Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 16

Temple University, Tyler School of Art, Architecture Department

Arch 3296/5296 Undergraduate/Graduate [Writing Intensive]


Movements in Modern Architecture
Spring Semester 2015, 3 credit hours
Time: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 AM 12:20 PM
Location: New Architecture Building, Seminar Room 305

Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

1.

Instructor: Assistant Professor Kenneth Jacobs


Office: Architecture Building, Office
Email Address: jacobsk@temple.edu
Office Hours: by appointment
Catalogue description
History and theories of the architecture and urbanism of the modern period, from the
beginning of the 19th century to contemporary architecture. Key ideas, texts, and iconic
buildings from the USA, Europe and other sites of the modernist diaspora are discussed.
Pre-requisite: Arch 2141 and Arch 2142 or by special permission (contact Professor)
Summary
This course is a historical and critical evaluation of the development of different
movements in modern architecture. It explores this subject through the major ideas,
figures, writings, artistic production, urbanism, and buildings of the period. In addition,
as an analysis and critique of modernism, the course introduces some of the current
discourse of architectural theory. Lectures, readings, and supplemental materials form
the basis of the course. Additional content may be recommended during the semester
as a complement to the required materials.
The study of architectural history is an important component of the professional
architecture curriculum at the Tyler School of Art, Temple University. Architectural history
is a humanistic and critical discipline based on visual observation, research, and
extensive written analysis. As such, it complements the practical and conceptual
projects of the design studio by surveying and analyzing historical precedents for design,
investigating their meaning in their own right, and evaluating their usefulness as formal
or programmatic models.
Throughout history, architecture has vividly reflected the cultures in which it evolved, and
the social, economic, political, and geophysical conditions which shaped its form. This
relationship continues today. Indeed, many issues of current concern to architects can
be considered outgrowths of previous historical developments. Thus, studying the
architecture of the past gives students a focused historical lens through which to
consider contemporary architectural problems.
By familiarizing students with the body of architecture and by illustrating the broad scope
and uses of architectural history and theory, this course also provides an invaluable
component of elective studies.
A special aspect of this course is not just to focus on built architecture as the only
legitimate outcome of the architectural process. We will examine and discuss various
outputs of architectural production as critical documents, following the lead of historian
Joan Ockman. To this end, speculative drawings, transcriptions of architectural
conferences, written manifestoes, three-dimensional models, and photographs, as well
as built works of architecture, will be examined.

Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

2.

We will be continuously evaluating and discussing various media, both visual and
textual. Our analyses and discussion will emphasize the importance of language in
giving words to our observations of visual phenomena.
But our main tool of interrogation is through writing. We will have lengthy discussions
about the role of writing as a translation of our perceptions of the visual image and built
architecture and how we are to translate our observations into words. We will examine
with great care the actual words of architects and weigh them against the production of
visual materials.
The main goal for writing this semester is to make a transition from your introductory
history classes, in which the papers served as systematic analyses of the different
aspects of a single building, to the Architectural Theory course that comes after this
one by urging you to think about and engage in writing as a way to treat architecture as
a discipline that finds expression in diverse media, including written language. It is the
goal that your final research paper will be an example of the written word as a genuine
architectural expression.
Organization
The course is organized as follows:
Lecture: 11:00-11:40am
Group Discussion of Readings: 11:45am-12:20pm
Through the lectures, class discussions, readings, and writing assignments the course
will present various movements in modern architecture. The information is organized by
movement and roughly in chronological order from the 1830s to present day. Various
themes will be introduced such as organicism, functionalism, transparency, and the
like, and will be discussed as a means to cut across time and location.
The lectures will include presentations of the architecture of the modern movement as
well as the writings and ideas of the architects set within a broader cultural and political
setting that will also treat the correspondence between architectural movements and the
literary and artistic movements of the day. In addition, to support the goal of the class as
a writing intensive course, we will discuss in detail the written manifestos of architects as
an equally strong architectural expression and create a manifesto to examine writing as
a crucial mode of architectural expression today. We will also investigate the importance
of the spoken word in response to the readings for this course in student led discussion
periods during which two students will work together to lead a discussion that will
address important issues within modern architecture. The final written and oral project
will include a presentation of the work, trends, and ideas of a contemporary
architect/group in comparison to the architects from the modern movements historical
period.
Course Assignments and Requirements
The required coursework will include two short written assignments, an oral presentation
in which two students will lead an in-class discussion of required readings, a term paper,
and a final oral and PowerPoint presentation.
Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

3.

Presentations on assigned readings


Student participation is required during the discussion of assigned readings. This will
require familiarity with the readings and the ability to articulate similarities and
differences among various architects and movements. As part of a two student group,
each student will be asked to lead a group discussion during one class discussion
period. The participation grade will include an oral presentation that will critically
examine one of the sets of assigned readings. The student will be expected to highlight
the key issues at stake in the selected readings, illustrating them as necessary with
appropriate visual materials. The presentation should be approximately 5 minutes in
length, allowing for approximately 15 minutes of discussion among the members of the
class. The presenting students will lead the discussion with the assistance of the
instructor.
Short writing assignments
Two short writing assignments, one on technology and the other on manifestos, will
parallel the introduction of these key themes in the lectures during the first 6 weeks of
the semester. These assignments ask the student to analyze and not just describe, and
be situated within the broader discourse of modernism. Each paper should be
approximately 750 words in length.
Research Paper
The research paper will explore ways that the condition of modernity is expressed
through architecture and/or urbanism. Each student will propose their own topic that
addresses the writings and buildings of a specific architect or movement set within the
broader cultural, intellectual, artistic, and political milieu of the time. The paper should
be a minimum of 2,000 words and appropriately illustrated. It will be developed
throughout the semester with feedback from the instructor. Submissions will include: 1)
a research statement and outline, 2) an in-progress draft, and 3) the final paper. More
detailed information regarding the assignment will be distributed in class during the third
week.
Final Presentation
Each student will prepare a 10-minute PowerPoint presentation on a contemporary
architect or group and situate the work within certain modern precedents investigated
over the course of the semester. In addition to the PowerPoint and oral presentation, a
750-word essay will accompany the presentation.
Students are responsible for all material presented in the lectures, readings, and
assignments.
Assignments are due at the beginning of class unless otherwise specified in printed
form, followed up by an electronic submission to the instructor. Late papers will be
automatically reduced to 66% of the possible grade. Assignments will not be accepted
after one week or after the graded assignments have been returned, whichever comes
first.
Final grades will be determined as follows and are based upon oral presentations and
written assignments:
Oral Participation & Presentation

15%

Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

4.

First Writing Assignment


Second Writing Assignment

10%
10%

Research Project/Term Paper


Research Statement & Outline
In-Progress Draft
Final Paper

5%
15%
35%

Final Presentation
PowerPoint presentation
Final essay

5%
5%

As a Writing Intensive Course, 80% of the grade is based on written assignments, with
55% of the grade based on writing that reflects extensive revision in response to the
instructors comments (the Research Paper).
As a Writing Intensive course, you will use writing to interrogate the
In the course of writing the paper, you will develop:
research, reading, and interpretation skills
the ability to critically read and interpret a number of texts and
architectural projects in relation to one another
the ability to write creatively, cite, respond to critical feedback and present
an architectural research paper
time management skills
verbal communication skills
This is a writing intensive course. In this course you will be required to:
evaluate and develop a topic
identify, find and evaluate a number of additional sources relevant to the
topic selected
write an annotated bibliography
develop a working outline to creatively structure the argument of a paper
write a paper of at least 2,000 words
correctly cite and reference your paper
respond positively to critical feedback
demonstrate your response to feedback by incorporating changes to your
final paper
Research Statement and Outline
To make an informed selection, look through the topics for the lectures, read ahead in
the syllabus, and select a group/architect/movement that interests you. Ask yourself
some critical questions:
Do the ideas interest me?
Will I understand them, if not now, then with work?
Is this something I am interested in finding out more about?
Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

5.

Is this something I am interested in writing about?


Is this something that I can see having relevance to my design work
and/or future work?
Is this something that I can see having relevance to contemporary
culture?

Speak with me if you are unsure about this. We will also schedule a short meeting after
you submit your topic to brainstorm your thesis and sources.
Annotated Bibliography
An annotated bibliography provides a summary of each of the sources you will use for
your project and why or how you will use them. The annotations have two functions: (1)
they indicate to the reader that you have read, understood, and evaluated each source
within the context of your project, and (2) they inform your reader of how or why the
source is useful for your research. In other words, annotated bibliographies summarize
your understanding of a source and assess the source for your project. Annotations that
simply summarize are not considered successful your role is to evaluate the source
and relate it to your research.
This task involves a number of things:
Finding and assessing the validity of your sources.
You are required to find at least 10 scholarly sources for your topic:
5 from Temple University Librarys Catalogue (Diamond Catalogue,
including e-Reserves)
5 from the Avery Index or JStor
Jill Luedke, the Tyler librarian located on the 2nd floor of Paley library, will run a hands-on
tutorial with our group early in the semester to assist you with this task.
Evaluating and using sources:
You are required to evaluate the value and usefulness ness of your source materials.
Guiding Questions for Your Annotated Bibliography (you do not necessarily need to
answer each question in each annotation, but someone reading the entire bibliography
should get the sense that, overall, you considered these issues carefully):

What is the central argument of the source? Try to summarize it in a


sentence or two.
What part(s) of the source might be applicable or useful for the project
that you are working on? Be sure to explain how or why you believe the
ideas connect to your project.
Did you notice any connections between this source and other sources on
your list? Were there related ideas? Did one source comment on or
correct another? Is there a link between concepts that you havent seen
mentioned elsewhere?
Overall, did you think the source is valuable and worthwhile for your
paper? Back up your evaluation with specific references.
Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

6.

The Draft Paper


The draft paper should be a first stab at the final paper and be referenced in Chicago
Style. It will be reviewed and your instructor will give you extensive written and verbal
feedback. You are required to resubmit your annotated bibliography, working
outline, and diagrams with the draft for grading. They will be evaluated and included
in the draft grade.
Note that at this stage, you might be asked to make major (or minor) revisions to the
draft paper if it does not demonstrate
your ability to critically read and interpret a number of texts and
architectural projects in relation to one another
your ability to take a position and structure an argument creatively
your ability to write grammatically correctly and spell and cite correctly
Feedback will be discussed in individual meetings scheduled one week after submission
of the draft paper. If it should be considered necessary, you will be required to resubmit
your draft paper one week after the individual meetings.
Note: Students having difficulties with writing will be permitted an additional week for the
submission of the draft, on condition that the instructor be duly notified and that, during
that week, he/she schedule an appointment with the Temple University Writing Center
for assistance. Evidence of the appointment must be produced when handing in the
draft.
The Final Paper
Your final paper should demonstrate that you have evaluated and incorporated the
critical feedback received at the draft stage. It must be referenced in Chicago Style and
should demonstrate that you have
critically read and interpreted a number of texts and architectural projects
in relation to one another
taken a position and structured an argument creatively
written in a grammatically correct manner and have rigorously edited the
paper to correct spelling errors and have cited your references in the
proper fashion
evaluated and responded to critical feedback
Course schedule, topics, and readings
The course will follow the attached schedule and reading list; however, for the sake of
flexibility, changes to the schedule and readings may occur through the semester.
Students will be responsible for familiarity with the course subject matter, all of which is
included in the reading, even if it is presented in a limited time period. Students are
expected to think critically about the subject matter throughout the course. This will be
addressed as the semester themes progress. The requirements in this syllabus
constitute the bulk of the course requirements, however, additional assignments may
also be given at the discretion of the instructor when they are beneficial for learning and
factored into the grading of the course. Revisions and other announcements will be
provided at the start of each lecture. It is each students responsibility to make certain
they are using a current schedule and reading list.

Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

7.

Textbooks and Readings


A full list of readings for the course will be handed out and updates posted on
Blackboard. For full comprehension of the course subject matter, a familiarity with all of
the assigned readings is necessary. In addition to required readings, a list of suggested
readings is also included. At the instructors discretion, readings may be added,
removed, and considered primary or secondary. Any such changes will be made to
enhance teaching the subject matter and will be announced at the start of class.
The following books are required for the course and are available in the TU Bookstore:
Colquhoun, Alan. Modern Architecture, Oxford University Press, 2002.
Frampton, Kenneth, Modern Architecture: A Critical History. London: Thames
and Hudson, 1992, 2006. (Note: there are a number of versions of this book
with some added information in later versions).
Conrads, Ulrich, Programs and Manifestoes on 20th-century Architecture.
London: Lund Humphries, 1970. (Note: there are a number of copyright dates
and publishers for this book. Content in newer and older versions is the same).
Turabian, Kate, Students Guide to Writing College Papers, Chicago: Chicago
University Press, 2010. (or earlier editions)
The required readings provide a compendium of historical, theoretical, and critical
material about the architecture of the early modern movement to the present. There will
also be a number of scanned articles that you will be able to download in PDF form from
our Blackboard site.
Week

Day

Month

Date

Lecture

Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

8.

_01

_02

_03

_04

Tues.

Jan.

13

INTRODUCTION: discuss schedule, syllabus, etc., overview of


the course

Thurs.

Jan.

15

Modernism, Modernity, Modernization: Discussion of readings

Tues.

Jan.

20

Industrializing England - Crystal Palace - Eiffel Tower

Thurs.

Jan.

22

Arts & Crafts Movement in Britain

Mon

Jan.

26

ADD/DROP DEADLINE

Tues.

Jan.

27

Chicago School + Prairie School, Frank Lloyd Wright

Thurs.

Jan.

29

Vienna Secession + Adolf Loos: Ornament and Crime

Tues.
Thurs.

_05

Tues.
Thurs.

_06

Tues.
Thurs.

_07

Tues.
Thurs.

Feb
.
Feb
.
Feb
.
Feb
.
Feb
.
Feb
.
Feb
.
Feb
.

Art Nouveau/ Jugendstil/Modernisme/Liberty

Deutsche Werkbund + Expressionism in Architecture

10

Research paper discussion/Writing discussion/

12

Library visit/ Writing center/Group discussion

17

The Avant Garde in Russia + Futurism in Italy

19

De Stijl and Neo-Plasticism

24

France: beton arme, reinforced concrete

26

Transparency + Opacity: dialectics of the Modern 1920-33.

_08
_09

_10

_11

_12

_13

_14

SPRING BREAK March 2-8


Tues.

Mar.

10

The International Style: MOMA exhibition

Thurs.

Mar.

12

Weimar Germany: the Bauhaus and beyond

Tues.

Mar.

17

LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW FROM COURSES

Tues.

Mar.

17

Architecture + Political regimes, Architecture during WWII

Thurs.

Mar.

19

WWII: Europe and US + The New Monumentality

Tues.

Mar.

24

The International Style in the world, Chandigarh, Brasilia.

Thurs.

Mar.

26

The Int'l Style: Mies, Saarinan + decline

Tues.

Mar.

31

Situated Modernism: Breuer, Kahn, Rudolph, Alvar Aalto

Thurs.

Apr.

New Brutalism: Smithsons, Team 10, Mat Buildings, etc.

Tues.

Mar.

Pop and Radical arch,1960s-Megastructural turn

Thurs.

Apr.

1966: Origins and sources of Post-Modernism

Tues.

Apr.

14

1980 on> Postmodern 2 + Deconstruction

Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

9.

Notebook and sketchbook


While I will post the lectures on Blackboard, I will also be lecturing on materials that are
not found directly in our readings. I expect you to take notes during lectures and to
sketch to capture your own understanding of the buildings I show. This is not a class
that just asks you to do a Slide ID test, but to begin to grasp the complexity and beauty
of modern architecture. I wont collect your notebooks, but I will notice if you are
engaged.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Attendance
(Note: The following policies are derived from, and in complete support of, official
University policy)
The lectures and in-class discussions form the basis of this course and, as such,
ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY. This course meets every Tuesday and Thursday from
11:00am12:20pm. Students are required to be in attendance and engaged with the
course material during this time. In addition, students are expected to attend the
evening lecture series of the Department of Architecture.
Students are entitled to three unexcused absences. Each additional unexcused
absence will result in the reduction of the final grade by one-half a letter grade. More
than five absences will be grounds for automatic failure of this course. Excused
absences will only be granted for health problems or unusual crises involving family
matters. It is the responsibility of the student to notify the instructor, preferably in
advance, of the circumstances. Students who are granted an excused absence will be
given one day for each excused day to make up any missed work.
For grading and other Academic policies, consult the TU Undergraduate Bulletin
http://www.temple.edu/bulletin/Academic_policies/policies_part2/policies_part2.shtm#dis
_action
Semester Grades
The work of all undergraduate students is graded and reported at the end of each
semester. Students may access their semester grades on OWLnet within 48 hours of
the end of the examination period for that semester and may request a mailed grade
report through OWLnet.
Grades will be assigned on the following scale, according to Temples academic policy:
A excellent
B good
C fair
D- passing
F failed
Numerical values are: A=4.00; A-=3.67; B+=3.33; B=3.00; B-=2.67; C+=2.33; C=2.00; C=1.67; D+=1.33; D=1.00; D-=0.67; F=0.00. See the attached Assessment Rubric for
more information regarding the determination of grades.
Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

10.

I will be giving you a midterm grade based on your work to date by March 9th, 2015 so
that you may gauge your progress and, in an extreme case, be able to respond to the
March 17th deadline to withdraw from a course. If you find this a necessity, please let
me know and I will arrange a meeting with academic advisor Laureen Duffy prior to such
action.
Incomplete Coursework
According to University policy and consistent with the Tyler School of Art_Architecture
we follow the University Incomplete policy:
An instructor will file an "I" (Incomplete) only if the student has completed the majority of
the work of the course at a passing level, and only for reasons beyond the student's
control.
An instructor may file an I when a student has not completed the work of a course by
the time grades must be submitted, but has completed the majority of the work at a
passing level and has a written agreement with the instructor and the department
regarding completion of the work, including the nature of the work to be completed, the
means by which the final grade will be determined, and the date by which the work must
be completed. The completion date may be no later than one year from the end of the
semester in which the student took the course. The agreement shall also specify a
default grade to be received if the work is not completed by the date indicated. One
copy of the agreement shall be retained by the instructor, one shall be given to the
student, and one shall be filed with the department office or, in colleges or schools
without departments, the Deans office.
When reporting the grade of "I" for a student, the instructor shall also file a report of the
default grade in the electronic grading system. If the instructor does not change the
grade of I, pursuant to the agreement with the student, by the end of one year from the
time the grade of I was awarded, the appropriate University official shall automatically
change the grade of I to the reported default grade, and the default grade shall appear
on the transcript and be used for all other grading purposes as the actual grade received
in the course.
Faculty advisors and staff advisors have the option of not permitting a student to register
for an overload if the student is carrying one or more active incomplete courses, or for
a full load if the student is carrying two or more active incompletes.
Policy on Use of Blackboard
This course will use the Blackboard system to post class documents, assignments, and
grades, as well as to disseminate any amendments to the course schedule or policies.
As all material posted in this manner will become the responsibility of those who
participate in this course, the ability to log onto Blackboard is a non-negotiable course
requirement for all students. No alternative email addresses will be considered for
communication with you. It is a requirement for you to regularly check Blackboard and
your Temple email. You are required to consult the materials that are posted for every
class on Blackboard. The posted lectures and readings are an incredible resource and I
assume that you will consult the materials in your studies. I am able to see if you are
regularly consulting the materials and it is crucial that you do so.
NAAB Criteria (for the M.Arch program certifications)
Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

11.

This course is in compliance with the standards set by the National Architectural
Accreditation Board in the areas of specialty as outlined here.
2009 Conditions for Accreditation
National Architectural Accrediting Board, Inc.
PART TWO (II): SECTION 1 STUDENT PERFORMANCE -- EDUCATIONAL
REALMS & STUDENT PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
The criteria encompass two levels of accomplishment:
UnderstandingThe capacity to classify, compare, summarize, explain and/or
interpret information.
AbilityProficiency in using specific information to accomplish a task, correctly
selecting the appropriate information, and accurately applying it to the solution of
a specific problem, while also distinguishing the effects of its implementation.
Realm A: Critical Thinking and Representation:
Architects must have the ability to build abstract relationships and understand the impact
of ideas based on research and analysis of multiple theoretical, social, political,
economic, cultural and environmental contexts. This ability includes facility with the
wider range of media used to think about architecture including writing, investigative
skills, speaking, drawing and model making. Students learning aspirations include:
Being broadly educated.
Valuing lifelong inquisitiveness.
Communicating graphically in a range of media.
Recognizing the assessment of evidence.
Comprehending people, place, and context.
Recognizing the disparate needs of client, community, and society.
A.1. Communication Skills: Ability to read, write, speak and listen effectively.
A.5. Investigative Skills: Ability to gather, assess, record, apply, and comparatively
evaluate relevant information within architectural coursework and design processes.
A.9. Historical Traditions and Global Culture: Understanding of parallel and divergent
canons and traditions of architecture, landscape and urban design including examples of
indigenous, vernacular, local, regional, national settings from the Eastern, Western,
Northern, and Southern hemispheres in terms of their climatic, ecological, technological,
socioeconomic, public health, and cultural factors.
Realm C: Leadership and Practice:
Architects need to manage, advocate, and act legally, ethically and critically for the good
of the client, society and the public. This includes collaboration, business, and
leadership skills. Student learning aspirations include:
Knowing societal and professional responsibilities.
Comprehending the business of building.
Collaborating and negotiating with clients and consultants in the design
process.
Discerning the diverse roles of architects and those in related disciplines.
Integrating community service into the practice of architecture.
Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

12.

C. 2. Human Behavior: Understanding of the relationship between human behavior, the


natural environment and the design of the built environment.
C. 8. Ethics and Professional Judgment: Understanding of the ethical issues involved in
the formation of professional judgment regarding social, political and cultural issues in
architectural design and practice.
Academic Standards
This course requires that all students maintain a high level of academic standards. As a
required course in the professional architecture curriculum in the history/theory series, it
is an important component in architectural education that draws on and supplements
other areas of architectural study.
As a 300 level course, critical inquiry of the subject matter is expected, and reading,
writing, and discussion are the primary forms of demonstrating the ability to address
architecture. The course demands the appropriate level of work for a third year student.
In some cases, grasping the subject matter may require some additional reading and
studying. Use of the Writing Center is highly recommended for students who find they
need assistance. Use of the Writing Center website (http://www.temple.edu/writingctr/)
or an equivalent alternative text as an aid for writing is required. The website includes
information on research, pre-writing, outlining, writing semester papers, avoidance of
plagiarism, and proper referencing. Texts that address issues of writing research paper
will be discussed in class. Standard texts for college courses that we recommend for
this course include A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations by
Kate L. Turabian. Consultation with the instructor is suggested for students who find
they need extra time, background material, or help. I am available and suggest meeting
outside of class time to discuss your work.
Written Materials
All papers submitted for this course should include reference information that follows the
Chicago Citation Guide. A direct link to the guide is as follows:
http://www.temple.edu/writingctr/support-for-writers/documents/ChicagoCitationGuide.pdf
All assignments are expected to be edited for structure, clarity in writing, and style before
submission. Further suggestions for clarity of ideas will be given by the instructor upon
submission. Suggestions usually focus on ways to make ideas more accessible, but
sometimes include critical advice concerning grammar, spelling, usage, and style. Like
design, it is expected that learning occurs through the writing process and writing skills and
awareness of writing quality improve and increase through the semester. Some standards
will be enforced throughout the semester, including the form of notation and bibliography.
Each student is expected to follow given guidelines and give correct citations at all stages of
writing. Likewise, all visual material is expected to be submitted with proper reference and in
a readable form. Editing is easier, less time consuming, and less cumbersome in the end if it
is considered throughout the process.
Documents that do not cite references in an appropriate manner will not be accepted
until proper attribution is in place. Please let me know if you would like to set up a time
to discuss the proper form.
Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

13.

Temple University Writing Center


Tutoring Hours: (please confirm on TU website for up-to-date information)
Monday thru Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
201 Tuttleman Learning Center
Temple's Writing Center provides help for graduate and undergraduate students who are
working on papers for classes, theses, and dissertations. The center offers a variety of
services to meet different needs. For undergraduate students, these services include
face-to-face tutoring, email tutoring, writing fellows, writing workshops, in-center
seminars.
Originality of work and Academic Honesty
CHEATING OR PLAGIARISM IN ANY FORM IS UNACCEPTABLE. Ideas are the
intellectual property of the author and require attribution. Proper citations are necessary
for text, images, charts, diagrams and statistical information and any materials from
published sources, copyrighted sources, and the World Wide Web. These are needed
for support in any meaningful research, and proper credit for ideas is required when
conducting research or consulting another persons work. Citations include the author,
title, publication or source, publisher (if any) and date of publication. Students who are
unfamiliar with proper citation or use of resources should seek the help of the Instructor
and/or the Writing Center. Assignments are to be done independently unless otherwise
specified. Although we encourage students to discuss the assignments, readings and
lectures, students are expected to do their own work. Improper uses of others work, or
significantly similar assignments will result in no credit given for the assignments in
question. In addition, no work should be submitted for this class and for another course
without full disclosure and prior discussion with all faculty involved. This also includes
the reuse of papers that have been written for other courses by the student. All work
must be original to the student and a new investigation in the semester they are taking
this course. Reuse of materials or submitting work for more than one course is
considered a serious academic violation and carries the same penalties as those for
plagiarism.
Every student should consult the Universitys policy on Plagiarism and Academic
Cheating as noted below. Compromise of academic integrity will follow university
guidelines, and unresolved cases may be referred to the University Discipline
Committee.
From the Temple Bulletin, Student Rights and Responsibilities: Temple University
believes strongly in academic honesty and integrity. Plagiarism and academic cheating
are, therefore, prohibited. Essential to intellectual growth is the development of
independent thought and a respect for the thoughts of others. The prohibition against
plagiarism and cheating is intended to foster this independence and respect.
Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of another person's labor, another person's
ideas, another person's words, another person's assistance. Normally, all work done for
courses -- papers, examinations, homework exercises, laboratory reports, oral
presentations -- is expected to be the individual effort of the student presenting the work.
Any assistance must be reported to the instructor. If the work has entailed consulting
Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

14.

other resources -- journals, books, or other media -- these resources must be cited in a
manner appropriate to the course. It is the instructor's responsibility to indicate the
appropriate manner of citation. Everything used from other sources -- suggestions for
organization of ideas, ideas themselves, or actual language -- must be cited. Failure to
cite borrowed material constitutes plagiarism. Undocumented use of materials from the
World Wide Web is plagiarism.
Academic cheating is, generally, the thwarting or breaking of the general rules of
academic work or the specific rules of the individual courses. It includes falsifying data;
submitting, without the instructor's approval, work in one course which was done for
another; helping others to plagiarize or cheat from one's own or another's work; or
actually doing the work of another person.
The penalty for academic dishonesty can vary from a reprimand and receiving a failing
grade for a particular assignment, to a failing grade in the course, to suspension or
expulsion from the University. Cases of suspected academic dishonesty are brought to
the attention of Chair of the Architecture Department and/or the University Disciplinary
Committee. The penalty varies with the nature of the offense, the individual instructor,
the department, and the school or college. Decisions regarding the consequences of
such infractions are rendered by these bodies.
For expanded text see:
http://www.temple.edu/bulletin/Responsibilities_rights/responsibilities/responsibilities.sht
m#honesty
Students who believe that they have been unfairly accused may appeal through the
School or College's academic grievance procedure. See Grievances under Student
Rights in this section. from the Temple University website (www.temple.edu)
Students with Disabilities
Disability disclosure statement:
Any student who has a need for accommodation based on the impact of a disability
should contact Tylers Academic Advisor Laurie Duffy at 215-777-9185 privately to
discuss the specific situation as soon as possible. Contact Disability Resources and
Services at 215-204-1280 at 100 Ritter Annex to coordinate reasonable
accommodations for students with documented disabilities.
Students must present the appropriate paperwork in order to receive special
accommodations. Accommodations are limited to those documented by the Office of
Disability Resources and Services and presented in an official letter to the faculty
member at the beginning of the semester.
If you should need any assistance in the matter, please dont hesitate to contact me.
Information on cancellation of classes due to inclement weather
The University participates with the City of Philadelphia and local radio stations such as
KYW (1060-AM), WDAS (1480-AM, 105,3-FM), WIOQ (102.1-FM), WUSL (98.9-FM) and
WPEN (950-AM), which broadcast code numbers indicating when classes are closed
because of snow or other inclement weather.
101
Day Class Cancellation

Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

15.

The most accurate and up-to-date information on class cancellations can be obtained by
calling the Universitys hotline at 215-204-1975, and by listening to Temples radio
station, WRTI 90.1-FM or referring to Temples website at: http://www.temple.edu
Academic Rights and Responsibilities
Freedom to teach and freedom to learn are inseparable facets of academic freedom.
The University has a policy on Student and Faculty and Academic Rights and
Responsibilities (Policy #03.70.02) which can be accessed through the following link:
http://policies.temple.edu/getdoc.asp?policy_no=03.70.02.
See separate attachments:

Reading List (detailed) and Recommended Bibliography

Writing assignments #1 and #2

Research paper topic and Schedule

Arch 3296/5296 Movements in Modern Architecture/Version 1.0

16.