


The ULB of Khilchipur is not supporting any education facilities in the town. All educational
programmes of government like Sarva Siksha Abhiyan (SSA), Mid-day Meals (MDM) Programme
etc. need to be implemented in municipal school.

7.3 Other Infrastructures & Facilities In Khilchipur


Recreation is an activity of leisure, leisure being discretionary time. Its one of the essential elements
of human biology and psychology. Recreational activities are often done for enjoyment, amusement
or pleasure and are considered to be
fun. Recreational activities can be communal or solitary, active
or passive, outdoors or indoors, healthy or harmful, and useful for society or detrimental. Public space
such as parks, playground, theatre and garden are essential venues for many recreational activities. Its
one of the most important components in urban life style now a day.

7.3.1. Existing Recreational & Cultural Facilities In Khilchipur


As such, the need for accessible reaction opportunities and facilities in town and cities are now being
recognized. Parks and recreation can have a measurable impact on state and local economies; they can
have important non-economic benefits as well. Table given below indicates the number of
recreational and cultural facilities in Khilchipur. Its apparent that the town is fully endowed with
recreational facilities. Apart from playground of schools, the town has no parks, no cinema hall and
no any community hall.
Table 7.6: Recreational and Cultural Facilities, Khilchipur
Particulars

Numbers

Stadium

Parks

Cinema Hall

Auditorium/Drama/Community hall

Public libraries including reading rooms

1(reading room)

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, 2011

7.3.2. Existing Public Amenities And Services In Khilchipur


Public amenities are resources, conveniences, facilities or benefits continuously offered to the general
public for their use and/ or enjoyment, with or without charges. Such public activities are expected to
function around the clock, in adverse conditions such as inclement weather, high noise environments

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

130

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

and in varying degree of light and heat. Consequently there are several key attributes that should be
integrated into all public amenities to ensure universal usability.
Public amenities include restrooms, information, public telephones and banks machines, waiting
sheds, drinking fountains and the like. Public amenities are especially important in delivering proper
service to people. Apart from the public amenities mentioned in the above table, the next table
summarizes the public amenities available in the town of Khilchipur.
Table 7.7: Public Amenities and Service Availability, Khilchipur
Particulars

Numbers

Graveyards

8 (Smashan Ghat and Kabrastan)

Postal & Telegraph Services

1 Post office and 1 Telegraph Office

Dhobi Ghat

1 Near Garh Ganga River

Fire Fighting Services

Available and under the Municipal Administration

Electricity Broad office

Available

Festival Grounds

2 Available

Petrol Pump

Police Station

1 Available

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad, 2011

7.3.3. Existing Sports Facilities In Khilchipur


At present there is no sports facility available in the town but only one (1) stadium is available.

7.4 Comparative Analysis With Th e Udpfi Guidelines


UDFPI (Urban Development Plan Formulations & Implementation) guidelines were created to assist
administrators, municipal town planners and consultants with essential details for urban development
plans formulation and implementation. The required number of infrastructure for the present
population (2011) and the projected population (2021 and 2035) were calculated based on the UDPFI
guidelines. The required number of sector infrastructure was then compared against the existing
infrastructure to determine the infrastructure gap.

7.4.1 Demand & Gap Assessment For Health Infrastructure In Khilchipur


Table given below gives an overview of the required health infrastructure.
Table 7.8: Demand and Gaps for Health Infrastructure, Khilchipur (M)
Projected Population

2011

2015

2025

2035

18932

20508

25045

30585

Dispensary
i

Required (1 / 15000 people as per UDPFI Guidelines)

ii

Existing

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

131

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.8: Demand and Gaps for Health Infrastructure, Khilchipur (M)
Projected Population

2011

2015

2025

2035

18932

20508

25045

30585

iii

Gap

iv

Additional gap

Maternity & Child Welfare


i

Required (1 / 45000 people as per UDPFI Guidelines)

ii

Existing

iii

Gap

iv

Additional gap

Hospital
i

Required (1 / 50000 people as per UDPFI Guidelines)

ii

Existing

iii

Gap

iv

Additional gap

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

7.4.2 Demand & Gap Assessment For Educational Infrastructure In


Khilchipur
Table given below gives an overview of the required Educational infrastructure. But the existing
infrastructure in the schools and college need to be upgrade.
Table 7.9: Demand & Gap Assessment for Health Infrastructure, Khilchipur
Horizon Year

2011

2015

2025

2035

Projected Population

18932

20508

25045

30585

PRIMARY SCHOOL
Required (1/2500 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

13

Existing

11

11

11

11

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year


SECONDARY SCHOOL
Required (1/7500 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year


SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL
Required (1/10000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

132

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.9: Demand & Gap Assessment for Health Infrastructure, Khilchipur
Horizon Year

2011

2015

2025

2035

Projected Population

18932

20508

25045

30585

Gaps
Additional Gap for Horizon Year
Source: by Consultant of the Project

7.4.3 Demand & Gap Assessment For Other Infrastructures & Facilities In
Khilchipur
UDPFI guideline on infrastructure development is highly dependent on population size of the town.
However, it is also important to understand that a town needs to provide at least one of the essential
social infrastructures such as medical and health infrastructure over time as these investments are
crucial to the growth and welfare of the town.
Table 7.10: Demand & Gap Assessment for Other Infrastructure & Facilities, Khilchipur
Horizon Year

2011

2015

2025

2035

Projected Population

18932

20508

25045

30585

Required (1/100000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

Required (1/20000 people as per UDPFI Guideline

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

FIRE BRIGADE

POST OFFICE

TELEPHONE EXCHANGE
Required (1/40000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

Required (1/20000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

POLICE STATION

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

133

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.10: Demand & Gap Assessment for Other Infrastructure & Facilities, Khilchipur
Horizon Year

2011

2015

2025

2035

Projected Population

18932

20508

25045

30585

Required (1/15000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

Required (1/15000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

Required (1/30000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

PETROL PUMP

LIBRARY

BUS STAND

Additional Gap for Horizon Year


COMMUNITY HALL
Required (1/15000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

Required (1/20000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

Required (1/30000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

Required (1/100000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

BANKS

PARK

STADIUM

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

134

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.10: Demand & Gap Assessment for Other Infrastructure & Facilities, Khilchipur
Horizon Year

2011

2015

2025

2035

Projected Population

18932

20508

25045

30585

Required (1/10000 people as per UDPFI Guideline)

Existing

Gaps

Additional Gap for Horizon Year

Gaps
Additional Gap for Horizon Year
CREMATORIUM

Source: by Consultant of the Project

7.5 SWOT Analysis Of Social Infrastructure In Khilchipur


Table 7.11: Swot Analysis Of Social Infrastructure For Khilchipur
Sector
Health

Strength

Weakness

-Effort from both


the
State
and
National level in
order
to
give
priority
in
resource
allocation
in
health
and
education sector

Opportunities

Threats

-Low level of -GoMP


is -Inadequate
infrastructure
committed
to implementation
facility in the improve the health capacity.
existing
service
delivery
hospitals.
through improved
and
equitable
-Low level of
access to quality
service delivery.
health
care
-Insufficient staff. especially targeted
-People still need at the poor which is
to depend on reflected in MP
Sector
district
head Health
quarter for better Strategy
service.

Education

Other
infrastructure
facilities

-Emergence
of -The
right
of -Inadequate
large number of children to free and implementation
private schools.
compulsory
capacity.
education
act,
-Inadequate and
passed
by
inferior
Parliament
in
infrastructure
August
2009,
facility in the
provides free and
schools
compulsory
education as a
fundamental right.
-Community
Lack
of -Implementation of -Inadequate
participation and maintenance of Community
implementation
willingness among existing assets
participation fund capacity.
people
for
which is a optional
improved service
reform
as
per
delivery
JnNURM reforms.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

135

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.11: Swot Analysis Of Social Infrastructure For Khilchipur


Sector

Strength

Weakness

Opportunities

Threats

Source: by Consultant of the Project

7.6 Summary Of Key Issues


HEALTH FACILITY

Better system need to be evolved for a graded user-free and addressing exclusion of the
poorest.

At present only one hospital is catering the entire town and nearby area. There is no other
medical facility such as dispensary and maternity and child care facility in the town.

Provision of assured and credible primary health services of acceptable quality is necessary.

EDUCATIONAL FACILITY

Increases in number of private schools indicate a clear shift to private schools.

Overall, inadequate and inferior infrastructure, poor public service delivery, lack of quality
choices and high dependency on privately provide services.

Some of the schools are located along the State Highway which creates noise pollution which
is not conducive for learning.

Improper maintenance of infrastructure and basic services in schools.

7.7 Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years In


Khilchipur
The goals and service outcomes for the sector for the period till 2035 are presented in the Table
below.
Table 7.12: Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
Details

(Current)

2015

2025

2035

Doctor-patient ratio

--

1/1200

1/900

1/600

Bed-population ratio

1/473

2/600

2/500

3/250

Implementation of health programmes

25%

50%

100%

100%

--

25%

50%

100%

68.38%

70%

80%

90%

--

50%

100%

100%

Health

Regular
monitoring
resources

of

water

Education
Literacy rates
Ensure 100% enrollment in primary
schools
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

136

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.12: Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years in Khilchipur


Details
Teacher student ratio

(Current)

2015

2025

2035

--

1/40

1/35

1/25

2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Source: Stakeholders consultation

7.8 Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur


The projects identified for the sector for the period till 2035 are presented in the Table below.
Table 7.13: Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur
Horizon

Priority

Detail of project

Year
2015

HIGH

Health Infrastructure
Up gradation of Existing Hospital
Construction of Dispensary (1 Nos)
Construction of Maternity & Child Welfare Center (1 Nos)
Education Infrastructure
Construction of Primary School (0 Nos)
Construction of Secondary School (1 Nos)
Construction of Senior Secondary School (1 Nos)
Construction of Public Library (1 Nos.)
Other Infrastructure
Construction of Community Hall (1 Nos)
Up gradation of Parks (1 Nos)
Construction of Crematorium (1 Nos)
Installation of Fire Fighting Services (1 Nos)

2025

MEDIUM

Health Infrastructure
Up gradation of Existing Hospital
Education Infrastructure
Construction of Primary School (1 Nos)
Construction of Secondary School (1 Nos)
Construction of Senior Secondary School (1 Nos)
Other Infrastructure
Construction of Crematorium (1 Nos)
Installation of Fire Fighting Services (1 Nos)

2035

LOW

Health Infrastructure
Construction of Dispensary (1 Nos)
Education Infrastructure

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

137

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.13: Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur


Horizon

Priority

Detail of project

Year
Construction of Primary School (2 Nos)
Construction of Secondary School (2 Nos)
Construction of Senior Secondary School (1 Nos)
Construction of Public Library (1 Nos.)
Other Infrastructure
Upgradation of Community Hall (1 Nos)
Upgradation of Parks (1 Nos)
Construction of Crematorium (1 Nos)
Up gradation of Fire Fighting Services (1 Nos)
2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Source: Consultants of the project

7.9 Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years In


Khilchipur
The strategies / policies / actions to be undertaken for achieving the Goals and implanting the projects
presented in the Table below.
Table 7.14: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
No
01

Strategies & Action Plan


Improving
initiatives

hygiene

behavior

through

community

2015

2025

2035

sanitation YES

Participation of several stakeholders, such as ULBs, NGOs and


CBOs is needed for a sanitation project. Community ownership
should be built from the beginning, including involvement in the
technical design.
Efforts for promoting community and household level hygiene
practices should complement the investments in sanitation
infrastructure.
User payment for services relieves pressure on municipal financing
and ensures maintenance. However, affordability of services for the
communities should be kept in mind, and the charge should be
commensurate to the paying capacity of the poor.
02

Mobilizing communities

YES

Building individual and institutional capacities in the slums is


crucial for sustainability.
Demand enhancement is possible through pro-active awareness
generation and information dissemination matched with quality
service.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

138

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.14: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
No
03

Strategies & Action Plan


Policy level interventions For Education

2015
YES

2025

2035

YES

The Education Department, which often remains outside the urban


development framework, needs to get integrated effectively into the
overall planning process.
Develop a common policy and regulatory framework among various
public and private sector providers of education in slum areas.
A clear policy of ear marking funds for education in municipalities
in general.
The emphasis of the Municipal Administration department to be laid
on service delivery by overseeing the quality aspects of planning,
providing and promoting education in urban areas with special
focus on the urban poor
A continuous dialogue between the municipal administered schools
and the education department would go a long way in improving the
condition of municipal school education in the state. Joint meetings
of Secretaries of Municipal Administration and Urban Development
and the Education Department to continuously review, monitor and
plan for the educational needs of urban poor.
04

Orientation of Teachers

YES

Extending academic and pedagogic support to teachers to improve


retention and learning by students in municipal schools
Sensitization programmes for teachers to bridge the social distance
between teachers and the slum dwellers
05

Funding of Municipal Schools

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

Educational tax should be levied by all the municipalities.


The general principle of equalization to be laid down and the state
grants to increase progressively in inverse proportion to the wealth
of the municipality concerned.
The education tax should be a direct tax tacked on to the property
tax at so much per cent on the annual letting value or the capital
value as the case may be.
The rate of the tax in each municipality will have to depend upon the
circumstances of each case.
06

Literacy Campaigns and Operation Restoration


Encompasses the programmes of Total Literacy Campaign (TLC)
and Post Literacy Programme (PLP). Literacy Campaign is the
principal strategy of the National Literacy Mission for eradication of
illiteracy.

07

Community participation fund (Urban Reform)

YES

In order to address these issues, it is proposed that the ULB should


come out with a Community Participation Fund (CPF). The primary
objective of the fund is to catalyse community participation by
supporting the building of community assets. In the long run, this
should lead to increased community participation in the citys
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

139

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 7.14: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
No

Strategies & Action Plan

2015

2025

2035

functioning thus enabling them to develop a sense of ownership on


community assets and take on responsibilities for community-based
exercises. One of the central features of accessing the grant from
Centre or state government is to implement mandatory reform
conditions such as Community Participation Law, to enable
constitution of Area Sabhas within municipal wards and Public
Disclosure Law. Implementing this strategy will have twofold effects,
one being the fulfillment of the reform and two creating sustainable
assets.
2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Source: Consultants of the project

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

140

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 8: Environment
The rapid increase in industrial and economic development has led to severe environmental
degradation that undermines the environmental resource base upon which sustainable
development depends. The economics of environmental pollution, depletion and
degradation of resources has in fact been neglected as compared to the issues of growth
and expansion.
Urban Environment includes both natural elements as well as built environment. Natural
elements include air, water, land, climate, flora and fauna. The built environment, physical
surroundings constructed or modified for human habitation and activity, encompasses
buildings, infrastructure and urban open spaces. A citys built environment also gives visible
form to important historic or contemporary cultural values. The intersection and overlap of
natural environment, built and socioeconomic environment constitute urban environment.
The escalated urbanization, associated with environmental degradation, has generated a
debate on how much urban green space has been lost due to the urbanization process.
Integrated means of addressing the ecological and environmental, economic and social
concerns are still neglected in the framework of development. As a result, large areas of
urban green space are declining rapidly, and causing numerous environmental problems.
However, both environmental awareness and environmental legislation (setting of standards
etc.) have advanced considerably in recent years, but enforcement is lagging almost
everywhere.
This chapter establishes the environment baseline situation of

Khilchipur.

It describes the

status of urban environment, quality and services, identifies environmental issues and
strategies to address these issues through CDP.

8.1. Flora and Fauna


In the past, the district of Rajgarh had thick forests. However, during the last 50 years the
forests were degraded. The forest can be divided into four categories: Dry Deciduous Teak
Forests, Foot Hill Teak Forest, Mixed Forest and Bamboo Forest. Teak is the most
important and has the most valorous species of the district. The forests of Rajgarh district
afford a large species of wild animals as birds, panther, wild pigs, nilgai etc.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

141

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

8.2. Pollution Levels


Air: No record is found about air pollution level in the municipal record because till date no study has
been done. Although data is not available, it is generally believed that there is deterioration of air
quality due to increased motorized vehicular traffic, burning of solid waste, use of coal and cow-dung
for cooking purposes, lack of green belt/buffer zones etc. In addition following factors also contribute
largely to the problem.

Increase in the number of vehicular traffic.

Poor road condition.

Construction of buildings.

Water: The quality of water was mentioned in chapter 5 (table 5.1). In terms of quality standards, the
quality of water is considered satisfactory by the Public Health Engineering Department (PHED).
Soil: There is no data available about soil pollution in the town. However, increasing saline land is
being reported in the last years. This kind of problem is caused mainly due widespread use of
fertilizers for agriculture purpose. Good quality of soil is extracted from earth in huge amount due to
brick manufacturing industries. It is inevitable to have an alternate to the economy of the town.

8.3. City Green Spaces


Good quality green space enhances the quality of urban life and contributes to improve health, more
sustainable neighborhood renewal and better community cohesion, especially in more deprived
communities. Green spaces introduce the natural into the urban environment. They offer, especially in
the form of parks and nature preserves, opportunities for recreation, reflection, and relaxation.
At present, Khilchipur has no parks which provide space for recreation and relaxation for its citizens.
The actual cover ratio of green spaces is 15%, according to Master Plan. Preserve and enhance the
green areas, parks, gardens, lake-side plantation are mandatory practices for every city. It is important
integrating preservation of environment with the urban growth characteristics. [Please refer the map
section for getting details on open space network and green spaces]

8.4. Water Front Development and Conservation


Due to development and growth of the town, the water resources are facing anthropogenic pressure,
which adversely affects ecological condition. Hence it is necessary to conserve and upgrade water
bodies by adopting suitable environmental measures in the interest of human being as well as for the
proper development of the town. Conservation of water resources is an essential measure for
sustainability.
Moreover, a large area of the state has faced droughts and natural water shortage. The irregular rains
increased acute shortage of fresh water. It is making government and people more and more conscious
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

142

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

about water. And it is necessary to create further efforts towards conservation and management of
water resources.
In Khilchipur, the water bodies are some very important water bodies which are deteriorating rapidly
due to increased urbanization.
A successful city cannot operate efficiently in isolation from its environment. It must balance social,
economic and environmental needs. It is therefore important to understand the linkages between urban
development and the natural resources / urban environment. While healthy urban ecosystems provide
cities with a wide range of services essential for their economic, social and environmental
sustainability, damaged ecosystems have a very negative impact on urban residents, and in particular
on the urban poor. Most importantly, one needs to understand that the environment cuts across all
sectors, income, groups and management areas.

8.5. Existing Environmental Regulations


The main objective of M.P. Pollution Control Board is to maintain water, air and soil in healthy and
usable condition for various purposes. With considerable authority and responsibility under various
environment legislation to prevent the pollution M.P. Pollution Control Board presently looks after
the implementation of following Acts:

Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act,1974

Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Cess Act, 1977

Air (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Act, 1981

Environment Protection Act ,1986 (certain sections)

Public Liability Insurance Act, 1991

The potential scope of the Act is broad with environment which includes water, air and land and
interrelationship among water, air, land, human beings, other creatures, plants, micro organisms and
property. Section 3(1) of the Act empowers the Center to take all such measures as it seems necessary
or expedient for the purpose of protecting and improving the quality of the environment and
preventing, controlling and abating environmental pollution. Central Government is authorized to set
new national standards for ambient quality of the environment and standards for controlling emissions
and effluent discharges; to regulate industrial locations; to prescribe procedures for managing
hazardous substances; to establish safeguard for preventing accidents; and to collect and disseminate
information regarding environmental pollution.
The EPA was the first environmental statute to give the Central Government authority to issue direct
written orders including orders to close, prohibit or regulate any industry operation or process or to
stop or regulate the supply of electricity, water or any other services (Section 5). Other powers
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

143

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

granted to the Central Government to ensure compliance with the Act include the power of entry for
examination, testing of equipment and other purpose (Section 10) and power to take samples of air,
water, soil or any other substance from any place for analysis (Section 11). The Act explicitly
prohibits discharge of pollutants in excess of prescribed standards (Section 7). There is also a specific
prohibition against handling of hazardous substances except in compliance with regulatory procedures
and discharges (section 8). Persons responsible for discharges of pollutants in excess of prescribed
standards must prevent or mitigate the pollution and must report the discharge to government
authorities (Section 9.1).
The Act provides for severe penalties. Any person who fails to comply with or contravenes any of the
provisions of the Act, or the rules or directions issued under the Act shall be punished for each failure
or contravention, with a prison term of up to 5 years or a fine up to 1 lakh or both. The Act imposes an
additional fine up to Rs. 5000 for every day of continuing violation (Section 15 (1)). If a failure or
contravention occurs for more than one year after the date of conviction an offender may be punished
with a prison term which may extend to seven years (Section 15 (2)).
The Act empowers the central government to establish standards for the quality of the environment in
its various aspects, including maximum allowable concentration of various environmental pollutants
(including noise) for different areas. These standards could be based on ambient levels of pollutants
which are sufficiently low to protect the public health and welfare. Emission or discharge standards
for particular industries could be adjusted to ensure that such ambient levels are achieved. The
Environment (Protection) Rules, 1986 allow the State or Central authorities to establish more
stringent standards based on recipient system.
The EPA includes a citizens suit provision (Section 19.6) and a provision authorizing the Central
Government to issue orders directly to protect the environment (Section 5). The Central Government
may delegate specified duties and powers under the EPA to any officer, state government or other
authority (Section 23). The Central Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) is responsible for
making rules to implement the EPA. The Ministry has delegated the powers to carry out enforcement
to the Central and State Pollution Control Boards in the country.
The MoEF has so far enforced several rules and regulations. It has adopted industry specific standards
for effluent discharges and emissions from different categories of industries. The Ministry has also
designated certain state and Central Officials to carry out specified duties under the Act and has
designated specific laboratories for testing the samples of air water and soil obtained under the Act.

8.5.1 Existing Environment Legislations In India


There are several other pieces of legislation that impact on the control of water pollution. A more
complete list is presented in following table.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

144

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 8.1: Important policies, legal provisions and authorities related to water pollution
Central/State Legal
Provisions

Main Objectives

Constitutional Provisions on Statutory powers conferred on states to make law on water and
sanitation
and
water sanitation
pollution
Policy
Statement
Abatement of
Pollution, 1992

for Suggests developing relevant legislation and regulation, fiscal


incentives, voluntary agreements, educational programs, information
campaigns, need environmental considerations into decision making
at all levels, pollution prevention at source, application of best
practicable solution, ensure polluter pays for control of pollution,
focus on heavily polluted areas and river stretches and involve public
in decision-making

The National Conservation Promotes judicious and sustainable use of natural resources,
Strategy
and
Policy preservation of biodiversity, land and water
Statement on Environment
and Development, 1992
The National Environment Promotes conservation national resources, protection of wild life and
Policy, 2006
ecosystems, prevention of pollution, reuse and recycling of
wastewater, adoption of clean technology, application of polluter pay
principle and amendment in the existing law from criminal to civil
suit provisions
National Sanitation Policy, Aimed at awareness generation, behaviour change, open defication
2008
free cities, safe disposal of wastes and propoer operation and
maintenance of sanitary installations. It requires different states and
cities to develop their sanitation policies, startegies and goals
The water (Prevention &
Control of Pollution) Cess
Act, 1977, as Amended in
1993 and 2003
Central
Ground
Authority

To charge cess on water consumption for polluting activities to


strengthen the pollution control boards by providing financial support
for equipment and technical personnel and to promote water
conservation by recycling

Water To regulate and control abstraction, development and management of


groundwater resources

The
Public
Liability To provide for public liability- insurance for the purpose of providing
Insurance Act, 1991
immediate relief to the persons affected by accident occurring while
handling any hazardous substance
Hazardous
waste Legislative framework for laws enactment related to storage
(Management and Handling) transport, handling and disposal of hazardous wastes
Rules, 1989
Manufacture, Storage and Rules for manufacture, storage and import of hazardous chemical
import
of
Hazardous
Chemical Rules, 1989
Municipal
Solid
waste Rules for Municipal Solid waste Management at urban cities
(Management and Handling)
Rules, 1999
The National Environment To provide for strict liability for damages arising out of any accident
Tribunal Act, 1995
occurring while handling any hazardous substance and for the
establishment of a National Environment Tribunal for effective and
expeditious disposal of related cases.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

145

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 8.1: Important policies, legal provisions and authorities related to water pollution
Central/State Legal
Provisions
Environment
Assessment
1994

Main Objectives

Impact To impose restrictions and prohibitions on the expansion and


Notification, modernization of any activity or new projects being undertaken in any
part of India unless environmental clearance has been accorded by
the Central Government or the State Government.

73rd and 74th Constitutional Obliging state governments to constitute Urban Local Bodies (ULBs)
Amendments - Role of Local and transfer responsibility for water supply and sanitation services to
Self Government
them
Municipalities Act, District Complete authority and jurisdiction over all urban amenities,
Municipalities Act or the including water supply and sanitation with municipality
Nagar Palika Act
Town Planning Act/Urban To establish development and planning authorities, having powers
Development authorities Act over any development activity in the area under their jurisdiction
Source: MoUD, GoI
All the current legal provisions deal with diverse water, wastewater and sanitation services and have
resulted in multiple bodies and jurisdictions in India. However, the sanitation is not covered in a
holistic manner except prohibition of its discharge into water bodies. This section will be dealt in
detail in the next stage of the Report.

8.6. SWOT Analysis


The Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats have been assessed based on the existing
situation analysis and participatory consultation with stakeholders and citizens, see below table:
Table 8.2: SWOT Analysis (Environment) for Khilchipur (M)
Sector
Environment

Strengths

Weaknesses

Opportunities

-Good water -No concrete data on -Infrastructure


quality
the
urban projects under
environment at ULB
state
government
-No Environmental
Management Plan
-Initiatives
by
State
-Infrastructure
Government
deficiency
causing
and Local Body
pollution of major
water bodies

Threats
-Uncontrolled mining of
marbles and minerals
-Uncontrolled movement
of heavy vehicles through
town.
-Sewage directly mixing
into the water bodies

8.7. Issues
Water

Intensive agricultural land use and high dependency on river water for irrigation.

Disposal of sewerage directly into surface drains or surface water bodies pollutes water
resources.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

146

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Ground water contamination due to absence of septic tanks in the city, leakages and
overflowing of sewerage pipelines.

Mixing of water and sewerage due to faulty lines.

Increasing number of per capita vehicles.

Traffic Congestion in the core area creates high level of noise and emissions results in chaotic

Air

environment.

Air pollution has increased in last few years due to increased traffic, cutting of trees, burning
of wood and charcoal in low income areas in urban fringes of the city.

Low Per capital green and open space in the core area.

Increasing saline land.

Erosion of soil from the banks of the water body.

Large-scale and uncontrolled mining of marbles and other minerals leads to deforestation.

Increasing use of Plastic.

Soil

Others

Lack of data on the environment in ULB.

No awareness about the kind of health hazards the pollution brings to the citizens.

No monitoring and evaluation carried out at ULB or State Level.

8.8. City Specific Strategies and Action Plan


The goals and service outcomes for the sector for the period till 2035 are presented in the Table
below.
Table 8.3: Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
Vision Goals

(Current)

Mandatory
Rainwater
Harvesting in all buildings

2015

Increase Urban Green Cover


Access to recreational and
Green Spaces

Reuse of Recycled Water

2025

2035

50%

100%

15%

25%

35%

25%

50%

100%

50%

100%

2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

147

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 8.3: Identified Goals Of Improvement For Horizon Years in Khilchipur


Vision Goals

(Current)

2015

2025

2035

Source: Stakeholders consultation

8.9 Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur


The projects identified for the sector for the period till 2035 are presented in the Table below.
Table 8.4: Identified Projects For Horizon Years In Khilchipur
Horizon

Priority

Detail of project

Year
2015

HIGH

Constructing a model project of Decentralised systems18 of Waste


Water Treatment.
Constructing a model project of Rain Water harvesting system.
Conservation of Existing Water Bodies
Construction of Parks and Gardens

2025

MEDIUM

Undertaking a Road Side plantation programme

2035

LOW

Undertaking an Environment Mapping of the town


Undertake training Programmes to sensitize and train officials in
ULB and towards the need for Rain Water Harvesting.

2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Source: Consultants of the project

8.10 Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years In


Khilchipur
The strategies / policies / actions to be undertaken for achieving the Goals and implanting the projects
presented in the Table below.
Table 8.5: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
No
01

Strategies & Action Plan


-Preservation and Rejuvenation of Water Bodies

2015

2025

2035

YES

Under this programme a study needs to be taken up to identify lakes


and pondswhich are polluted in the city. The next step will be to reroute the domestic sewageoutfalls, nallahs and chemicals wastes
which are directly discharging into the waterbodies. Desilting of
ponds and lakes may be taken up to increase the holdingcapacity.
Proper catchment treatment is also required to maintain the quality
ofwater. The following intervention will help in preserving &

18

It refer to localized applications where uncontaminated wastewater from bath, washbasins, clothes washing etc. is used for non-potable purposes such as for

watering landscape. It can also refer to secondary and tertiary treatment facilities that serve individual homes, apartments and small communities by treating the
wastewater from these areas and allowing them to be reused in the same locality for non-potable purposes such as toilet flushing, washing of floors, watering of
gardens or recharging groundwater supplies through water recharge structures.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

148

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 8.5: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
No

Strategies & Action Plan

2015

2025

2035

Rejuvenation of Water Bodies:


Desiltation project for Major Watder Bodies
Conservation & Preservation of River Garh Ganga
02

-Urban Greening Plan

YES

YES

YES

Group

Group

A comprehensive plan may be prepared for Protecting the green


cover through changes in land use zoning and creating and
developing parks for that purpose can be considered. This also
indirectly helps in preventing soil erosion mostly near river banks. It
is suggested to undertake the following interventions:
Tree Plantation: It is suggested to increase the per capita green
spaces through increasing plantation of trees along major roads and
increase the amount of densification in identified areas.
03

Introduce Mandatory Rainwater Harvesting in all buildings (Urban


Reform)
Group 1:
The Groundwater Zones in the City based on existing knowledge of
Geology, depth to Ground Water Table and existing Groundwater
monitoring data.
Implement Pilot projects in Government and Institutional buildings
to finalize design of Rainwater Harvesting structures (based on
existing knowledge) most suited to the topography and geological
conditions of the City
Identify critical areas and land uses where RWH should be taken up
on immediate basis
Extend implementation of RWH to all land uses including industries,
green areas and transportation (like footpaths)
Group 2:
Prepare draft building byelaws to reflect the mandatory clause of
Rainwater Harvesting.
Widely disseminate the new set of Building Byelaws through a
website that also provides links to other key resources and via
Public Interest advertisements in the mass media.
City Level Workshops to address the queries of general public
Start of Approval as per the new building byelaws
Offer rebate on property tax has been offered as an incentive for
implementing rainwater harvesting systems.
Maintain a digital database of information regarding Ground Water
Scenario and Tube wells in the city.
Provide Separate budgetary allocation for Rain Water Harvesting in
the Municipal Budget.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

149

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 8.5: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
No

Strategies & Action Plan

2015

2025

2035

Introduce Byelaws on Reuse of Recycled Water19 (Urban Reform)

Group

Group

Group 1: Legal and institutional

Prepare legal and institutional framework to allow for water reuse


Define roles and responsibilities of agencies/departments
Prepare water reuse byelaws making dual piping; dual plumbing etc
mandatory in new property developments
Adopt water reuse byelaws through an ordinance or change in
regulations
Group 2: Operational
Conduct feasibility studies for identifying reuse technologies and
applications
Make water reuse mandatory in new developments all large
buildings with more than 2000 sq.m. area and new layouts shall
implement water reuse
Approval of plans by ULB or planning authority for new
developments shall conform to water reuse regulations
Lead by example ULBs should adopt water recycling in municipal
and other government buildings
Implement monitoring requirements
Conduct public education campaigns and awareness programs in
schools, offices, community spaces
04

Improve Environment Management System

05

Introducing Public
Conservation

Private

Yes

Partnership

in

Environment

Yes

Public-Community Partnerships, by which public agencies and local


communities cooperate in the management of a given environmental
resource, each partner bringing agreed resources, assuming
specified responsibilities, and with defined entitlements, e.g. Joint
Forestry Management.
Public-Private-Voluntary Organization Partnerships, in which the
provision of specified public responsibilities is accomplished on
competitive basis by the private sector, and the provision is
monitored by competitively selected voluntary organizations, e.g.
Build, Own, Operate DEWATS.
06

19

Air pollution: A city level air pollution management plan can be


formulated to take care of point sources as well as non point sources
of air pollution within the city. In case of stationary and point

YES

YES

Water reuse refers to the practice of capturing and using water discharged or lost by a previous user. Water reuse reforms allow ULBs to ensure dependable

and cost-effective water supply to communities in an environmentally sustainable manner.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

150

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 8.5: Proposed Strategies & Action Plans For Horizon Years in Khilchipur
No

Strategies & Action Plan

2015

2025

2035

sources of pollution like industrial units, enforcement agencies like


State Pollution Control Board may be alerted. In case of small
industries that function under municipal license, the industries may
be asked to switch to cleaner fuel as a condition of renewal of
license. In case of moving and line sources like automobile traffic, if
the cause of pollution is congestion at certain stretches of roads and
intersection, measures like traffic diversion, banning of heavy
vehicle traffic during peak hours, building by passes etc may be
identified in conjunction with roads and traffic component of intramunicipal infrastructure. In case of serious and persistently high
levels of pollution, a proposal for establishing air quality monitoring
station may also be considered.
07

Noise Pollution: An action plan may be developed based on the


analysis of sources of noise. In case the source of noise pollution is
public loud speakers, applications may be made at the appropriate
levels to enforce restrictions on use during specific hours such as
between 10.00 p.m. and 06.00 a.m. supported by strict enforcement.
Where traffic, particularly hourns, is the source, no horn zone may
be declared and the restriction strictly enforced. Where high speed
traffic on highways is the source, noise barriers may be proposed
particularly near sensitive uses like schools and hospitals.

YES

YES

08

-Water quality: To ensure good quality drinking water supply the


ULBs can have a programme of water quality monitoring at the
main sources, online and at the user end of water supply system,
with help of State Government Agencies. It can also carry out
periodic testing of water quality by procuring low cost kits for field
testing. The major thrust however, should be in the field of
maintenance of the existing infrastructure.

YES

YES

09

Promotion of community awareness and education: Community


awareness with respect to causes and sources of air, water, soil and
noise pollution is important. It is also important that the effects of
environmental pollution and its long term impact be understood by
the community.

YES

010 Soil Pollution: Compliance of the MSW (Management & Handling) YES
Rules, 2000 including identification and selection of landfill sites
and safe disposal of solid waste of the city. Solid Waste Management
to be further improved by segregating the waste and reusing and
recycling the same. For further details please refer to the section on
Solid Waste Management Sector Plan.
011 Undertake a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)

YES

An ad hoc approach to environmental issues is fragmentary,


expensive and inefficient. Therefore, it is essential to undertake a
Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA).
2015: (Period: Current to 2015); 2025: (Period: 2015 to 2025); 2035: (Period: 2025 to 2035)
Source: Consultant of the Project

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

151

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 9: Existing Institutional Framework


For Development
9.1 Background
Madhya Pradesh is no exception to the general trend obtainable in the country as a whole in the field
of local self-government in the post-independence period, though the state had to face some peculiar
problems arising out of 2 the re-organisation of states in India in 1956 and then in 2000. The new state
of Madhya Pradesh, inherited a diverse legislation and administrative system, varying from the
provincial autonomy of the former Madhya Pradesh, to the central control and direction of Bhopal and
Vindhya Pradesh states which were part C states, prior to their merger in the new state. The
developments in the field of local self-government in different regions comprising the new state did
not manifest a uniform pattern.
The Mahakoshal region which formed a part of the British India had long and well-established
traditions in the field of municipal government, whereas developments in the former states of Bhopal,
Vindhya Pradesh and Madhyabharat which were constituted consequent upon the amalgamation of
princely states, had not taken place on a well-conceived basis. The following Acts were in operation
earlier to the formation of new state of Madhya Pradesh and were also continued in operation till their
replacement by new legislations.
1

The Central Provinces and Berar Municipalities Act, 1922, as amended between 1927 and
1956, applicable to Mahakoshal region

The Jabalpur Municipal Corporation Act, 1948

The Madhyabharat Municipalities Act, 1954

The Vindhya Pradesh State Municipal Act, 1954

The Madhyabharat Municipal Corporation Act, 1954

The Bhopal State Municipal Act, 1955

In July, 1957, the M.P. Government appointed the Local Self-government (Urban) Committee, to
suggest modifications in existing legislations, with a view to bringing about uniformity in the
structure and working of municipalities in the state. The Committee submitted its report in 1959 and
in the light of the recommendations of this committee, the State Government, enacted the following
legislation, replacing the diverse legislations in operation in different parts of the state:
1

The Madhya Pradesh Municipalities Act, 1961

The Madhya Pradesh Municipal Corporation Act, 1956

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

152

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

The Constitutional amendment Act, 1992, gives local bodies a constitutional status, assigns them a
large number of functions, ensures them stability, provides a suitable framework to function with
greater freedom and also makes institutional arrangements for devolution of larger financial resources.
To meet the constitutional requirements and aspirations, the Madhya Pradesh government made
necessary amendments in the existing legislations relating to local bodies in the state. Under the new
dispensation, three types of urban local bodies have been set up in the state:
1. Municipal corporations to be constituted in large urban areas.
2. Municipal councils for smaller towns.
3. Nagar Panchayats for urban areas (less than 20,000 people). These are transitional areas from rural
to urban.

9.2. Urban Local Body Structure


In India a Nagar Parishad or municipality is an urban local body that administers a city of population
200,000 or less. Under the Panchayati Raj system, it interacts directly with the state government,
though it is administratively part of the district it is located in. Generally smaller district cities and
bigger towns have a Nagar Parishad. The members of the Nagar Parishad are elected representatives
for a term of five years.
The figure gives a brief outline of Khilchipur Nagar Parishad and its administration.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

153

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

The structure of the ULBs consists of two Wings i.e., the Deliberative Wing and the Executive Wing.

9.2.1 Executive Wing


An elected council comprising of a directly elected President and Ward councilors represents the
Elected Wing. The town is divided into wards according to its population and representatives are
elected from each ward. One elected councilor represents each Ward. As per the 74th Constitutional
Amendment Act (CAA), A Vice President assists the President and is elected from amongst the
councilors. The term of both, the President and his Deputy, is for a period of 5 years. The
residents/citizens have a key role in defining the development of the city as they identify and elect the
representative for the local body in the city. The citizens have a major role in designing the system.
There is a provision for the reservation in the election process for the councilor. The reservation
details in Khilchipur are given in the below table. The Functions and powers of the Elected Wing are
attached in the annexure.
Table 9.1: Reservation of post in KHILCHIPUR Nagar Parishad
Gender

Nos

SC

OBC

6-7

ST

Ladies

General

11 (8M & 3F).

Reservation

7 (5 SC, 2 Ladies)

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

9.2.2 Administrative Wing


The Chief Municipal Officer, who is also the executive head of the ULB, heads the administrative
Wing. A chief municipal officer, along with officers like an engineer, sanitary inspector, health officer
and education officer who come from the state public service are appointed by the state government to
control the administrative affairs of the Nagar Parishad. There are about 72 sanctioned post in
Khilchipur (M) in which about 67 are been filled and remaining 5 are vacant. There are about 58
Employees engaged on daily basis. The Functions and powers of the Administrative wing are attached
in the annexure.
Table 9.2: Chart of post in KHILCHIPUR Nagar Parishad
Status of post

Nos

Posts filled

72

Posts remaining

Sanctioned post

67

Engaged on daily basis

58

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

154

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 9.2: Chart of post in KHILCHIPUR Nagar Parishad


Status of post

Nos

Source: Khilchipur Nagar Parishad


Various departments under the ULB, share the responsibility of service delivery within the ULB. The
functions of various officials/departments, under the Administrative wing, are elucidated hereunder:
(i) Chief Municipal Officer. The CMO is at the apex of this structure and is responsible for all
activities carried out by the ULB. The CMO is responsible for preparation and certification of all
periodical records, returns and furnishes all information as may from time to time be required by the
Municipal Council or the Standing committees. He is also responsible for preparation of accounts. At
each general meeting, the Commissioner along with some other key officials, discuss various issues
with the elected representatives.
(ii) General Administration Department. This department is responsible for establishment, other
essential matters relating to office, officers, staff and their welfare like preparation of staff pay bills,
registration of birth and death certificates, etc.
(iii) Engineering Department. Engineer heads the Engineering Section and is assisted by assistant
engineers, junior engineers and other staff. This department looks after all the works relating to
execution and maintenance of basic amenities like water supply, storm water drains, internal roads,
street lights, etc. The Engineering department is also responsible for ensuring the quality of works and
their execution within the time frame.
(iv) Revenue and Accounts Department. The department is headed by the CMO and assisted by
Accounts officers, Revenue Officers, and other officers. The Accounts Section is responsible for
supervising all financial transactions related to the ULB, advising the Commissioner on all internal
financial matters, updating financial receipts and expenditure details in accordance with the utilization
of funds, reporting deviations in expenditure of funds in any of the allocated schemes, assisting
preparation of the budget, maintenance of accounts regarding stamp duty, SFC Grants, MP Grants,
maintenance of petty cash book and general cash book and attending to audit requirements and other
such accounts-related duties. Revenue Officer, heading the Revenue Section, is responsible for
collecting taxes such as, trade tax, house tax, advertisement tax, and entertainment tax; collection of
duty; issuing notices for recovery of tax; and monitoring revenue collections of the ULB.
(v) Public Health Department. The department is headed by Municipal Health Officer, and is
responsible for ULB services such as solid waste management, public health related works like
malaria control, family planning, mother and child health care, etc, and other government assisted
programs related to health and poverty reduction and awareness programs. The Municipal Health
Officer assisted by the Sanitary Inspectors, is responsible for services of solid waste management and
Malaria Control activities. Junior officers are in-charge of works execution at the field level, which
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

155

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

includes monitoring and supervising the work of sanitary labourers in the wards under their charge
and attending to specific local complaints. Besides, this department is responsible for the enforcement
of the Public Health Act. The department is also involved in promotion of health awareness programs
and implements various State and Central assisted schemes like pulse polio project, SJSRY etc.

9.2.3 Institutions and Capacity of the Urban Local Body


The governance of urban local bodies assumes importance with the adoption of 74 th Constitutional
Amendment Act. The Act proposes mandatory elections and greater devolution of functions to the
urban local bodies. In light of these developments, it is appropriate to review the system of
governance of the project in Khilchipur urban area. This element outlines the present structure of the
elected and administration wings of the ULB and deals with issues related to management functions,
operations and reforms.
The functional jurisdictions of these agencies vis--vis the ULB in respect of the main civic services
are shown in Table 9.3.
Table 9.3: Institutional responsibility Matrix, KHILCHIPUR (M)
Within ULB jurisdiction
Urban infrastructure

Planning
and

Construction

design

Outside ULB
jurisdiction

Operation
and
maintenance

Water Supply

ULB

ULB

ULB

PHED

Sewerage

ULB

ULB

ULB

PHED

Drainage

ULB

ULB

ULB

PHED

Storm Water Drainage

ULB

ULB

ULB

PHED

Solid waste Disposal

ULB

ULB

ULB

NA

Municipal Roads (including flyovers) ULB

ULB

ULB

GoI/
GoMP
(PWD) / HB

Street Lighting

ULB

ULB

ULB

NA

Environment

MPPCB/
EPCO

MPPCB/
EPCO

MPPCB/
ULB

MPPCB/ EPCO

Source: Khilchipur (M)

9.3 Department of Housing & Environment, GoMP


The Department of Housing and Environment, Government of Madhya Pradesh has two branches.
The main objectives of the department is as under:
Housing: Under this the works related to housing construction projects, housing projects for
government employees and National Housing Policy, M.P.Sthan Niyantran Adhiniyam and
M.P.Prakosth etc are carried out.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

156

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Environment: The main works carried out under the Environment Department mainly relates to land
management, development planning and
management, Development of Biological Resources, Control of Pollution, Environmental
Upgradation, Capital Project and works related to capital area.
Development authority: The main works carried out under the department relates to the development
of Urban and special notified areas. The principle departments under this are Town & country
Planning Department, Madhya Pradesh Vikas Pradhikaran Sangh, Capital Project Administration.

9.4 Town and Country Planning Department


The Town & Country planning department is governed under M.P. Nagar Thata Gram Nivesh
Adhiniyam 1973 and rules prepared there under e.g. M.P.Nagar Tatha Gram Nivesh Niyam 1975 and
M.P.Bhumi Vikas Niyam 1984.
The main functions are, preparation of Town Development Plan, Review Evaluation and Modification
of existing Development Plan, Preparation of Regional Development Plan , Monitoring and
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

157

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Enforcement of various schemes such as Integrated Development Plan of Small and Medium Towns
(IDSMT) and Urban Infrastructure Development scheme for Small & Medium Towns (UIDSSMT),
Control on unauthorized development in towns and functions of State Nodal Agency for National
Urban Information System Scheme.
T&C P Act 1973 Ammendment, Bhoomi Vikas Niyam, TCP Niyam 1975, TCP - Vyyan- Niyam etc.
are the acts and rules applicable under the department:

9.5. Development Authority


Development Authorities in Madhya Pradesh are incorporated by the Government of the State of
Madhya Pradesh in 1973 in the place of city Improvement Trust (formed in 1924 under the British
Rule) under the Madhya Pradesh Town and Country Planning Act of 1973. The major task of
Development Authority is construction of residential / housing societies but along with that it has
undertaken several development projects like construction of roadways, traffic square areas and also
Lakes & Gardens, etc. Development Authority (DA) is to implement the master plan made by Town
and Country Planning Office, Bhopal. Besides this many other functions are performed by DA, which
includes construction as well as extension of roads, developing gardens, constructing railway over
bridges, building swimming pool, parks, clubs, petrol pump and it also undertakes plantation work to
fulfill its social responsibilities. In this way, DA works towards improving infrastructure facilities in
the city upon which the pace of real estate development depends much.
However in smaller towns like Khilchipur such development authorities does not exist. ULB is the
only implementing authority of the master plan and development works.

9.6. Public Health Engineering Department


The Public Health Engineering Department performs this essential function. Immunisation and
provision of a hygienic environment are complementary measures towards the prevention of diseases
and promotion of health. The Public Health Engineering Department is an independent department
under Government of Madhya Pradesh. The major activities of the department are enumerated
below:01. Survey, investigation, preparation and execution of water supply schemes for towns &
villages;
02. Survey, investigation, preparation and execution of sewerage and sewage disposal schemes
for towns;
03. Execution of rural sanitation schemes;
04. Supply of safe drinking water at places of Fair;
05. Coordination in prevention of pollution of water bodies due to discharge of industrial wastes;

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

158

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

06. Giving technical advice to various Government departments and local bodies on Public
Health engineering topics.
PHED has been given the responsibility of planning, design and construction of the water supply,
sewerage and drainage projects since 1995. Under this arrangement, the financial and administrative
sanction for a project comes from the PHED. The assets, however, have to be transferred to the ULB
on completion for operation and maintenance. Though, the PHED staffs works under tile functional
control of the MC, their administrative control remains with the PHED. There is therefore duality here
and accountability is blurred.

9.7. Madhya Pradesh Housing Board


The Madhya Pradesh Housing Board was established as a body corporate under the Madhya Pradesh
Griha Nirman Mandal Adhiniyam, 1972 which replaced the earlier similar Act of 1950. The objective
of Madhya Pradesh Housing Board is to deal with and satisfying the need of housing accommodation
and for matters connected there-with. The principal activity of the Housing Board is to create houses
and housing sites for the people, along with related facilities such as office complexes and
commercial areas and other provision for health, education and cultural amenities.
Madhya Pradesh Griha Nirman Mandal Adhiniyam, 1972,Madhya Pradesh Griha Nirman Mandal
Regulation, 1998, Allotment Rules, State Housing & Habitat Policy 2007 are major acts and policies
which govern the department.

9.8. Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board


Madhya Pradesh Pollution Control Board was established on 23rd September,1974 under the
provisions of Madhya Pradesh State Prevention and Control of Water Pollution Act,1974. Madhya
Pradesh Pollution Control Board was formed under the provisions of section 4 of Water (Prevention
and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974. The Board is also functioning as the State Board under section 5
of the Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981.
Apart from the above said Acts, the Board is also enforcing the following Acts & Rules :
01. The Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Cess Act, 1977, and as amended in 1991.
02. The Water (Prevention & Control of Pollution) Cess Rules, 1978.
03. The following Rules framed under Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 :
a. Hazardous Wastes (Management & Handling) Rules, 1989, and Amendment Rules 2000.
b. Manufacture, Storage and Import of Hazardous Chemical Rules, 1989.
c. Environmental Impact Assessment Notification, 1994 and 1997.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

159

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

d. Bio-Medical Waste (Management & Handling) Rules, 1998, and Amendment Rules
2000.
e. Recycled Plastics Manufacture & Usage Rules, 1999.
f.

The Noise Pollution (Regulation & Control) Rules, 2000.

g. Municipal Solid Wastes (Management & Handling) Rules, 2000.


h. Ozone Depleting Substances (Regulation & Control) Rules, 2000.
i.

Batteries (Management and Handling) Rules, 2001

04. The Public Liability Insurance Act, 1991.


Functions of the Board
The Important functions of the Board under Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974,
and Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981, (Section 17) are:

To plan comprehensive program for the prevention, control or abatement of pollution and
secure executions thereof,

To collect and disseminate information relating to pollution and the prevention, control or
abatement thereof,

To inspect sewage or trade effluent treatment and disposal facilities, and air pollution control
systems and to review plans, specification or any other data relating to the treatment plants,
disposal systems and air pollution control systems in connection with the consent granted,

Supporting and encouraging the developments in the fields of pollution control, waste recycle
reuse, eco-friendly practices etc.

Creation of public awareness about the clean and healthy environment and attending the
public complaints regarding pollution.

To advise the State Government on any matter concerning the prevention, control or
abatement of water pollution and air pollution.

To encourage, conduct and participate in investigations and research relating to problems of


water pollution and prevention, control or abatement of water pollution;

Laydown, modify or annul effluent standards for the sewage and trade effluents

9.9. Other Departments


- Environmental Planning and Coordination Organization (EPCO)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

160

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

The Environmental Planning and Coordination Organization (EPCO) was established by the Housing
and. Environment Department of the Government of Madhya Pradesh.
EPCOs responsibility is to assist and advise the State Government on environmental policy and
planning through

The preparation of a comprehensive data-based report on the status of the State's


environment, with regular updating

The appraisal of particular development projects and industrial projects

The study of particular environment problems and the formulation of feasible solutions

The facilitation of expert external inputs, including consultation services, in addition to its
own capacities

Undertaking environmental research and promote it through academic institutions

Undertaking environment sensitive planning by providing comprehensive design services in


architecture, urban and landscape design and environmental graphics.

Coordinating environment related activities and policies of the different agencies of


government and its different levies; to also co-ordinate activities of NGOs and other groups
among themselves and public agencies.

- Lake Conservation Authority


Lake Conservation Authority (LCA) is a successor organization of Bhoj Wetland Project. After
successful implementation of multidisciplinary and mega Bhoj Wetland Project for integrated
conservation and management of picturesque and ecologically important Upper and Lower lakes of
Bhopal funded by Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC), it was realized that water
resources conservation programmes are not an one time activity. To sustain the conservation gains,
efforts have to be continued. Consequently, the State Government has constituted the Lake
Conservation Authority of M.P (MPLCA) as registered society on 20th May 2004 under M.P.
Societies Registration Act 1973 to execute post project conservation and management works of Bhoj
Wetland Project and also to facilitate conservation and management of other water resources of the
entire state in an environmentally sustainable manner with emphasis on public and stakeholders
participation.
The primary objective of LCA is to manage, maintain and conserve lakes, ponds, reservoirs, tanks and
other surface & sub surface water resources such as watercourses, rivers, ground water etc in an
environmentally sustainable manner and promote participation of public and various stakeholders for
sustainable management of water resources. The LCA also provides consultancy services to
institutions on water related issues. LCA has an advisory role to the State Government regarding
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

161

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

integrated water resource management and for regulation and control of all types of activities, which
are detrimental to the lakes and water bodies.

- Madhya Pradesh Vikas Pradhikaran Sangh


The objective behind the formation of the MPVPS was to provide a forum for the Urban Local bodies
and other developmental agencies to provide technical expertise, technical guidance in project
management, study and research backup through consultancy services. Since it was a body formed
under the aegis of the Government of Madhya Pradesh, it is also ordained to implement the works
and the tasks assigned to it by the Government.
The Govt. of Madhya Pradesh, Housing & Environment Department declared Madhya Pradesh Vikas
Pradhikaran Sangh as Nodal Agency for the IDSMT schemes in the State as per the provisions of
revised guidelines of IDSMT schemes issued by Govt. of India in 1995. Vikas Pradhikaran Sangh is
providing Architectural and Engineering Consultancy to the towns selected under IDSMT scheme and
also monitoring the financial and financial progress of the schemes.

- Capital Administration Project, GoMP


The responsibility of comprehensive development of a city rests with the Housing & Environment
department of the State Government. Under the Housing & Environment department, master plan is
prepared for rural and urban development. According to this the task of city development is taken up.
The CPA headed by the Principal Secretary as the administrator has been set up under the Housing &
Environment department for overall planned and speedy development worthy of capital's splendor.
For proper coordination of various works, a separate forest division has been established under the
Capital Project Administration, besides the engineering departments and in addition one separate
Nazul Officer has also been posted. In accordance with the master plan prepared and land reserved
by the Housing & Environment Department, the CPA undertakes the Construction, development and
maintenance of roads, parks, buildings and further it safeguards and develops the land marked by the
Nazul Officer. Quick decisions and actions are possible as the Principal Secretary being the sole
administrator effectively coordinates and controls all these activities.
In accordance with the master plan prepared and land reserved by the Housing & Environment
Department, the CPA undertakes the Construction, development and maintenance of roads, parks,
buildings and further it safeguards and develops the land marked by the Nazul Officer. Quick
decisions and actions are possible as the Principal Secretary being the sole administrator effectively
coordinates and controls all these activities.

-Disaster Management Institute

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

162

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Disaster Management Institute (DMI), Bhopal is one of the leading organizations in the country,
which has attained substantial credibility in imparting professional training and conducting
consultancy services on natural and man-made disasters management. Established in 1987 in the
backdrop of the world's worst-ever industrial disaster (1984) in Bhopal, DMI is an autonomous
organization under the Housing and Environment Department, Government of Madhya Pradesh. This
is the only institute of its kind in the whole country, which is dealing both natural and industrial
disasters.

9.10. Inter - Agency Issues


At present, together with the ULB, there are state agencies also operating in the same urban space,
independently of the ULB. These are the State Housing Board, the Town and Country Planning
Department, etc. Similarly there are central government agencies. The activities of all these agencies
impact on the same or the peripheral urban space, which affect the spatial pattern and future growth
direction.
- ULB and TCPD/ Housing Board: There is a proper co-ordination between ULB / TCPD/ Housing
Board. More importantly, the T&CP makes planning decisions and recommendations, which are
mostly accepted by the MC and only those recommendations are discussed which the MC feels is
inimical to the future growth / development of the city. A similar relationship exists between ULB and
HB. Sometimes there emerge issues relating to Handing, over-taking of assets between the ULB and
the HB.
- ULB and PHED: PHED has been given the responsibility of planning, design and construction of
the water supply, sewerage and drainage projects of the municipal corporations (MC) since 1995.
Under this arrangement, the financial and administrative sanction for a project comes from the
PHED. The assets, however, have to be transferred to the MC on completion for operation and
maintenance. Though, the PHED staffs works under tile functional control of the MC, their
administrative control remains with the PHED. There is therefore duality here which can be sorted
out. The current arrangement between the ULB and PHED is working and it is likely to improve in a
better way in the coming years.
There is therefore a need for (i) clearly defined delegation of authority and responsibilities; (ii)
intensive assistance to ULBs (Urban Local Bodies) / implementing agencies in project planning and
management; (iii) advance action for preparing detailed engineering design (where one is
unavailable); (iv) faster completion of land acquisition and resettlement.

9.11. City Specific Strategies And Action Plan


(A) Goals for Horizon Years
The goals and service outcomes for the horizon period 2010-2035 are presented in the below table
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

163

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 9.4: Goals for Horizon Years


2011/2012 (Current)

2015

2020

-Computerization of Records.

-Training and skill


building initiatives
needs
assessment,
delivery of skill building
activities, other capacity
building initiatives.

2025
-EGovernance
Initiative

-Performance Management at all levels Administrative


linking individual goals and objectives to Reforms
departmental, and ultimately organization
goals.
-Management information and decision
support, Managing performance of
organizational sub-units (departments or
zones / wards).
-Tendering,
Procurement,
Contract
management, materials management.
-Citizen Interface Systems and Processes

-Realigning
internal -Decentralization
of
municipal Structural
organization structures administration, and synchronization of Reforms
and processes
internal jurisdictions
-Introduce Staffing review
(B) Strategies and Action Plan
The strategies are in alignment of the optional reforms envisaged to be achieved. The reforms
principally include administrative, Structural and E-Governance initiative. The
(I) Administrative Reforms
-Personnel Management Systems, comprising - staff deployment, leave, payroll, personnel
administration, hiring and contracting, transfers, grievance management (Administrative Reforms)
The objective of the strategy is to achieve Efficient deployment of available staff, Satisfied personnel,
higher productivity, Transparency and fairness in dealing on personnel matters, Effective and efficient
administration of personnel Function etc.

Computerize payroll management, timely and direct transfer of salaries and wages, including
contract staff payments

Review and simplify all employment and service rules related to all cadre and staff levels of
municipal employees. Make amendments to reflect current realities of managing municipal
staff.

Aligned to the employment service rules (modified), prepare and disseminate a HR policy for
all municipal staff.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

164

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Bring transparency in all systems related to transfers, promotions and wage increments. Share
widely the processes that are adopted.

-Training and skill building initiatives needs assessment, delivery of skill building activities, other
capacity building initiatives (Administrative Reforms)
The objective of the strategy is to enhance capacity of municipal staff to deal with increasing scale
and changing complexities of municipal functions. This can be achieved through following actions:

Undertake training needs assessment for all staff. This need assessment should be integrated
with annual departmental review, and individual performance review (for mid & senior
officers).

Tie-up with State-level and other institutions for periodic delivery of training, related to job
skills, hands-on training, etc. Build certain level of in-house training delivery capacity.

Organize other capacity building initiatives, such as: exposure visits / study tours to other
ULBs within India / abroad (for large cities); dissemination of literature and multi-media
material; visits and close working with experts, counter-parts from other ULBs, technical
consultants, etc.

Within ULBs, build team working through team projects; sharing of experiences across
departments / zones / wards; problem-solving workshops anchored by senior officers; etc.

Incentivize

training

participation,

self-learning

initiatives

of

accredited

courses,

documentation and sharing of experiences.


Performance Management at all levels linking individual goals and objectives to departmental,
and ultimately organization goals (Administrative Reforms)
The objective of the strategy is to Generate desired service delivery outcomes through individual and
department level performance. This is achieved through the following measures:

Aligned to the overall development plans of the ULB, specific targets of performance are set
for each department. Similarly service delivery targets are set for each zone / ward.
Performance measurement of senior officers heading the departments / zones / wards is
directly linked to these targets.

The system of Annual Confidential Report (ACR) should be improvised within the
framework of rules. The method of assessment should be made very objective, laying down
performance areas and sub-areas. Expectations of performance should be discussed at
periodic intervals.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

165

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Citizen feedback is inbuilt into performance review of all departments / functions that have
citizen interface.

Performance targets, and accomplishment of performance at departmental level / geographic


jurisdiction level (zone / ward), is widely communicated within the ULB. This should instill a
sense of healthy competition and pride in achieving the set targets.

Within the framework provided by the service rules, a system of incentives / rewards for good
performance should be instituted.

-Management information and decision support, Managing performance of organisational subunits (departments or zones / wards) (Administrative Reforms)
The objective of the strategy is to Enable transparent and efficient allocation of scarce resources to
those functions / areas (physical spaces within the city) which are more deserving, Ability to isolate
poor performance to infrastructure deficiency, poor O&M, poor management, etc., and thereby take
appropriate decisions. This is achieved through the following measures:

The Council of the ULB should pass a resolution to adopt Standardised Service Level
Benchmarks (SSLBs), defined by the Ministry of Urban Development. Adoption of SSLBs by
the ULB implies, setting up systems to periodically measure and report service level
performance indicators. The reliability, independence and therefore credibility of the
measurement systems are improved over period of time.

Additional indicators that reveal operating performance of the ULB should be defined,
measured and reported.

Systems to periodically place the performance indicators before decision makers. For e.g.
CMO / President and print in local media, etc.

Periodic review systems take stock of performance, remedial action and operational decisions
are initiated on that basis. Decisions related to budget allocation, prioritisation of projects,
staff deployment, etc. are guided by intra-city disparity in service levels.

-Tendering, Procurement, Contract management, materials management (Administrative Reforms)


The objective of the strategy is to Reduce time and cost in implementing projects, Balanced contracts,
leading to more credible suppliers and improved quality in delivery. This is achieved through the
following measures:

Systems for periodic review of contracts, third party inspection and monitoring of project
implementation, quality control during construction. Maintenance of records and project
documents a site.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

166

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Institutionalise systems for empanelment, pre-qualification and other methods to cut-down


procurement cycle time.

Institutionalise systems for wider dissemination of all tenders (including e-tenders), foster
competition and provide level playing field for all competent vendors.

Introduce measures to ensure all tenders for procurement of goods / services have clear
technically specifications, quality and delivery standards laid down. Commercial terms and
conditions are balanced, unambigous and incentivises speedy implementation.

-Citizen Interface Systems and Processes (Administrative Reforms)


Citizen has ease and convenience of single point contact, irrespective of multiple institutions and
backend processes. This may include the following:

Provide point of citizen interface at vantage locations across city, a minimum of one in each
ward. Interface should be direct contact with trained personnel, and through IT interfaces such
as touch screens, kiosks, signages and instruction boards, etc.

Leverage technology to provide multiple services (tax returns, paying user charges, birth &
deaths registration, building plan permissions, citizen complaints, etc.), through single
terminal, and citizen database integrated at back end.

Rope in other citizen services and utilities (electricity utility, telecom company, post office,
courier services, etc.) to enhance economies of scale, and higher level of convergence for
citizens.

Define and maintain standards of services rendered through such centres. Involve private
sector and sustain through revenue model built on transaction fee concept.

Accessibility should include accessibility of elected representatives to their citizens (at both
area sabha and ward levels), and accessibility of officials to citizen representatives.

(II) Structural Reforms


-Decentralisation of municipal administration, and synchronisation of internal jurisdictions
(Structural Reforms)
This will include the following activities:

All sub-ULB jurisdictions (electoral wards, zones, engineering circles, etc.) should be
represented spatially on the city map. Examine the extent of incongruity.

Identify bottlenecks to merging boundaries. For network services (water supply, sewerage,
SWM) the network design, and logistics may pose peculiar problems in some places. Resolve
these problems one by one (introduce intermediate metering in case of water supply, or club
more than one ward to constitute a zone, etc.).

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

167

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Transfer adequate powers to zonal administrative and engineering heads, to take decisions for
uninterrupted operations.

Strengthening of Ward offices for effective monitoring of Municipal administration.

Formulation of Ward Committees to strengthen the ground level management.

-Realigning internal organisation structures and processes (Structural Reforms)


This will include the following activities:

Review deployment of operations staff, and realign with new jurisdictions. Alter reporting
relationships where necessary.

Review flow of information regarding operations from field to Zonal office / Head of Dept.
Make appropriate changes.

Provide information swiftly to municipal staff, citizens and all other stakeholders about the
change in boundaries. Communicate widely through maps and charts, with adequate level of
detail (scale not more than 1:1000).

Provide training to all municipal staff about the revised structures, reporting lines.

-Introduce Staffing review (Structural Reforms)


This will include the following activities:

Undertake indepth review of staffing patterns in the ULB, covering staff in position,
vacancies, sanctioned posts, etc. Examine skill and experience profile. Compare with norms.
Examine ageing profile and examine superannuation rate (by department, level and skill
base).

Conduct interviews, time and motion studies, and undertake other measures to identify
number of personnel required for the job. Also project increase / decrease in requirement if
any. Focus on field level service delivery functions, citizen interface points and administrative
support roles.

Analyse skill availability Vs requirement, to lead to identification of gaps and redundancies.


Prepare redeployment plan to bridge gaps and eliminate redundancies.

Examine span of control, reporting hierarchy and adequacy of decision-making staff at all
levels. Many a times, the Commissioner has a large span of control, with some minor
departments such as Nursery / Urban Forestry directly reporting to the CMO. These
departments never get adequate attention, and consequently performance and effectiveness of
the department suffers.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

168

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Abolish redundant posts, many of which would have lost relevance.

If gaps still remain, explore options of outsourcing staff on contract basis, or outsourcing the
activity itself. Many functions can be taken up under PPP, reducing the staffing burden of the
ULB.

Prepare a detailed and timebound transition plan, with small incremental steps being taken up
every day.

Communicate the plan, and hold detailed dialogue with staff unions, counsel them and all
staff being redeployment on individual basis.

Take up measures for people to take pride in new role, improve hygiene factors and work
conditions such as providing proper working spaces, uniforms, tools and devices,
communication devices, etc. Often these minor issues are neglected, which snowball into
larger issues, making transition difficult.

As structural changes are very fundamental and often face resistance, the President and CMO
should take lead responsibility in implementation at ULB level. The leader of opposition should
also be engaged in implementing the changes.
Responsibilities will include:

Preparing detailed implementation plan

Designing the revised organisation structures, processes/ procedures / reporting formats and
forms, etc.

Providing orientation training to concerned staff

Liason with DLB / State Government for appropriate approvals

Seeking internal approvals for budgets to implement these administrative reforms, and
monitoring related spending

Periodic monitoring of tasks, identifying constraints / problems and resolving them

Playing role of counterpart staff to external experts / consultants deployed to advise and guide
the structural reforms

(III) Others
-Citizen Charter
A Citizens Charter is the expression of an understanding between the citizen and the public service
providers about the quantity and quality of services citizens receive in exchange for their taxes. It is
essentially about the rights of the public and the obligations of the public servants. As public services
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

169

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

are funded by citizens, either directly or indirectly through taxes, they have the right to expect a
particular quality of service that is responsive to their needs and is provided efficiently at a reasonable
cost. The Citizens Charter is a written, voluntary declaration by service providers about their service
standards, choice, accessibility, non-discrimination, transparency and accountability. It should be in
accord with the expectations of citizens. Therefore, it is a useful way of defining with users and others
what service should be and what standards to expect. A further rationale for the Charters is to help
change the mindset of the public official from someone with power over the public to someone with a
care of duty in spending the publics taxes and in providing them with necessary services. This goal
should be immediately setup.
-E-Governance
With increased emphasis on e-governance, information technology is playing an important role in
reforming the cumbersome government processes. On-line transaction processing facilities are
available to citizens including payment of utility bills such as electricity bills, water and sewerage
charges, property tax, trade licensing fee, telephone bills, issue of certificates such as birth and death,
issue of permits and licenses such as learners license, driving license, etc. These services, available
on 24X7 basis at Citizen Service Centres, banks and web portal, include birth and death certificates,
trade license, property tax, advertisement fee and market rent payment, civic works information,
house numbering, suppliers and contractors payments, etc. These projects are instrumental in creating
a new municipal culture of citizen-friendly service provision. It is essential to build e-capabilities of
municipal governments to simplify corruption-prone municipal processes and improve their
functioning. This goal should be achieved by 2035.
-Community Participation
It is being increasingly realized that communities have little capacity to participate. Providing the
platform for participation is only one aspect of enabling community participation; the other is to
ensure that communities have capacity to fully utilize these spaces, and participate meaningfully. In
order to address these issues, ULB should:

Come out with a Community Participation Fund (CPF) in similar lines with JNNURM. The
primary objective of the fund is to catalyse community participation by supporting the
building of community assets.

Identify and implement a number of pilot projects to take forward agreed approaches to
increase effective Community participation through formulation of CBO and Capital projects.
This provision should be thought immediately. Further by 2015 the state should ensure
enforcement of community participation law.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

170

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Identify means to develop and improve participatory approaches in policy making, planning,
resource allocation and monitoring;

Develop Community projects after achieving financial sustainability.

-Effective service provision


For effective service provision, the following activities shall apply (i) asset ownership; (ii) asset
planning, design and creation; (iii) asset maintenance; (iv) cost recovery and tariff structures; (v) cost
recovery (billing and collection); (vi) legislative support; and (vii) resource provision. Stakeholder
institutions will play a critical and constructive role in supporting Project ULBs in undertaking the
aforesaid activities. Provision of adequate technical assistance and implementing capacity-building
measures will constitute important responsibilities considering the capacity of the agency with regard
to implementing large and integrated urban infrastructure development projects.
- Preparation of Detailed Project Report
A Detailed Project Report (DPR) is integral to the creation of quality infrastructure essential for
sustained urban growth and enhanced access to basic services. A Detailed Project Report involves
generation of a comprehensive document regarding a sector project (i.e. Water Supply Augmentation)
which shall serve as a basis for investment decision-making, approval of plans and designs, project
planning, and implementation scheduling for all types of infrastructure projects.
Undoubtedly, a DPR entails a meticulous process of preparing information such as overall assessment
of a particular infrastructure, baseline information of the beneficiaries (user categories and urban poor
accessibility), list of capital expenditure support for a particular sector from other schemes, cost
recovery mechanisms, existing relationship and collaboration with private sector and full information
on capital spending and other pertinent details.
Above and beyond the mentioned criteria, the quality and strength of a DPR comes from its
relationship with the City Development Plan (CDP). Essentially, a DPR should take into account the
various development plans proposed for sector infrastructure in the CDP and must also rationalize
how the project supports the priorities identified hereto. Needless to mention, the preparation of a City
Development Plan is a milestone reform made under the JNNURM as it supports a participatory and
sound decision-making process based on a consultation-driven and research-supported process in
addressing city issues on a priority basis.
Box 9.1
In the case of Khilchipur, DPRs for sector projects have already been prepared prior to the
completion of the CDP. The table presented shows the Status of the DPRs for Urban Services in
Khilchipur Except for Housing, DPRs for almost all sectors have already been made. However, upon
careful analysis and review reports, various areas for revision and preparation have been identified
including the population projections and demand calculation as they have not been worked against
the CDP. Moreover, the DPRs should be amended in line with the proposed sector developments
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

171

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

made in the CDP to ensure cost-effectiveness and sustainability of the projects.


Table 9.5: Status of DPR for Urban Services
Status of DPR
Urban infrastructure

Remarks

Preparation

Sanctioning

Present

(Y/N)

(Y/N)

Status

Water Supply

Under
A.A.

T.S.

& Needs a Revision

Sewerage

Storm Water Drainage

DPR Prepared

Needs a Revision

Solid waste Disposal

No

DPR Prepared

Needs a Revision

Roads

Housing

Under
Preparation

No

Under
Preparation

Environment /

DPR Prepared

Needs a Revision

Needs
Preparation

Needs
Preparation

Water Conservation
Source: Khilchipur (M)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

172

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 10: Overview Of Municipal Finance


Of Khilchipur
In line with the recognition of the role of local governments in a participatory process of decisionmaking, a number of responsibilities concerning delivery of basic services as well as the provision,
maintenance and improvement of physical and social infrastructure have been devolved to Urban
Local Bodies. In order to fulfill their roles at satisfactory levels, the ULBs have been empowered to
levy certain taxes and fees with the introduction of 74th Constitutional Amendment Act, in an attempt
to make the ULBs financially strong to perform certain additional functions listed in the Twelfth
Schedule. The state governments have brought in these taxation provisions for the ULBs either
through introduction of new Municipal Acts or amendments of the existing ones.
Moreover, the fiscal domain of municipal governments in India includes a wide array of tax and nontax revenue sources. Specifically, the sources of income for the ULB are tax revenues on water,
houses, markets, entertainment and vehicles paid by residents of the town, among others. In case of
Khilchipur, the ULB receive funds from the State Government in the form of grants-in-aid for various
long-term and special projects and events.
However, due to the unprecedented demand for existing services and infrastructure, municipal bodies
are at constant pressure to increase revenues to cover capital investments, revenue expenditure and at
the same time maintain surplus for creating assets in the future. Particularly, the ULB is responsible
for a range of sector functions which include, among others, Water Supply, Sanitation, Storm Water
& Solid Waste Management, Hospitals, Roads, Street lighting, Drainage, Fire Brigade, Market Places,
etc.
Moreover, the fiscal domain of municipal governments in India includes a wide array of tax and nontax revenue sources. Specifically, the sources of income for the ULB are tax revenues on water,
houses, markets, entertainment and vehicles paid by residents of the town, among others. In case of
Khilchipur, the ULB receive funds from the State Government in the form of grants-in-aid for various
long-term and special projects and events.
Furthermore, even with the vested liberty to introduce taxation and fees on various services,
municipal bodies are still confronted by a difficult situation as local resources and mechanisms for
revenue generation are not commensurate to the increasing requirements for sustaining urban growth.
The roots of depletion of financial resources are varied and embedded in larger political, social and
cultural contexts. Poor planning and inefficient management practices, lack of coordination and
evaluation processes, weak and even non-existent internal and public information system, poor staff
and unclear responsibility designation, corruption and other undesirable institutional practices are
some of the factors which weaken and hamper the financial performance of the ULBs.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

173

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

With the aforementioned concerns, it is needless to emphasize that an evaluation of the municipal
finance of a town is indispensable to analyzing the relationship of its financial performance and
quality of services delivery. The analysis of the same is essential in identifying areas which need to be
improved and alternative sources of revenue for the town.

10.1 Overview Of Municipal Finance In Khilchipur


In analyzing the financial condition of Khilchipur, all the three to five-year budget copies were made
available but still the figures of the income and expenditure are extracted. In what follows, an analysis
of the existing financial situation of Khilchipur involved in the execution and maintenance of
municipal infrastructure works shall be presented. The analysis has been undertaken with respect to
the trends in the revenue and expenditure of the ULB. Data collected from the annual accounts of the
ULB have been compiled and analyzed under 2 categories: Revenue Account and Capital Account.
Table 10.1: Overview of Municipal Finance of Khilchipur
FINANCIAL YEAR
No
.

Major
Account Head

2005-2006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2006-2007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2007-2008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2008-2009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2009-2010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Average
(Rs. In
Lacs)

A. Revenue Account
1

REVENUE
INCOME

REVENUE
EXPENDITU
RE

Status
Revenue
Account

of

123.85
(SC)50.8%

168.62
(GR)36.1
%
(SC)53.9%

193.91
(GR)15.0
%
(SC)53.9%

232.70
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)53.9%

290.87
(GR)25.0
%
(SC)53.9%

202.0
(GR)24.0
%
(SC)53.3%

140.29
(SC)71.1%

168.35
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)71.1%

193.60
(GR)15.0
%
(SC)71.1%

232.32
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)71.1%

290.40
(GR)25.0
%
(SC)71.1%

205.0
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)71.1%

-16.44

0.28

0.32

0.38

0.47

-3.0

B. Capital Account
4

CAPITAL
RECEIPTS

120.00
(SC)49.2%

144.00
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)46.1%

CAPITAL
EXPENDITU
RE

57.00
(SC)28.9%

68.40
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)28.9%

78.66
(GR)15.0
%
(SC)28.9%

94.39
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)28.9%

117.99
(GR)25.0
%
(SC)28.9%

83.3
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)28.9%

Status
Capital
Account

63.00

75.60

86.94

104.33

130.41

92.1

431.42

539.27

377.3

of

165.60
(GR)15.0
%
(SC)46.1%

198.72
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)46.1%

248.40
(GR)25.0
%
(SC)46.1%

175.3
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)46.7%

C. Overall Account
7

Total Income

243.85

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

312.62

359.51

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

174

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 10.1: Overview of Municipal Finance of Khilchipur


FINANCIAL YEAR
No
.

Major
Account Head

2005-2006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2006-2007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2007-2008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2008-2009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2009-2010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Average
(Rs. In
Lacs)

(Revenue plus
Capital)

(SC)100.0
%

(GR)28.2
%
(SC)100.0
%

(GR)15.0
%
(SC)100.0
%

(GR)20.0
%
(SC)100.0
%

(GR)25.0
%
(SC)100.0
%

(GR)22.1
%
(SC)100.0
%

Total
Expenditure
(Revenue plus
Capital)

197.29
(SC)100.0
%

236.75
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)100.0
%

272.26
(GR)15.0
%
(SC)100.0
%

326.71
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)100.0
%

408.39
(GR)25.0
%
(SC)100.0
%

288.3
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)100.0
%

Overall Status
Surplus
/
Deficit

46.56

75.88

87.26

104.71

130.88

89.1

Source: Analysis of the Consultant


GR-Growth Rate;
SC-Sectoral Share;
The following key analysis can be summarized from the table above for the overall income and
expenditure patterns
Total
Income Total annual Income has increased from Rs.243.85 Lacs in 2005-2006 to
(Revenue and Capital)
Rs.539.27 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 21.95%.
The ratio of Revenue Income to the Capital Income has increased over the
years from 2005-2006 to 2009-2010 It was 1.0 in 2005-2006 which moved
up to 1.2 in 2009-2010.
Out of the 5 years, Revenue Income was higher than capital Income in 5
Years, no year showed higher capital Income.
Total
Expenditure Total annual Expenditure has increased from Rs.197.29 Lacs in 2005-2006
(Revenue and Capital)
to Rs.408.39 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
The ratio of Revenue Expenditure to the Capital Expenditure has over the
years from 2005-2006 to 2009-2010 It was 2.5 in 2005-2006 which moved
up to 2.5 in 2009-2010.
Out of the 5 years, Revenue Expenditure was higher than capital
Expenditure in 5 Years, no year showed higher capital Expenditure.
Revenue
Account Total annual Revenue Income has increased from Rs.123.85 Lacs in 2005(Revenue Income and 2006 to Rs.290.87 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 23.79%.
Revenue Expenditure)
Revenue Expenditure has increased from Rs.140.29 Lacs in 2005-2006 to
Rs.290.40 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
Ratio of Revenue income to the Revenue expenditure was higher in the
year ,2009-2010 (1.0) ,2008-2009 (1.0) ,2007-2008 (1.0).
Capital
(Capital

Account Total annual Capital Income has increased from Rs.120.00 Lacs in 2005Income and

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

175

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Capital Expenditure)

R E P O R T

2006 to Rs.248.40 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.


Capital Expenditure has increased from Rs.57.00 Lacs in 2005-2006 to
Rs.117.99 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
Ratio of Capital income to the Capital expenditure was higher in the year
,2009-2010 (2.1) ,2008-2009 (2.1) ,2007-2008 (2.1).

Surplus / Deficit

Overall Account: Out of the 5 years, 5 years showed a surplus


account.(Average: 89.1 Lacs). No year showed a deficit account.
Revenue Account: Out of the 5 years, 4 years showed a surplus
account.(Average: 0.4 Lacs). Year 2005-2006(Deficit:-16.44) showed a
deficit account.
Capital Account: Out of the 5 years, 5 years showed a surplus account.
(Average: 92.1 Lacs). No year showed a deficit account.

However, an analysis of the Revenue and Capital Account of the town is imperative in properly
assessing the financial performance of the town in terms of the soundness of their income generation
activities and allocation system for various sector projects. An assessment of the Municipal Fiscal
Status on Revenue and Capital Accounts is crucial to understanding surplus and deficits created in a
more systematic manner.

10.2 Revenue Account Of Khilchipur


10.2.1 Revenue Income
The Revenue Account for the municipal finance consists of operating Revenue Income and Revenue
Expenditure items of the town. They refer to financial transactions for recurring items or those related
to daily operations of the town. The following Table gives a highlight of the overall compositional
share of various revenue income heads of the town.
Table 10.2: Composition of Revenue Income of Khilchipur
FINANCIAL YEAR

No.

Major
Account
Head

A1

Rates and Tax


Revenue

80.18
92.21
110.65
138.32
94.3
50.15
(GR)59.9% (GR)15.0% (GR)20.0% (GR)25.0% (GR)30.0%
(SC)40.5%
(SC)47.6% (SC)47.6% (SC)47.6% (SC)47.6% (SC)46.2%

A2

Assigned
Revenues &
Compensation

33.78
38.84
46.61
58.27
41.1
28.15
(GR)20.0% (GR)15.0% (GR)20.0% (GR)25.0% (GR)20.0%
(SC)22.7%
(SC)20.0% (SC)20.0% (SC)20.0% (SC)20.0% (SC)20.5%

A3

Rental Income
from
Municipal
Properties

33.60
38.64
46.37
57.96
40.9
28.00
(GR)20.0% (GR)15.0% (GR)20.0% (GR)25.0% (GR)20.0%
(SC)22.6%
(SC)19.9% (SC)19.9% (SC)19.9% (SC)19.9% (SC)20.4%

A4

Fees & User


Charges

17.19
19.77
23.72
29.65
20.9
14.33
(GR)20.0% (GR)15.0% (GR)20.0% (GR)25.0% (GR)20.0%
(SC)11.6%
(SC)10.2% (SC)10.2% (SC)10.2% (SC)10.2% (SC)10.5%

2005-2006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

2006-2007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2007-2008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2008-2009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

176

2009-2010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Average
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 10.2: Composition of Revenue Income of Khilchipur


No.

Major
Account
Head

A5

FINANCIAL YEAR
2005-2006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2006-2007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2007-2008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2008-2009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2009-2010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Average
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Sale & Hire


Charges

2.29
(SC)1.8%

2.75
3.16
3.79
4.74
3.3
(GR)20.0% (GR)15.0% (GR)20.0% (GR)25.0% (GR)20.0%
(SC)1.6%
(SC)1.6%
(SC)1.6%
(SC)1.6%
(SC)1.6%

A6

Revenue
Grants,
Contribution
and Subsidies

0.19
(SC)0.2%

0.23
0.26
0.31
0.39
0.3
(GR)20.0% (GR)15.0% (GR)20.0% (GR)25.0% (GR)20.0%
(SC)0.1%
(SC)0.1%
(SC)0.1%
(SC)0.1%
(SC)0.1%

A7

Income from
Investment

0.75
(SC)0.6%

0.90
1.04
1.24
1.55
1.1
(GR)20.0% (GR)15.0% (GR)20.0% (GR)25.0% (GR)20.0%
(SC)0.5%
(SC)0.5%
(SC)0.5%
(SC)0.5%
(SC)0.5%

Source: Analysis of the Consultant


GR-Growth Rate; SC-Sectoral Share; SC w.r.t to Revenue Income
The following Analysis can be drawn from the above table:Rates and Tax Revenue

Revenue Income has increased from Rs.50.15 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.138.32 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 28.87%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 46.2%.

Assigned
Revenues
Compensation

& Revenue Income has increased from Rs.28.15 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.58.27 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 20.5%.

Rental Income from Municipal Revenue Income has increased from Rs.28.00 Lacs in 2005-2006 to
Properties
Rs.57.96 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 20.4%.
Fees & User Charges

Revenue Income has increased from Rs.14.33 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.29.65 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.93%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 10.5%.

Sale & Hire Charges

Revenue Income has increased from Rs.2.29 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.4.74 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 1.6%.

Revenue Grants, Contribution Revenue Income has increased from Rs.0.19 Lacs in 2005-2006 to
and Subsidies
Rs.0.39 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.70%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 0.1%.
Income from Investment

Revenue Income has increased from Rs.0.75 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.1.55 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.90%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 0.5%.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

177

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

With respect to different components of Revenue Income, the following classifications of various
income sources can be adjudged.
Details

Average
Sectoral
share
w.r.t

100%

75% to
100%

50% to 75%

25% to
50%

Less than
25%

Revenue
Income
Rates and Tax (CAGR)
Revenue
28.87%
Average
(SC)
46.2%

Other
Taxes
(59.0%),

Assigned
(CAGR)
Revenues
& 19.95%
Compensation
Average
(SC)
20.5%

Compensation
in lieu of Taxes
&
Duties
(52.0%),

Rental
Income (CAGR)
from Municipal 19.95%
Properties
Average
(SC)
20.4%

Water Tax
(17.9%),
Property tax
(9.9%),
Tax
on
Animals
(8.4%),
Vehicle Tax
(2.4%),
Professional
Tax (2.4%),
Taxes
&
Duites
Collected
by Others
(48.0%),

Rent
from
lease of
lands
(80.4%),

Rent from
Guest
Houses
(16.1%),
Other Rents
(3.6%),

Fees &
Charges

User (CAGR)
19.93%
Average
(SC)
10.5%

Other Charges Other Fees User


(53.7%),
(39.8%),
Charges
(5.2%),
Penalties
and Fines
(1.3%),

Sale &
Charges

Hire

Sale
Products
(65.5%),

(CAGR)
19.95%
Average
(SC) 1.6%

Revenue Grants, (CAGR)


Contribution and 19.70%
Subsidies
Average
(SC) 0.1%

Revenue
Grants
(100.0%),

Income
Investment

Interest
(100.0%),

from (CAGR)
19.90%
Average
(SC) 0.5%

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

178

of Sale
of
stores &
scrap
(34.4%),

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

10.2.2 Revenue Expenditure


Revenue Expenditure of ULB mainly comprises of Establishment Expenses/ Administrative
Expenses, Operations and Maintenance Expenses and Miscellaneous Expenses. The Revenue
Expenditure for the last 3 to 5 years in various sectors are summarized in the following Picture.
Table 10.3: Composition of Revenue Expenditure of Khilchipur
FINANCIAL YEAR

No
.

Major
Account
Head

B1

Establishment
Expenses

2005-2006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2006-2007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2007-2008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2008-2009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2009-2010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Average
(Rs. In
Lacs)

23.78
(SC)16.9%

28.53
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)16.9%

32.81
(GR)15.0
%
(SC)16.9%

39.37
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)16.9%

49.21
(GR)25.0
%
(SC)16.9%

34.7
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)16.9%

43.68
(GR)15.0
%
(SC)22.6%

52.41
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)22.6%

65.52
(GR)25.0
%
(SC)22.6%

46.2
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)22.6%

B2

Administrative
Expenses

31.65
(SC)22.6%

37.98
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)22.6%

B3

Operations &
81.86
Maintenance (SC)58.4%

98.24
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)58.4%

112.97
(GR)15.0
%
(SC)58.4%

135.56
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)58.4%

169.46
(GR)25.0
%
(SC)58.4%

119.6
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)58.4%

B4

Interest
Finance
Charges

3.60
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)2.1%

4.14
(GR)15.0
%
(SC)2.1%

4.97
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)2.1%

6.21
(GR)25.0
%
(SC)2.1%

4.4
(GR)20.0
%
(SC)2.1%

&

3.00
(SC)2.1%

Source: Analysis of the Consultant


GR-Growth Rate; SC-Sectoral Share; SC w.r.t to Revenue Income
The following Analysis can be drawn from the above table:Establishment
Expenses

Revenue Expenditure has increased from Rs.23.78 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.49.21 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.94%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 16.9%.

Administrative
Expenses

Revenue Expenditure has increased from Rs.31.65 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.65.52 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 22.6%.

Operations
Maintenance

& Revenue Expenditure has increased from Rs.81.86 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.169.46 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 58.4%.

Interest & Finance


Charges

Revenue Expenditure has increased from Rs.3.00 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.6.21 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 2.1%.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

179

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

With respect to different components of Revenue Expenditure, the following classifications of various
income sources can be adjudged.
Details

Average
Sectoral
share w.r.t

100%

75% to
100%

50%
to
75%

25% to 50%

Less than 25%

Revenue
Expenditure
Establishment
Expenses

(CAGR)
19.94%
Average (SC)
16.9%

Administrative
Expenses

(CAGR)
19.95%
Average (SC)
22.6%

Salaries,
Wages
and
Bonus
(84.2%),

Rent, Rates Printing


and
and
Taxes Stationary
(42.7%),
(16.6%),
Other
Adminstrative
Expenses
(14.2%),
Advertisment
and Publicity
(11.8%),
Books
&
Periodicals
(7.1%),
Communication
Expenses
(4.7%),
Professional
and Other Fees
(2.4%),
Legal Expenses
(0.5%),

Operations & (CAGR)


Maintenance
19.95%
Average (SC)
58.4%

Interest
Finance
Charges

WATSAN
Establishment
Expenses
(15.8%),

Other
operating &
maintenance
expenses
(45.8%),
Water Supply
(Bulk
Purchase)
(27.5%),

Water Supply
(Power & Fuel)
(20.2%),
Hire Charges
(3.8%),
Repairs
&
maintenance Infrastructure
(2.7%),

& (CAGR)
Interest
on
19.95%
Loans from
Average (SC) State
2.1%
Government
(100.0%),

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

180

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

10.3 Capital Account Of Khilchipur


As reiterated earlier, Capital Account consists of Capital Income and Capital Expenditure, on and for,
construction of capital works which include creation of sector infrastructure assets (i.e. water supply,
sewerage and drainage development, conservancy schemes, purchase of machinery, plants, vehicles,
etc.).

10.3.1 Capital Income


Generally, the bulk of the Capital Income sources for the municipality come from State/Central
government schemes, Grants, Loans, Sale of Municipal Capital Assets. In the case of Khilchipur,
Capital Income sources come from Basic Services Grants, SFC & Road Repairs Grants, IDSMT/
UIDSSMT programme, Slum Improvement prgramme, Central/State/ District Grants for
Development Works or Singhstha 2004/MP/MLA Grants, etc.
The following Table gives a highlight of the overall compositional share of various capital income
heads of the town.
Table 10.4: Composition of Capital Income of Khilchipur
No.

Major
Account
Head

FINANCIAL YEAR
2005-2006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2006-2007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2007-2008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2008-2009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2009-2010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Average
(Rs. In
Lacs)

C1

Grants,
141.30
162.50
194.99
243.74
172.1
Contribution
117.75
(GR)20.0% (GR)15.0% (GR)20.0% (GR)25.0% (GR)20.0%
for
Spefic (SC)98.1%
(SC)98.1% (SC)98.1% (SC)98.1% (SC)98.1% (SC)98.1%
purposes

C2

Secured
Loans

2.25
(SC)1.9%

2.70
3.11
3.73
4.66
3.3
(GR)20.0% (GR)15.0% (GR)20.0% (GR)25.0% (GR)20.0%
(SC)1.9%
(SC)1.9%
(SC)1.9%
(SC)1.9%
(SC)1.9%

Source: Analysis of the Consultant


GR-Growth Rate; SC-Sectoral Share; SC w.r.t to Revenue Income
The following Analysis can be drawn from the above table:Grants, Contribution
Spefic purposes

for Capital Income has increased from Rs.117.75 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.243.74 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 98.1%.

Secured Loans

Capital Income has increased from Rs.2.25 Lacs in 2005-2006 to


Rs.4.66 Lacs in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.96%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 1.9%.

With respect to different components of Capital Income, the following classifications of various
income sources can be adjudged.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

181

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Details

Average
Sectoral
share w.r.t

R E P O R T

100%

75% to
100%

50%
to
75%

25% to 50%

Less
than
25%

Capital
Income
Grants,
(CAGR)
Contribution for 19.95%
Spefic purposes
Average
(SC) 98.1%

Secured Loans

Others
(38.9%),
State Government
(32.5%),
Grants from other
government
agencies (28.7%),

(CAGR)
19.96%
Average
(SC) 1.9%

Loans from State


Government
(100.0%),

10.3.2 Capital Expenditure


There is currently a huge disparity between the Revenue Expenditure and the Capital Expenditure
which indicates that there have been nominal investments for infrastructure assets for the town.
Capital Expenditure comprises of spending on Street Lighting, Water Supply, Sewerage / Sanitation,
Solid Waste Management, Roads, Public Works, Leisure, Recreation & Entertainment Facilities,
Education, Central / State / District Grants for Development /Singhstha 2004/MP/MLA and IDSMT/
UIDSSMT . The major chunk of the Capital Expenditure is incurred largely on establishing basic
services like Water Supply, slum improvement, minor road constructions / upgradations, drainage
lines construction or upgradations.
The following Table gives a highlight of the overall compositional share of various Capital
Expenditure heads of the town.
Table 10.5: Composition of Capital Expenditure of Khilchipur
No
.

Major
Accoun
t Head

D1

Fixed
Assets

Financial year
2005-2006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2006-2007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2007-2008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2008-2009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

2009-2010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Average
(Rs. In
Lacs)

57.00
(SC)100.0
%

68.40
(GR)20.0%
(SC)100.0
%

78.66
(GR)15.0%
(SC)100.0
%

94.39
(GR)20.0%
(SC)100.0
%

117.99
(GR)25.0%
(SC)100.0
%

83.3
(GR)20.0%
(SC)100.0
%

Source: Analysis of the Consultant


GR-Growth Rate; SC-Sectoral Share; SC w.r.t to Revenue Income
The following Analysis can be drawn from the above table:Fixed
Assets

Capital Expenditure has increased from Rs.57.00 Lacs in 2005-2006 to Rs.117.99 Lacs
in 2009-2010 with a CAGR of 19.95%.
The average Sectoral Share is around 100.0%.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

182

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

With respect to different components of Capital Expenditure, the following classifications of various
income sources can be adjudged.
Details

Average Sectoral
share w.r.t

100%

75% to
100%

50% to
75%

25% to 50%

Less than 25%

Capital Expenditure
Fixed
Assets

(CAGR)
Average
100.0%

19.95%
(SC)

Roads & Bridges Waterways


(40.1%),
(22.4%),
Sewerage
and Other
Fixed
Drainage
Assets (8.6%),
(28.9%),

10.4 Key Financial Indicators & Analysis Of Finance In Watsan


Context
Financial sustainability of any institute can be judged by financial and performance ratio. Here some
ratio pertaining to income, expenditure and performance of Khilchipur which are given below in
Table.
Table 10.6: Key Financial Indicators for Khilchipur
FINANCIAL YEAR
No.

20052006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Major Account Head

20062007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20072008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20082009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20092010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

(I) INCOME RATIO


A

Assigned Revenues & Compensation as %


Of total Income

As a % of total income

11.5%

10.8%

10.8%

10.8%

10.8%

As a % of revenue income

22.7%

20.0%

20.0%

20.0%

20.0%

Rates and Tax Revenue (Own Sources)

As a % of total income

20.6%

25.6%

25.6%

25.6%

25.6%

As a % of revenue income

40.5%

47.6%

47.6%

47.6%

47.6%

Property tax

As a % of total income

2.5%

2.4%

2.4%

2.4%

2.4%

As a % of revenue income

5.0%

4.4%

4.4%

4.4%

4.4%

Revenue
Subsidies

As a % of total income

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

As a % of revenue income

0.2%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

Rental Income from Municipal Properties

As a % of total income

11.5%

10.7%

10.7%

10.7%

10.7%

As a % of revenue income

22.6%

19.9%

19.9%

19.9%

19.9%

Grants,

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Contribution

and

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

183

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 10.6: Key Financial Indicators for Khilchipur


FINANCIAL YEAR
No.

Major Account Head

20052006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20062007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20072008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20082009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20092010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

Fee & User Charges

As a % of total income

5.9%

5.5%

5.5%

5.5%

5.5%

As a % of revenue income

11.6%

10.2%

10.2%

10.2%

10.2%

(II) EXPENDITURE RATIO


A

Establishment Expenses

As a % of total expenditure

12.1%

12.1%

12.1%

12.1%

12.1%

As a % of revenue expenditure

16.9%

16.9%

16.9%

16.9%

16.9%

As a % of income from Rates and Tax


Revenue (Own Sources)

47.4%

35.6%

35.6%

35.6%

35.6%

Operations & Maintenance

As a % of total expenditure

41.5%

41.5%

41.5%

41.5%

41.5%

As a % of revenue expenditure

58.4%

58.4%

58.4%

58.4%

58.4%

(III) PERFORMANCE RATIO


A

Income per capita (In Rs.)

Revenue Income (in Rs.)

654

891

1024

1229

1536

Capital Income (in Rs.)

634

761

875

1050

1312

Expenditure per capita (In Rs.)

Revenue Expenditure (in Rs.)

741

889

1023

1227

1534

Capital Expenditure(in Rs.)

301

361

415

499

623

(IV) OTHER INDICATOR


1

Operating ratio

1.13

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Capital utilization Ratio

0.48

0.48

0.48

0.48

0.48

Total Income / Total Expenditure

1.24

1.32

1.32

1.32

1.32

(V) WATSAN Establishment Expenses


1

% of the Total Income

1.5%

1.4%

1.4%

1.4%

1.4%

% of Total Expenditure

1.9%

1.9%

1.9%

1.9%

1.9%

% of the Revenue Income

3.0%

2.7%

2.7%

2.7%

2.7%

% of Capital Receipts

3.1%

3.1%

3.1%

3.1%

3.1%

(V)WATSAN O & M Expenses


1

% of the Total Income

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

% of Total Expenditure

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

% of the Revenue Income

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

184

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 10.6: Key Financial Indicators for Khilchipur


FINANCIAL YEAR
No.

Major Account Head

% of Capital Receipts

20052006
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20062007
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20072008
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20082009
(Rs. In
Lacs)

20092010
(Rs. In
Lacs)

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

Source: Analysis of the Consultant

10.5 Summary Of Key Financial Issues In Khilchipur


Revenue Generation
As reiterated earlier, deficits in Revenue Account are usually covered through net or surplus Capital
Income. Because of this, municipalities lose surplus to be carried out for future capital works leading
to lack of funds for creation or maintenance of infrastructure assets and worse, accrual of larger
deficits in the future should the situation remains uncontrolled.
Taxes are a major source of revenue for the town. These revenue incomes being flexible in nature
possess great potential to increase municipal fund. In line with the bread and butter of the town, major
chunk of the Revenue Income for ULB comes from Passenger Tax, octroi compensations,
conservancy charges, water taxes, property taxes etc. . However, other forms of taxes have not been
fully harnessed as observed in their nominal figures and minor growth rates. This can be explained by
minimal tax charges or non-establishment of tax demand (i.e. for Property Tax). Heavy dependence
on Grants has also been observed.
Revenue Account Deficits and Non-Creation of Municipal Assets
Based on the analysis of the Revenue and Capital Account of the ULB, the town has not poorly
performed as far as Revenue Account is concerned. The Revenue Expenditure of the town has
ballooned more than the Revenue Income resulting in huge and constant deficits for the town within
the same period. The bulk of the Revenue Expenditure on Operations & Maintenance under is largely
incurred on Lighting Services, generally pertaining to huge electricity incurred from overwhelming
lighting used during festivals. Coupled with limited resources, lack of management of the Operations
and Maintenance (O&M) expenditure has left the town with complete with nothing but huge deficits.
In an ideal setup, proper management of the Revenue Account should lead to surplus which is carried
out to the Capital Account for creation of municipal assets and infrastructure development necessary
for harnessed and sustainable growth of the town. These include, among others, Water Supply
Augmentation, Road Construction and Upgradation, Sewerage System Construction, Purchase of
Materials and Equipment for Solid Waste Management. Undoubtedly, these projects have long term
service to the people.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

185

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

However when deficits as opposed to surplus are incurred, a dismal situation exists such that it has
been a widespread practice for municipalities to cover these deficits through funds from the Capital
Account and thereby reducing funds for infrastructure investments. As for Khilchipur, huge disparity
between Revenue and Capital Account indicates weak capacity of the town to create assets and
investments for sustained urban growth. This weakness has been established in the infrastructure
development for Water Supply and SWM / Sanitation Sectors. Non-investment on these sectors has
led to environmental disintegration of the town.
Funding Capital and Operational Costs
Inadequate Public Funding and Over-reliance on External Aid
While allocating funds for water and sanitation projects at national levels, most of the funding is for
water and centralized wastewater treatment, and not for sanitation management. In addition, many of
the target cities rely on central development assistance to fund sanitation and wastewater projects.
Dependence on external assistance can reflect a lack of long-term commitment and project ownership.
Low Wastewater Tariffs and Inadequate O&M Funding
Cities and utilities that have constructed centralized wastewater treatment and waste treatment
facilities often have difficulty generating funds to cover O&M cost. National regulations have either
reduced tariffs over time, or kept them the same, even while costs have inflated. In case of OSS the
household payments (if any) for desluidging cover only collection costs not treatment costs.
Financing Sanitation Management
Funding sanitation management through the exchequer places an unreasonable strain on the state's
finances. This is not only detrimental to the economy of the country - it also engenders a lack of
accountability and immediate responsibility among the ULBs to generate revenue for septage/sewage
management. Thus, it is important that the beneficiaries also share the responsibility of waste
management following the 'Polluters pay principle'. As per the present pace of economic growth in
Madhya Pradesh, the government's financial capacity would be strengthened due to higher collection
of taxes and private participation is also expected to increase. Therefore, it is necessary to draw up a
long term financing and investment plan for septage/sewage management based on expected
economic development.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

186

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 11: Urban Reforms


11.1. Status of Mandatory & optional Reforms
The CDP should also be linked to the Reform Agenda. The Reform Agenda would include the
strategy to implement reforms, in a phased manner. The CDPs would facilitate identification of
projects and ULBs are required to prepare Detailed Project Reports (DPRs). The funds for identified
projects across cities would be disbursed to the ULB/ Parastatal agency through the designated SLNA
as soft loan or grant-cum-loan or grant. The SLNA / ULB in turn, would leverage additional resources
from other sources.
In the 74th Constitutional Act Amendment (CAA), the ULBs have been assigned key management
roles including provision and delivery of basic goods and services (i.e. infrastructure). However,
many of the ULBs fail to provide satisfactory service levels to its people due to its financial and
operational weaknesses. With the goal of making ULBs financially sustainable, the JNNURM has
launched mandatory and optional reforms aimed at increasing the efficiency and minimizing
opportunities for corruption among ULBs. Under the same initiative, special funds are granted to
ULBs upon fulfillment of these reforms. The optional and mandatory reforms which need to be
achieved for accessing funds from Central government have not been fulfilled in Khilchipur at all. The
following is the current status of the reforms in Khilchipur.
The CDP proposes to cover all the Optional and Mandatory reforms. The list of these reforms is as
follows.
Table 11.1: Status of Urban Reforms, Khilchipur
Achieved
Mandatory Reforms (ULB)
M1

Shift to Double Entry Accounting

No

M2

Property tax 85% coverage and Property tax 90% collection efficiency

No

M3

E-Governance Set-up

No

M4

Internal Earmarking of Funds for Services to Urban Poor

No

M5

Levy of User Charges: 100% Recovery of O & M for sewerage, Water Supply
and SWM

No

M6

Provision of Basic services to urban poor including security of tenure at


affordable prices, improved housing, water supply and sanitation

No

Optional Reforms (ULB / States)


O1

Introduction of Property Title Certification System in ULBs

No

O2

Revision of Building Bye Laws streamlining the Approval Process

No

O3

Simplification of legal and procedural framework for conversion of agricultural No


land for non-agricultural purposes

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

187

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 11.1: Status of Urban Reforms, Khilchipur


Achieved
O4

Revision of Building Bye laws Mandatory Rainwater Harvesting in all No


buildings

O5

Earmarking 25% developed land in all housing projects for EWS/LIG

No

O6

Byelaws on Reuse of Recycled Water

No

O7

Introduction of computerized process of Registration of land and property

No

O8

Administrative Reforms

No

O9

Structural Reforms

No

O 10

Encouraging PPP

No

Source: Urban Local Body

11.2. Reform Identification


It is suggested to implement reforms on the following ways and grouping:

Group 1 Reforms: Reforms which ULB can take up on its own initiative and where the
involvement of state government is marginal/ Low. Such reforms are suggested to be taken on
priority basis.

Group 2 Reforms: Reforms in which the involvement of State is low and the ULB can
manage in its own capacity.

Group 3 Reforms: Implementation of Reforms in which ULB and State holds a combined
responsibility

Group 4 Reforms:

Implementation of reforms which will be implemented after the

successful implementation of projects proposed in the CDP.

Group 2 and 3 Reforms envisaged with an assumption that all the process required from state
level to kick start the process will be implemented immediately.

Interlinked reforms can be undertaken simultaneously.

The following are the Group 1 Reforms:


Table 11.2: Suggested Group 1 Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M)
No

Reforms

Involvement of State

Implementation

Low

ULB level

M 2 Property tax 85% coverage & 90% collection efficiency Low

ULB level

M 3 E-Governance Set-up

Low

ULB level

M 6 Basic services for the urban poor

Low

YES

M 1 Shift to Double Entry Accounting

M-Mandatory Reforms
O- Optional Reforms

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

188

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

The following are the Group 2 Reforms:


Table 11.3: Suggested Group 2 Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M)
No

Reforms

Involvement

Implementation

of State
M 4 Internal Earmarking of Funds for Services to Urban Poor

Medium

ULB level

O8

Administrative Reforms

Medium

ULB level

O9

Structural Reforms

Medium

ULB level

O7

Introduction of computerized process of Registration of

Medium

ULB level

land and property


M-Mandatory Reforms
O- Optional Reforms
The following are the Group 3 Reforms:
Table 11.4: Suggested Group 3 Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M)
No.

Reforms

Involvement of
State

Implementati
on

O1

Introduction of Property Title Certification System in High


ULBs

ULB level

O2

Revision of Building Bye Laws streamlining the High


Approval Process

ULB level

O5

Earmarking 25% developed land in all housing projects High


for EWS/LIG

ULB level

O3

Simplification of legal and procedural framework for High


conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural
purposes

ULB level

M-Mandatory Reforms
O- Optional Reforms
The following are the Group 4 Reforms:
Table 11.5: Suggested Group 4 Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M)
No.

Reforms

Involvement
of State

Implementation

Remarks

M5

100 % cost recovery O&M for Water Supply


& SWM

Not Required

ULB level

O4

Revision of Building Bye laws - Mandatory Not Required


Rainwater Harvesting in all buildings

ULB level

Provision
Made in
the CDP

O6

Byelaws on Reuse of Recycled Water

Not Required

ULB level

O 10

Encouraging PPP

Not Required

ULB level

M-Mandatory Reforms
O- Optional Reforms

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

189

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

11.3 City Specific Strategies And Action Plan


(A) Goals for Horizon Years
The previous section classified the reforms on the basis of the stakeholder involvements. These
reforms are then suggested to be undertaken on immediate, medium and long term basis which are
done on the following basis:
Basis for undertaking Immediate Reforms:

Reforms which will improve the Municipal finance like shifting to Double Entry Accounting
system and implementation of Property Tax reforms are envisaged on priority Basis.

Pro poor reforms like internal earmarking of funds and allocation 25% land to EWS / LIG, are
envisaged on priority basis in order to avail the benefits of the ongoing schemes of BSUP /
IHSDP and the recently announced scheme of Rajiv Awas Yojana of Slum Free City
Planning.

Basis for undertaking Medium Term Reforms:

Reforms which are linked after the successful implementation of Projects or services.

Reforms where the involvement of state is required to kick start the process.

Reforms which can be undertaken and which are linked with successful implementation of
Immediate Reforms.

Basis for undertaking Long Term Reforms:

Reform which requires a unified will at all level and involves multi stakeholders.

Reforms which are linked after the successful implementation of Projects or services.

The following table describes the horizon years for undertaking reforms in a systematic and
planned way.
Table 11.6: Goals for Horizon Years (Municipal Reforms)
Immediate
2012

2013

- Shift to
Double
Entry
Accounting
(M1) Group
1

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

2014

2015

-Provision of
Basic
services for
the
urban
poor

- Property
tax
85%
coverage &
90%
collection
efficiency

Medium Term

Long Term

2020

2025
- E-Governance
Set-up
(M3) Group 1

(M6) Group
1
(M2) Group
1

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

190

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 11.6: Goals for Horizon Years (Municipal Reforms)


Immediate
2012

2013

2014

2015

Medium Term

Long Term

2020

2025

- Internal
Earmarking
of Funds for
Services to
Urban
Poor.

- Introduction of
computerized
Administrative
process
of
Reforms
Registration of
(O 8) Group 2
land
and
property

(M
4)
Group 2

Structural (O 7) Group 2
Reforms
(O 9) Group 2
Earmarking
25%
developed
land in all
housing
projects for
EWS/LIG.

-Revision
of
Building Bye Laws
streamlining the
Approval Process
(O2) Group 3

(O 5) Group
3

- Simplification
of legal and
procedural
framework
for
conversion
of
agricultural land
for
nonagricultural
purposes
(O3) Group 3
-Introduction of
Property
Title
Certification
System in ULBs
(O 1) Group 3

Encouraging
PPP

- Byelaws on
Reuse
of
Recycled Water

- 100 % cost
recovery
O&M
(Water Supply & (O6) Group 4
Solid
waste
(O10) Group
- Revision of
management)(M5)
4
Building
Bye
Group 4
laws - Mandatory
Rainwater
Harvesting in all
buildings
(O4) Group 4
The guidelines of all these reforms needs to be followed as per JNNURM Toolkit defined by Govt.
of India. The details on each of these reforms are not dealt in Detail in this report. Note: MMandatory Reforms, O- Optional Reforms

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

191

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

(B) Strategies and Action Plan


The strategies and action plan are mentioned in chapters relevant to particular section. The strategies
and action plan proposed in this report has a objective or goal to achieve the reforms envisaged, so it
is needless to mention the strategies again. Please refer to the strategies and action plan in individual
chapters. The following are the details of some key strategies mentioned in this report.
Table 11.7: City Specific Strategies & Action Plan, Urban Reforms, Khilchipur (M)
No.

Urban Reform

Details of
Strategies

M1

Shift to Double Entry Accounting

Refer Chapter 10

M2

Property tax 85% coverage and Property tax 90% collection Refer Chapter 10
efficiency

M3

E-Governance Set-up

Refer Chapter 9

M4

Internal Earmarking of Funds for Services to Urban Poor

Refer Chapter 7

M5

Levy of User Charges: 100% Recovery of O & M for sewerage, Water


Supply and SWM

Refer Chapter 5

M6

Provision of Basic services to urban poor including security of tenure at


affordable prices, improved housing, water supply and sanitation

Refer Chapter 7

O4

Revision of Building Bye laws Mandatory Rainwater Harvesting in all Refer Chapter 5
buildings

O6

Byelaws on Reuse of Recycled Water

Refer Chapter 5

O8

Administrative Reforms

Refer Chapter 9

O9

Structural Reforms

Refer Chapter 9

O
10

Encouraging PPP

Refer
5,6,7

Chapter

M-Mandatory Reforms
O- Optional Reforms

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

192

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 12: Project Prioritization, CIP &


Fop For Khilchipur
The Project Prioritization Plan of Khilchipur have been prepared through: (i) a comprehensive process
of assessment of the status of physical and social infrastructure sectors, (ii) preliminary analysis of
demand and supply and (iii) stakeholder consultations.
The strategies adopted primarily have three dimensions: improving the service delivery by efficiency
measures, improving service delivery by creating infrastructure assets and improving the governance
aspects. BA
This chapter summarises the projects identified for each sector for creating infrastructure assets. It is
based on the analyses presented in the foregoing chapters.

12.1. Sector Wise Project Identification And Prioritisation For


Khilchipur
12.1.1. Water Supply
A) Basis for Project Identification
The CDP proposes to develop Khilchipurs water supply system based on the following project
identification criteria:

Integrating the DPR prepared by the ULB and sectoral schemes of State / Central
Government.

Improving the coverage and serving the uncovered area on priority basis.

Improving the quality and quantity of water supplied at consumer-end through improvements
to water treatment facilities.

Monitoring of distribution system for technical losses, water theft, indiscriminate usage of
water at public stand posts and reducing the unaccounted for water (UFW) through Water
Auditing, Awareness Campaign on Water Conservation, Rain Water Harvesting.

100 % O & M Cost Recovering Mechanism through Compulsory Water Metering, Adopting
differential pricing system, Bringing System Efficiency, Tariff Revision.

Improving duration and frequency of water supply through effective water demand
management.

B) Project Identification
It is suggested to undertake water supply sub-projects as under:
I. Augmentation of Water Supply
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

193

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

The current works shall focus on the existing supply augmentation at source and at distribution end.
This should be in-lines with the DPR prepared in a phased manner.
II. Water Treatment Plant
A scientific treatment plant of water to be installed. Measures should be taken to ensure water quality
not only relate to the treatment of the water, but to its conveyance and distribution after treatment as
well.
III. Water Supply Distribution Network & Upgradation
The existing water supply distribution being old with varying diameters, it is suggested to upgrade
and replace the existing Distribution system of approximately.
IV. Extension of distribution network within town
An extension of distribution network by 2035 is planned for new areas to keep a focus on better
network coverage and system delivery.
V. Establishing Customer Connections Water Meters
In order to achieve an effective O & M cost recovery it is suggested to provide Water meters to every
household.
VI. Providing Community Taps and Group Connections
Community taps can be provided based for the population that is to be served. This option may not
ensure full cost recovery, as there will be many social problems, thefts, lack of accountability and
maintenance.
C) Requirement & Phasing
The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Water Supply is presented in the Table
below:
Table 12.1: Proposed Projects for Water Supply for Khilchipur
No

Components

Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011
to FY 2015]

Water
(MLD)

Supply

II

Water Treatment
(MLD)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

System

2025
[ FY: 2015 to FY
2025]

3.13

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)
3.13

Plant

2.63

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

194

2.63

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.1: Proposed Projects for Water Supply for Khilchipur


No

Components

Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011
to FY 2015]

III

Water Supply Distribution


Network & Upgradation
(Km)

IV

Extension of distribution
network within town (Km)

Providing
(Nos)

VI

Establishing
Customer
Connections Water Meters
(Nos)

Public

2025
[ FY: 2015 to FY
2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

17.00

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)
17.00

1.78

4.16

35

52

3565

1151

1043

5759

Taps

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.2. Sewerage OR Waste Water Management


A) Basis for Project Identification
The CDP proposes to develop Khilchipurs Underground Sewerage system based on the following
project identification criteria:

Integrating the sectoral schemes of State / Central Government.

Covering 100% areas of the Town in a phased Manner.

Developing a sewerage system based on sewage flow equivalent to 80 percent of net water
supply to a household;

Developing a safe disposal system of sewage by providing a Sewerage Treatment Plant.

100 % O & M Cost Recovering Mechanism through Bringing System Efficiency, Imposing
Tariff etc.

B) Project Identification
The CDP proposes to undertake Sewerage sub-projects. Component specific intervention comprises
the following:
I. Sewer Network
Works proposed include provision of collection and conveyance system in a phased manner
for 100% Coverage.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

195

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

II. Sewerage Treatment Plant


It is proposed to install sewerage Treatment Plant in a phased manner taking into
consideration the projection made in this report.
C) Requirement & Phasing
The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Sewerage is presented in the Table below:
Table 12.2: Proposed Projects for Sewerage for Khilchipur
Coverage
No

Components

Sewer network (KM)

II

Decentralized Wastewater Treatment


Systems (DEWATS)

2015
[ FY: 2011
to FY
2015]

2025
[ FY: 2015
to FY 2025]

15.38

3.40

2035
Total
[FY: 2025 Requirement
to FY 2035]
(by 2035)

3.30

4.16

22.94
3.30

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.3. Sanitation
A) Basis for Project Identification
The CDP proposes to develop Khilchipurs Sanitation system based on the below mentioned project
identification criteria:

Integrating the Central Government Scheme of preparing City Sanitation Plan under National
Urban Sanitation Policy (2008) issued by Ministry of Urban Development, Govt. of India.

Achieving 100% open defecation free.

Upgrading and maintaining the existing infrastructure of Public Sanitation on PPP basis.

100 % Coverage of households under sanitation.

100 % O & M Cost Recovering mechanism through instituting PPP.

B) Project Identification
The CDP proposes to undertake Sewerage sub-projects. Component specific intervention comprises
the following:
I. Preparation of City Sanitation Plan
Government of India has announced National Urban Sanitation Policy 2008. The vision for urban
sanitation in India as pronounced in the policy is
all Indian cities and towns become totally sanitized,

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

196

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

healthy and liveable and ensure and sustain good public health and environmental outcomes for all
their citizens with a special focus on hygienic and affordable sanitation facilities for the urban poor
and women. The Government of India will provide assistance through state Government for the
following:

Preparation model City Sanitation Plans

Providing assistance for the preparation of Detailed Project Report (DPR) as per city
sanitation plan.

Promote public-private partnership in respect of key projects/activities identified in the city


sanitation plan;

II. Construction of Public Pay & Use Toilets


Construction of Public Pay & Use Toilets in each ward is envisaged on PPP basis.
III. Construction & Upgradation of Public Urinals
The Public Urinals though sufficient in number needs an upgradation / expansion with water facilities
and maintenance. A total of about 36 Nos. are targeted by 2035 in a phased manner.
IV. Evaluation Study & Rapid Impact Assessment
The purpose of such exercise is to assess the success rate of Status focused on sanitation and
cleanliness in the City. These can be specifically targeted on sanitation standards in slums, including
the effects of the drive on eradicating open defecation, level of cleanliness from the point of view of
citizens and impact of IEC (information education communication) and EE (entertainment education)
programmes. This needs to get elevated by 2025 from ULB side.
C) Requirement & Phasing
The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Sanitation is presented in the Table below:
Table 12.3: Proposed Projects for Sanitation for Khilchipur
Coverage
No

Components

2015
[ FY: 2011 to
FY 2015]

Preparation of City Sanitation Plan

1.00

1.00

II

Construction of Public Pay & Use


Toilets

6.00

III

Construction of Individual HH
Toilets

1250

938

2187.50

IV

Construction & Upgradation of


Public Urinals

24

30

Evaluation Study & Rapid Impact


Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

2025
[ FY: 2015 to
FY 2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Lumsum

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

197

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

Lumsum

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.3: Proposed Projects for Sanitation for Khilchipur


Coverage
No

2015
[ FY: 2011 to
FY 2015]

Components

2025
[ FY: 2015 to
FY 2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

Assessment
Source: Projections by CONSULTANT
Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.4. Solid Waste Management


A) Basis for Project Identification
The CDP proposes to develop Khilchipurs Solid Waste Management system is based on the below
mentioned project identification criteria:

Achieving Segregation at Source mechanism for the entire city.

Achieving 100 % primary collection system.

100 % Waste treatment and disposal facility for developing environmentally safer town.

Strengthen the institutional capacity;

Promote public/Private partnership, self help groups and NGO support;

Educate the public and create awareness on various issues of solid waste management;

Support the informal recycling activities; and

B) Project Identification
The CDP proposes to undertake Solid Waste Management sub-projects as under:
I. Primary Collection

Phased implementation of Door to Door collection System through community


organizations and ULBs by providing two bins for every household. This will induce a
system of segregation of waste at source.

Provision of Two system Publics Bins @ ward Level at public places like Markets, Hotels /
Restaurants, Religious places, Hospitals / Dispensaries and other Public Places. This will
induce a system of segregation of waste at source.

Street sweeping on daily basis for efficient segregation at source mechanism.

II. Solid Waste Transportation

-Introduction Multi-bin carts Tricycles.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

198

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

-Provision of Tractor for increasing the collection and transportation capacity on daily
basis.

III. Processing & Disposal

Encouraging local level aerobic vermi composting.

Sanitary land filling of inorganic fraction of waste and the compost rejects.

IV. IEC Activity

This will include Preparation of detailed project report and implementation of IEC
strategies and awareness design campaigns.

C) Requirement & Phasing


The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Solid Waste Management is presented in the
Table below:
Table 12.4: Proposed Projects for Solid Waste Management for Khilchipur
Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011 to
FY 2015]

2025
[ FY: 2015 to
FY 2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

Provision of bins @ Household


Level (Green & White) for Door to
Door Collection

7723

1709

2087

11519

II

Provision of Tricycles For Door To


Door Collection

15

23.0

III

Provision of Publics Bins @ ward


Level

30

30

60

IV

Provision of Tractor

Construction of Vermi Compost


Plant

2.56

6.95

VI

Scientifically reengineered landfills


Management
[Green
Buffer
Development,
Environmental
Monitoring]

2807

6856

No

Components

VII IEC Activity for SWM

9.52

12559

22222

Lumsum

Lumsum

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.5. Storm Water Drainage


A) Basis for Project Identification
The CDP proposes to develop Khilchipurs Drainage based on the below mentioned project
identification criteria:
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

199

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

100 % Coverage in terms of areas.

Covering the lengths of major Roads.

Existing Drainage pattern and network.

Upgrading the existing state of infrastructure on priority basis.

B) Project Identification
The CDP proposes to undertake Drainage sub-projects. Component specific intervention comprises
the following:
I.

Drainage Network

The proposed network length is considered for entire drainage system of Khilchipur.
II.

De-silting & Alignments of Major Drains

It is proposed to de-silting and re aligning the existing major drains with proper and uniform width.
C) Requirement & Phasing
The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Drainage is presented in the Table below:
Table 12.5: Proposed Projects for Storm Water Drainage for Khilchipur
Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011 to
FY 2015]

2025
[ FY: 2015 to
FY 2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

Storm Water Drainage Network


(KM)

20.76

6.81

8.31

35.88

De-silting and Alignment of major


drains

10.00

No

Components

I
II

10.00

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.6. Traffic and Transportation


A) Basis for Project Identification
The CDP proposes to develop Khilchipurs Traffic & Transportation system is based on the below
mentioned project identification criteria:

Integrating the DPR prepared by the ULB and sectoral schemes of State / Central
Government.

100 % coverage for the entire city and with a prioritization of uncovered areas.

To reduce delays at the junctions and remove bottlenecks.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

200

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

To improve the efficiency of road space.

Decongestion in the core part of the city.

Undertake effective measures for environmental protection.

B) Project Identification
The CDP proposes to undertake Traffic & Transportation sub-projects. Component specific
intervention comprises the following:
I. Widening of Important Roads
Road-widening programme improves channel capacity by adding more area to the circulation
channels. It is proposed to widen major roads with installation of necessary amenities like plantation,
signage, advertisement, street furniture etc.
II. Parking Provision with Pavements on Major Roads
On-street parking and regulation of on street parking at various locations has also been proposed as a
mitigation measure.
III. Up gradation of Kuttcha Roads
Upgradation of of roads envisaged by ULB are considered in CDP. This needs to be taken in phased
manner.
IV. Construction of additional Roads
Construction of additional roads are proposed for new development and areas by 2035.
V. Development of Bus cum Truck Terminal
As derived from stake holders consultation relocation and construction of a new Bus terminal is
needed. This is also proposed in CDP.
VI. Improvement of Junctions & Accident Prone areas
Major junctions and minor junctions are proposed to be taken up for improvements. Provision of High
mast lighting at all major junctions, Stop Signs and Place identification signs should be done.
VII.

Construction of Model Roads

It has been observed that, in most of the major roads in the town pedestrians are forced to use the
carriageway due to the absence or poorly maintained footpaths. Footpaths of 1.5 m wide are proposed
along the major roads where heavy pedestrian movements are observed. For traffic safety and
convenience, appropriate signs, markings, lighting, guideposts are required to be provided on curves,
intersections, public utility places, etc. Proposals for road furniture are made considering the
importance of the road, safety and aesthetic. This developed stretches will be known as Model Roads.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

201

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

C) Requirement & Phasing


The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Traffic and Transportation is presented in the
Table below:
Table 12.6: Proposed Projects for Traffic & Transportation for Khilchipur
No

Components

Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011
to FY
2015]

2025
[ FY: 2015
to FY 2025]

2035
[FY:
2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

Widening of important roads [Km]

12.00

12.00

II

Onstreet Parking Provision with


Pavements on Major Roads [Km]

0.00

0.00

III

Upgradation of Kuttcha Road roads


[Km]

5.00

5.00

IV

Construction of Additional roads


[Km]

1.78

Development of bus cum Truck


terminal [Km]

1.00

VI

Improvement of junctions
accidents areas [Nos]

2.00

VII

Expansion of bridge over River

VIII Implementation
Management Plan

of

and

Traffic

4.16

5.00

10.94
1.00

2.00

4.00

0.00

0.00

1.00

1.00

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.7. Street Lighting & Fire Fighting System


A) Basis for Project Identification
The CDP proposes to develop Khilchipurs Street Lighting system is based on the below mentioned
project identification criteria:

100 % coverage for the entire city and with a prioritization of unlit areas

Average spacing between lamp posts in the town 25 Meters.

To introduce PPP for energy conservation.

B) Project Identification
It is suggested to undertake the following subprojects under this sector as follows:
I. Construction of new street light poles
Construction of new street lights poles in non lit and emerging areas will be required by 2035.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

202

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

II. Upgradation of existing street light poles


The existing street light poles should be upgrades by using energy efficient lighting and
accessories.
III. Fire Fighting System
A well equipped Fire Fighting system should be installed with provision of yearly Operation
and Maintenance.
C) Requirement & Phasing
The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Street Lighting & Fire Fighting System is
presented in the Table below:
Table 12.7: Proposed Projects for Street Lighting & Fire Fighting System for Khilchipur
Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011
to FY 2015]

2025
[ FY: 2015
to FY 2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

Construction of new street


light poles

0.00

331

331

662

II

Upgradation of street light


poles

60.00

III

Fire
Fighting
System:
Equipments & Utilities) (For
Number of Years)

2.00

No

Components

60
1.00

1.00

5.00

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.8. Basic Services For Urban Poor


A) Basis for Project Identification
The CDP proposes to develop services to the urban poor on the below mentioned project
identification criteria:

Integrating the Central Government Scheme of Slum Free City Planning under Rajiv Awas
Yojana (2009) issued by Ministry of Urban Development, Govt. of India.

Achieving 100 % Slum Free City Planning.

Provision of Housing to BPL population on Priority Basis

Demand for Housing is in line with the review of the master plan-2021 prepared for
Khilchipur.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

203

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Provision of Housing and necessary basic services like water supply, sewerage, Drainage,

Electricity as internal development.


B) Project Identification
It is suggested to undertake the following subprojects under this sector as follows:
I.

Preparation of Slum free City Plan

It is imperative to prepare an action plan for slum free city plan for the town of Khilchipur.
The brief guidelines of the schemes are reiterated in this report.

II.

Construction of Housing

A construction of dwelling units are considered in CDP. This includes provision of Basic
Services. This is envisaged in a phased manner with BPL population on priority basis.

III.

Provision of Basic Services

The Urban Slum population having house but lacks basic services will be recorded on
priority Basis.

C) Requirement & Phasing


The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Basic Services to the Urban Poor is
presented in the Table below:
Table 12.8: Proposed Projects for Basic Services to the Urban Poor Khilchipur
Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011 to
FY 2015]

2025
[ FY: 2015 to
FY 2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

No

Components

Preparation of Slum free


City Plan

II

Construction
of
Dwelling units including
services like Water
Supply,Sewerage,
Drainage and electricity
for
(internal
Development)

1310

122

149

1581

III

Provision
of
Basic
Services
including
services like Water
Supply,Sewerage,
Drainage and electricity
for
(internal
Development) to Urban
Poor Households

509

509

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

204

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.8: Proposed Projects for Basic Services to the Urban Poor Khilchipur
Coverage
No

Components

2015
[ FY: 2011 to
FY 2015]

2025
[ FY: 2015 to
FY 2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.9. Environment
A) Basis for Project Identification
The CDP proposes to develop Khilchipurs Urban Environment is based on the below mentioned
project identification criteria:

Conservation of Existing Water bodies

Improving Quality Urban environment

To introduce PPP for environment conservation

Other pollution like air, water, soil should be reduced.

B) Project Identification
The CDP proposes to undertake the following sub-projects under this sector. Component specific
intervention comprises the following:
I.

Development of modernized slaughter house


For the existing fish markets and animal market it is proposed to develop a modernized
slaughter house.

II.

Urban Greening Plan


Increasing the per capita urban green and open space it is proposed to take up the project for
greening major streets through urban plantation, beautification, landscaping and developing
Vans and gardens. This should be achieved through community participation.

III.

Construction or Parks & Gardens


Construction of Parks and Gardens to be developed are envisaged.

C) Requirement & Phasing


The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Environment is presented in the Table
below:

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

205

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.9: Proposed Projects for Urban Environment for Khilchipur


Coverage
No

2015
[ FY: 2011 to
FY 2015]

Components

Desiltation project
Major Water Bodies

for

II

Desiltation project
Major Water Bodies

for

III

Conservation of
Ganga River

IV

Development
modernized
house.

Implementation of Urban
Greening
Plan:
Urban
Plantation,
Beautification
and
Landscaping,
Van/
Gardens

VI

Development of Dhobi
Ghat

2025
[ FY: 2015
to FY 2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

1.00

1.00

Garh

of
slaughter

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.10. Urban Governance


A) Basis for Project Identification
Refer Action Plan in chapter No. 11.
B) Project Identification
It is suggested to undertake the following subprojects under this sector as follows:
I.

Implementation of Double Entry Accrual Based Accounting

II.

Implementation of Property Tax Reforms

III.

Preparation of Integrated GIS Base Map with Total Station Survey

IV. Computerisation of Records


V.

Upgradation of Office Infrastructure

VI. Complaint Redressal System


VII. Municipal Services Performance Measurement System
VIII. Training & Capacity Building Programme
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

206

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

IX. EGovernance initiative large scale expansion


C) Requirement & Phasing
The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Urban Governance and Municipal Reforms
is presented in the Table below:
Table 12.10: Proposed Projects for Urban Governance for Khilchipur
Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011 to FY
2015]

2025
[ FY: 2015 to FY
2025]

No

Components

Implementation of Double
Entry
Accrual
Based
Accounting

Do

II

Implementation of Property
Tax Reforms

Do

III

Preparation of Integrated
GIS Base Map with Total
Station Survey

Do

IV

Computerisation of Records

Do

Upgradation
Infrastructure

VI

Complaint Redressal System

Do

VII

Municipal
Services
Performance
Measurement System

Do

VIII

Training
&
Capacity
Building Programme

Do

IX

EGovernance initiative
large scale expansion

of

Office

2035
[FY: 2025 to FY
2035]

Do
Do

Do
Do

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.1.11. Social Infrastructure & Other Projects


A) Basis for Project Identification
This involves particularly Heritage, health and educational infrastructure. Refer Action Plan in
chapter No. 5, 7.
B) Project Identification
It is suggested to undertake the following subprojects under this sector as follows:

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

207

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Health Infrastructure

Construction of Dispensary

Health Infrastructure

Construction of Maternity & Child Welfare

Health Infrastructure

Signage regulation Programme


-Regulation of signage is considered appropriate in tourist destination. For
this a street signage programme should be launched where street plaques
bearing the name of the area and municipal symbols should be displayed at
the important places. This will undertakes the following projects
-Provision of Electronic signages and information displays
-Conversion of Existing Shops Into A Gallery Heritage Street Scape
Creation of Living Heritage Streets
Such an initiative carried for the entire town will generate a heritage
character typically unique of its kind. Such an initiative proved successful
in many big cities like Orrisa, Delhi, Mumbai through PPP.
Decongestion in the inner core of the town
As there is only one approach road with a heavy pedestrian movement,
there are vehicular entry which created problems of traffic and congestion.
Pedestrianisation on all such important roads should be initiated through
introducing pick-up& drop up facilities with non-polluting battery
operated vehicles.

Education
Infrastructure

Construction of Primary Schools

Education
Infrastructure

Construction of Secondary Schools

Education
Infrastructure

Construction of Senior Secondary Schools

Heritage Conservation

Conservation and Heritage Programme

C) Requirement & Phasing


The requirements involved in the mentioned projects for Urban Governance and Municipal Reforms
is presented in the Table below:
Table 12.11: Proposed Projects for Social Infrastructure & Other Projects for Khilchipur
No

Components

Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011 to
FY 2015]

Construction
Dispensary (In Nos.)

of

1.00

II

Construction of Maternity
& Child Welfare
(In
Nos.)

1.00

III

Construction of Hospital
(In Nos.)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

2025
[ FY: 2015
to FY 2025]

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

1.00

2.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

208

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.11: Proposed Projects for Social Infrastructure & Other Projects for Khilchipur
No

Components

Coverage
2015
[ FY: 2011 to
FY 2015]

2025
[ FY: 2015
to FY 2025]

IV

Construction of Primary
Schools (In Nos.)

2.00

3.00

Construction
Secondary Schools
Nos.)

of
(In

1.00

1.00

VI

Construction of Senior
Secondary Schools (In
Nos.)

1.00

VII

Construction of Library
(In Nos.)

VIII

Construction
Community Hall
Nos.)

IX

2035
[FY: 2025 to
FY 2035]

5.00
1

1.00

Conservation
and
Heritage Programme (In
Number of years)

Do

2.00

1.00

1.00

of
(In

Total
Requirement
(by 2035)

1.00

2.00
1.00

Do

Do

5.00

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components & Phasing

12.2. Capital Investment Plan For Khilchipur


12.2.1. Water Supply
Under this sector, provision of source development, updagration and extension of existing network,
extension of treatment plants, public taps and connections water meters are proposed. The Capital
Investment Plan (CIP) for the Water Supply sector is based on the requirements and demand for the
year 2035. The investment phasing is presented in Table below:
Table 12.12: Investment Phasing (Water Supply), Khilchipur
No

2015

Components

2025

2035

Total
Cost

(in Rs Lacs)
I

Water Supply System

31.29

0.00

0.00

31.29

II

Water Treatment Plant

0.00

47.32

0.00

47.32

III

Water Supply Distribution


Network & Upgradation

314.50

0.00

0.00

314.50

IV

Extension of distribution
network within town

0.00

32.99

76.88

109.87

Establishing
Customer
Connections Water Meters

35.65

11.51

10.43

57.59

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

209

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.12: Investment Phasing (Water Supply), Khilchipur


No

2015

Components

2025

2035

Total
Cost

(in Rs Lacs)
VI

Providing Public Taps


Grand Total ( in Rs Lacs)

1.21

0.27

0.33

1.81

382.65

92.10

87.64

562.39

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

12.2.2. Sewerage
An investment of is proposed for provision of sewer network and sewerage treatment plant by the
year 2035, as showed in Table below:
Table 12.13: Investment Phasing (Sewerage), Khilchipur
No

2015

Components

2025

2035

Total
Cost

(in Rs Lacs)
I

Sewer network

922.84

204.16

249.33

1376.34

II

Decentralized
Wastewater
Treatment Systems (DEWATS)

77.52

17.15

20.94

115.61

1000.36

221.31

270.28

1491.95

Grand Total ( in Rs Lacs)


Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

12.2.3. Sanitation
The investments for Sanitation are in line with Preparation of City Sanitation Plan, Construction of
Public Pay & Use Toilets and Evaluation Study & Rapid Impact Assessment. The total estimated cost
proposed by 2035 summarized in Table below:
Table 12.14: Investment Phasing (Sanitation), Khilchipur
No

2015

Components

2025

2035

Total
Cost

(in Rs Lacs)
I

Preparation of City Sanitation Plan

10

10.00

II

Construction of Public Pay & Use


Toilets

30.00

0.00

30.00

III

Construction of Individual HH Toilets

156.25

117.19

0.00

273.44

IV

Construction & Upgradation of Public


Urinals

5.40

21.60

27.00

Evaluation Study & Rapid


Assessment

5.00

5.00

201.65

138.79

5.00

345.44

Impact

Grand Total ( in Rs Lacs)


Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

210

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

12.2.4. Solid Waste Management


The components of primary and secondary collection, including collection in festival days, and
scientifically landfill development are planned for the immediate requirement due to the poor
condition in this sector. The highest cost of SWM sector is for Landfill Site Development by 2035.
And the estimated cost for development of one compost plant is summarized below:
Table 12.15: Investment Phasing (Solid Waste Management), Khilchipur
No

2015

Components

2025

2035

Total
Cost

(in Rs Lacs)
I

Provision of bins @ Household Level


(Green & White) for Door to Door
Collection

38.62

8.54

10.43

57.59

II

Provision of Tricycles for Door to


Door Collection

1.54

0.34

0.42

2.30

III

Provision of Publics Bins @ ward


Level

0.45

0.45

0.00

0.90

IV

Provision of Tractor

13.25

26.50

13.25

53.00

Construction of Vermi Compost Plant

6.41

17.38

0.00

23.79

VI

Scientifically reengineered
Management

8.42

20.57

37.68

66.67

VII

SWM Training & Capacity Building


Workshops

3.5

3.5

7.00

3.5

3.5

7.00

75.69

80.79

61.78

218.26

landfills

VIII IEC Material


Grand Total ( in Rs Lacs)
Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

12.2.5. Storm Water Drainage


The only component of this sector is extension of drainage network and de-silting and realignment of
major drains which is proposed to be carried out in a phased manner as below:
Table 12.16: Investment Phasing (Drainage), Khilchipur
No

2015

Components

2025

2035

Total Cost

(in Rs Lacs)

Drainage Network

249.14

81.67

99.73

430.54

II

De-silting and Alignment of major drains

70.00

70.00

Grand Total ( in Rs Lacs)

319.14

81.67

99.73

500.54

Note: Refer Annexure for detail on each components

12.2.6. Traffic and Transportation

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

211

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Infrastructure are proposed for up-gradation and widening of important roads, development of parking
lots, construction of additional roads, improvement of junctions and accidents areas, among other
projects. The details of investment phasing for this is summarized in Table below:
Table 12.17: Investment Phasing (Traffic and Transportation), Khilchipur
No

2015

Components

2025

2035

Total Cost

(in Rs Lacs)

Widening of Major roads

360.00

0.00

0.00

360.00

II

On street Parking Provision with


Pavements on Major Roads

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

III

Up-gradation of Kaccha roads

125.00

0.00

0.00

125.00

IV

Construction of Additional roads

53.50

124.67

150.00

328.17

Development
terminal

0.00

50.00

0.00

50.00

VI

Improvement of
accidents areas

0.00

15.00

15.00

30.00

VII

Expansion of bridge over River

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

VIII

Implementation
Management Plan

0.00

10.00

0.00

10.00

538.50

199.67

165.00

903.17

of

bus

cum

Truck

junctions

of

and

Traffic

Grand Total ( in Rs Lacs)


Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

12.2.7. Street Lighting & Fire Fighting


Provision of new street light poles, up-gradation of existing street light poles and Report for Energy
Planning are proposed for this sector. The details are presented in Table below
Table 12.18: Investment Phasing (Street Lighting), Khilchipur
2015

2025

2035

Total Cost

No

Components

Construction of new street light


poles

66.2

66.2

132.4

II

Upgradation of existing street


light poles

12

12

III

Fire
Fighting
System:
Equipments & Utilities) (For
Number of Years)

10

20

Grand Total ( in Rs Lacs)

22

71.2

71.2

164.4

(in Rs Lacs)

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

212

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

12.2.8. Basic Services to the Urban Poor


Under the CIP it is proposed to improve the slum infrastructure. The component Preparation of Slum
Free City Plan has an estimated for Construction of Dwelling units including services cost and
Provision of Basic Services including services cost. The investment phasing is illustrated in Table
below:
Table 12.19: Investment Phasing (Basic Services to the Urban Poor), Khilchipur
2015

2035

Total Cost

0.00

0.00

15.00

3274.50

304.95

372.42

3951.87

Provision
of
Basic
Services
including
services like Water
Supply,
Sewerage,
Drainage and electricity
for
(internal
Development) to Urban
Poor Households

127.25

0.00

0.00

127.25

Grand Total ( in Rs
Lacs)

3,416.75

304.95

372.42

4094.12

No

Components

Preparation of Slum free


City Plan

15.00

II

Construction
of
Dwelling units including
services like Water
Supply,
Sewerage,
Drainage and electricity
for
(internal
Development)

III

2025
(in Rs Lacs)

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

12.2.9. Environment
A total investment is identified for founding environmental projects. The phasing of investment for
identifies projects is presented in Table below:
Table 12.20: Investment Phasing (Environment), Khilchipur
2015

No

Components

Desiltation project for


Major Water Bodies

III

Conservation of
Ganga River

IV
V

2025

2035

Total Cost

(in Rs Lacs)
500.00

500.00

Garh

50.00

50.00

Development
of
modernized
slaughter
house.

200.00

200.00

Implementation

20.00

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

of

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

213

20.00

40.00

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.20: Investment Phasing (Environment), Khilchipur


No

2015

Components

2025

2035

Total Cost

20.00

790.00

(in Rs Lacs)

Urban Greening Plan:


Urban
Plantation,
Beautification
and
Landscaping,
Van/
Gardens
VI

Development of Dhobi
Ghat
Grand Total ( in Rs
Lacs)

500.00

270.00

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

12.2.10. Social Infrastructure & Other Projects


The following investments are planned for social Infrastructure, Health Infrastructure, Education
Infrastructure and Heritage Infrastructure:
Table 12.21: Investment Phasing (Social Infrastructure & Other Projects), Khilchipur
No

2015

Components

Heritage

II

2025

2035

Total Cost

(in Rs Lacs)
75

75

75

225.00

Social Infrastructure &


Other Projects

125.00

125.00

125.00

375.00

III

Health Infrastructure

125.00

125.00

125.00

375.00

IV

Education Infrastructure

125.00

125.00

125.00

375.00

Grand Total ( in Rs
Lacs)

450.00

450.00

450.00

1350.00

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

12.2.11. Urban Governance


The projects in Urban Governance & Municipal Reforms, as shown in Table below:
Table 12.22: Investment Phasing (Urban Governance & Municipal Reforms), Khilchipur
2015

No

Components

Implementation
of
Double Entry Accrual
Based Accounting

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

2025

2035

Total Cost

(in Rs Lacs)
15.00

15.00

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

214

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.22: Investment Phasing (Urban Governance & Municipal Reforms), Khilchipur
2015

2025

2035

Total Cost

No

Components

II

Implementation
of
Property Tax Reforms

15.00

15.00

III

Preparation
of
Integrated
GIS Base
Map with Total Station
Survey

25.00

25.00

IV

Computerisation
Records

30.00

(in Rs Lacs)

of

30.00

60.00

Upgradation of Office
Infrastructure

30.00

30.00

VI

Complaint
System

20.00

20.00

VII

Municipal
Services
Performance
Measurement System

35.00

35.00

VIII

Training & Capacity


Building Programme

40.00

IX

EGovernance initiative
large scale expansion

Redressal

Grand Total

85.00

( in Rs Lacs)

155.00

40.00

80.00

100.00

100.00

140.00

380.00

Source: Projections by PRUDA-AIILSG

12.2.12. Summary of Investment & Phasing


The total base cost of projects for all the sector is shown in the following Table:
Table 12.23: Summary of Investments, Khilchipur
Sectoral
Share of
the total
Investment

Summary of Investments (KHILCHIPUR)


No. Components

2015

2025

2035

Total

(in %)

Water Supply

382.65

92.10

87.64

562.39

5.21%

Sewerage

1000.36

221.31

270.28

1491.95

13.81%

Storm Water Drainage

319.14

81.67

99.73

500.54

4.63%

Solid Waste Management

75.69

80.79

61.78

218.26

2.02%

Sanitation

201.65

138.79

5.00

345.44

3.20%

Traffic & Transportation

538.50

199.67

165.00

903.17

8.36%

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

215

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.23: Summary of Investments, Khilchipur


Sectoral
Share of
the total
Investment

Summary of Investments (KHILCHIPUR)


7

Street Lighting

12.00

66.20

66.20

144.40

1.34%

Fire Fighting

10

20.00

0.19%

Basic Services to Urban Poor

3,417

305

372

4094.12

37.91%

10

Urban Environment

500

270

20

790.00

7.31%

11

Urban Governance

85.00

145.00

150.00

380.00

3.52%

12

Heritage

75

75

75

225.00

2.08%

13

Education Infrastructure

125.00

125.00

125.00

375.00

3.47%

14

Health Infrastructure

125.00

125.00

125.00

375.00

3.47%

15

SOCIAL
INFRASTRUCTURE
OTHER PROJECTS

125.00

125.00

125.00

375.00

3.47%

&

Total

6991.75 2055.47 1753.04 10800.26

% Share of the total Investment

64.74%

19.03%

100%

16.23%

12.3. FINANCIAL OPERATING PLAN FOR KHILCHIPUR


12.3.1 Overview
Financial sustainability of infrastructure investments is determined based on Khilchipur
municipalities ability to sustain investments (through debt servicing and operation and maintenance)
from the municipal fund. Most sub-projects undertaken in ULBs (in the State and across India) are
financially unviable if they are to take recourse to project revenue. Municipal taxes and non-taxes
generally supplement the shortfall in debt repayment and O&M. Financial sustainability analysis for
project ULBs is therefore based on the municipal funds ability to pay for sub-project costs. Reforms
initiatives are subsequently based on resource mobilization and expenditure management initiatives
required for CDP sustainability.
The Financial and Operating Plan (FOP) shall lay out the planned fiscal status of Khilchipur ULB
over the CDP period, taking cognizance of Multiyear Investment Plans for each sub-project, sources
and disposition of sub-project funds, and performance of Municipal Revenue Account. The FOP will
be reviewed annually to determine the extent to which targets are met and undertake
corrections/revisions accordingly. The FOP also helps in assessing the requirement of funds over the
short-term and identifying sources with potential for revenue enhancement. The main objective of the
FOP is to enable ULB to determine their own priority objectives in terms of goals, resources, service
and management aspects in the medium-term.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

216

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

12.3.2 Methodology adopted for preparing FOP


The guiding criterion for project sizing is that in no year should the ULB have a Negative Opening/
Closing Balance. The FOP process involves the following steps:
Step 1.

Projection of yearly Income (Revenue and Capital20) under various heads and alternative
assumptions without proposed infrastructure OR No Reform Scenario.

Step 2.

Projection of Revenue Expenditure for existing levels of services without Proposed


Infrastructure OR No Reform Scenario.

Step 3.

Calculating the overall closing balance without Proposed Investment OR No Reform


Scenario (Referred as Scenario 1)

Step 4.

Estimation of Capital Account (Income with GoI-GoMP-ULB-Others 21 equity) and


(expenditure i.e. Identified in the Capital Investment Plan) for providing new Capital
Infrastructure at different service levels.

Step 5.

Calculating the overall closing balance with Proposed Investment on the overall closing
balance without proposed investments OR No Reform Scenario (Referred as Scenario 2).

Step 6.

Estimation of Additional Revenue Account (Revenue Income + O & M expenditure due


to the provision of New Infrastructure separately referred as Reform scenario.

Step 7.

Estimation of annual debt servicing burden under alternative scenarios of loan / grant if
applicable.

Step 8.

Calculating the overall closing balance with Additional O & M Expenditure loaded on
Scenario 2. (Referred as Scenario 3)

Step 9.

Calculating the overall closing balance with Additional Revenue Account loaded on
Scenario 2. (Referred as Scenario 4)

The investment sustenance capacity of ULB is assessed based on projection of operating / revenue
surplus of the municipal fund prior to investments. The projection of the revenue account of the
municipal fund is carried out based on certain assumptions of revenue realization and expenditures.
These assumptions are generally trend based or on revenue base and basis, collection efficiencies and
revenue enhancement plans of the ULBs.
The investment sustenance is ascertained considering projected revenue surplus available to service
additional debt for capital investment, operate and maintain new assets created and revenue
realizations from the new investments.

20

-Capital Income/grants of regular schemes like SJSRY, State Finance

21

-Grants in the form of Loans, Local Sources, Stakeholders etc

Commission, etc.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

217

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

12.3.3 Projection Of Municipal Fund With No Reform Sce nario


(I) REVENUE ACCOUNT
The projected municipal fund (2013-14 to 2034-35) and the underlying assumptions are presented in

Annexure Financial Operating Plan. Some of the key assumptions with regards items of income
and expenditure under the revenue account, and their basis are elucidated in the following tables.
(I.A) Assumptions in Projection of Revenue Income
The assumptions adopted are primarily based on past trends (5-year average growth trend or 5-year
compound annual growth rate - CAGR, whichever is lower), subject to minimum (5%) and maximum
annual growth rate (15%) ceilings. The assumptions and working sheets for forecasting municipal
income are presented in Table below:
Table 12.24: Assumptions in Projecting Revenue Income, Khilchipur
Details

Remark / Basis

Taxes
/ The sources of revenue income for the town comes from a variety of
Fees
&
Rates and Tax Revenue (includes Property tax, Water Tax, Sewerage Tax, Conservancy
Charges
Tax, Lighting Tax, Education Tax, Vehicle Tax, Tax on Animals, Electricity Tax,
Professional Tax, Advertisement Tax, Pilgimage Tax, Export Tax, Other Taxes);
Rental Income from Municipal Properties (Includes Rent from Civic Amenities, Rent
from Office Buildings, Rent from Guest Houses, Rent from lease of lands etc.);
Fees & User Charges (Includes Empanelment & Registration Charges, Licensing Fees,
Fees for Grants of Permit, Fees of Certificate or Extract, Development Charges,
Regularisation Fees, Penalties and Fines, Other Fees, User Charges, Entry Fess,
Service /Administrative Charges etc.);
Note: Other New taxes / Fees such as sewerage Tax/ Charges, User Charges for
parking, SWM etc are assumed separately in the additional revenue sections subject to
implementation of the proposed infrastructure or schemes.
Non Tax

The non-tax sources of revenue income, viz. municipal own sources, compensation and
assigned revenue are forecast based on past trends.
Assigned Revenues & Compensation ( includes Taxes & Duties Collected by Others,
Compensation in lieu of Taxes & Duties, Compensation in lieu of Octroi, State Finance
Commission, Compensation in lieu of Concession etc.);
Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies (includes Revenue Grants, Reimbursement for expenses, Contribution towards schemes From State Government/
Central Government / Other Organisations);
Income from Investment;
Interest Earned and Other Income (Includes Deposit Forfeited, Lapsed Deposit,
Insurance Clam Recovery, Profit on Disposal of Fixed assets, Recovery from
Employees, Unclaimed Refund Payable/Liabilities Written Back, Excess Provision
written back and Miscellaneous Income).

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

218

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

(I.B) Adopted Growth Rates in Projection of Revenue Income


The adopted Growth rates and working sheets for forecasting municipal income are presented in
Table below.
Table 12.25: Adopted Growth Rates for Projecting Revenue Income, Khilchipur
Past CAGR
(in %)

Sources of Revenue Income

[Previous 5
Years]

Adopted CAGR
(in %)

A1

Rates and Tax Revenue

29%

15.00%

A2

Assigned Revenues & Compensation

20%

15.00%

A3

Rental Income from Municipal Properties

20%

15.00%

A4

Fees & User Charges

20%

14.00%

A5

Sale & Hire Charges

20%

14.00%

A6

Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies

20%

10.00%

A7

Income from Investment

5%

10.00%

A8

Interest Earned

0%

5.00%

A9

Other Income

0.00%

0.00%

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


(I.C) Assumptions in Projection of Revenue Expenditure
The assumptions adopted are primarily based on past trends (5-year average growth trend or 5-year
compound annual growth rate - CAGR, whichever is lower), subject to minimum (5%) and maximum
annual growth rate (15%) ceilings.
Table 12.26: Assumptions in Projecting Revenue Expenditure, Khilchipur
Details

Remark / Basis

Establishment
The high growth is primarily due to inappropriate booking of salary
Expenditure / Salary of expenditure in terms of regular & casual work force. It is also possible that
Regular Staff
the picture is unclear as there is no detail breaks up of salary expenditure
of casual work force. The casual work force exists mainly in SWM,
sanitation, water supply etc. These expenditures are also non-recurring
items of revenue expenditure. A negative growth rate is adopted for some
sectors on the assumptions of implementation of double accounting system
reform in the ULB.
O&M / Contingencies

This high growth in Expenditure is primarily due to inappropriate booking


of expenses by ULB in terms of capital and revenue items. It is likely that
some capital expenditure items have been accounted under revenue
account. A nominal growth rate of 15 per cent per annum is assumed to
forecast operation and maintenance and contingency expenditure.

Source: CONSULTANT

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

219

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

(I.D) Adopted Growth Rates in Projection of Revenue Expenditure


The adopted Growth rates and working sheets for forecasting Revenue expenditure are presented in
Table below:
Table 12.27: Adopted Growth Rates for Projecting Revenue Expenditure, Khilchipur
Past CAGR
Sources of Revenue Expenditure

(in %)
[Previous 5 Years]

Adopted CAGR
(in %)

B1

Establishment Expenses

20%

15.00%

B2

Administrative Expenses

20%

15.00%

B3

Operations & Maintenance

20%

15.00%

B4

Interest & Finance Charges

0%

0.00%

B5

Programme Expenses

0.00%

0.00%

B6

Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies

0.00%

0.00%

B7

Miscellaneous Expenses

0%

5.00%

B8

Transfer of Fund

0.00%

0.00%

Source: Projections by CONSULTANT


(II) CAPITAL ACCOUNT
Assumptions in Projection of Capital Income

In case of capital Income, it is assumed that the Central Finance Commission Grant, and other
scheme-based capital grants will decrease gradually and divert into new capital infrastructure.

Special Grants Based Works like Basic service grants, Road Repair Grants from state
government are not excluded from the regular capital income. Instead these grants would be
utilized as part of the larger / city-wide capital investment plan, rather than on ad hoc small
projects in isolation.

12.3.4. Projection of Municipal Fund with Proposed Investments


(I) MODES OF FINANCE FOR CIP
Following section of the report focuses on various modes of finance for implementation of different
development projects envisaged in the City Investment Plan (CIP). Mainly, modes of finance can be
either through government grant/aid or through public private partnership (PPP) or through loan from
financial institutes.
Through Government Grant/Aid
- UIDSSMT- Urban infrastructure Development Scheme for Small & Medium Towns aims at
improvement in urban infrastructure in towns and cities in a planned manner. The components for
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

220

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

assistance under the scheme will include all urban infrastructure development projects including water
supply and sewerage. The sharing of funds would be in the ratio of 80:10 between Central
Government & State Government and the balance 10% could be raised by the nodal/implementing
agencies from the financial institutions. Implementing agencies may substitute internal resources for
funds to be raised from financial institutions.
-IHSDP- The sharing of funds for IHSDP would be in the ratio of 80:20 between Central
Government & State Government/ULB/Parastatal. States/Implementing Agencies may raise their
contribution from their own resources or from beneficiary contribution/ financial institutions.
It is assumed that the sharing pattern will be as same as that of UIDSSMT i.e. 80:10 and the rest has
to be raised from Financial Institution.
Through PPP
As a response to an insufficient provision of basic urban services and a lack of access to finance and
other resources by ULBs that aim to increase access to these services, a number of PPP options have
emerged. These include: service contracts; performance based service contract; joint sector company
to implement and finance the project; a management contract for operations and maintenance (O&M);
and construction cum build-operate-transfer (BOT) contract.
In case of Khilchipur, the Following projects are suggested to be developed on PPP basis.

Construction of Public Pay & Use Toilets

Development of Parking sites and design of road junctions/traffic inlands to control and
manage traffic in an efficient manner.

Construction of Additional Road with onsite parking facilities

Transportation, Treatment and disposal of SWM

Street Lighting

Development of Bus cum transport terminal

Other than this, it is proposed to upgrade dwelling units of various slum areas and provide
basic services to the urban poor can be developed on PPP basis.

Following refers the project share on PPP basis.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

221

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.28: Suggested Project Cost to be developed Through PPP, Khilchipur


PPP
Share of
the
Sectoral
CIP

By 2015
Amount
(in Lac
Rs.)

By 2025
Amount
(in Lac
Rs.)

By 2035
Amount
(in Lac
Rs.)

Total
Amount
(in Lac
Rs.)

Solid Waste Management

15%

11.35

12.12

9.27

32.74

Sanitation

10%

20.17

13.88

0.50

34.54

Traffic & Transportation

5%

26.93

9.98

8.25

45.16

Street Lighting

10%

1.20

6.62

6.62

14.44

Basic Services to the Urban Poor

10%

341.68

30.50

37.24

409.41

Urban Environment*

20%

100.00

54.00

4.00

158.00

Heritage*

30%

22.50

22.50

22.50

67.50

Education Infrastructure*

30%

37.50

37.50

37.50

112.50

Health Infrastructure*

30%

37.50

37.50

37.50

112.50

598.82

224.60

163.38

986.79

Sector

Grand Total

12.3.5. Assumed Funding Pattern for CIP


Assumption for CIP: The sharing of funds required for CIP would be in the ratio of 80:10 between
Central Government & State Government and the balance 10% could be raised by the ULB from the
financial institutions or through PPP.
Assumption for ULB contribution: It is proposed that the ULB can undertake the CIP with 10%
share of the CIP. The amount required from the ULB can be through term loan from markets. This
means that additional Revenue up to Rs. 3.00 Cr. required by the ULB needs to be done through Term
Loan.

12.3.6. Additional Revenue Account due to Proposed Investments


The assumptions pertaining to funding sources, additional revenues, O&M expenses and debt
servicing are presented in the following tables.
The assumptions of natural increase in the development over a period of time are done as under:
(i) Assumptions for Additional Revenues as a result of Proposed Investments
The additional revenue as a result of proposed investments is assumed to get generated with the
delivery of the services. Apart from that the additional revenue generation of the taxes with the
increase in the population is also assumed under this head. This will match the base scenario growth
rates.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

222

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.29: Additional Revenues as a result of Proposed Investments


By
2011

By 2015

By
2035

By 2025

Population

8344

20508

20508

25045

25045

30585

Household

1669

3,862

3862

4,716

4716

5,759

Projected Population Increase

12163

4536

5540

Projected
Household

2192

854

1043

Increase

in

Commercial Establishment

67

70

77

85

93

103

Institutional Establishment

17

18

19

21

23

26

Increase
in
Establishment

Commercial

Increase
in
Establishment

Institutional

Water Supply TAX


Proposed Tarrif

Base
Rate

By
2015

By
2020

By
2025

By
2030

By
2035

Residential

500

625

781

859

859

859

Commercial

750

938

1172

1289

1289

1289

Institutional

1125

1406

1758

1934

1934

1934

1000

1250

1563

1719

1719

1719

525002
3

31548
94

56881
53

42364
46

694469
1

52.50

31.55

56.88

42.36

69.45

One time Connection


Registration Charges

Additional Revenue with Population


Increase and Development
Additional Revenue with Population
Increase and Development (In Lacs)

Assumed
to
be
collected
from the
additiona
l
projected
Househol
ds.
1.1
times to
the base
rate

Sewerage TAX
Proposed Tarrif

Base
Rate

By
2015

By
2020

By
2025

By
2030

By
2035

Residential

500

625

781

859

859

859

Commercial

750

938

1172

1289

1289

1289

Institutional

1125

1406

1758

1934

1934

1934

3000

3750

4688

5156

5156

5156

107422
17

31822
76

86580
81

42728
91

105712
96

107.42

31.82

86.58

42.73

105.71

One time Connection


Registration Charges

Additional Revenue with Population


Increase and Development
Additional Revenue with Population
Increase and Development (In Lacs)

Assumed
to
be
collected
from
every
househol
d.
1.1
times to
the base
rate

SWM TAX

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

223

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.29: Additional Revenues as a result of Proposed Investments


By
2011

By 2015

By
2035

By 2025

Population

8344

20508

20508

25045

25045

30585

Household

1669

3,862

3862

4,716

4716

5,759

Proposed Tarrif

Base
Rate

By
2015

By
2020

By
2025

By
2030

By
2035

Residential

400

500

625

688

688

688

Commercial

600

750

938

1031

1031

1031

Institutional

900

1125

1406

1547

1547

1547

250

313

391

430

430

430

268966
5

25163
85

37337
92

33791
34

455843
7

26.90

25.16

37.34

33.79

45.58

One time Connection


Registration Charges

Additional Revenue with Population


Increase and Development
Additional Revenue with Population
Increase and Development (In Lacs)

Assumed
to
be
collected
from
every
househol
d.
1.1times
to
the
base rate

PROPERTY TAX
Proposed Tarrif

Base
Rate

By
2015

By
2020

By
2025

By
2030

By
2035

Residential

500

625

781

859

859

859

Commercial

750

938

1172

1289

1289

1289

Institutional

1125

1406

1758

1934

1934

1934

150

188

234

258

258

258

291584
1

31432
57

44259
34

42209
56

540338
4

29.16

31.43

44.26

42.21

54.03

One time Connection


Registration Charges

Additional Revenue with Population


Increase and Development
Additional Revenue with Population
Increase and Development (In Lacs)

Assumed
to
be
collected
from
every
househol
d.
1.1times
to
the
base rate

PARKING TAX
Proposed Tarrif

Base
Rate

By
2015

By
2020

By
2025

By
2030

By
2035

Residential

200

250

313

344

344

344

Commercial

300

375

469

516

516

516

Institutional

450

563

703

773

773

773

75

94

117

129

129

129

120752
8

12575
08

17926
48

16886
56

218855
3

12.08

12.58

17.93

16.89

21.89

One time Connection


Registration Charges

Additional Revenue with Population


Increase and Development
Additional Revenue with Population
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

224

Assumed
to
be
collected
from
every
househol
d.
1.1times
to
the
base rate

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.29: Additional Revenues as a result of Proposed Investments


By
2011

By 2015

By
2035

By 2025

Population

8344

20508

20508

25045

25045

30585

Household

1669

3,862

3862

4,716

4716

5,759

Increase and Development (In Lacs)


City Development Surcharge
Proposed Tarrif

Base
Rate

By
2015

By
2020

By
2025

By
2030

By
2035

Residential

100

125

156

172

172

172

Commercial

150

188

234

258

258

258

Institutional

225

281

352

387

387

387

500785

62824
1

84063
8

84364
5

102627
8

5.01

6.28

8.41

8.44

10.26

233.06

138.83

251.39

186.42

306.93

50%

60%

70%

65%

60%

116.53

83.30

175.97

121.17

184.16

One time Connection


Registration Charges

Additional Revenue with Population


Increase and Development
Additional Revenue with Population
Increase and Development (In Lacs)
GRAND TOTAL
COLLECTION EFFICIENCY

Assumed
to
be
collected
from
every
househol
d.
1.1times
to
the
base rate

ACTUAL REVENUE COLLECTION


with Population Increase
and Development (In Lacs)
Additional Revenues as a result of Proposed Investments
(ii) Assumptions for Additional O&M expenditure due to Proposed Investments
For checking the sustenance of the proposed infrastructure, it is necessary estimate the Additional O
& M Cost due to the proposed infrastructure. The total investment is factored in order to get the O &
M cost, these are based on the following assumption:
Table 12.30: Assumptions for Additional O&M expenditure due to Proposed Investments,
Khilchipur
S. No.

Sector of Investment

O&M Cost as %of Capital


Investment

Water Supply

4.00%

Sewerage

5.00%

Storm Water Drainage

4.00%

Solid Waste Management

10.00%

Sanitation

2.50%

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

225

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 12.30: Assumptions for Additional O&M expenditure due to Proposed Investments,
Khilchipur
S. No.

Sector of Investment

O&M Cost as %of Capital


Investment

Traffic & Transportation

4.00%

Electricity & Street Lighting

5.00%

Fire Fighting

2.50%

Basic Services for Urban Poor

0.00%

10

Environment

2.50%

11

Urban Governance

0.00%

12

Heritage

2.50%

13

Education

2.50%

14

Health

2.50%

15

Social Infrastructure & Other Projects

2.50%

12.3.7. FOP Results with Proposed Investments


The parameters for ascertaining investment sustenance are:
01. Positive year-on-year closing balance of the municipal fund with the following scenarios
A. Without proposed investments
B. With Proposed investments loaded over Without Proposed investments
C. Additional Revenue Account loaded on the B
D. With Additional O & M Expenditure loaded on the B
02. Average DSCR of not less than 1.75; and
03. Minimum Cash DSCR of not less than 1.5
The following table presents the sustainable annual investment and the proposed funding plan for the
same.
Table 12.31: FOP Results,
Khilchipur

20142015

20192020

20242025

20292030

20342035

Scenario 1: NO REFORM
SCENARIO (Closing Balance)

30.84

107.07

211.08

310.09

286.63

II

Closing Balance
account
with
Investments only

598.82

368.07

345.19

67.57

230.94

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

of capital
Proposed

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

226

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Table 12.31: FOP Results,


Khilchipur

R E P O R T

20142015

20192020

20242025

20292030

20342035

III

Scenario 2: Overall Closing


account with closing balance
with proposed Investments
loaded on closing balance
account without proposed
investments I-II

629.66

475.14

556.27

377.65

517.57

IV

Additional Revenue & O&M


(Closing Balance)

279.69

124.59

(138.10)

77.30

634.86

Scenario 3: With Additional O


& M Expenditure loaded on
Scenario 2 (III)

492.82

201.45

213.20

(34.82)

56.00

VI

Scenario 4: With Closing


Balance of additional Revenue
Account loaded on Scenario 2
(III)

909.35

599.73

418.17

454.95

1,152.43

VII

Overall Closing Balance


Closing Balance without
proposed investments only +
Closing Balance Additional
Revenue Account

310.53

231.66

72.98

387.38

921.49

VIII

DSCR

0.35

0.42

0.32

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

227

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Chapter 13: City Vision


13.1. Summary of Sectoral Strategies
Please refer Chapter 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 & 10 for Detailed Sectoral Strategies.
Table 13.1: Sectoral Strategies for Khilchipur
Sectors
Water Supply

Strategies
Augmentation of existing supply network at source and at distribution end
Water treatment augmentation
Up-gradation and replacement of existing distribution system
Extension of distribution network within town
Providing Community Taps and Group Connections
Establishing Customer Connections Water Meters
Operation and Maintenance Plan
Tariff Revision
Bringing System Efficiency
Compulsory Water Meter
Cost recovery through adopting differential pricing system
Water Supply Inventory
Water Auditing
Awareness Campaign on Water Conservation
Customer satisfaction through providing regular information service
performance
Rain Water Harvesting in bye-laws
Streamlining Institutional Responsibilities

Sewerage

Provision of sewerage network


Provision of sewerage treatment plant
Public Private Partnership participation in sewerage system
Operation and Maintenance Plan
Tariff Revision
Bringing System Efficiency
Waste Water Treatment and Reuse
Segregation of sewers from the drains
Prevention of solid waste and silt in the sewer line.
Regular sewer cleaning
IEC activities
Creation of Database of the existing sewerage

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

228

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 13.1: Sectoral Strategies for Khilchipur


Sectors

Strategies
Institutional Strengthening and Capacity Building
System Maintenance Plan

Sanitation

Preparation of City Sanitation Plan


Provision of Public Pay and Use Toilets
Evaluation Study and Rapid Impact Assessment

Solid
Management

Waste Implementation of Door to Door collection System

d Waste Management

Provision of Two system Publics Bins at ward Level at public places


Street sweeping on daily basis
Introduction Multi-bin carts Tricycles
Provision of tractor for increasing the collection and transportation capacity
Encouraging local level aerobic vermi composting
Promote "Reduce, Re-use and Re-cycle (R-R-R)" of Waste
Promote Community Participation
Encouragement to NGOs and Waste Collector Cooperatives
Implementation of Municipal Solid Waste (Management & Handling) Rules2000 of Government of India
Promote public/Private partnership, self help groups and NGO support
Strengthen the institutional capacity
Educate the public and create awareness on various issues of solid waste
management
Explore cost recovery options
Decentralization of Administration

Drainage

Preparation of Storm water Master Plan


Provision of Storm Water Network
Operation and Maintenance Plan
Interconnection between Drainage
Conservation of Drains
Monitoring of water quality parameters
Eviction and Rehabilitation of Encroachment

Traffic
Transportation

and Upgradation / Widening of Important Roads


Development of Parking Lots
Construction of additional Roads
Development of Bus Terminal
Improvement of Junctions and Accident Prone areas
Operation and Maintenance Plan

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

229

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 13.1: Sectoral Strategies for Khilchipur


Sectors

Strategies
Increase Pedestrian Movement
Creation of Urban Green Spaces
Preparing a detailed road register

Basic Services
Urban Poor

to Preparation of Slum free City Plan under Rajiv Awas Yojana & BSUP
Provision of Housing to BPL population on Priority Basis
Providing sufficient, timely and uniform supply of potable water.
Installing public stand post.
Laying of new sewer connection or connecting slum latrines to existing
sewer line.
Initiating solid waste management, especially segregation at source.
Construction of side drains.
Paving approach roads.
Maintenance of street lights.
Improvement and maintenance of basic services to the urban poor
Community Mobilisation
Training programmes in Slum
Capacity Building

Environment

Conservation of Gadh Ganga River


Beautification of Existing Ghats near Stop Dam
Beautification of landscaping around important Heritage Structure
To conserve the edge of the Gadh Ganga river - Gadh Ganga Greening

Heritage

Conservation of Tangible and Intangible Heritage


Conservation of Intangible Heritage
Listing of Heritage Structures
Heritage Education
Development of Tourist Information and Display Centre
Development of new Ghats
On site infrastructure for Heritage Building
Signage regulation Programme
Creation of Living Heritage Streets
Provision of Tourist Accommodation
Decongestion in the inner core of the town
Basic Services to Tourist
Provision of Water sports and cruiser facilities
Provision of Camp Site

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

230

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Table 13.1: Sectoral Strategies for Khilchipur


Sectors

Strategies
Adaptive Reuse of the existing place

Street Lighting

Provision of new street light poles


Upgradation of existing street light poles
To introduce PPP for energy conservation
Introduction of solar lighting and other non-conventional sources of energy
Involve Local Neighborhoods and Provide Feedback
Running a switch-off campaign
To undertake energy audit at regular intervals.
Provide incentives for conservation.
Improving maintenance practices.
Improving data management.

13.2. City Vision


As a milestone reform, the City Development Plan has considerably revolutionized the planning
process by laying emphasis on development of multi-perspective strategies based on collective vision
and goals expressed by the stakeholders. During the process of CDP formulation, stakeholders had
opportunity to collectively develop a Vision based on the most pressing issues of their town within
which future actions shall be made and assessed periodically.
The vision aspires Khilchipur to become a fully-self sufficient town in all aspects of its existing
economical, environmental, institutional and social arrangements. Aiming at a socially-inclusive
society, a well-functioning local government (fiscal and management wise) that ensures the welfare of
its citizens, especially urban poor, by including them into the mainstream urban service delivery
systems.
It is recognized the importance of maintaining the integrity of its physical environment by way of a
comprehensive management plan and investment in infrastructure that would promote healthy habits
among its citizens. Attaining 100% coverage of sector services will undoubtedly contribute to the
economic vitality of the town.
The vision for Khilchipur is to become:

An

economically sustainable, highly livable, safe, clean and peopleresponsive city embodying a transparent, efficient and financially strong local
government that offers its citizens equal opportunities for growth and
universal access to high-quality infrastructure and urban services

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

231

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

C ONTENTS
Annexure 1: Self Assessment Checklist for Inception Report .................................................................................... 233
Annexure 2: Town Information (Census 2001) .......................................................................................................... 234
Annexure 3: Ward Demographic Information (2001) ................................................................................................ 235
Annexure 4: Ward Population (2011) ........................................................................................................................ 238
Annexure 5: BPL Population..................................................................................................................................... 239
Annexure 6: Proceedings of the Project ..................................................................................................................... 240
Progress Report ..................................................................................................................................................... 240
Annexure 7: Documentation of First Workshop ........................................................................................................ 242
Proceedings for the Workshop ............................................................................................................................... 242
Key Findings of the Workshop .............................................................................................................................. 242
List of Participants For The Kick-off Workshop .................................................................................................... 245
Annexure 8: Documentation of Second Workshop .................................................................................................... 246
Reform Agenda ..................................................................................................................................................... 252
Annexure 9: List Of Participants For Second Workshop............................................................................................ 258
Annexure 10: Documentation of Third Workshop ..................................................................................................... 259
Annexure 11: Details Of Third Workshop ................................................................................................................. 260

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

232
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 1: S ELF A SSESSMENT C HECKLIST

FOR

I NCEPT ION

R EPORT

The purpose of this stage is to review and analyse the current status and unique features of the
city with regard to the state of its development, systems and procedures, as equally its
institutional and financial context. This stage is meant to identify the strengths and weaknesses
in the citys development and to provide an understanding of what impedes service delivery and
management within the existing set-up and what contributes to better service provision.

RECONNAISSANCE

The Consultant will spend their first week with reconnaissance activities,
including:
Introductory meetings with the Mayor/President, Municipal Commissioner/Chief Municipal
Officer, Heads of Departments, Councillors, representatives of ongoing urban programmes, etc.
Determine feasibility and composition of a city level Steering Group (comprising of Citizen
forum) for the CDP
Citizen forum shall be formed comprising of 15 eminent persons from different walks of life.
Obtain base maps, and available secondary data on the citys demographics, master plan,
reports prepared under past and current urban development programmes, ULBs annual budget
reports, other reports giving status of service delivery, and other relevant documents on heritage
listing, data on slums and urban poor, government policy documents, etc.
Identify the line departments and key stakeholders for urban service delivery and
development such as PHED, Town and Country Planning Department, Development Authority,
SADA, local chamber of commerce, NGOs, CBOs, religious organizations, financial
institutions, commerce and industry etc.
Field reconnaissance to determine growth patterns of the city, characteristics of slums and
environmentally sensitive areas etc. (Date)
Identify economic opportunities and blocks in tapping these (eg. Tourism, industry etc.)
Mapping : Preparation of City level base maps using Auto-CAD/GIS
(Minutes of meeting/ workshop/Photographs must be included in report)

KICK-OFF WORKSHOP

The Consultants will organise, with ULB support, a one day kick-off workshop[1] to familiarize
the stakeholders with the purpose, process, and expected outcomes of the CDP, and build
enthusiasm, understanding and commitment to the CDP. (Date)

Stakeholders for the kick off workshop may include:

TOWN
Khilchipur
Insert

14/11/2011

22/11/2011

Elected representatives, Mayor/President, Municipal Commissioner/Chief Municipal Officer


etc.
City level planning and service providing agencies viz., ULB, Town and Country Planning
Department, Development Authority, SADA etc.
Line Departments of the state government such as pollution control board, health
department, tourism department, PHED, PWD, Traffic and Transportation etc
Private sector agencies such as chambers of commerce and industry,
Non-governmental and community based organisations
Representatives of the poor communities
At the completion of this phase the consultants will present their preliminary analysis,
methodology in an Inception report. Based on their preliminary analysis, consultations and
workshop the consultants will propose special papers (maximum 2) on specific sectors or
issues. (Minutes of meeting/ workshop/Photographs and HINDI presentation and base maps
must be included in report)
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

233
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 2: T OWN I NFORMATION (C ENSUS 2001)


No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Particular
TOWN_NAME
CLASS
C_STATUS
AREA
HOUSEHOLD
POP_1901
POP_1911
GR_01_11
POP_1921

10

GR_11_21

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32

POP_1931
GR_21_31
POP_1941
GR_31_41
POP_1951
GR_41_51
POP_1961
GR_51_61
POP_1971
GR_61_71
POP_1981
GR_71_81
POP_1991
GR_81_91
POP_2001
GR_91_2001
DENSITY
SEX_1981
SEX_1991
SEX_2001
AVG_RAIN
MAX_TEMP

33

MIN_TEMP

34
35
36
37
38
39

STATE_H_NA
SH_DIST
DIST_H_NA
DH_DIST
HD_H_NA
SD_DIST

18.80
BHOPAL
160
Rajgarh
18
KHILCHIPUR
0

40

DIST_TH_HQ

Khilchipur

41

TH_DIST

42

CITY_1LAKH

43

CITY_DIST

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53

Detail
Khilchipur
IV
NP
6.47
2,796
5,121
5,868
14.59
5,300
-9.68
5,779
9.04
6,663
15.30
6,227
-6.54
6,970
11.93
8,412
20.69
10,101
20.08
12,675
25.48
15,317
20.84
2,367
922
919
954
976.41
33.00

0
GUNA
141
BIAORA
44
KHILCHIPUR
0

No.
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Particular
ADVANCE
OTH_SOUR
TOT_REC
GEN_ADM
PUB_SAF
PUB_H_C
PUB_WORKS
PUB_INST
OTH_EXP

63

TOT_EXP

64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85

POPULATION
SC_POP
ST_POP
K_ROAD
P_ROAD
SEWER
WATER_BOR
SERVICE
LAT_OTH
METH_D_N_S
SOU_OF_SUP
SYS_STOR
STOR_CAP
FIRE_F_SER
F_F_NAME
DIST_F_SER
EL_DOM
EL_IND
EL_COM
EL_ROAD_L
EL_OTHERS
HOSPITALS

86

HOS_BEDS

87
88
89
90
91
92

HT_NAME
DISP
DISP_BEDS
DT_NAME
HEALTH_CTR
HC_BEDS

93

HCT_NAME

94

F_W_CTR

95

FWC_BEDS

96

FWCT_NAME

Detail

No.
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115

Particular
COMMERCE
ARTS_SCI
ARTS_COMM
ART_SC_CO
LAW
UNIV
OTH_COL
ASC_NEAR
MEDICAL

116

MEDI_NEAR

0
1,428
50
402
645
437
1

117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138

ENGG
ENGG_NEAR
POLYTECH
POLY_NEAR
VT_INST
SH_INST
TYPE_INST
SH_TYPE_IN
OTH_INST_S
S_SEC
SS_NEAR
SECONDARY
SEC_NEAR
MIDDLE
MID_NEAR
PRIMARY
PRIM_NEAR
ADULT_CNT
ALC_NEAR
OTH_CNTR
N_HOSTELS
N_SEATS

30

139

WWH_DIST

140
141
142
143
144
145

RC_FAC
STADIUM
CINEMA
AUDITORIUM
P_LIB
R_ROOMS

146

IMP_COM1

147

IMP_COM2

148

IMP_COM3

149

EXP_COMM1

0
178
4869
932
369
2009
1062
30
216
4618
15,317
1,908
349
5
15
OSD,BSD
109
106
581
Pt,ST
T
OHT
350
1

2
0
1
0

1
0

RAILWAY_ST
97
TB_CLINIC
150
EXP_COMM2
0
RAIL_DIST
98
TBC_BEDS
0
151
EXP_COMM3
BUS_ROUTE
99
TBC_NAME
152
MAN_COMM1
BR_DIST
100
NUR_HOMES
153
MAN_COMM2
0
NAV_R_C
101
NH_BEDS
154
MAN_COMM3
NAV_DIST
102
NHT_NAME
155
BANKS
0
REC_TAX
103
MED_OTH
156
A_C_SOC
2314
0
REV_M_T
104
OTHMI_BEDS
157
N_A_C_SOC
659
0
GOVT_GRANT
1718
105
ARTS
0
LOAN
106
SCIENCE
0
0
Source: Town Directory of Madhya Pradesh, District Census Handbook, Census of India, 2001

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

234
\*

Detail
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bhopal
(160)
0
Bhopal(160)
0
Pachore(79)
0
0
2
0
2
2
3
6
10
0
0
0
0
BHOPAL
(160)
1
0
0
0
1
0
Agriculture
Equipment
Electrical
Goods
KIRANA
Groundnut
Oil
Coriander
PULSES
OIL
KHALI
SHOES
5
1
1

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

A NNEXURE
(2001)

3:

W ARD

R E P O R T

D EMOGRAPHIC

WARD

Total
Households

Total
Population

Total
Male
Population

Khilchipur (NP)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

2796
182
194
194
323
160
160
124
111
128
252
107
108
113
345
295

15317
1056
1105
1030
1710
850
882
698
652
629
1325
680
642
552
1801
1705

7839
544
557
512
886
434
441
361
332
324
688
341
332
286
924
877

WARD

Khilchipur (NP)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

Total
SC
Population

1908
53
395
263
796
138
46
0
0
11
7
0
23
1
161
14

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Total
ST
Population

973
30
203
138
408
67
23
0
0
5
6
0
10
1
74
8

Total
Female
Population

Total
Population
under 0-6
Age Group

7478
512
548
518
824
416
441
337
320
305
637
339
310
266
877
828

2523
186
214
206
329
136
121
93
79
78
224
90
90
76
285
316

Total
Literate
Population

935
23
192
125
388
71
23
0
0
6
1
0
13
0
87
6

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

235
\*

I NFORMATION

Total Male
Literate
Population

349
38
33
0
25
60
0
0
0
11
35
2
3
1
83
58

Total
Male
Population
under 0-6
Age
Group

Total
Female
Population
under 0-6
Age Group

1264
93
94
100
178
69
54
49
42
38
115
44
41
35
148
164

1259
93
120
106
151
67
67
44
37
40
109
46
49
41
137
152
Total Female
Literate
Population

191
24
20
0
14
31
0
0
0
7
20
1
1
1
43
29

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

NON_WORK
_M

NON_WOR
K_F

4656

3758

898

10661

4081

6580

295
343
393
514
268
280
168
199
173
398
194
202
202
512
515

260
262
260
414
214
220
154
177
151
326
161
160
163
416
420

35
81
133
100
54
60
14
22
22
72
33
42
39
96
95

761
762
637
1196
582
602
530
453
456
927
486
440
350
1289
1190

284
295
252
472
220
221
207
155
173
362
180
172
123
508
457

477
467
385
724
362
381
323
298
283
565
306
268
227
781
733

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

236
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

MAIN_OT_F

MAIN_OT_P

MAIN_HH_F

MAIN_HH_P

MAIN_AL_M

22 21 126 96 30 3413 3008 405


1 0 11 9 2 261 243 18
1 0 20 12 8 250 218 32
4 7
6
6 0 110
83
27
0 2 24 18 6 390 348 42
1 1 20 12 8 206 183 23
0 0 12 9 3 159 139 20
0 0
4
4 0 161 149 12
4 0
4
3 1 180 161 19
0 0
3
3 0 161 141 20
0 2
7
6 1 335 289 46
1 1
0
0 0 185 155 30
0 0
0
0 0 159 138 21
2 0
0
0 0 152 137 15
3 8 15 14 1 414 363 51
5 0
0
0 0 290 261 29

MAIN_AL_F

MAIN_AL_P

43
1
1
11
2
2
0
0
4
0
2
2
0
2
11
5

MAIN_CL_P

Khilchipur
3822 3319 503 240 193 47
(NP)
278 258 20
5
5
0
1
273 233 40
2
2
0
2
195 145 50 68 52 16
3
422 370 52
6
4
2
4
251 211 40 23 15 8
5
171 148 23
0
0
0
6
166 154 12
1
1
0
7
190 170 20
2
2
0
8
165 144 21
1
0
1
9
365 311 54 21 16 5
10
187 156 31
0
0
0
11
165 144 21
6
6
0
12
157 142 15
3
3
0
13
457 393 64 17 13 4
14
380 340 40 85 74 11
15

WARD

MAIN_CL_F

MAIN_OT_M

NON_WOR
K_P

MAIN_HH_M

TOT_WOR
K_F

MAIN_CL_M

TOT_WORK
_M

MAINWORK_F

MAINWORK_P

Khilchipur
(NP)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15

TOT_WOR
K_P

MAINWORK_M

WARD

R E P O R T

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R

MARG_CL_F

MARG_AL_P

MARG_AL_M

MARG_AL_F

MARG_HH_P

MARG_HH_M

MARG_HH_F

26
1
2

97
0
1

16
0
0

81
0
1

51
2
6

21
1
2

30
1
4

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14

198 115
92 44
17
3
109 72
2
0
9
7
8
7
33 15
7
5
37 16
45 21
55 23

83
48
14
37
2
2
1
18
2
21
24
32

3
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
6
0
7

1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
2

2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0
5

32
5
7
12
0
0
0
10
2
7
2
2

7
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
2
1
0
0

25
5
7
10
0
0
0
9
0
6
2
2

2
7
4
20
2
0
0
2
0
0
0
4

2
1
0
11
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

0
6
4
9
2
0
0
2
0
0
0
2

15

135

55

10

17

14

80

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

237
\*

65
4
14
61
16
1
80
5
77
0
9
8
19
5
24
43
42
10
6

MARG_OT_F

MARG_CL_M

6
0
0

MARG_OT_M

MARG_CL_P

32
1
2

MARG_OT_P

MARGWORK_F

MARGWORK_M

R E P O R T

Khilchipur
834 439 395
(NP)
17
2
15
1
70 29 41
2

WARD

MARGWORK_P

F I N A L

396 258
1
13
27 34
105
43
3
59
0
7
7
12
3
15
21
19

56
37
2
18
0
2
1
7
2
9
22
23

74

32

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 4: W ARD P OPULATION (2011)


Population Under Age
Group (0-6)

Total Population

Male Population

Female Population

Other Population

Total Population

Male Population

Female Population

Other Population

Total Population

Male Population

Female Population

Other Population

Literate Population

Total Households

Population

216

1167

594

573

182

87

95

816

475

341

292

1451

744

707

224

120

104

892

537

355

249

1393

703

690

193

97

96

753

465

288

500

2756

1416

1340

438

235

203

1422

851

571

175

880

458

422

142

89

53

593

331

262

158

903

444

459

150

74

76

643

345

298

120

698

378

320

87

46

41

556

322

234

106

621

310

311

74

35

39

525

274

251

140

645

319

326

69

35

34

553

284

269

10

293

1504

739

765

232

106

126

1031

566

465

11

131

661

333

328

59

28

31

576

302

274

12

134

654

328

326

80

39

41

512

280

232

13

117

615

303

312

64

25

39

499

272

227

14

595

3067

1558

1509

396

191

205

2336

1273

1063

15

339

1917

970

947

227

132

95

1238

689

549

TOTAL

3565

18932

9597

9335

2617

1339

1278

12945

7266

5679

Ward No.

Source: Urban Local Body (ULB)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

238
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 5: BPL P OPULATION


Ward No.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
TOTAL

Total
Households

216
292
249
500
175
158
120
106
140
293
131
134
117
595
339
3565

BPL
Households
214
234
196
430
159
160
100
37
63
183
58
98
103
171
402

2608

% of Total
Households

99.07%
80.14%
78.71%
86.00%
90.86%
101.27%
83.33%
34.91%
45.00%
62.46%
44.27%
73.13%
88.03%
28.74%
118.58%
73.16%

APL
Households
98

122
148
154
113
87
98
137
148
122
142
118
98
178
151

1914

% of Total
Households

45.37%
41.78%
59.44%
30.80%
64.57%
55.06%
81.67%
129.25%
105.71%
41.64%
108.40%
88.06%
83.76%
29.92%
44.54%
53.69%

Source: Urban Local Body (ULB)

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

239
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 6: P ROCEEDINGS OF THE P ROJECT


To start the process of formulation of CDP, PRUDA-All India Institute of Local Self Government has
followed the process of Participatory methods as follows:

P ROGRESS R EPORT
22 October 2011: Introduction of consultants organized by UADD, GoMP at Pallika Bhavan, Bhopal.
A one day workshop was organized in which an understanding of CDP was imparted to the consultant
present. The meeting gave a realistic picture of the nature of urbanization in MP and the expected outcome
from the exercise. A toolkit was distributed to the entire consultant in order to maintain uniform standard of
preparing the CDP and data Collections. It was also mentioned that the Municipal Officers and staff would
also be undergoing training in the next week. It was also discussed that the work should start by 1 October,
2011. PRUDA-AIILSG team members attended the workshop.
2 November 2011: Contact address of the ULBs and Officials was circulated amongst all the consultant.
5 November 2011: A letter was issued by UADD and Principal secretary addressing the preparation of CDP
to the concerned officials.
9 November 2011: Contract agreement dully signed by AIILSG-PRUDA as send UADD Bhopal
9 November 2011: A letter was issued to the ULB by AIILSG-PRUDA regarding the preparation of CDP
and conducting an introductory meeting for the same.
A Brain Storming session was kept for in-house team and they came out with a list of 27* probable list of
representative of residents so that all sections of citizens are being invited. This list was sent to ULB so that
participation of citizens cutting across different social and economic section can be insured. This list can be
broadly divided in to four categories, namely direct implementers of government and indirect implementers
of urban development, media and prominent persons of their respective field apart from other sphere of
public life and general citizens. This list was intimated to ULB for additional invitation, which they readily
agreed to.
14 November 2011: District level Meeting At Rajgarh Collectorate
The team paid an initial visit to the District Headquaters and identified its outstanding features and noted
overall impression and major issues seen. A meeting with all the ULB officials, engineers and interdepartment staff was organized in order to engage them in the development of the CDP. The team also
looked into the available data from each department and every personnel. Introductory meetings with the
ULB Chief Municipal Officers (CMO) were likewise organized in order to ensure that his presence in every
stage of the process which would also encourage line departments, SDM, Tehsil Dar and other officials to do
the same.
After the initial meetings, a letter was drafted which was sent to the different Towns to assure their presence
and participation in the consultation workshop and the overall preparation of the CDP. A meeting of ULB
officer of respective towns was called in the office premises of the respective ULBs where a presentation
was made in front of them so that they can understand the prime importance of CDP. In the meeting
situation of existing status in view of officers and what next best can be done was discussed in details. Their
understanding of challenges that a town can face and how to come out of this was looked upon.
A clear-cut understanding of role and responsibility was briefed to them and their role to support the
preparation was made clear. A date of organizing the Kickoff workshop was also finalized in the meeting. A
letter was sent to all the concerned officials regarding the kickoff workshop. The draft of the letter is
attached in the report. The details of the person present.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

240
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

No.
Name
Designation
Mobile Number
Shri O.B Jha
Project Officer, DUDA
09907282325
1.
Naresh Mawar
CMO, Talen
09977771718
2.
R.B Carpenter
CMO, Khujner
07697293345
3.
Mohammad Saleem Khan
CMO, Boda
09425445239
4.
K.D Dandotia
CMO, Khilchipur
09407558088
5.
Krishna Rau Shinde
CMO, Pachore
09407558088
6.
Jaykeerti Jain
Sub Engineer, Khujner
09425012900
7.
Vijay Singh Pawar
CMO, Zirapur
09424421430
8.
Brijesh
Upadhyay
Sub
Engineer,
Zirapur
09425693043
9.
Project Officer
09879550337
10. Jay N. Padalia
Note: The Scanned Copy of the Attendance Sheet of District Level Meeting as Annexure 8.. And the
Copy of Presentation is attached as Annexure 9 in this Report.
18 November 2011: KICK OFF WORKSHOP
A meeting was called in the office premises of the ULBs with all elected councilors to brief them about
CDP. This meeting was organized at the initiative of Team of PRUDA to give momentum to the CDP. This
meeting was placed strategically to make councilors engines of motivation for residents to come up with
aspiration and expectations of citizens. The list of people present is attached in the report.
On the day of consultative workshop (Kick off Workshop) an informal meeting was arranged with all ULB
line department people so that feel of issues and constrains can be looked in to minute details which will
help in designing of future plans with accurate financial and administrative concerns of present
implementers.
In the meeting we came across galaxy of thoughts, some are achievable some are not. Just to make sure that
everybody share their dreams it was mentioned that in the beginning of the meeting that we are here for
future so let everybody share their vision.
At the initiation of meeting of consultative workshop it was made clear that prospects of city has to be
discussed so we should not limit our thoughts to only present day services or day today need but think of
future.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

241
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 7: D OCUMENTATION OF F IRST W ORKSHOP


The development of City Development Plan entails an extensive and simultaneous coordination and
consultation among the key stakeholders for the smooth flow of each preparation stage. During the initial
stage, a meeting was set with the elected officers to inform them about their pivotal role in encouraging the
line departments and the general public in developing a vision for the town.
During the consultative workshop (Kick off Workshop), a meeting with the ULB line departments was
organized which mainly discussed the most pressing issues and concerns in the town and how they may be
addressed through a vision. The kick off workshop is a crucial stage for the preparation of the CDP primarily
because it supports a participatory decision-making process involving all the stakeholders concerned. At the
start of the said workshop, it was made clear that ideas and aspirations should not be limited on the present
needs of the town but should also extend to the future prospects of the same. Although some of the
articulated aspirations are unattainable for the moment, the exercise was especially important in engaging all
the concerned to work for the development of the town.

P ROCEEDINGS

FOR THE W ORKSHOP


As stated earlier, a letter of intimation was sent to 52 heads and officials of ULBs, line departments (state
and ULBs), concerned groups but only 37 people were able to successfully attend the event. The general
public was likewise invited to make the discussion richer and more meaningful. The meeting proper was led
by the president of the ULB. The AIILSG-PRUDA team was cordially introduced to the people. During the
workshop proper, no formal presentation was made on the facets of the CDP (rationale, contents, format,
etc) but handouts from the UAAD Madhya Pradesh toolkit in Hindi were distributed among the participants.
The first session was devoted to enlightening the participants about the CDP and its process. First, the
rationale and significance of the CDP was explained within the context of the current issues and challenges
faced by the town. Second, the processes involving the development of the CDP was likewise communicated
including the steps involved in the preparation of the CDP, the intricacies of data gathering, the wide range
of data needed and the expected outcome. Finally, the importance of stakeholder participation was pointed
giving emphasis on the importance of the preparation of data by the departments. The last point is especially
crucial in enlightening the participants about their role in the final outcome of the CDP.
The second session was focused on the detailed discussion of the issues and concerns surrounding each
sector. The session was highly informal and interactive in nature which was intended to encourage each
participant to engage in the discussion. During the discussion, opinions were laid out and key issues were
highlighted. The highlights of the discussion include the situation of the basic services delivery in the town;
the performance of each sector in providing basic services to people especially to the underprivileged;
physical condition of the town (environmental degradation and encroachment); the need for physical and
social infrastructure and major barriers to making the necessary provision.

K EY F INDINGS

OF THE W ORKSHOP
With the concerns on the basic services provision, the people expressed their overall dissatisfaction with the
performance of the ULBs. Some of them brought up the lack of proper sewerage system as the town is
devoid of underground sewerage system (open drains) which can potentially harm the citizens through rapid
and increased spread of diseases. The issue on the inappropriate water distribution was also given attention.
The quality of the water was also reported to be deteriorating as the town lacks facilities for proper filtration.
On the solid waste management part, people expressed disappointment with the untimely collection of solid
waste by the ULBs.
As regards the need for infrastructure development for the town, the people articulated on the lack of paved
roads and recreational facilities such as libraries and parks. The people pointed the importance of the said
infrastructure on the further development of the town and the citizens. In relation to the concerns on the
physical condition of the town, environmental degradation and land encroachment were highlighted.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

242
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Finally, some of the most common systemic problems were also brought up such as poverty and huge
unemployment rate in the town. The people expressed that the underprivileged and the marginalized should
be given priority. After the discussion, the participants were asked to provide feedbacks in the form of
writing. These concerns also relate to basic services provision and maintenance. People expressed that a roof
water harvesting should be developed to conserve groundwater resources. This concern relates to the
increasing number of households indiscriminately extracting groundwater and thus depleting the natural
resources of the town. There were also complaints about the water supply distribution as water is supplied
for only 10-15 minutes which means that people need to collect and store as much water within the given
period. Finally, pay and use toilets were unhygienic and poorly maintained.
The kick off workshop lasted for 2 hours and 30 minutes. From the details elaborated above, it is evident
that the workshop was successful in gathering the opinions of participants coming from various sectors.
During the conclusion of the workshop, the next stages for the CDP preparation were laid out including its
broad schedules and working deadlines.
Apart from those discussed above, the following points also emerged from the consultative workshop:
Land/ Physical Issues:

No open space for citizens due to unplanned city


Traffic chaos due to encroachment on road by business men and vendors
in all parts of city
Parking problems in town especially during the festival days
Infrastructure and Facilities Issues
Roads and repair of the same
Paucity of street light and maintenance problems
Led lights and solar lights for power saving option for public place lighting
Toilets for men and women at public place like malls and shopping
complex, main market etc.
Drainage system non functional in old town
Need of sports complex in town
Need of picnic spot in town or in its outskirts
Tree plantation on side of road
Basic Services Issues
Water scarcity in summer and taps remain non functional
Lack of gutters and overall sewerage system
Solid waste management
Town Management and Sustainability
Institutional strengthening for local body
Tax evasion and no strict action
Internal traffic regulation
Overall pollution and unhygienic condition of the town
Water logging in low lying area
Some mechanism for revenue generation for Nagarpalika so that it can
become self sustainable

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

243
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

R E P O R T

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

244
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

L IST

OF

R E P O R T

P ARTICIPANTS F OR T HE K ICK - OFF W ORKSHOP

Date: 22 November, 2011.

No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.

Place: KHILCHIPUR

Name of Candidate
Jay N. Padalia
Vijay Sharma
Tahir Patel Mansuri
Gopal Sharma
Giriraj Vyash
Syambabu Sharma
Chaman Irentar
Gopal Dixit
Ramesh
V.K.Mallegia
Anil Trivedi
S.K.Yadav
Ramanlal
Tarun Rathi (IAS)
Dinesh Gupta
Mohan Sharma
Rameshchandra Srivastav
J.N.Sharma
Narayan Gupta
Dr. R.N.Gupta
Gopal Sarifa
Anand Gupta
Vasantibai Malavia
Radhesyam Vishvkarma
Dindayal Aadalia
Rajendra Acharya
Mahendra singh
K.C.Vyash
Irfan Khan
Rakesh Jaiswal
Shyam Gupta
Dhinash Dharud
Kailash Soni
Sudhar Mukahm
Banvarilal
Dhanraj singh Potar
R Gopal Dangi
Jitendra Lej
Aashik Trivedi
Satish Patil

Designation
Project Officer, PRUDA-AIILSG
MLA Representative
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Journalist
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Teacher, Khilchipur Town
Asst. Teacher
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Additional Collector, Rajgarh
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Health, Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Citizen, Khilchipur Town
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Citizen Khilchipur Town
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Ex. Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Citizen Khilchipur Town
Citizen Khilchipur Town
Councilor, Khilchipur NP
Journalist
Journalist
Journalist
Journalist
Citizen Khilchipur Town

Mobile Number
09879550337
09926511668
08435528555
07566717779
09425443641
09981260905
09424405845
09425443576
09425443576
09981014865
_
09098444547
094225815
09977925977
09425038939
09424465855
09993744448
09617178545
09300088662
09113674415
09300733070
09425443703
09424465509
09300490491
09425039049
0942537852
08349595537
09630532404
09302814933
09827965150
08103979436
09424429401
09425443661
09827298250
9926419705

Note: The Scanned Copy of the Attendance Sheet of Kick off workshop is attached as Annexure 7 & And the Copy
of Presentation is attached as Annexure 9 in this Report.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

245
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 8: D OCUMENTATION OF S ECOND W ORKSHOP

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

246
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

SECTOR GOALS
The achievement of a shared vision is undoubtedly a daunting task as it requires fulfillment of other goals
essential in ensuring the optimal growth of the town. There are two sets of goals which need to be fulfilled
by the town sector goals and reform agenda goals. The former primarily concerns itself with the planning,
construction and rehabilitation of the existing infrastructure according to calculated gaps brought about by
present and future population growth. Moreover, the latter aims at creating institutional changes through
mandatory and optional reforms.
Giving due emphasis to the importance of physical and social infrastructure in the development of the town,
the people conveyed their goals for each sector within the context of its level of investment, sector service
level and coverage issues. Sectors were also assessed in terms of the expected demand on that sector and the
likely consequences should the problem remain unresolved given the towns future growth. Furthermore, the
participants pinpointed the most important issues in each sector and made suggestion as to how they want
them to be improved.
WATER SUPPLY
Water is a basic resource and should be available to all. Yet for stakeholders in
, water supply remains to
be a hurdle for the town. One of the main concerns of the people relate to the insufficient capacity of water
supply and poor quality of drinking water due to the faulty distribution system of the town. According to
them, water supply level has become inadequate due to huge transmission losses (23% water lost) brought
about the imperfect water distribution system. They also added that due to the same system, rainwater along
with other substances gets mixed with the water being distributed making it unsuitable for drinking. Because
of the high level of unaccounted for water and desiccation of river at certain periods, stakeholders expressed
concerns on the groundwater depletion as many people still depend on tube wells. Moreover, they were also
dismayed with the fact that water is supplied for a very limited time per day and that some of the wards are
not covered by public water supply (80% coverage) and are supplied through inconvenient tankers.
Broadly speaking, workshop participants expressed their desire to primarily ensure sustainability of water
supply in terms of quantity and of quality and improve service levels for the same. In order to improve the
service levels for the particular sector, it was underscored that ULBs should be financially capable of
carrying out Operations & Maintenance (O&M) measures along with other necessary water services.
Moreover, their aspirations for water supply generally pertain to having reduced unaccounted for water and
reduced dependence on groundwater by minimizing transmission losses and increased coverage and hours of
public water supply.
In order to immediately address the concerns and fulfill the aspirations of the people for water supply, it was
felt that the Detailed Project Report (DPR) on water augmentation for
which is already at the
implementation stage needs to be aligned with the analysis, calculations and recommendations made in the
CDP with proper consultations with the stakeholders. By making amendments to the DPR at present, the
water supply project will be easily appraised and as such people will be able to reap the benefits of the
project in a short period of time. Moreover, proper restructuring of the document will ensure that the
proposed augmentation will be able to fulfill the required capacity and quality of water supply for the town
given its present and future growth.
With the proper restructuring of the DPR, water supply will be augmented and the problem of water supply
capacity will be alleviated. By 2015, the goal will be focused on laying additional piped water supply for
uncovered areas that will enable achievement of comprehensive (100%) public water supply coverage of the
wards. By pursuing this goal of laying a more efficient piped water supply (water distribution system),
unaccounted for water will extensively be controlled, quality of drinking water will improve considerably as
there will be minimal contamination of water and there will be continuous and uninterrupted water supply
for all. In the same period (2015), the goal of having Review and Monitoring system with appropriate
benchmarks and indicators shall be pursued which will ensure water quantity and quality level of water and
high level of service to the people.
In order to make the ULB financially capable of performing O&M measures and providing quality service
level to its citizen in line with appropriate benchmarks and indicators, it is envisioned that by 2025, all
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

247
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

households will be covered by metered connections and recover 50% of O&M costs through user charges.
The metered connections will strengthen the water supply system as it will enable justified tax and charges
according to usage, early detection of leaks, conservation water resource as charges are based on usage and
punishment of non-paying users. Most importantly, the metered connections will increase tax and improve
tax collection. Through this efficient system, the ULB can undoubtedly strengthen the financial condition of
the town and by 2035 will be able to achieve not only 100% O&M costs incurred but also coverage of newly
developed areas. Moreover, by making amendments, changing of distribution system, installing metered
connections, placement of Review and Monitoring system will ensure water sustainability (quantity and
quality), improve coverage and service levels and will generate municipal funds for the towns future
growth.
SEWERAGE
A proper sewerage promotes a livable and healthy city. One of the main concerns which the stakeholders
have raised is the unsightly and unhygienic open roadside gutters. They added that the open gutters have
attracted animals and insects alike. This scenario makes the whole environment unpleasant due to its strong
stench especially in crowded areas. Aside from being open and unsightly, they complained that the gutters
are unreliable as there has been increased clogging and encroachment making it difficult to clean.
Therefore, stakeholders expressed their desire to have a scientific sewerage system that will allow proper
treatment, efficient transport and safe disposal of wastewater into a common sewer line that can perform
well over a long period of time. It was pointed that need to improve the sewerage of the town is not a choice
but rather as a requirement and as such implementation of the project for this sector should be implemented
without further delay. Needless to say, the goal is intricately linked with the protection of the River Parvati
and improvement of the health of the people and the urban environment as people are becoming alarmed
with the pollution of the water bodies. In line with these aspirations, the sector goals for the Sewerage of the
town are presented in the table below.
By 2015, it was strongly felt that a DPR should be prepared for quick implementation of the required
sewerage project for the town. After the preparation of the DPR, it is envisioned that by 2025, the town will
have an underground sewerage network for the entire city with 100% coverage characterized by an
integrated system allowing efficient transport and proper treatment before disposal. Certainly, the system
will help maintain the overall health of the river bodies especially that of the WATER BODIES. As it is an
underground system, strong odors and breeding of disease-carrying vectors will be eliminated. In order to
keep the performance of the sewerage system, the ULB should secure funds from user charges or tax to
carry out required inspection activities and for improving wastewater treatment coverage. By improved
collection of sewerage service charges, it is envisaged that by 2035, 100% O&M cost will be recovered and
100% wastewater treatment shall be achieved. Through a comprehensive wastewater treatment, pollution of
water bodies and development of diseases will be controlled. By 2035, a Review and Monitoring system
with appropriate benchmarks and indicators will be in place in line with the aspirations of the people to
maintain enhanced service levels.
SANITATION
Improved sanitation is essential in keeping overall health of the town and the people. As regards sanitation,
stakeholders of
expressed their dismay with the rampant open defecation and urination in the town which
has led to contamination of the River BODIES. As the dire habit open excreta disposal remains strong in the
town, they envisioned having improved coverage of sanitation services and facilities for all. Participants also
emphasized construction of additional public toilets and proper maintenance of the same (new and existing
ones) through public-private partnerships that will strengthen Pay & Use toilet scheme.
In order to immediately address the concerns and fulfill the aspirations of the people for sanitation, it was
strongly felt for the town to prepare a City Sanitation Plan as per National Urban Sanitation Policy (NUSP)
2008 at present. As a backgrounder, NUSP is a recently-launched and community-driven policy which aims
at making every city in India clean, healthy, sanitized and livable. As a policy that promotes public and
environmental health among welfare recipients, the plan is focused on providing low-cost hygienic
sanitation facilities and services for the urban poor.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

248
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

In line with this policy, cities and towns are required to prepare their City Sanitation Plan (CSP) and execute
it accordingly. The CSP preparation strongly supports the aspirations of the stakeholders of
as it aims to
discontinue open defecation, promote safe human excreta disposal, provision and maintenance of low-cost
hygiene facilities, encourage community participation and PPP, capacity building and full recovery of
capital and O&M costs for the same, among others.
The City Sanitation Plan being comprehensive in scope will help systematically solve sanitation problems of
the town. As the plan is to be implemented after preparation, it is envisioned that by 2015, the town will
enhance its PPP for designing, construction and maintenance of public toilets. As prescribed in the same
plan, 100% coverage of Hygienic sanitation facilities shall be achieved in 2025 which is line with the
stakeholders aspiration of discontinuing open defecation and urination and open excreta disposal. As
stakeholders are concerned with sustainability of the sanitation projects, user charges will be collected from
the people that will allow ULBs to sustain its O&M and sanitation rehabilitation activities, wherever
possible and necessary. To this end, it is envisaged that by 2035, full (100%) recovery of O&M costs and a
review and monitoring system with appropriate benchmarks shall be achieved. Both goals will ensure that
activities for sanitation upgradation and coverage of newly developed areas will be sustained.
STORM WATER DRAINAGE
With respect to Storm Water Drainage (SWD) the town, stakeholders pointed the current storm water
drainage is not properly performing according to the requirements of the city. They also reported rampant
illegal encroachment along the major drains which has affected their drain performance.
Given these concerns, the table below shows the main goals under the storm water drainage as identified by
the stakeholders. In order to promptly deal with the stakeholders range of concerns and aspirations, the
prepared DPR for storm water drainage needs to be restructured and realigned with the analysis and
recommendations made in the CDP done through proper stakeholder consultation. The DPR for storm water
drainage concerns itself with planning, rehabilitation of existing drains and construction of new drains. As
stakeholders identified drain rehabilitation and construction as their immediate priority, proper amendment
of the DPR should be done at present to pave way for rapid appraisal and implementation of the storm water
drainage within less time.
With the proper restructuring of the DPR, construction and alignment of existing Nallas and Drains is
envisaged by 2015 which will undoubtedly improve their performance. By 2025, the goal will be to
implement a comprehensive storm water drainage master plan that will include removal of encroachments
and development of recharging mechanisms according to the towns unique drainage pattern. As the
stakeholders also pointed the need for proper maintenance of the system, training and capacity building and
a review and monitoring system utilizing appropriate benchmarks and indicators will be operational by 2035
and will ensure the sustainability of the project and service level of SWD sector.
SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT
Solid Waste Management (SWM) is one of the key problems in growing cities and towns. One of the key
concerns voiced out by stakeholders is the non-practice of door-to-door collection, SWM segregation,
recycling and proper disposal. Participants also pointed the need for proper processing through SWM
treatment. They raised concerns with increased indiscriminate dumping at open grounds, roadside gutters,
streets, rivers and other water bodies in
which has greatly contributed to the unpleasant atmosphere of
the town. Moreover, they also noted the rampant open firing activities in the town.
Generally, it was felt that the town requires establishment of proper solid waste disposal arrangements where
segregation at source, improved collection, efficient transport, proper processing and safe disposal that will
be carried out in a comprehensive manner with satisfactory level at the least. Stakeholders are increasingly
alarmed with unsystematic and indiscriminate solid waste disposal which has led to the contamination of
major water bodies and clogging of drains in major congestion points in the town. Aspirations for the SWM
sector also extended to adoption of sophisticated mechanisms transforming waste to into energy resource. As
in sewerage & sanitation, stakeholders wanted to ensure sustainability of its environment (land and water
bodies).
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

249
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Given these problems, the table below shows the main goals under the Solid Waste Management (SWM) as
identified by the stakeholders. Given the need to immediately deal with the stakeholders concerns and
pursue their aspirations, the DPR for SWM, which has been found to be incongruent with the analyses made
in CDP, needs to be restructured for speedy appraisal, implementation and ensured sustainability of the
project. The DPR for SWM includes recommendations for SWM arrangements and other sector
improvements.
Upon proper restructuring of the DPR, the goal by 2015 will be on fulfillment of 100% Door-to-Door
Collection and 100% Segregation at Source that will prevent people in
from dumping at anyplace and
implementation of comprehensive Segregated Collection Mechanism (100%) to stimulate recycling
activities in the town. By 2025, a shift of focus from improving collection to 100% segregation at source at
household level, efficient transportation, treatment & disposal will be in place that will minimize the
environmental degradation and will help fuel waste to energy activities. In line with the desire of the people
for project sustainability, another goal for 2025 is to recover 50% O&M costs through SWM charges that
will help ULB improve its services. With the same end, the goal for 2035 will be to have full (100%)
recovery of costs for O&M, enhancement of PPP and setting up of review and monitoring system with
appropriate benchmarks that will pave way for sustained SWM activities and coverage of newly developed
areas, if necessary to gradually minimize pollution levels in the town.
ROADS (URBAN TRANSPORT)
The issues under Traffic and Transport of the town are closely linked with its Indore-Bhopal route location
and its economy. Needless to say, the town heavily relies on urban transport for the transport and trade of its
agricultural goods. To sustain its agricultural activities and harness its growth potentials, stakeholders felt
distressed about the worsening traffic scenario and increased congestion brought about by unpaved and
poorly designed roads, illegal parking and encroachment on road. They also raised concerns about the
limited safety of roads as there are no proper signage, sidewalks and pedestrian lanes and streetlights
notwithstanding the fact that
roads are heavily used. They also desired to have an improve traffic and
transportation system that will be commensurate to the future growth of the town.
In order to immediately sanction the necessary amendments articulated by the stakeholders, the need to
carefully review and restructure the DPR according to the CDP at present surfaced during the workshop. The
DPR is a document which contains the necessary road and traffic amendments which should be prepared and
worked against the CDP. However, as the DPR was prepared before the CDP, present restructuring is
important for appraisal and implementation requirements of the project. After restructuring the DPR, road
amendments will ensue.
By 2015 the goal will be removal of encroachments and restoration and construction of major roads. As this
has also been addressed in the master plan, the implementation of the project will be smoother. Goals for
2015 will also be focused on strengthening urban public transport and creation of proper facilities that will
reduce peoples dependence on small and bulky private vehicles and will put an end to illegal parking. This
will significantly improve the travel time and reduce pressure on roads. Another goal for 2015 will be on
beautification of major junctions which include provision of proper traffic signage, sidewalks, pedestrians
and circles that will improve ensure safety of both vehicles and pedestrians.
As people wanted to ensure the sustainability of the project, the goal for 2025 will be the implementation of
a traffic management plan which means enhanced transformation of urban transportation in
through
provision of proper utilities, facilities and management controls. To the same end, 100% cost recovery with
the assets created with O&M by 2035 will be in place that will help in further enhance potentials from the
transportation of the town.
URBAN SLUM
The city development plan seeks to improve infrastructure, delivery of basic goods and services and enable
institutional change with the ultimate goal of uplifting the lives of the urban poor and the vulnerable groups.
Emphasizing the interest of the urban slum is crucial in enabling an equitable and socially-inclusive
development process. During the workshop, stakeholders all agreed to make the needs of the slum and the
rest of the urban population a priority. Participants also conveyed their desire to enhance accessibility to
both sides of the Shiv Puri area so that citizens in this area can benefit greatly from infrastructure and other
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

250
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

urban services of the town. Having enhanced access to basic goods and social services such as water,
sanitation, among other; improved housing and increased opportunities for employment are some of the
most salient aspirations of the stakeholders.
To this end, it was felt that proper identification of the slum and BPL population is needed at present to
systematically recognize the bona fide slum members as per urban poor guidelines so as to reduce the slum
population in the town and facilitate proper distribution of fund for urban poor alleviation. Moreover, goals
by 2015 are focused on providing individual households in urban slum areas need to be connected with tap
water supply and improved sanitation facilities.
In line with the aspirations of the people to improve the overall condition of the slums and eliminate poverty
in the country, another important goal for 2015 is towards enhancing in-situ development schemes through
the Rajiv Awas Yojana (RAY) program under the JNNURM. The RAY program for the slum dwellers and
urban poor envisages a slum-free India by motivating state governments and union territories to address
slum issues through a systematic approach. The main goals of the program are to analyze slums based on
their unique contexts, bring slums to the formal system, enable them to have enhanced access to basic
services as others, remove them out of the slum environment while retaining their sources of livelihood and
employment. It would mobilize existing schemes of JNNURM which include BSUP, IHSDP, ISHUP and
other similar schemes to improve the projects. Moreover, by 2025, a slum-free city is expected and review
and monitoring system with appropriate benchmarks and indicators will be in place by 2035 to prevent new
slums from thriving.
ENVIRONMENT
Environment degradation has been a key concern for Indian cities especially that most of them are
characterized by high pollution levels due to non-adoption of sophisticated mechanisms to alleviate the
problem. One of the most important concerns that people have pointed are the contamination of water bodies
due to solid waste dumping, non-treatment of sewerage and lack of proper sanitation practices in place.
Moreover, they have observed that the town has increasingly become non-conducive and congested. They
also raised concerns as regards the depletion of groundwater resource. Moreover, they want to move towards
having an environmentally-sustainable city.
With this in mind, reviewing and restructuring of DPR in line with the CDP was deeply felt at present in
order to immediately address the concerns of the people. This action will allow smooth sanctioning of the
projects that is expected to slow down or impede the environmental degradation of the town. Upon appraisal
of DPR in consideration of the CDP recommendations, by 2015, the goal will be focused on conservation of
existing water bodies which fulfill the water supply requirements of the town.
Moreover, by 2025, it is felt that more stringent actions should be in place such as implementation of
Environment Management Plan which will pave way for systematic approach to environmental problems.
Moreover, another goal for 2025 is towards Revision of bylaws to make rain-water harvesting mandatory in
all buildings. This goal is very much in line with the aspirations of the people to conserve water bodies and
groundwater by reducing pressure and dependence on both. Mandatory rain-water harvesting is an efficient
process that places emphasis on sustainable use of water. In the same vein, another goal for 2025 is the
implementation of tax incentive schemes for energy-efficient buildings which encourages government and
private institutions and individuals to take part in creating an environmentally-sustainable community by
utilizing efficient systems.
In order to institutionalize the process and make the projects more sustainable, it is envisaged that by 2035,
Training & Capacity building on Adoption of Water & Energy Conservation Measures will be in place.
Moreover, all goals converge at the ultimate goal of the town, that is, to create a conducive and sustainable
environmental for all.
HERITAGE
For cultures as old as Indias, heritage conservation is imperative both in economical and social terms. In
economic terms, it brings revenue to the town by giving people employment and other opportunities of
livelihood through tourism. As regards heritage, the people expressed concerns with the lack of awareness
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

251
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

and esteem for its heritage and pointed that because of this the town has not benefited from its heritage.
They also feel that people should learn to appreciate the value of their culture and heritage.
Given these heritage problems, the people envisaged that by 2015, there should be identification of
important historic buildings of architectural importance. By 2025, they also expressed desires to develop a
heritage walk to promote tourism. With the promotion of tourism, creation of museums, art centres and the
like to conserve heritage for posterity by 2035 is envisaged which will make people connected to their roots
and institutionalize the process of heritage conservation.

R EFORM A GENDA
SECTOR GOALS FOR MUNICIPAL REFORMS
The creation of Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) is a clear expression of the countrys support towards a
decentralized and participatory form of government. Since the 74th Constitutional Act Amendment (CAA),
the ULBs have been assigned key management roles including provision and delivery of basic goods and
services (i.e. infrastructure). However, many of the ULBs fail to provide satisfactory service levels to its
people due to its financial and operational weaknesses. With the goal of making ULBs financially
sustainable, the JNNURM has launched mandatory and optional reforms aimed at increasing the efficiency
and minimizing opportunities for corruption among ULBs. Under the same initiative, special funds are
granted to ULBs upon fulfillment of these reforms.
financially sustainable in the
During the workshop proper, the adoption of reforms necessary for making
future was discussed. In a broader approach, it has been pointed that the town needs to establish tax demand
for various forms of taxes through proper surveys. The introduction of user charges to fully recover costs for
future infrastructure projects has been deemed necessary for creating capital in the town. In order to reduce
occasions of inefficiency and under-the-table transactions, it was felt that there should enhanced
transparency and accountability through financial management systems and proper monitoring. Furthermore,
the participants discussed fulfillment of these reforms that would enable institutions to perform in an
integrated and unswerving manner.
Decentralization
Land and Housing Markets
Transparency and Accountability
Community Participation
Financial Management System
Municipal Finance
Budgetting for the Poor
DECENTRALISATION
Madhya Pradesh emerged as a leader in decentralized development in the mid-1990s. It was the first state in
India to hold elections after the 73rd amendment and to pass its own Decentralization Act. The GoMP
strategy to deepen decentralization reform is based on: (1) community empowerment by strengthening
village level institutions such as the Gram Sabha; (2) untied grants to the Gram Panchayat (GP) level; (3)
improved accountability mechanisms, namely by establishing the peoples right to recall local elected
officials; and (4) devolving state government powers to Zilla Sarkar (District Planning Committee).
Madhya Pradesh has incorporated provisions of Article 243 of the Constitution. Urban areas are addressed
through Madhya Pradesh Municipalities Act, 1961 and Municipal Corporation Act, 1956, the former for
Nagar Panchayats and Municipal Councils and the latter for Municipal Corporations. These acts together
with various rules cover various aspects of the functioning of local bodies including constitution, elections,
conduct of business, functions, and powers. However, some of the financial and administrative powers
earlier given to the DPC between 1998 to 2000 have been withdrawn and vested with the local bodies or the
departments.
Under the M.P. District Planning Committee Act, 1995 and Amendment Act 1999 (Zila Yojana Samiti
Adhiniyam), the government has created an institutional framework for district level planning and
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

252
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

implementation of all development works.The main objectives/functions of the DPC are to formulate a
consolidated development plan for the district prepared by the Panchayats and municipalities in the district,
based on local problems/ issues which have been duly assessed by local bodies, as well as to identify local
needs and objectives through a district level mapping of resources. The main functions of the ULB include
preparation of Annual Development Plans, execution of schemes/works/projects routed through the GP by
Central or State government. In order to execute this role, it is provided with grants and a share of state
levied taxes and fees. In addition, the GP may levy user charges for services provided by it as well as levy
certain taxes.Madhya Pradesh has gradually been increasing the involvement of local governments in
implementing social sector programs. Decentralization over the years has become the overarching
policy framework in the states vision for development. The following are some concerns for urban
areas which needs to be made for achieve decentralization:
To provide agreed support to enable decisions on decentralisation to be embedded and to operate
effectively;
take forward decentralisation, supporting agreed action plans for implementing Government
decisions on decentralisation;
To ensure that the people have a strong voice in the governance, through embedding participatory
mechanisms into planning and monitoring of service delivery, enhancing decentralisation and
ensuring inclusiveness of the poor and disadvantaged;
The urban though much decentralized in Madhya Pradesh still lags behind an effective monitoring system
and planning interventions for Municipal administration. The real application of democratic local
governance can further be strengthen through an immediate action of preparation of annual development
plans in order to attain sustainability. Further there is a need to strengthen ward offices for effective
monitoring of municipal administration which needs to addressed by 2015. And finally the formation of
Ward Committees to strengthen the ground level management and decision making process. This is
envisioned as a major goal of 2025. The following table outlines the goals for attaining further
decentralization.
2011/2012
2015
2025
2035
Preparation of
Strengthening of Ward offices
-Formulation of
Review and
Decentralisation
Annual
for effective monitoring of
Ward Committees to monitoring
Development
Municipal administration
strengthen the
Plans
ground level
management.
LAND & HOUSING MARKETS
India is transforming into Urban, this transition to an urban society, however, has not been accompanied by
a corresponding increase in the supply of basic urban services like water supply, sewerage and drainage
network, garbage disposal facilities, citywide roads, and public safety systems like street lighting and
pedestrian pathways. Nor has the supply of land and housing kept pace with the increase in urban
population. The result of this unbalanced growth is a familiar one: large numbers of households without
access to basic services, poor housing and proliferation of slums, widespread poverty, road congestion, and
high pollution levels. Currently the cities in India follow a long planning process, concentrated mostly on
land use, zoning and detailing aspects. Often the meticulously prepared land use Master Plans lose their
sanctity due to ad hoc and discretionary changes in the land use, zoning and building restrictions. The entire
process of implementation of Master Plans needs to be reviewed and made transparent. Moreover, these land
use plans will have to be translated into Development Plans. The immediate concerns is to implement the
provisions made under the master plan prepared by TCP department of Madhya Pradesh. And also to divise
innovative ways to meet the housing and land shortage and up gradation of existing housing stocks.
Further either the state or the ULB should strive for earmarking at least 20 to 25 % of last in all housing
projects for EWS and LIG category this needs to be incorporated in the bylaws and necessary amendments
should be made accordingly. This goal should be benchmarked with the consideration of 2015. A long term
goal of introducing Property title certification system and computerized process of registration of land and
property and finally an online Building plan approval system should be managed by 2025 and 2035
respectively.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

253
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Land &
Housing
Markets

2011/2012
-Implementing Building
bylaws & regulations as per
the Master plan provisions
-Devise programmes to
meet housing shortages and
augment supply of land for
housing, particularly for the
vulnerable group

R E P O R T

2015
-Earmarking at least
20-25 per cent of
developed land in
all housing projects
(both public and
private agencies) for
EWS and LIG
category with a
system of cross
subsidization.

2025
-Introduction of
Property Title
Certification System
in ULBs.
-Introduction of
computerized process
of registration of land
and property.

2035
Online
Building
Plan
Approval
System

TRANSPARENCY & ACCOUNTABILITY


A key aspect in designing an efficient system of service delivery is to define a clear role for the
municipalities.
Citizen Charter
A Citizens Charter is the expression of an understanding between the citizen and the public service
providers about the quantity and quality of services citizens receive in exchange for their taxes. It is
essentially about the rights of the public and the obligations of the public servants. As public services are
funded by citizens, either directly or indirectly through taxes, they have the right to expect a particular
quality of service that is responsive to their needs and is provided efficiently at a reasonable cost. The
Citizens Charter is a written, voluntary declaration by service providers about their service standards,
choice, accessibility, non-discrimination, transparency and accountability. It should be in accord with the
expectations of citizens. Therefore, it is a useful way of defining with users and others what service should
be and what standards to expect. A further rationale for the Charters is to help change the mindset of the
public official from someone with power over the public to someone with a care of duty in spending the
publics taxes and in providing them with necessary services. This goal should be immediately setup.
E-Governance
With increased emphasis on e-governance, information technology is playing an important role in reforming
the cumbersome government processes. On-line transaction processing facilities are available to citizens
including payment of utility bills such as electricity bills, water and sewerage charges, property tax, trade
licensing fee, telephone bills, issue of certificates such as birth and death, issue of permits and licenses such
as learners license, driving license, etc. These services, available on 24X7 basis at Citizen Service Centres,
banks and web portal, include birth and death certificates, trade license, property tax, advertisement fee and
market rent payment, civic works information, house numbering, suppliers and contractors payments, etc.
These projects are instrumental in creating a new municipal culture of citizen-friendly service provision. It is
essential to build e-capabilities of municipal governments to simplify corruption-prone municipal processes
and improve their functioning. This goal should be achieved by 2015.
Performance Management System
Performance management is a key instrument for improving the delivery of services and infrastructure to the
people. It is a strategic approach, which equips leaders, managers, workers and stakeholders at different
levels with a set of tools and techniques to regularly plan, continuously monitor, periodically measure and
review performance of organisations, territorial jurisdictions and functionaries in terms of indicators and
targets for economy, efficiency, effectiveness and impact.
The system links development goals, policies, priorities, plans, programmes, projects, budgets, action plans
and performance towards achieving the desired objectives. The system involves performance indicators,
performance monitoring, performance measurement, performance-based evaluation, performance-based
review and evidence-based policy-making.
The aim of evaluation is to determine the relevance of objectives, economy (minimising cost of obtaining
resources), efficiency (using resources efficiently), effectiveness (achieving the desired socio-economic
impacts), and sustainability so as to incorporate lessons learnt into the decision-making process.
The strategic objectives behind performance management are:
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

254
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

To create a performance culture and ethos across public service in terms of shared values,
outcome orientation and best practices;
To promote accountability of employees and organisations in using resources and ensuring that
implementation objectives are met;
To empower citizens to generate pressure for change and transformation;
To guide capacity building development for better governance;
To contribute to overall development agenda.

Improving Municipal Organisation


Financial management of a large public agency like a municipal organization deserves integrated direction
by managers with a professional training and commitment. Financial viability based on vigorous
exploitation of the local revenue base and sound financial management. The following are some key aspect
for improving Municipal Organisation
Improving human resources through training, process consultation, action research methods and role
workshops;
Improving responsiveness to the needs arising from urban growth, with the ability to plan the
development of the city and its services ahead of, or at least in pace with demand;
Sensitivity to the needs of the urban poor, and a weighting of public interventions to promote their
access to shelter, basic services and employment; and
Concern for environmental protection, through public service provision and regulation of the private
sector.
To identify institutional strengthening needs of financial functions in local bodies and undertake
capacity building and system development activities which will produce a demonstrated increase in
transparency and reduction of misallocations
To improve planning, resource allocation, monitoring, management and accounting systems and
access to information so that accountability is clear, spending is transparent and public expenditure
is more effectively controlled
2011/2012
2015
2025
2035
-Improving
Transparency -Creation of Effective -Use of E-Governance set Citizen
Charter up for strengthening of Implementation Municipal
&
of complaints
redressal of Performance Organsiation
Accountability -Formulation
effective man power system.
Management
utilization strategies. -Implementation
of System
-Formulation
of Public Disclosure Law
Institutional
-Disclosures of Quarterly
Responsibility Matrix Balance sheets for Public
Viewing and response.
COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION
It is being increasingly realized that communities have little capacity to participate. Providing the platform
for participation is only one aspect of enabling community participation; the other is to ensure that
communities have capacity to fully utilize these spaces, and participate meaningfully. In order to address
these issues, ULB should: Come out with a Community Participation Fund (CPF) in similar lines with JNNURM. The primary
objective of the fund is to catalyse community participation by supporting the building of
community assets.
Identify and implement a number of pilot projects to take forward agreed approaches to increase
effective Community participation through formulation of CBO and Capital projects. This provision
should be thought immediately. Further by 2015 the state should ensure enforcement of community
participation law.
Identify means to develop and improve participatory approaches in policy making, planning,
resource allocation and monitoring;
Develop Community projects after achieving financial sustainability.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

255
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

Community
Participation

2011/2012
-Formation of Community
Based
Organisations
(CBO)
-Formulation of Capital
Projects / Programme
through
community
participation

R E P O R T

2015
Implementation
of Community
Participation
Law
-Formation of
Community
Participation
Fund

2025
Advanced Locality
Management (ALM)
for Wards/ Zones for
effective Community
Participation
in
Projects
and
Activities

2035
-Development of
Traffic
Circles
-City
Beautification.
-Signage
regulations.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM


Introduction of Credit Enhancement of Mechanisms
Credit enhancement mechanisms enable the issuer of debt to obtain a higher credit quality than would have
been possible on a stand-alone basis. Superior credit rating in the case of a debt instrument benefits the
issuer in terms of lower interest rates and easier marketability due to high safety of the instruments.
The credit quality of municipal bonds can be enhanced by the following mechanisms:
Some clearly identified sources of revenues of a municipal body can be captured in an escrow
account. This account can act as collateral for bond-servicing and also meet the debt servicing
obligations directly at the direction of the trustees of the bonds.
The State Government can provide security by pledging to meet debt obligations in case of the
inability of the municipal borrower to meet them. State-municipal transfers in the form of shared
taxes and grants constitute a major source of municipal finance in many States. An agreement
between the State Government and the bond-issuing municipality which stipulates that the annual
transfers could be captured in an escrow account on a predetermined schedule for debt servicing and
act as a collateral to municipal bond issue may be worked out.
A portion of the funds raised through bond issue can be kept in an escrow account or invested in
marketable securities and provide credit-cum-liquidity support to the instrument. Similarly, the
amounts kept in the sinking fund could be invested in liquid securities and earn interest which could
cover part of the debt-servicing obligations.
The escrow accounts should be monitored by an independent trustee of the bonds and any shortfalls
should be compensated by the State Government.
Project revenues may be suitably earmarked for the purpose of bond-servicing in addition to general
obligation
2011/2012
2015
2025
2035
-Strategic
-Systematic repayment of -To utilize surplus Special
projects
Financial
revenue in developing identification
&
Management interventions debts.
for
debt -Cost Benefit analysis capital infrastructure preparation
of
System
recovery
-Credit Rating of ULB in for attaining financial implementation
order to access public sustainability
for mechanism for the
borrowings
capital
same
MUNICIPAL FINANCES
Property Tax
It is widely accepted that property taxes can provide the municipal governments an access to a broad and
expanding base while promoting efficiency through the linking of provision of municipal services closely to
their financing. They are indirect user charges for civic services whose benefits are collective and not
confined to identifiable individuals.
Experience with property tax reforms in India suggests that there are several problems that need to be
addressed simultaneously. These include: (1) simplification of tax laws, (2) coverage of tax net, (3)
valuation accuracy, (4) collection efficiency, (5) rate setting, (6) administrative incentives and (7) policy and
institutional reforms.
Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

256
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

Double Entry Accrual Based Accounting System


Most municipalities follow a system of cash-based accounting as against accrual based accounting used by
the private sector. Under cash-based accounting, receipts and payments are posted as and when cash is
received or paid. This often leads to serious offbudget/ book liabilities being incurred but not recorded. In
the case of accrual-based accounting, the financial effects of transactions are recognised in the period in
which they occur, irrespective of whether the cash is received or paid. This enables transactions to be
reported in the financial statements for the relevant period. Municipal accounts adopt the cash-based system
on the ground that the primary objective of accounting is to maintain budgetary control over activities.
However, it is being widely recognised that a combination of cash and accrual-based accounting may be
more appropriate for municipalities. Under this Modified Accrual basis, revenue is recorded only when cash
is received, while expenses and related liabilities are recorded when incurred.
Municipal
Finances

2011/2012
-Institutionalizing
&
Implementation of Double Entry
Accrual
Based
Accounting
System.
-Implementation of Property tax
reforms

2015
Strengthening
the
internal
audit system

2025
-Review
and
Monitoring
system
with
appropriate
benchmarks
and
indicators.

2035
Review &
Monitoring

BUDGETING FOR THE POOR


Separate budget head for urban poor welfare and detailed budget items under this separate head and
other respective service heads for the urban poor in ULB
Well designed, structured, user-friendly budget document for general (non-urban poor) and urban
poor category population of the city.
Institutional framework at ULB level for implementing development works and service delivery for
urban poor of the city.
Number of budget heads, items segregated and appropriately provided with resources
% of resources allocated to urban poor (amount budgeted - both revenue and capital accounts)
% of resources actually utilized for urban poor against resources budgeted for urban poor (actual
amount spent both revenue and capital accounts; % of total budget)
% participation of citizens in various budgetary processes

The following are some vision goals for Budgeting for the Poor

2011/2012
Budgeting for -Adequate budgetary allocation for
effective implementation of SJSRY
the Poor
scheme.
-Provision of Basic services to urban
poor including security of tenure at
affordable prices, improved housing,
water supply and sanitation
-Internal Earmarking of Funds for
services to Urban Poor

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

2015
-Earmarking 25 %
of
the
total
budgetary
allocation
for
Urban
Poor
-Conducting
Livelihood
support
programme
for
Urban Poor

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

257
\*

2025
2035
Implementation Review &
of
various Monitoring
schemes
of
Urban Poverty
/ slums through
PPP

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 9: L IST O F P ARTICIPANTS F OR S ECOND


W ORKSHOP
DATE: 22/2/2012

No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Name of Person
Jay N. Padalia
Nitin Sharma
V.P. Pour
D.K.Gurgela
M.L.Kurumali
J.K. Tiwari
Giriraj Singh
R.C. Shrivastava
Sandip Sinh Ram
Vijay Sharma
Mohna dir Patel mansuri
Navabi lan
shrinath Dhariya
Mohan Bhandari
Ashish Trivedi
Niteru Gupta
R. Gopal Pangi
Harisingh
Ram karan Malavar
Shrinath Ghatiya
G.P. Chaurasia

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Designation
Project Officer
Project Officer
Zone president
Teacher
Retd. A.D.M.
A.E. P.H.E.

Vidhayak
Sansad Pratinidhi
Parshad ward 6
Parshad ward 7
Parshad ward 11
Up adhyax
Nagrik

Upadhyax
Parshad ward 13
Acct.

Mobile Number
9879550377
9418353814
9424465531
9977117171
9827842474
9754853588
9753769451
9977925977
9425038941
9926511668
9755704555
9827960158
9977882241
9098777899
9827295210
9993366056
9424429401
9827353192
9753163721
9977882241
9425443301

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

258
\*

Sign

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 10: D OCUMENTATION OF T HIRD W ORKSHOP


The City Development Plan follows a sound process starting out with a systematic analysis of the
existing status of cities and towns within which stakeholders can build their vision and goals upon to
achieve holistic growth. As an action-based planning approach, the CDP lays emphasis on bridging the
gap between where we are and where we want to be by identifying a range of strategies and priority
projects most appropriate to the citys distinct arrangements.
Identification of strategies and priority actions is a challenging endeavor as it has to be dealt with careful
analysis of the most salient urban problems, consideration of stakeholders interests and balancing of
urban needs and available resources. By way of consultative workshops, stakeholders and consultants
should work hand in hand to come out with the most suitable and effective means to manage the city
towards its equitable and sustainable growth.
In what follows, this section shall describe the steps involved in the identification of strategies and
priority projects for Khilchipur gained from the third consultative workshop and first state level
discussion at Bhopal. Moreover, this section also depicts how involvement at various government levels
can create a more meaningful development process.
Minutes of the workshop
October 12, 2012, Third Workshop on Strategy and Priority Actions & Projects
After the momentous state level discussion at Bhopal, the team gathered the key stakeholders for the
third workshop to discuss the strategy and priority actions and strategies that will achieve the goals
expressed in the second workshop. Prior to the third workshop, the team closely coordinated with the key
stakeholders and invitation letters were sent to 100 stakeholders (including ULB officials, staff, ward
officers, concerned groups and citizens) out of which 40 people successfully attended.
The third workshop was held in the ULB office premises with the aforementioned stakeholders. Led by
Municipal Council President, the CDP was given a new momentum by emphasizing its scale and
importance in providing a framework within which future development activities shall be developed and
monitored. Moreover, it was affirmed that ULB backlogs should be promptly addressed so that
achievement of goals and strategies will be facilitated in a smooth and orchestrated manner.
The raison d'tre for the third workshop was articulated to the participants through a quick examination
of the CDP process. The importance of formulating strategies and priority projects to fulfill the towns
aspirations was likewise discussed. During the workshop proper, the team presented the minutes of the
second workshop and the formulated vision, sector and reform agenda goals consistent with their present
concerns and future aspirations of the stakeholders to which the people readily gave their approval to.
Moreover, the possible strategies and priority projects to achieve the vision were also discussed and
refined by the stakeholders.
The kick off workshop lasted for 1 hour and 30 minutes. The workshop was concluded by giving
stakeholders an idea of the outcomes of the third workshop and the gravity of the next stages were made
clear to the people.

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

259
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

CITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN (CDP) FOR K H I L C H I P U R


F I N A L

R E P O R T

A NNEXURE 11: D ETAILS O F T HIRD W ORKSHOP

Prepared by:
PRUDA-R & D Wing of AIILSG
Ahmedabad

Prepared For:
Urban Administration & Development Department
Government of Madhya Pradesh

260
\*

Project Coordinator
City Managers Association
Madhya Pradesh

City Profile
CompanyName
ULB Name

Khilchipur Nagar Parishad

Whether the Sectoral Analysis report is as per UADD requisites

Town Brief

Geographical location (Town)


Average rainfall (annual)
Height above mean sea level
Municipal area (1991)
Municipal area (2001)
Municipal area (2011)
Date of Constitution of ULB

Population

Historic importance

Population Year 1981 (under Municipal


boundary only)
Population Year 1991 (under Municipal
boundary only)
Population Year 2001 (under Municipal
boundary only)
Population Year 2011 (under Municipal
boundary only)

Latitude
Longitude
MM
Mts
Sq kms
Sq kms
Sq kms
Date

In one or two
sentences

24.03 degree North


76.57 degree East
394m (1292 ft)
6.47 sq.km.
6.47 sq.km.
6.47 sq.km.
Founded in 1544 by Dewan Ugra Sen, a
Khichi Rajput. A grant of land was
subsequently made to him by the Mughal
Emperor, which included the adjoining
Zirapur and Machalpur parganas, later in
Gwalior state.
10101
12675
15317
18932

Town level
CAGR

Name of Population projection Method


Projected population adopted Year 2015

20508

Projected population adopted Year 2025

25045

Projected population adopted Year 2035

Land Use

Land Use
Residential
Commercial
Public - semi public
Agriculture
Recreational
Industrial
Roads
Green area
Sensitive
Water bodies
Total

30585
% Standard (as per Land use (Tentative Land use (Tentative
UDPFI)
in percentage)
in Sq kms )
35
6
12
na
20
12
15
na
na
na
100

47.31
21.51
7.84
96.26
172.92

27.36
12.44
4.53
55.67
100.00

City Profile (Ward Wise)


Ward #
Name of ward
Ward Population (2001)
Ward Population (2011)
Area (sq Ha)
Density (PPH)
Male
Female
SC/ST (2001)
ST (2001)
BPL
Sex ratio
Literacy rate (%)
No. of Primary schools
No. of Primary Health
Centre
No. of Households
Primary occupation
(Majority)
Seconday occupation
Tertiary occupation
No. of SS/LS industrial
units
No. of Commercial
establishments
No. of Slum pockets
Slum population (2011)
No. of Slum Households
No. of Individual water
connections in the ward
No. of Community water
connections
No. of Commercial water
connections
No. of Tubewells
No. of Handpumps
No. of OHTs
% Coverage of piped
water supply
No. of Individual Toilets
No. of Individual Septic
tanks
No. of Community Septic
tanks

Ward 1

Ward 2

1105
1451

Ward 3
Vinoba
Bhave
1030
1393

Ward 4
Dr.
Ambedkar
1710
2756

Hanumangadh

Priyadarshini

1052
1167

10.43

10.67

25.69

112
544
512

136
557
548

54
512
518

53
30

395
203

214
941

Ward 5

Ward 6

Maulana Azad Netaji Bose

Ward 7
Ward 8
Jawaharlal Maharana
Nehru
Pratap
698
652
698
621

Ward 9

Ward 10

Ward 11

Ward 12

Tagore

Ahilya Devi

Tilak

Sanjay
642
654

Ward 13
Vallabh
Patel
852
615

Ward 14
Mahatma
Gandhi
1808
3067

Ward 15
Maharani
Laxmibai
1705
1917

633
645

1352
1504

679
661

Total

850
880

880
903

29.35

1.23

2.25

3.30

2.99

3.20

6.68

0.96

2.46

2.16

66.78

3.97

94
886
824

717
434
416

401
441
441

211
361
337

208
332
320

202
324
305

225
688
637

687
341
339

266
332
310

285
286
266

46
924
877

483
877
828

15648
18932
172.12
110
7839
7478

263
138

796
408

138
67

46
23

0
0

0
0

11
5

7
6

0
0

23
10

1
1

161
74

14
8

1908
973

234
984

196
1012

430
930

159
959

160
1000

100
934

37
964

63
941

183
926

58
994

98
934

103
930

171
949

402
944

2608.00
956
68.38%
11

220

273

262

519

166

170

131

117

121

283

124

123

116

578

361

3565

AGRI

LABOUR

AGRI

LABOUR

BUSINESS

SERVICE

AGRI

SERVICE

AGRI

LABOUR

BUSINESS

BUSINESS

SERVICE

BUSINESS

AGRI

LABOUR

AGRI

LABOUR

AGRI

SERVICE

LABOUR

LABOUR

LABOUR

LABOUR

AGRI

SERVICE

AGRI

AGRI

AGRI

LABOUR

35%

1167

1451

1393

2756

1504

1917

220

274

263

520

284

362

29
10188
1919

119

148

142

280

89

92

71

63

66

153

67

67

63

312

195

1921
79
15

3
40
5
80%
50%

No. of Community toilets


% of population - Open
defecation
No. of Dust bins
Wardwise Waste
generated (Kgs)
Road sweeping (1 time or 2
times)
Total no. of sanitary
workers in the ward

30

292

363

348

689

220

226

175

155

161

376

165

164

154

767

479

4733

34

City Profile (Ward Wise)


Ward #
Name of ward

Ward 1

Ward 2

Hanumangadh

Priyadarshini

Ward 3
Vinoba
Bhave

Ward 4
Dr.
Ambedkar

Ward 5

Ward 6

Maulana Azad Netaji Bose

Ward 7
Ward 8
Jawaharlal Maharana
Nehru
Pratap

Ward 9

Ward 10

Ward 11

Ward 12

Tagore

Ahilya Devi

Tilak

Sanjay

Ward 13
Vallabh
Patel

Ward 14
Mahatma
Gandhi

Ward 15
Maharani
Laxmibai

Length of Pucca road


(Mts)
Length of Kuccha road
(Mts)
Length of State Highway
Length of National
Highway
Length of Road side drains
Pucca (Mts)
Length of Natural drains
(Nallah)
Pucca/Channelized (Mts)
Length of Natural drains
(Nallah) Kuttcha (Mts)
No. of Streetlights
No. of Electricity
connections

Total

12000
5000

722

Name of Tourist site if any


Name of Heritage site if
any
Bus stop (No.)
Bus stand(No.)
Parks (No.)
Playground(No.)
No. of Residential
properties
No. of Commercial
properties
Total Property tax
collection (in Rs.)
Property tax coverage(in
%)
Available Government
land (Sq kms)
Remarks

1
0
1

400000

278713
70%

Sectoral Analysis
Source

Sewerage
Drainage
SWM

Physical Infrastructure

Water Supply

No. of Tubewell / River / Well

Existing Source
Tubewell
Well
3

River/Lake
Garh Ganga river, Fatehpur Dam (9 km
away)

Water Supplied by Tubewell /


River / Well in MLD
Total water supply in the town (MLD)
Existing Supply rate (LPCD) considering distribution
losses
Water Charges per household per month (Rs.)
Flat/Metered
% Coverage under paid water supply
Whether any treatment plant exists (Y/N),If yes mention
capacity (MLD)
Proposed source (Surface)
Total sewage generation (MLD)
Whether any treatment plant exists (Y/N),If yes mention
capacity
Total no. of individual septic tanks
Total no. of community septic tanks
Total no. of Sewage/Mud pumps available with the ULB
Frequency of Cleaning Individual Septic tanks
Frequency of Cleaning Community Septic tanks
Name of natural nallah (Storm water drain)
Length of natural nallah (Storm water drain) Kms
Ultimate disposal point of nallah
Length of road side drain (Kms)
Coverage of road side drainage w.r.t roads (%)
Ultimate disposal point of Road side drains
Any treatment plant/procedure adopted
Per capita Solid waste generation (Considering
Standards) (in gms)
Total SW generation (in Tons)
Frequency of SW collection by the ULB (1 time per
day/2 times per day)
Collection efficiency of the ULB (%)
Any initiative for DTDC (Yes /No)
Any initiative for scientific disposal of waste
Name of dumping/ landfill site
Is the existing site Dumping site or allotted site for
Scientific disposal
Area of allotted landfill site for Scientific disposal
Distance of the Dumping site/landfill site from main
settlement area (Kms)
No. of Tractor trolleys/vehicles available with the ULB
for carrying Solid waste to the LF site
If site for Scientific disposal is not allotted then whether
formally requested by the ULB
Name of National Highway passing from or nearby
from the town (NH-XYZ)

0.72 MLD
50 lpcd
40
60%
1.25 MLD
Fatehpur dam
no

no

Garh Ganga river

Garh Ganga river


no
250
4.8 T/day
1
70
no
no
Mela Kshetra, Ward no 4
Y
0.5 Ha
2 km
2

NH 12 Bhopal-Kota

Sectoral Analysis

Roads

Distance of National Highway if nearby from the town


(NH-XYZ) in Kms

Name of State Highway passing from or nearby from


the town (SH-XYZ)

Traffic & transportation


Street lighting

Total length of Pucca roads (Kms)

CC
WBM
Total (kms)

8 km
4 km
12 km

Total length of Kuccha roads (kms)

(kms)

5 km

Gap w.r.t Standards

(kms)

Total no. of vehicles in the town


Bus stand (yes/No)

Any intracity mass transport mode (yes/no)

no

Name of locations facing major traffic


issues

1
2
3

Kshirsagar pulia
Jahlawar naka chowk
Bus stand junction

Name of the street beautified as per the


instructions of UADD
Total no. of street lights

722

No. of Streetlights under working condition

640

No. of Streetlights having Tubes


No. of Streetlights having CFL
No. of Streetlights having Incandescent bulbs
No. of Streetlights having LED
No. of Streetlights having LPS
Location of Substation
http://www.mptransco.nic.in

Power

Physical Infrastructure

Distance of State Highway if nearby from the town (SHXYZ) in Kms

Total no. of residential connections

400 KV
220KV
132KV

1 (6.3 MVa)
0
0
1922

Total no. of Commercial connections


Any subsidy for BPL (Y/N)

Duration of Electricity supply per day (in Hrs)

16

Heritage & tourism


Environment

Heritage & tourism

Sectoral Analysis
Name of Heritage site/s
Ownership/agency
Prevailing Heritage Act/s
Name of Tourist site/s
Ownership/agency

Shani Mandir, Dargah Sharif, Shivalaya


Moti Maharaj

Total no. of Pilgrims/ Tourists visiting town per day

Name of River/Lake/Forest range/Any specific species


Prevailing Environmental Act/s
Areas facing threats
No. of Primary Health centres/Dispensary

Health

No. of Hospitals

Multispeciality hospital if any (Y/N)

Education

Name of Nearby town reffered for


Treatment

1
Government

1 (ward 14)

Beds
Private
Beds

30
1
10

no
Name of
town
Distance
(Kms)

Bhopal & Indore


120 kms

No. of Primary schools

11

No. of Secondary/High schools

No. of Colleges
No. of ITI

1
1

No. of Beneficiaries under SJSRY (Street Vendor)


Social security schemes

Social Infrastructure

Garh Ganga river

No. of Beneficiaries under Haath thela/Rickshaw chalak


yojna
No. of Rain Basera/Night Shelter
Ownership of Rain Basera (with ULB/Rental)
No. of Beneficiaries under Gharelu Kamkaji Mahila
Yojana

Name of other Social security


schemes

Name of
Scheme

Samajik Suraksha pension Yojana


Vridawastha pension Yojana

Sectoral Analysis
Slums & Urban Poor
Name of Slum
Individual
No. of
No. of
No. of
No. of
Ward
Notified/
Ward
Ward Area
water
Community Handpump Individual Community
pocket/ reference
Un-notified population (Sq.km.)
No
connections
taps
s
toilets
toilets
name

No. of
Pucca
houses

No. of Semi
pucca
houses

No. of
Kuccha
houses

No. of
No. of
Permanent Temporary
pattas
pattas
distributed distributed

No. of
Primary
school in
the slum
pocket

No. of
Beneficiarie
Any
Primary
s under
interventio
Health
social
ns under
centres in
security
IHSDP
the slum
schemes
(Y/N)
pocket

Deepgrah/
Neelgarh

Notified

1167

0.54

119

84

95

Mataji Prajapati Notified

1451

0.64

148

74

67

Somwaria Bardi Notified

1393

0.65

142

85

73

4
5
6
7
8
9

Subhash Kalaji Notified

2756

0.69

280
89
92
71
63
66

71

116

Khandipole
Moipura

1504

0.35

153

105

71

129

100

48+25

10

Notified

11
12
13
14
15
Total

67
67
63
312
Jaystambha
Maligali

Notified

1917

0.415

195

10188

3.285

1921

79

Reforms Action Plan


Reforms

Timeline to achieve reforms till 2015

Achieved (Y/N)
2012-13

Full migration of double accounting


System
Property tax reforms, 85% coverage
ratio and 90% collection ratio
Levy of user charges : full recovery of O
& M charges for sewerage, water supply
and SWM
Internal earmarking of basic services to
urban poor
E-governance
Provision of basic services to urban
poor including security of tenure at
affordable prices, improved housing,
water supply, sanitation

N
N
N
N
N
N

Preliminary
Any City specific
estimate (if any)
Strategies
for
adopted
implementation

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

Implementing
agency

Capital Expenditures

Revenue Expenditure

Capital
Receipts

Revenue Income

Municipal Finance (Should be filled carefully and it should be checked whether the capital income is factual or based on assumption
Year
Rates and Tax Revenue
Assigned Revenues & Compensation
Rental Income from Municipal Properties
Fees & User Charges
Sale & Hire Charges
Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies
Income from Investments
Interest Earned
Other Income
Total - Revenue Income
Grants, Contribution for specific purposes
Secured Loans
Unsecured Loans
Deposits
Deposit works
Total Capital Receipts
Establishment Expenses
Administrative Expenses
Operations & Maintenance
Interest & Finance Charges
Programme Expenses
Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies
Miscellaneous Expenses
Transfer to Fund
Total - Revenue Expenditure
Fixed Assets
Capital Work-in-Progress
Investments -General Fund
Investments-Other Funds
Stocks/Inventory
Loans, Advances and Deposits
Other Assets
Miscellaneous Expenditure
Total Capital Expenditure
Total Income
Total Expenditure

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

13389830
12502379

Note: Refer Madhya Pradesh Municipal Accounting Manual for further details. Can be downloaded from "Download" Section of www.mpurban.gov.in.

2009-10

2010-11

Rates and Tax Revenue

Assigned Revenues & Compensation

Rental Income from Municipal Properties

Fees & User Charges

Sale & Hire Charges

Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies

Income from Investment

Interest Earned

Other Income

Consolidated Capital Income for Development Works

Other Expenses

CAGR

204.29

48.81

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

Surplus/ Deficit

63.00

253.10

CAPITAL ACCOUNT

TOTAL INCOME

(14.19)

57.00

147.29

0.00

5.00

0.00

0.00

5.00

81.86

31.65

23.78

120.00

120.00

133.10

0.00

5.00

5.00

0.19

2.29

14.33

28.00

28.15

50.15

2004-05

REVENUE ACCOUNT

0.00%

0.00%

5.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

15.00%

15.00%

15.00%

0.00%

0.00%

5.00%

10.00%

10.00%

14.00%

14.00%

15.00%

15.00%

15.00%

assumed

57.00

20%

#DIV/0!

0%

#DIV/0!

#DIV/0!

0%

20%

20%

20%

20%

#DIV/0!

0%

5%

20%

20%

20%

20%

20%

29%

CAGR

Total Capital Expenditure

Works

Major Capital Expenditure Heads

Consolidated Capital Expenditure for Development

Total Revenue Expenditure

Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies

Programme Expenses

Miscellaneous Expenses

Interest & Finance Charges

Operations & Maintenance

Establishment Expenses

Administrative Expenses

Major Revenue Expenditure Heads

Total Capital Income

Major Capital Income Heads

Total Revenue Income

Major Revenue Income Heads

WITHOUT REFORMS

REVENUE PROJECTIONS

78.58

243.15

321.72

75.60

2.97

68.40

68.40

174.75

0.00

5.00

0.00

0.00

5.00

98.24

37.98

28.53

144.00

144.00

177.72

0.00

5.00

5.00

0.23

2.75

17.19

33.60

33.78

80.18

2005-06

90.36

278.12

368.48

86.94

3.42

78.66

78.66

199.46

0.00

5.00

0.00

0.00

5.00

112.97

43.68

32.81

165.60

165.60

202.88

0.00

5.00

5.00

0.26

3.16

19.77

38.64

38.84

92.21

2006-07

108.43

331.74

440.17

104.33

4.11

94.39

94.39

237.35

0.00

5.00

0.00

0.00

5.00

135.56

52.41

39.37

198.72

198.72

241.45

0.00

5.00

5.00

0.31

3.79

23.72

46.37

46.61

110.65

2007-08

135.54

412.18

547.72

130.41

5.13

117.99

117.99

294.19

0.00

5.00

0.00

0.00

5.00

169.46

65.52

49.21

248.40

248.40

299.32

0.00

5.00

5.00

0.39

4.74

29.65

57.96

58.27

138.32

2008-09

6.04

337.06

343.10

0.00

6.04

0.00

337.06

0.00

5.25

0.00

0.00

5.00

194.87

75.34

56.60

0.00

343.10

0.00

5.25

5.50

0.43

5.40

33.80

66.65

67.01

159.06

2009-10

7.01

386.35

393.35

0.00

7.01

0.00

386.35

0.00

5.51

0.00

0.00

5.00

224.10

86.64

65.09

0.00

393.35

0.00

5.51

6.05

0.47

6.15

38.54

76.65

77.06

182.92

2010-11

8.03

443.00

451.03

0.00

8.03

0.00

443.00

0.00

5.79

0.00

0.00

5.00

257.72

99.64

74.85

0.00

451.03

0.00

5.79

6.66

0.52

7.02

43.93

88.15

88.61

210.36

2011-12

Annexure 12: Financial Operating Plan for KHILCHIPUR

9.12

508.12

517.24

0.00

9.12

0.00

508.12

0.00

6.08

0.00

0.00

5.00

296.38

114.59

86.08

0.00

517.24

0.00

6.08

7.32

0.57

8.00

50.08

101.37

101.91

10.26

582.98

593.24

0.00

10.26

0.00

582.98

0.00

6.38

0.00

0.00

5.00

340.84

131.78

98.99

0.00

593.24

0.00

6.38

8.05

0.63

9.12

57.09

116.58

117.19

278.20

9.12

241.91

2013-14

2012-13

11.46

669.04

680.50

0.00

11.46

0.00

669.04

0.00

6.70

0.00

0.00

5.00

391.96

151.54

113.84

0.00

680.50

0.00

6.70

8.86

0.69

10.39

65.09

134.07

134.77

319.93

19.38

2014-15

12.69

767.97

780.67

0.00

12.69

0.00

767.97

0.00

7.04

0.00

0.00

5.00

450.75

174.27

130.91

0.00

780.67

0.00

7.04

9.74

0.76

11.85

74.20

154.17

154.99

367.92

30.84

2015-16

13.96

881.72

895.68

0.00

13.96

0.00

881.72

0.00

7.39

0.00

0.00

5.00

518.37

200.41

150.55

0.00

895.68

0.00

7.39

10.72

0.83

13.51

84.59

177.30

178.23

423.11

43.54

2016-2017

15.25

1012.48

1027.73

0.00

15.25

0.00

1012.48

0.00

7.76

0.00

0.00

5.00

596.12

230.48

173.13

0.00

1027.73

0.00

7.76

11.79

0.92

15.40

96.43

203.90

204.97

486.58

57.50

2017-2018

16.53

1162.83

1179.36

0.00

16.53

0.00

1162.83

0.00

8.14

0.00

0.00

5.00

685.54

265.05

199.10

0.00

1179.36

0.00

8.14

12.97

1.01

17.55

109.93

234.48

235.72

559.56

72.75

2018-2019

Rates and Tax Revenue

Assigned Revenues & Compensation

Rental Income from Municipal Properties

Fees & User Charges

Sale & Hire Charges

Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies

Income from Investment

Interest Earned

Other Income

Consolidated Capital Income for Development Works

Establishment Expenses

Administrative Expenses

Operations & Maintenance

Interest & Finance Charges

Programme Expenses

Revenue Grants, Contribution and Subsidies

Miscellaneous Expenses

Other Expenses

1335.69

17.79

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

Surplus/ Deficit

0.00

1353.48

CAPITAL ACCOUNT

TOTAL INCOME

0.00

17.79

REVENUE ACCOUNT

1335.69

0.00

8.55

0.00

0.00

5.00

788.37

304.80

228.96

0.00

1353.48

0.00

8.55

14.27

1.11

20.01

125.32

269.65

271.07

18.98

1534.44

1553.43

0.00

18.98

0.00

1534.44

0.00

8.98

0.00

0.00

5.00

906.63

350.52

263.31

0.00

1553.43

0.00

8.98

15.69

1.22

22.81

142.86

310.10

311.73

740.02

107.07

89.28

643.50

2020-2021

2019-2020

Total Capital Expenditure

Works

Major Capital Expenditure Heads

Consolidated Capital Expenditure for Development

Total Revenue Expenditure

Major Revenue Expenditure Heads

Total Capital Income

Major Capital Income Heads

Total Revenue Income

Major Revenue Income Heads

WITHOUT REFORMS

REVENUE PROJECTIONS

20.08

1762.96

1783.04

0.00

20.08

0.00

1762.96

0.00

9.43

0.00

0.00

5.00

1042.62

403.10

302.80

0.00

1783.04

0.00

9.43

17.26

1.34

26.01

162.87

356.62

358.49

851.03

126.05

2021-2022

21.02

2025.71

2046.73

0.00

21.02

0.00

2025.71

0.00

9.90

0.00

0.00

5.00

1199.02

463.57

348.23

0.00

2046.73

0.00

9.90

18.99

1.47

29.65

185.67

410.11

412.27

978.68

146.13

2022-2023

21.75

2327.83

2349.58

0.00

21.75

0.00

2327.83

0.00

10.39

0.00

0.00

5.00

1378.87

533.10

400.46

0.00

2349.58

0.00

10.39

20.89

1.62

33.80

211.66

471.62

474.11

1125.48

167.15

2023-2024

22.18

2675.21

2697.39

0.00

22.18

0.00

2675.21

0.00

10.91

0.00

0.00

5.00

1585.70

613.07

460.53

0.00

2697.39

0.00

10.91

22.97

1.78

38.53

241.29

542.37

545.22

1294.31

188.90

2024-2025

22.22

3074.65

3096.88

0.00

22.22

0.00

3074.65

0.00

11.46

0.00

0.00

5.00

1823.55

705.03

529.61

0.00

3096.88

0.00

11.46

25.27

1.96

43.93

275.07

623.72

627.01

1488.45

211.08

2025-2026

21.76

3533.95

3555.71

0.00

21.76

0.00

3533.95

0.00

12.03

0.00

0.00

5.00

2097.09

810.78

609.05

0.00

3555.71

0.00

12.03

27.80

2.16

50.07

313.58

717.28

721.06

1711.72

233.31

2026-2027

20.63

4062.09

4082.73

0.00

20.63

0.00

4062.09

0.00

12.63

0.00

0.00

5.00

2411.65

932.40

700.41

0.00

4082.73

0.00

12.63

30.58

2.37

57.09

357.48

824.87

829.22

1968.48

255.06

2027-2028

Annexure 12: Financial Operating Plan for KHILCHIPUR

18.69

4669.39

4688.08

0.00

18.69

0.00

4669.39

0.00

13.27

0.00

0.00

5.00

2773.40

1072.26

805.47

0.00

4688.08

0.00

13.27

33.64

2.61

65.08

407.53

948.60

953.60

2263.75

275.70

2028-2029

15.70

5367.73

5383.43

0.00

15.70

0.00

5367.73

0.00

13.93

0.00

0.00

5.00

3189.41

1233.10

926.29

0.00

5383.43

0.00

13.93

37.00

2.87

74.19

464.59

1090.90

1096.64

2603.31

294.38

2029-2030

11.42

6170.74

6182.17

0.00

11.42

0.00

6170.74

0.00

14.63

0.00

0.00

5.00

3667.82

1418.07

1065.23

0.00

6182.17

0.00

14.63

40.70

3.16

84.57

529.63

1254.53

1261.14

2993.81

310.09

2030-2031

5.55

7094.14

7099.69

0.00

5.55

0.00

7094.14

0.00

15.36

0.00

0.00

5.00

4217.99

1630.78

1225.01

0.00

7099.69

0.00

15.36

44.77

3.48

96.41

603.78

1442.71

1450.31

3442.88

321.51

2031-2032

(2.28)

8155.97

8153.70

0.00

(2.28)

0.00

8155.97

0.00

16.13

0.00

0.00

5.00

4850.69

1875.39

1408.77

0.00

8153.70

0.00

16.13

49.25

3.82

109.91

688.31

1659.12

1667.86

3959.31

327.06

2032-2033

(12.51)

9377.01

9364.50

0.00

(12.51)

0.00

9377.01

0.00

16.93

0.00

0.00

5.00

5578.29

2156.70

1620.08

0.00

9364.50

0.00

16.93

54.17

4.21

125.30

784.67

1907.98

1918.03

4553.21

324.78

2033-2034

(25.65)

10781.12

10755.47

0.00

(25.65)

0.00

10781.12

0.00

17.78

0.00

0.00

5.00

6415.04

2480.21

1863.09

0.00

10755.47

0.00

17.78

59.59

4.63

142.84

894.52

2194.18

2205.74

5236.19

312.28

2034-2035

(WITH REFORMS)

Additional Revenues as a result of Proposed Investments

(20.31)

279.69

259.38

279.69

Closing Balance

Investments (WITH REFORMS)

300.00

136.84

116.53

2015-16

(20.31)

136.84

116.53

2014-15

Opening Balance

REVENUE ACCOUNT as a result of Proposed

REFORMS)

Additional O&M as a result of Proposed Investments (WITH

B Major Capital Income Heads

A Major Revenue Income Heads

Investments (WITH REFORMS)

Additional Revenues as a result of Proposed

239.07

259.38

(20.31)

136.84

116.53

2016-2017

218.76

239.07

(20.31)

136.84

116.53

2017-2018

198.45

218.76

(20.31)

136.84

116.53

2018-2019

124.59

198.45

(73.86)

273.68

199.83

2019-2020

50.74

124.59

(73.86)

273.68

199.83

2020-2021

(23.12)

50.74

(73.86)

273.68

199.83

2021-2022

(96.97)

(23.12)

(73.86)

273.68

199.83

2022-2023

(170.83)

(96.97)

(73.86)

273.68

199.83

2023-2024

(138.10)

(170.83)

32.72

343.08

375.80

2024-2025

(105.38)

(138.10)

32.72

343.08

375.80

2025-2026

Annexure 12: Financial Operating Plan for KHILCHIPUR

(72.65)

(105.38)

32.72

343.08

375.80

2026-2027

(39.93)

(72.65)

32.72

343.08

375.80

2027-2028

(7.20)

(39.93)

32.72

343.08

375.80

2028-2029

77.30

(7.20)

84.50

412.47

496.97

2029-2030

161.80

77.30

84.50

412.47

496.97

2030-2031

246.30

161.80

84.50

412.47

496.97

2031-2032

330.80

246.30

84.50

412.47

496.97

2032-2033

415.30

330.80

84.50

412.47

496.97

2033-2034

634.86

415.30

219.56

461.57

681.13

2034-2035

GoMP-Grant

PPP Project Income

ULB Contribution

Proposed Investments only

Closing Balance of capital account with

Total Capital Income

externally aided projects

VIII

VII

VI

IV

III

II

of capital account with

3:

With

Additional

&

Balance

without

proposed

DSCR

Revenue Account

investments only + Closing Balance Additional

Closing

Overall Closing Balance

Revenue Account loaded on Scenario 2 (III)

Scenario 4: With Closing Balance of additional

Expenditure loaded on Scenario 2 (III)

Scenario

Additional Revenue & O&M (Closing Balance)

proposed investments I-II

loaded on closing balance account without

closing balance with proposed Investments

Scenario 2: Overall Closing account with

Proposed Investments only

Closing Balance

Balance)

Scenario 1: NO REFORM SCENARIO (Closing

FOP WITH VARIOUS SCENARIOS

2.00

GoI-Grant

Loans from State Government or other

Capital Income

Total Capital Expenditure

Construction Period 2 Years)

% annual (Moratorium Period 2 Years,

Total CIP INVESTMENTS

Annual Loan Repayment @ interest Rate of 10

Capital Expenditure (CIP)

(With Proposed Investment)

1.00

Opening Balance

INVESTMENTS

CAPITAL ACCOUNT WITH PROPOSED

2010

0.00

0.00

10%

15%

75%

0.00

0.00

2010

2011

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2011

2012

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2012

2013

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2013

2014

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2014

310.53

909.35

492.82

279.69

629.66

598.82

30.84

2014-2015

598.82

7590.57

0.00

699.18

598.82

1,048.76

5,243.81

6991.75

6,991.75

0.00

2014-15

0.25

302.92

856.50

460.28

259.38

597.13

553.59

43.54

2015-16

553.59

0.00

45.23

45.23

598.82

2015-16

0.28

296.57

804.52

428.61

239.07

565.45

507.95

57.50

2016-2017

507.95

0.00

45.64

45.64

553.59

2016-2017

Annexure 12: Financial Operating Plan for KHILCHIPUR

0.30

291.51

753.37

397.77

218.76

534.61

461.86

72.75

2017-2018

461.86

0.00

46.09

46.09

507.95

2017-2018

0.33

287.73

702.98

367.69

198.45

504.53

415.25

89.28

2018-2019

415.25

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

46.61

46.61

461.86

2018-2019

0.35

231.66

599.73

201.45

124.59

475.14

368.07

107.07

2019-2020

368.07

0.00

47.19

47.19

415.25

2019-2020

0.37

176.79

497.02

172.60

50.74

446.28

320.23

126.05

2020-2021

320.23

0.00

47.84

47.84

368.07

2020-2021

0.39

123.01

394.68

144.11

(23.12)

417.79

271.66

146.13

2021-2022

271.66

0.00

0.00

48.57

48.57

320.23

2021-2022

GoMP-Grant

PPP Project Income

ULB Contribution

Proposed Investments only

Closing Balance of capital account with

Total Capital Income

externally aided projects

VIII

VII

VI

IV

III

II

of capital account with

3:

With

Additional

&

Balance

without

proposed

DSCR

Revenue Account

investments only + Closing Balance Additional

Closing

Overall Closing Balance

Revenue Account loaded on Scenario 2 (III)

Scenario 4: With Closing Balance of additional

Expenditure loaded on Scenario 2 (III)

Scenario

Additional Revenue & O&M (Closing Balance)

proposed investments I-II

loaded on closing balance account without

closing balance with proposed Investments

Scenario 2: Overall Closing account with

Proposed Investments only

Closing Balance

Balance)

Scenario 1: NO REFORM SCENARIO (Closing

FOP WITH VARIOUS SCENARIOS

2.00

GoI-Grant

Loans from State Government or other

Capital Income

Total Capital Expenditure

Construction Period 2 Years)

% annual (Moratorium Period 2 Years,

Total CIP INVESTMENTS

Annual Loan Repayment @ interest Rate of 10

Capital Expenditure (CIP)

(With Proposed Investment)

1.00

Opening Balance

INVESTMENTS

CAPITAL ACCOUNT WITH PROPOSED

0.41

70.18

292.45

115.74

(96.97)

389.42

222.27

167.15

2022-2023

222.27

0.00

49.39

49.39

271.66

2022-2023

0.42

18.08

414.63

311.77

(170.83)

585.45

396.55

188.90

2023-2024

396.55

0.42

72.98

418.17

213.20

(138.10)

556.27

345.19

211.08

2024-2025

345.19

0.42

127.93

420.58

182.89

(105.38)

525.96

292.65

233.31

2025-2026

292.65

0.41

182.41

421.21

150.79

(72.65)

493.86

238.80

255.06

2026-2027

238.80

0.39

235.77

419.23

116.08

(39.93)

459.16

183.46

275.70

2027-2028

183.46

0.36

287.18

413.63

77.76

(7.20)

420.84

126.45

294.38

2028-2029

126.45

0.00

0.00

205.55

2280.06

0.00

57.01

57.01

183.46

2028-2029

224.60

0.00

55.34

55.34

238.80

2027-2028

0.00

0.00

53.85

53.85

292.65

2026-2027

0.00

0.00

52.53

52.53

345.19

2025-2026

308.32

0.00

51.36

51.36

396.55

2024-2025

1,541.60

2105.79

50.32

2055.4678

222.27

2023-2024

Annexure 12: Financial Operating Plan for KHILCHIPUR

0.32

387.38

454.95

(34.82)

77.30

377.65

67.57

310.09

2029-2030

67.57

0.00

58.89

58.89

126.45

2029-2030

483.31

550.87

(23.40)

161.80

389.08

67.57

321.51

2030-2031

67.57

0.00

0.00

0.00

67.57

2030-2031

573.36

804.30

145.54

246.30

558.01

230.94

327.06

2031-2032

230.94

1916.42

0.00

175.30

163.38

262.96

1,314.78

1753.04

0.00

1,753.04

67.57

2031-2032

655.58

886.53

143.26

330.80

555.73

230.94

324.78

2032-2033

230.94

0.00

0.00

0.00

230.94

2032-2033

727.58

958.52

130.75

415.30

543.22

230.94

312.28

2033-2034

230.94

0.00

0.00

0.00

230.94

2033-2034

921.49

1,152.43

56.00

634.86

517.57

230.94

286.63

2034-2035

230.94

0.00

0.00

0.00

230.94

2034-2035

Police thana

Petrol pump

Hospital

13

11

Government Senior Secondary Sc

10

14

Raj mahal chowk


Garh ganga river

Palace marg

8 !

Boys School Girls School

15

12

Nagar panchayat

Government Primary School

Main Market NH Chok

Water works & filter plant

Government Primary School

Oil mile

Water works & filter plant

Raj mahal chowk

Police thana

Petrol pump

Palace marg

Oil mile

Nagar panchayat

Hospital

Girls School

Garh ganga river

Boys School

Main Market NH Chok

0.18

0.27

Project Consultant:
PLANNING & RESOURCES
ON URBAN DEVELOPMENT AFFAIRS
(PRUDA)
R & D Wing of
ALL INDIA INSTITUTE OF
LOCAL SELF GOVERNMENT (AIILSG)

Project Co-Ordination:
City Managers Association,
Madhya Pradesh

Project Client:
Urban Administration &
Development Department (UADD),
Government of Madhya Pradesh

0 0.045 0.09

Town/city Index

PUBLIC_SEMIPUBLICAMINITY

Building

River / Waterbody

S ROAD

P ROAD

T ROAD

km

0.36

KHALCHIPUR

MADHYA PRADESH STATE

Road

RAJGARH DISTRICT

Government Senior Secondary Sc

Government Primary School

Bus stand

State Index

!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
!

!
!
!
!

Mela Ground

Ward Boundary

Municiple Boundary

Legend

Madhya pradesh

Town/ City: KHALCHIPUR


District:Rajgarh

City Devlopment Plan

MAP NO-12 EXISTING SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE MAP