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Enterprise Buildings Integrator

Operators Guide

Document

Release

Issue

Date

ZD34-003-310

R310

July 2005

Notice
This document contains Honeywell proprietary information. Information contained herein
is to be used solely for the purpose submitted, and no part of this document or its contents
shall be reproduced, published, or disclosed to a third party without the express permission
of Honeywell Limited Australia.
While this information is presented in good faith and believed to be accurate, Honeywell
disclaims the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a purpose and makes no
express warranties except as may be stated in its written agreement with and for its
customer.
In no event is Honeywell liable to anyone for any direct, special, or consequential damages.
The information and specifications in this document are subject to change without notice.
Copyright 2005 Honeywell Limited Australia

Honeywell Trademarks
Honeywell Enterprise Buildings Integrator and SafeBrowse are U.S. registered
trademarks of Honeywell, Inc.
Other Trademarks
Microsoft, and SQL Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
Trademarks that appear in this document are used only to the benefit of the trademark
owner, with no intention of trademark infringement.

Support and Other Contacts


For technical assistance, call your nearest Honeywell office.

Training Classes
Honeywell holds technical training classes on Enterprise Buildings Integrator. These
classes are taught by experts in the field of building control systems. For more information
about these classes, contact your Honeywell representative.

ii

Readme File
Before installing and configuring Enterprise Buildings Integrator, you should refer to the
readme.txt file located in the root directory on the installation CD. This file contains
information about features that may have been added or changed since the production of
the Enterprise Buildings Integrator publication set or online help.

Related Documentation
For a complete list of publications and documents for Enterprise Buildings Integrator, see
the Enterprise Buildings Integrator Overview.

iii

iv

Contents
1

About This Guide


How to Use This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Understanding the Basics


Introducing EBI and Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Introducing Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Starting Station and Signing On. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
What Type of Security Do You Use? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Understanding Security Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Changing Stations Setup File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Understanding Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Understanding Stations Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Understanding the Status Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Using the Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Entering Commands in the Command Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Resizing the Station Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Using your Mouse (or its equivalent) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Using a Trackball. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Using a Touch Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Using your Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Using Shortcut Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Using Displays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Understanding System Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Using the Navigation Menu and Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Calling up a Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Calling up a Web Page or File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Printing Station Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Understanding Display Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Understanding Alarms and Other Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Understanding Electronic Signatures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Understanding Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Understanding Point Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Controlling Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Disabling a Point. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Point Controls Requiring Electronic Signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Searching for System Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Using the Search Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Searching from the Command Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide v

Contents

Understanding and Managing Access Control


Understanding Zones, Time Periods and Access Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Time Periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Access Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding How EBI Controls Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unlocking a Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Cardholders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching for a Cardholder or Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

40
40
41
41
42
43
44
45

Managing a Building
Understanding Global Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Monitoring Fire Panels

Responding to Alarms
The Alarm Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing What is Shown in the Alarm Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Area Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Details Pane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating the Alarm Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pausing the Alarm Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acknowledging Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Comments to an Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing an Alarm Video Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alarm Management Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Three-stage Alarm Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Structured Response Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Alarm Banner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

52
55
56
57
57
57
58
59
60
61
62
62
63
66

Responding to Events
Changing What is Shown in the Event Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Using Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Adding Comments to an Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Viewing an Event Video Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Adding an Operator Recorded Event. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Responding to Access Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Using Event Archiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Event Collection and Archive Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Archiving Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Restoring Archived Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Checking Event Records for Tampering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

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R310

Contents

Responding to Messages
Changing What is Shown in the Message Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filtering and Sorting the Message Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Area Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Details Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating the Message Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pausing the Message Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acknowledging Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Comments to a Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Reporting Incidents

10

Producing Reports
Requesting a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Requesting a Report from the Command Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calling up a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standard Report Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Reports from the Summary Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11

Communicating with Your Colleagues

12

Controlling CCTV Cameras


Viewing a Camera Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling a Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locking a Camera and Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Freezing a Video Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting the Brightness of a Video Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13

90
91
92
93
95

100
101
102
102
102

Displaying Detailed Point Information


Using Point Detail Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calling up a Point Detail Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying Point History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying Recent Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Faceplates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Group Detail Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Quick Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Trend Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying a Trend Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Zooming in on a Trend Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

14

80
80
80
82
82
82
83
84
85

104
104
105
105
106
107
108
109
110
110

Monitoring System Status


Monitoring Channel Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Monitoring Point Server Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide vii

Contents

Monitoring Controller Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Monitoring Station Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Printer Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring a Redundant Server System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Distributed Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

15

Specialized Access Control Procedures


Responding to Deadman Timer Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resetting the Deadman Timer Points. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Guard Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring or Controlling a Guard Tour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Shifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring and Controlling a Shift. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sealing and Unsealing an Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing a Seal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sealing an Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sealing and Exiting an Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unsealing an Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16

122
122
124
124
128
128
130
130
131
131
131

Reference Information
Command Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shortcut Keys for a 12-function Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calling up Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calling Up Specialized Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Focusing on Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Data and Issuing Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Someones Station Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Glossary
Index

viii

114
115
116
117
118
119

R310

134
136
137
137
137
138
138
139

About This Guide


This guide describes how to use Station to monitor and control your Enterprise Buildings
Integrator (EBI) system.

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide

1 About This Guide

How to Use This Guide

To learn about:

Go to:

The basics, such as the layout of the screen and how to use your keyboard

page 3

Responding to alarms

page 51

Responding to events

page 67

Responding to messages

page 79

Monitoring system status

page 111

Generating and printing reports

page 89

Using the Message Pad

page 97

R310

Understanding the Basics


Note Every EBI system is configured to meet a particular set of requirements.
This means that some of the information in this guide may not be applicable to you,
or may operate in a slightly different way. Consequently, you should ask your
supervisor or an experienced colleague before you perform any procedure described
in this guide.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Introducing EBI and Station


Enterprise Buildings Integrator (EBI) is a sophisticated management and control
application that:

Displays system data in a manner that you can easily understand

Allows you to control your system by sending appropriate commands

Automatically performs scheduled tasks

Notifies you of system activities, including alarms and system events

Produces comprehensive reports


The following figure shows a typical EBI system. EBI runs on the serverthe main
computerwhich collects and processes data, administers system activities and performs
automated tasks.
The point servers and the controllers are the hands and eyes of your system,
controlling and collecting data from field devices, such as card readers, air
conditioning units and so on.
A point server collects information from the field and sends this information to
the EBI system upon request. In general, this information is not stored in EBI unless you
are collecting history.
Controllers also collect information from the field but continually send this
information to the EBI system where it is stored.
In most cases, the controllers are located near the devices they control, and are
connected to the server via a LAN (Local Area Network) or other communication
link.

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Introducing EBI and Station

Station

Station

Server

LonWorks
Point Server

Alarms

Reports

LON Bus

Controller

Controller

Introducing Station
A Station is, in effect, a set of control panels through which you and your
colleagues monitor and control your system. (Station is a separate EBI program that runs
on standard computers, as well as on the server.)
Station presents information as a series of displayseach display is a control
panel that shows a particular set or type of information, and has an appropriate
set of controls, such as buttons and scroll bars.
There are two basic types of display:

System. These are supplied with EBI and show information in a standardized manner.
For the most part, system displays consist of lists and electronic forms containing
system configuration details.

Custom. These have been created specifically for your system, and make it
much easier to interpret and control system activity. For example, a security-related
display might show the layout of a particular floor, whereas an air-conditioning
display might include a schematic diagram of the air-conditioning system.
In addition to displays, Station can display Web pages and files, such as Microsoft
Word documents, which typically contain operating procedures.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Figure 2.1 Typical System Display

Figure 2.2 Typical Custom Display

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Starting Station and Signing On

Starting Station and Signing On


To start Station and sign on:
1
From your computers Start menu, select either (whichever appears on your Start
menu):
Start Programs Enterprise Buildings Integrator Station
Start Programs Enterprise Buildings Integrator Client Software
Station
Station establishes contact with the server and displays the startup display specified in
the default setup file.
2
Your system may be set up so that you can select a particular setup file, which
controls the way Station operates. If this is the case, see Changing Stations Setup
File on page 10.
3
Sign onto Station in accordance with the security option used on your system. See
What Type of Security Do You Use? on page 7.

What Type of Security Do You Use?


Station supports two types of security.
You use:

Go to:

Operator-based security if you have been assigned a user name and a


password or your Station user name and password are the same as your
Windows user name and password.

page 8

Station-based security if you have not been assigned a user name.

page 9

When you start Station, you are automatically assigned OPER security
level. You can subsequently change to a higher level providing you know
the password for that level on that Station.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Signing On With Operator-based Security


With operator-based security, there can be several ways to sign on, depending on how your
site is configured.
If you have

Then sign on to Station

Separate Windows and Station


user names and passwords

Using Station Operator logon with your Station user


name and password.

The same user name and


password for Windows and
Station

Is automatic if your site is set up to use single signon.


Otherwise sign on to Station using Station Operator
Logon. Ask your supervisor or experienced colleague if
your site is set up to use single signon.

SignOn Manager

Using SignOn Manager. Your security details are


automatically passed to Station when Station starts.

Note

Your password, but not your user name, is case-sensitive.

To sign on when a sign on prompt appears:


1
In the Station Operator Logon dialog box type your user name and your password.
2
Click OK.
Tip

Asterisks (*) appear as you type each character of your password.

Changing Your Password


Note:

Your password must be between 5 and 40 letters/numbers, without spaces.

Your password is case-sensitive.


To change your password:
1
Type chgpsw in the Command Zone and press <Enter>. The Change Password
dialog box opens.
2
Type your old password and press <Tab>.
3
Type your new password and press <Tab>.
4
Re-type your new password and click OK. (The new password is only accepted if the
new password entries are identical.)

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Starting Station and Signing On

What do You Do If You are Forced to Sign on?


If configured on your system, you can perform a duress signon if someone forces you to sign
on. Duress signon is identical to a normal signon, except that you log on using a special
duress operator ID and password that is given to you by your manager or system
administrator.
The duress operator ID and password logs you onto the system in what appears to be a
normal situation, however it raises an alarm that does not appear on your Station. Other
staff will see the alarm on their computers and act accordingly.
Ask your supervisor or an experienced colleague whether your system is set up for duress
signon.
Signing Off
You sign off by typing bye in the Command Zone and pressing <Enter>.
Note Station might be customized to sign-off automatically if you have not used
the keyboard for a specified time.

Signing On with Station-based Security


You are automatically assigned OPER security level when you start Station. You can change
to a higher level providing you know that levels password for that Station.
To change to a higher level:
1
Type psw in the Command Zone and press <Enter>. The Station Logon dialog
box opens.
2
Type the password and click OK.
Signing Off
You only need to sign off if you have changed to a security level other than OPER.
You sign off by typing bye in the Command Zone and pressing <Enter>. This returns
Station to OPER security level.
Note Station may be customized to automatically sign you off if you do not use
the keyboard for a specified time.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Understanding Security Levels


Your security level determines which tasks you are permitted to perform. Note, however,
that even if you are allowed to perform a particular task you may be prevented from
performing it in certain circumstances.
If you attempt to perform a task that requires a higher security level, the following message
appears in the Message Zone:
Higher Security Level Required
Tip

Your security level appears at the right of the Status Line. The levels are, from lowest to highest: LVL1,
LVL2, OPER, SUPV, ENGR and MNGR.

Changing Stations Setup File


To select another Station setup file:
1
Select Station Connect. The Connect dialog box opens.
2
Select the appropriate configuration file from the Recent Connections tab or the
Other Connections tab.
The Recent Connections tab contains a list of setup files (.stn) most recently used.
The Other Connections tab lists all your setup files. If your setup file is not listed,
click the Browse button to navigate the required setup file.
3
Click Connect.
Note
file.

Station automatically uses default.stn unless you select another setup

Understanding Areas
If your system is divided into areas, your access to parts of the system can be restricted. For
areas where you have access, the tasks that you can perform can also be restricted. For
example, you may have View access to an area in your system. In this case, you can only
view items in the area, you cannot make any changes, such as acknowledging alarms or
changing a point parameter.

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Understanding Stations Layout

Understanding Stations Layout


The current display occupies most of the Station window. The other parts, above and below
the display, provide you with the tools and controls you use to monitor and control your
system.

Menus
Command Zone

Toolbar
Message Zone

Display

Alarm Line
Status Line

Figure 2.3 Stations Layout

Part

Description

Menubar

You select commands from Stations menus in the same


way as in other applications.
For example, to call up the Event Summary, select View
Events Event Summary.

Toolbar

Clicking a button on the toolbar provides speedy access


to a frequently required command. For a description of
each button, see Using the Toolbar on page 14.

Command Zone

You type commands in the Command Zone. See Entering


Commands in the Command Zone on page 16.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Part

Description

Message Zone

Station displays explanatory messages in the


Message Zone. For example, if you try to call up a
non-existent display, something like The display file
xxxx was not found appears in the Message Zone.

Display

Each display is a separate control panel that you use


to monitor and control a particular part of your system.
For more information about displays, see:

Using Displays on page 21

Understanding Display Objects on page 26

Alarm Line

Generally, this line displays the most recently


unacknowledged alarm message. (The Alarm Line may
be hidden on your system, or it may be configured to
operate in a special manner.)

Status Line

Provides an overview of your systems status. For


example, a flashing red field indicates that there is at
least one unacknowledged alarm. See Understanding the
Status Line on page 12.

Understanding the Status Line


The Status Line provides an overview of your systems status. The following table describes
each field in the Status Line, starting from the left.

Field

Description

Date and time

The current date and time, as set on the server.

Alarm

Indicates whether there are any alarms, as well as their


status:

Blank. There are no alarms.

Flashing red. There is at least one unacknowledged


alarm.

Red (not flashing). There is at least one alarm, but


they have all been acknowledged.

Click the field to call up the Alarm Summary, which lists


each alarm.

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Understanding Stations Layout

Field

Description

Comms

Indicates the status of communication links between the


server and other devices (such as channels, controllers,
and so on):

Blank. Normal communications.

Flashing cyan. There is at least one


unacknowledged communications alarm.

Cyan (not flashing). There is at least one


communications alarm, but they have all been
acknowledged.

Click the field to call up the System Status displays, which


contain communication-related information. See Monitoring
Channel Status on page 112.

Message

Indicates whether there are any messages, as well as


their status:

Blank. No messages.

Flashing green. There is at least one


unacknowledged message.

Green (not flashing). There is at least one message,


but they have all been acknowledged.

Click the field to call up the Message Summary, which


lists each message.

Download

Indicates download status and problems associated


with cardholder details:

Grey. Access control is operating normally.

Flashing yellow. Card details are currently being


downloaded.

Yellow (not flashing). There was a failure or timeout


during the download. Click the field to see the
problemssee Monitoring Downloads on page 119.

Download on grey background. Only applicable if


you have a DSA system. A download to a remote
server is yet to complete.

Server ID

The name or number of the server to which Station is


connected. (In some systems, you can connect to more
than one server.)

Station number

The number of this Station. (Most systems have more


than one Station.)

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2 Understanding the Basics

Field

Description

Security level

Your security level. See Understanding Security Levels on


page 10.

Using the Toolbar


The buttons in the toolbar provide speedy access to frequently required displays and
commands. For example, to call up the System Menu you simply click the toolbar
button.
Note Some buttons only appear on your toolbar if you have the associated option.
For example, the
button appears in your system only if you have the Deadman
Timer option.

Button

Description
System Menu. Calls up the System Menu, a specialized display that
provides quick access to the other major displays. See Calling up a Display from the
System Menu on page 23.
Access Configuration Menu. Calls up the Access Configuration Menu,
which you use to configure the access control-related aspects of your
system.
Cardholder Menu. Calls up the Cardholder Management Menu, which
you use to manage cardholders. See Understanding and Managing Access Control
on page 39.
HVAC Configuration. Calls up the HVAC Configuration Menu, which you
use to manage your building. See Managing a Building on page 47.
Alarm Summary. Calls up the Alarm Summary, which provides a one-line
description of every alarm. See Responding to Alarms on page 51.
Acknowledge/Silence Alarm. Acknowledges the most recent, or
selected, alarm.
Alarm Banner. This only appears if your system has been configured to use an
Alarm Banner. See Using the Alarm Banner on page 66.
Associated Display. Calls up the display associated with the object that is
in alarm, or the selected object.

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Understanding Stations Layout

Button

Description
Event Summary. Calls up the Event Summary, which provides a one-line
description of every event. See Responding to Events on page 67.
Callup Display. Calls up the specified display. To call up a display:
1

Click the button.

Type the displays name/number and press <Enter>.

When configuring a system, engineers normally link related displays in a


chain so that you can quickly call up the next/previous display.
Page Down. Calls up the next display in the current chain.
Page Up. Calls up the previous display in the current chain.
Navigate Back.
Navigate Forward
Enable you to move backwards and forwards between displays you have
previously called. Click the arrow to the right of the Navigate Back and
Navigate Forward buttons to view a list of displays you have previously
called.
Reload Page.
Reloads the current display
Trend. Calls up the specified trend display. To call up a trend:
1

Click the button.

Type the trend number and press <Enter>.

Group. Calls up the specified Group Detail display. To call up a group:


1

Click the button.

Type the group number and press <Enter>.

Raise. Raises a parameter value.


Lower. Lowers a parameter value.
See Example ScenarioChanging the Value of a Point from a Display on page 32.
Enter. Accepts the newly entered value.
Cancel. Cancels the newly entered value, and returns it to its original value.

Toggle In Service/Out of Service


Toggles the state of the selected object.

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Button

Description
Search Cardholder. Calls up the Cardholder Management Search display,
which you use to search for cardholders or cards. See Searching for a Cardholder
or Card on page 45.
Detail/Search. Performs either of two tasks, depending on the context:

If an alarm or object is selected on the current display, clicking the


button calls up the associated Point Detail display. See Using Point Detail
Displays on page 104.

If nothing is selected on the current display, clicking the button calls up


the Search display, which you then use to search for system items such
as points, operators and so on. See Searching for System Items on page 36.

Deadman. This only appears if your system has the Deadman Timer
option. You click this to clear Deadman Timer messages. See Responding to
Deadman Timer Messages on page 122.
Incident Report. Calls up the Incident Report Display. See Reporting Incidents
on page 87.
Zoom. Changes the magnification of displays.
Command

Commands are typed in the text field. The Command Zone also retains a
history of previously selected displays. You can return to a display by
choosing from the list. See Entering Commands in the Command Zone on
page 16.

Entering Commands in the Command Zone


When you become familiar with Station, you may find it quicker to enter some commands
in the Command Zone rather than choosing them from menus, or navigating through
several displays.
For example, to call up a display called level1:
1
Click the Command Zone.
2
Type level1 and press <Enter>.
Note In the case of a numbered display, you need to type pag before the page
number, for example: pag301.
For a complete list of Command Zone commands, see Command Reference on
page 134.

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Understanding Stations Layout

Tip

The Command Zone retains a history of the last 20 different commands that you have opened since you
logged on. You can re-enter a display quickly by choosing its command from the alphabetically arranged list.
Note that f you make a typing error when entering a command, you can fix the error by selecting it from the
list, making the correction, then press <Enter>.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Resizing the Station Window


Note You only need to read this topic if you can resize or move the Station
window. (Station may be configured so that it always occupies the full screen.)
To resize the Station window if it is maximized (occupies the full screen):
Click
(Restore) in the top-right of the window.
Move the pointer to the window border or corner.
When the pointer changes to a two-headed arrow, drag it to resize the window. As
you drag, the border moves with the pointer, making the window larger or smaller.

1
2
3

To move the Station window:


Move the pointer over the title bar at the top of the window.
Drag the pointer. As you drag, the window moves with the pointer.

1
2

To minimize the Station window, so that it disappears:


Click
(Minimize) in the top-right of the window.
The only indication that Station is still available is the Station button on the taskbar
at the bottom of the screen):

To restore the Station window to its previous size:


Click the Station button on the task bar.

Zooming in and out


You can zoom in and out of the display to make the display area of the Station window
larger or smaller.
To resize a display:
1
Use the Zoom control on the toolbar to change the magnification of the display.
2
Select View Show Full Page.

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Using your Mouse (or its equivalent)

Using your Mouse (or its equivalent)


In most systems, Station computers are fitted with a mouse that allows you to select objects
on the screen.
Note If you have a specialized device such as a trackball or a touch screen, you
need to read the appropriate set of instructions: Using a Trackball on page 19 or
Using a Touch Screen on page 19.
You use your mouse to perform the following actions:

Selecting. Move the pointer over an object and momentarily press the mouses left
buttonthis action is called clicking.

Displaying object details. Move the pointer over a display object and rapidly press the
mouses left button two timesthis action is called double-clicking.

Tabbing. When you momentarily click the right mouse buttonan action called
right-clickingyou select the next object defined in the tab sequence. (A tab sequence is a
list of objects that you can select. In general, objects that you need to edit or control
are added to the tab sequence so that you can easily select them.)
If you hold down <Shift> when tabbing, you select the previous object in the Tab
sequence.

Using a Trackball
You use a trackball in a similar manner to a mousefor example, rolling the ball forwards
is equivalent to moving the mouse forwards. The functions of the two buttons are identical
to those on a mouse.

Using a Touch Screen


The following table describes how to use a touch screen.
To:

Do this:

Move the pointer

Slide your finger across the screen. The pointer follows


the tip of your finger.

Select an object

Tap the object.

Display an objects details

Quickly tap the object twice.

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Using your Keyboard


You can perform all Station operations using your keyboard.

Using Shortcut Keys


You can quickly access many commands by pressing the appropriate shortcut key. For
example, if you have a standard computer keyboard (with 12 function keys), you can display
the Alarm Summary by pressing <F3>.
To learn about keyboard shortcuts see Keyboard Shortcuts on page 136.

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Using Displays

Using Displays
Stations displays are, in effect, a set of control panels through which you monitor and
control your system.

Understanding System Displays


Station includes many system displays, which are categorized as follows:
Display type

Description

Detail

Provides detailed information about a particular point. This


information includes current values, scanning, history and so
on.

Trend

Graphically displays changes in values, over time, of


one or more variables. Trends can be displayed in
several ways, including lines and barcharts.

Group

Displays various types of information about related


points on a single display.

Summary

Displays information, such as alarms and events, in list


form. You can display more details about an item in the
list by clicking it.

Status

Displays detailed status information about system


equipment, such as controllers and printers.

Configuration

These displays are only used to set up your system. As


an operator, you may need to look at them, but you will
probably not be able to change them.

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Using the Navigation Menu and Pane


The Navigation Menu is the top-level menu that provides a speedy way of calling up system
displays. You call up the menu by clicking the triangle that appears at the top-left of every
system display.

Many system displays also have a Navigation Pane on the left that lists related displays.
Clicking the plus sign next to an entry in the Navigation Pane expands to show a list of
displays. Clicking an entry in the Navigation Pane calls up the associated display.

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Using Displays

Calling up a Display
You can call up a display using any of the following techniques.
If you need to call up Web pages or files such as Microsoft Word documents, see Calling
up a Web Page or File on page 25.

Calling up a Display from a Menu


This example shows how to call up the Event summary:
1
Click the View menu. A list of important system displays appears. (The list also
includes commands).
2
Move the pointer down to Events. A list of event displays appears.
3
Select Event Summary to see the Event summary display.
Note Custom displays are usually listed under a special menu. Ask your supervisor
or an experienced colleague for the menus name, and the purpose of each of the
listed displays.

Calling up a Display from the System Menu


The System Menu is a specialized display that provides quick access to the other major
displays.
To call up a display from the System Menu:
1
Click
(System Menu) on the toolbar to call up the System Menu.
2
Click the button next to the display you want to see.

Calling up a Display from the Toolbar


The toolbar contains several buttons, such as
(System Menu) and
Summary), that quickly call up specialized menus or displays.

(Event

For details of other buttons that call up displays, see Using the Toolbar on page 14.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Calling up a Display from the Command Zone


You can call up a display from the Command Zone providing you know its name or number.
(EBI uses two naming conventions for displays. Some, including many system displays, are
numbered; whereas others, including most custom displays, are named.)
Tip

The title and the name/number of the current display are shown at the top of the Station window. For
example: Channel Status Summary (65) is a numbered display, whereas Search (sysSearch) is a named
display.
To call up a display whose name is primary:
Click the Command Zone.
Type primary and press <Enter>.

1
2

To call up a display whose number is 57:


Click the Command Zone.
Type pag57 and press <Enter>.

1
2

Calling up a Display with a Shortcut Key


You can quickly call up important displays, such as the Alarm Summary by pressing the
appropriate shortcut key. For example, if you have a standard computer keyboard, pressing
<F3> calls up the Alarm Summary.
For a list of shortcut keys, see Keyboard Shortcuts on page 136.

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Using Displays

Calling up a Web Page or File


In addition to calling up displays, you may need to call up Web pages and other files, such as
Microsoft Word documents. Such pages and files typically contain operating procedures.
Note SafeBrowse is the Station feature that allows you to call up Web pages and
files. It may have been configured so that you can only call up authorized Web pages
and files.
To call up a HTML file called, c:\procedures\proc7.htm:
1
Click the Command Zone.
2
Type file://c:\procedures\proc7.htm and press <Enter>.
The following table shows how to call up various types of file/page.
To call up a:

Type:

File

file://c:\procedures\proc7.htm
where c:\procedures\proc7.htm is the full name of a
file.

Web page

http://www.honeywell.com
where www.honeywell.com is the address of a Web site.

FTP Site

ftp://ftp.hsc.com
where ftp.hsc.com is the address of a FTP site.

Printing Station Information


At times you may want to print a snapshot of a display, or whatever else is shown in
Station. In the case of a display, the shapshot shows the displays values and statuses at the
moment you issue the print command.
To print Station details:
1
Select Action Print. A message appears, indicating that the details are being
printed.
Notes:

The Status and Alarm Lines are printed, but not the Message Zone.

If you print a Web page, only the visible portion of the page is printed.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Understanding Display Objects


As you move around the displays, you will notice that they contain discrete items such as
buttons, checkboxes and indicatorsthese are called display objects. The following table
describes the main types of display object.
Display object

Description
Alphanumeric. There are two types of alphanumeric:

Read-only, which displays a numeric value (such as


boiler temperature) or text (a message or status).

Data-entry, which you can edit. For example, if the


alphanumeric represents a points SP (setpoint) such as
boiler temperaturechanging its value will raise/lower
the boilers temperature.

Button. When you click a button, EBI performs a specified


task such as turning off a motor or calling up another display.
Chart. Charts display real-time or historical information
in a graphical manner. Charts can simultaneously
display several types of information, such as the
temperature and pressure of a boiler. Charts can also
display information in the most appropriate form, such
as lines or bars.
If a chart is larger than its window, you can use the
scrollbars to move around the chart. For example, if the
chart is very long, moving the horizontal scroll box to
the left or right moves the chart to the left or right.
Checkbox. When you click a checkbox, you select or
deselect an option. An x in the checkbox indicates
that the option is selected.
Indicator. An indicator gives a visual indication of a
value, relative to its minimum and maximum values.

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Understanding Display Objects

Display object

Description
List. Contains a list of options. You display the list by
clicking the
button, and then select the appropriate
option by clicking it.

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Understanding Alarms and Other Messages


EBI has a control system that generates an appropriate messages, depending on how you
are expected to respond at prescribed times or whenever there is a significant change in
your system. The way in which you respond to a message depends on its type.
For this message type:

Go to:

Alarm. An alarm is generated whenever an abnormal condition occurs.

page 51

Event. An event is any significant change in the system, including any


commands you issue.

page 67

Messages. A message can be generated for many reasons. For example,


when a point goes into alarm, you may receive an explanatory message in
addition to the alarm message. In other cases you may be required to
perform a function before a message can be acknowledged.
Information Only messages need only be acknowledged. They are then
removed from the list of messages.

page 79

Confirmation messages will flash until you confirm that they have been
read.

page 79

Single Signature messages require that you acknowledge the message with
your logon password. You need the appropriate control or security level
to respond to this type of message.

page 29

Double Signature messages. Some highly critical actions may require a


dual signature acknowledgment. Two different individuals, each with the
appropriate control or security level, must acknowledge the message.

page 29

Deadman. A Deadman message is generated at regular intervals, which


you must acknowledge. An alarm is raised if you dont acknowledge the
message within the specified time.

page 122

Note Explanatory messages also appear in the Message Zone when, for example,
you are issuing a command. These messages are informative only, and are not caused
by changes to your system.

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Understanding Electronic Signatures

Understanding Electronic Signatures


As a security measure, certain types of control point changes may require either a single or
double signature confirmation.
When an electronic signature is required, an Electronic Signature dialog box is displayed.
You may, in some cases, need to select a reason for the response or action from a
predefined list. Optionally, you may also add a comment in the dialog box. Note however,
that once you click the Sign button, the reason and comment cannot be modified or
deleted.
For some highly critical actions, two electronic signatures may be needed. In the case of a
double signature requirement, the Electronic Signature dialog box displays two tabs one
for the Primary signature, and the other for the Secondary signature. The minimum control
(or security level) and the area of responsibility required by either signer is displayed under
their respective tabs.

Figure 2.4 Electronic Signatures - dual signature requirement


The secondary signature must be different from the primary signature and must be made
by an individual with the appropriate security level.
See Point Controls Requiring Electronic Signatures on page 34 for additional
information.

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Understanding Points
A point is a collection of information about a particular part of your system. For example, a
point representing a motor would include:

An ID, which uniquely identifies the motor.

A descriptive name, such as Fan cool unit 1.

The current state (off or on).

The desired state. This is applicable if you are allowed to control the point. For
example, if current state of the motor is On you can change the real state of the
motor to Off using the display.

Understanding Point Parameters


Each item of information about a point is called a parameter. The main parameters store:

The current value or state of the point (sometimes referred to as Point Value or PV).

The desired value or state of the point (sometimes referred to as Set Point or SP).

The control state of the point, that is, whether the point is being automatically
controlled or manually controlled (sometimes referred to as Mode or MD).
Not all points will have all of these parameters.

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Controlling Points

Controlling Points
You control your system by controlling points. For example, to turn off a motor, you would
set the appropriate parameter of the associated point to Off .
Note The amount of control you have depends on several factors, including your
security level, and the way in which a point has been configured. There are also
several ways of controlling a point. Consequently, you should ask your supervisor or
an experienced colleague before you attempt to control any point.
In some cases you may be required to provide either a single or a double electronic
signature before making changes to control points. See Understanding Electronic
Signatures on page 29 and Point Controls Requiring Electronic Signatures on page 34.
You can control a point from:

A point detail display

A faceplate, if one has been configured for the point

A custom display
To control a point from

Do this

A point detail display

double-click an associated display objectthis calls up the Point


Detail display for that point. You can then change parameter values.

A faceplate

Click an associated display object, such as an alphanumeric.


The faceplate pops up. You can then change parameter
values.

A custom display

Select an editable associated display object, such as an


alphanumeric.

Example ScenarioChanging the Value of a Point from the Detail Display


You want to switch off a fan for maintenance purposes. The point that controls the fan you
want to switch off is called fan_unit2 and it has the following parameters:

PV, which shows the current value of the point.

OP, which is the parameter you use to control the point.

MD, which shows the control mode of the point.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Solution
1
Double-click an associated display object to call up the Point Detail display for
fan_unit2.
2
If control mode (MD) of the point is set to AUTO, change it to MAN.
3
Change OP to Off.
If the point has failed, you can even disable it by deselecting the Scanning and Control
Enabled checkbox to prevent misleading error messages being generated.
Example ScenarioChanging the Value of a Point from a Display
You want to change the temperature of a room. The point that controls the room
temperature is called room1_temp. The point has the following parameters:

PV, which shows the current temperature

SP, which you use to change the temperature


You are currently viewing a display which graphically shows the room as well as labeled
alphanumeric display objects for the parameters.
Solution
1
Select the alphanumeric that shows the SP. (The object is editable if the value appears
in reverse video when you select it.)
Tip

Information about the point, including its ID, appears in the Message Zone.
Change the value by either:

Typing the new value and pressing <Enter>.

Clicking toolbar buttons. Clicking


(Raise) or
(Lower). Each time you
click the button the value increases/decreases by a small amount.

Example ScenarioChanging the Value of a Point from a Faceplate


You want to turn on the lights in the south west corner of level one in your building. The
point that controls these lights is called Level1SWLights. The point has the following
parameters:

Value, which shows the current status of the point, that is whether the lights are on or
off.

Mode, which shows the control mode of the point.


A faceplate has been created for this point.
Solution
Click an associated display object to call up the faceplate for Level1SWLights.
Change Mode to Manual.
Change Value to On.

1
2
3

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Controlling Points

Disabling a Point
You typically need to disable a point if the associated device is being serviced or repaired
this prevents misleading alarms being generated. (When you disable a point, EBI stops
gathering information about that point.)
Note

Not all point types can be disabled in this manner.

To disable a point:
Select an editable display object associated with the pointfor example, an
alphanumeric that shows the PV. (The object is editable if the value appears in
reverse video when you select it.)
Information about the point, including its ID, appears in the Message Zone.
2
Click
(Enable/Disable).
1

Tip

The points parameters turn gray to indicate that the point is disabled.
To enable a disabled point:
1
Select an editable display object associated with the pointfor example, an
alphanumeric that shows the PV. (The object is editable if the value appears in
reverse video when you select it.)
Information about the point, including its ID, appears in the Message Zone.
2
Click
(Enable/Disable).

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2 Understanding the Basics

Point Controls Requiring Electronic Signatures


Certain point control operations may require either single or double signatures before they
can be made.
If a single signature is needed, you must have the appropriate control level to perform the
task. A control level can be any number from 0 to 255. Only an operator who has a control
level that is equal to or higher than the point's control level can control that point. When
you attempt to make a change to a point, the minimum control or security level required is
shown in the Electronic Signature dialog box. If a secondary signer is also required, the
dialog box will contain two tabs, one for each of the signers. The required security level of
the second signer is shown in the Secondary signature tab.
To sign with a single electronic signature:
1
When the Electronic Signature dialog box is displayed, select a predefined reason
from the Reasons list (if applicable).
2
Enter your user name if required.
3
Enter your password in the Electronic Signature dialog box.
4
Enter your domain, if required.
5
Enter any additional information under Comments.
6
Click OK.
A confirmation is sent to the controller and the change takes place. An event is
generated recording your name and other information about the action, such as date
and time.
To sign with a double electronic signature:
When the Electronic Signature dialog box is displayed, select a predefined reason
from the Reasons list (if applicable) in the Primary signature tab.
2
Enter your user name, if required.
3
Enter your password.
4
Enter your domain, if required.
5
Enter any additional information under Comments.
6
Click Sign.
Your signature is locked in and cannot be changed.
7
Click the Secondary signature tab.
The secondary signer must have a different user name from the primary signer and
must have the a security level equal to or higher than level displayed in the Secondary
signature tab.
1

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Point Controls Requiring Electronic Signatures

8
9
10

The secondary signer enters their user name, domain and password.
Any additional information, if required, is added in Comments.
Click OK.
A confirmation is sent to the controller the change is made. Events are generated
recording the names of the signers together with other details.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Searching for System Items


You search for system itemssuch as points, operators and Stationsusing the
(Detail/Search) toolbar button.
Note You use
(Search Cardholder) to search for cardholders or cards. See
Searching for a Cardholder or Card on page 45.

Using the Search Display


Notes

Each search is restricted to one type of item, such as points, operators or Stations.

If you enter only the first part of the name in your search, EBI will find all matching
items of the specified type. For example, Floor1 will find Floor1MainDoor,
Floor1SideDoor and so on.

You can use wildcard characters (* and ?) in your search. An asterisk (*) represents
one or more unknown characters, whereas a question mark (?) represents one
unknown character. For example:

*Door will find all points that end with Door, such as Floor1MainDoor,
Level2SideDoor and so on.

Floor?MainDoor will find points Floor1MainDoor, Floor2MainDoor


and so on.
To use the Search display:
1
Click the
toolbar button to call up the Search display.

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Searching for System Items

Figure 2.5 Search Display


2
3

Select the type of item you are searching for in Search in.
Type the item name (or the first part of it) in For and then click the Go button.
If your search finds only one item, its details are displayed.
If your search finds more than one item, they are listed in Search Results display. Click
an item to see its details.

Searching from the Command Zone


You can search from the Command Zone regardless of what is currently displayed;
however, the search is not limited to a specific item type.
To search from the Command Zone:
1
Click the Command Zone.
2
Type the item name (or the first part of it) and then click the
toolbar button.
If your search finds only one item, its details are displayed.
If your search finds more than one item, they are listed in Search Results display. Click
an item to see its details.

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2 Understanding the Basics

Getting Help
You can display an online version of this guide by choosing Help Operators Guide.
Tip

38

If you have not used online documentation before, click the Help Me! button at the top of the guides
window.

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Understanding and Managing


Access Control
Access control involves controlling and monitoring employee and visitor access
to your building or site, or specific parts of it, at different times of the day or
night.
Everyone is issued with a card which they present to card readers before
attempting to enter restricted areas. The card reader only grants access (by, for
example, unlocking a door) if the cardholder has the required access rights.
In general, EBI performs its access control functions without the need for operator
intervention. However, there are several tasks you do have to perform, such as responding
to access events.
Note Some access control functions are optional. Ask your supervisor or
an experienced colleague for the list of options applicable to your system.

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3 Understanding and Managing Access Control

Understanding Zones, Time Periods and Access Levels


In order to understand how EBI controls a cardholders access, you need to understand the
relationship between Zones, Time Periods and Access Levels.

Zones
A zone represents a physical space that is totally enclosed by card readers. This
means that to enter a zone, you must use your access card at a card reader, which
then allows you to enter that zone.
The following figure shows a floor layout with two zones: Human Resources
and Pay Office.
Note that in order to get into the Pay Office, you need to use your card two
times: first to get into Human Resources, and then to get into the Pay
Office.

Lobby
Card Reader

Human Resources

Card Reader
Pay Office

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Understanding Zones, Time Periods and Access Levels

Time Periods
A time period represents a specified set of times, during which associated cardholders have
access to the required zones.
For example, there might be two time periods:
Time period

Access allowed

Standard

Monday to Saturday (excluding holidays)


7:00am to 9:00pm

Payroll

Monday to Friday (including holidays)


8:30am to 5:00pm

Access Levels
An access level represents a collection of one or more zone/time period pairs. For
example, the following access levels may be defined:
Access level

Details

Staff

Consists of only one zone/time period pair:

Pay

Human Resources (zone), and Standard (time period)

Consists of two zone/time period pairs:

Human Resources (zone), and Payroll (time period)

Pay Office (zone), and Payroll (time period)

Using the above examples, a card belonging to:

An ordinary staff member would have the Staff access level.

A payroll officer would have the Pay access level.


(In more complex security systems, a card may be assigned up to eight access
levels.)

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3 Understanding and Managing Access Control

Understanding How EBI Controls Doors


Controlling and monitoring access requires several devices in addition to a card
reader. The following figure and table describe the devices typically used to
control access through a door.

Door status switch

Lock

Exit switch (other side of the door)

Card reader

Figure 3.1 Door Control Devices

Device

Associated point

Card Reader. Unlocks the door


if a valid card is presented.

An access point monitors card usage, reporting events


such as access granted and access denied.
You use this point to obtain details about card usage.
For example, you would request a report on this point
to find out when a particular cardholder has passed
through the door.

Lock

A status point that controls the lock.


Normally, the point is controlled by the card reader.
However, you control it when you unlock the door for visitors,
or for staff who have forgotten their cards. See Unlocking a
Door on page 43.

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Understanding How EBI Controls Doors

Device

Associated point

Door status switch

A status point monitors the doors open/closed status.


For example, it raises an open too long alarm if
someone holds the door open longer than allowed.

Exit switch. If fitted, people must


press it before leaving a zone.

A status point monitors the status of the Exit switch.


Pressing the switch prevents an alarm being raised
when opening the door.

Point Naming Conventions


Because the points are related, they are generally named in a manner that helps
you identify the door as well as the points function. For example, the points for
the main door might be named as follows:

MAINDR-DS for the door status switch

MAINDR-RD for the card reader

MAINDR-LK for the door lock


The naming convention makes it easier for you to perform tasks. For example, if
you need to unlock a door, you would unlock the doors LK point.
You need to ask your supervisor or an experienced colleague for the point
naming conventions used on your system.

Unlocking a Door
This procedure describes a typical way of unlocking a door. (The steps you need
to perform may vary. Ask your supervisor or an experienced colleague for
precise instructions.)
To unlock a door:
1
Call up the display that shows the door (typically a customized display
showing a floor plan).
2
Double-click the doors lock point to call up the Point Detail display for that
display.
3
Change the OP (output) value to Unlock.

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3 Understanding and Managing Access Control

Managing Cardholders
Note This guide only covers basic cardholder management tasks. For
details about advanced tasks, such maintaining the cardholder database and
adding photographs to cards, see the Access Control and Security Guide.
You manage cardholders from the Cardholder Management display. To call up
the display, click the
(Cardholder Menu) toolbar button. (Alternatively,
click Cardholder Management on the System Menu.)

Figure 3.2 Cardholder Management Display

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Managing Cardholders

Searching for a Cardholder or Card


To search for a cardholder or a card:
1
On the Cardholder Management display, click Search for Cardholders or
Cards to call up the Search display. (Alternatively click the
(Search
Cardholder) toolbar button from any display.)

Figure 3.3 Search Display


2

Select Cardholders or Cards from Search in. (You can ignore the other
options in the list.)

Tip

Click Advanced Search to see other fields that you can use to narrow your search.
3
Enter the relevant details.

Tip

If you do not know a cardholders exact name, type the first part of it. For example, if you type Thom, you
will find Thompson and Thomas.
4
Click the Go button to perform your search.
The cards/cardholders that match your search criteria appear in the Navigation Pane.
Also, the details of the first card/cardholder appear on the right.
5
Click the appropriate card/cardholder to see the details.

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3 Understanding and Managing Access Control

Figure 3.4 Typical Cardholder Details

Performing a Quick Search


If you know the card number or the cardholders name, you can quickly perform a search,
regardless of what is currently displayed.
To perform a quick search:
1
Click the Command Zone.
2
Type the number or name and press <F11> (or click the

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toolbar button).

Managing a Building
EBI manages your building-related systems, such as HVAC (heating, ventilation and
air-conditioning) and lighting, in an automated manner, based on pre-defined schedules.
There is little need for operator intervention, except for routine tasks, such as
downloading new schedules or requesting routine reports.
You control EBIs building management functions from the Building Management
Configuration display. To call up the display, click Building Management on the
System Menu or click the
(Building Management) toolbar button.
Note This guide only covers basic building management tasks, such as
modifying a schedule or producing a report. For details about advanced
tasks, such configuring a controller, see the Building Management Guide.

Figure 4.1 Building Management Configuration Display

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4 Managing a Building

Understanding Global Schedules


A global schedule is a schedule that you simultaneously download to a group of
related controllers, such as controllers on a particular floor or section of a
building. In an office building, for example, you could use one global schedule to
provide uniform control of the lighting and air conditioning to all floors occupied
by a particular tenant.
To see the list of global schedules:
Click System Configuration on the System Menu to call up the System
Configuration display.
2
Click Global Schedules to call up the Global Schedules display.
If a schedule has been modified and needs downloading, a download
required indication appears under Download Status.
1

Figure 4.2 Global Schedules Display


3

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To download:

All modified schedules, click the Download Modified button.

All schedules regardless of whether they have been modified, click the
Download All button.

Monitoring Fire Panels


You only need to read this topic if Fire Monitoring appears on the System Menu.
Note This guide only describes how to call up the status displays
associated with fire panels. It does not describe, for example, how to start a fire drill
or how to evacuate a building. For details of these procedures see the Building
Management Guide.
EBI monitors your fire panels, and raises an appropriate alarm whenever a fire panel raises
an alarm.
To monitor the status of the fire panels:
1
Click the
(System Menu) toolbar button to call up the System Menu.
2
Click Fire Monitoring to call up the Fire Monitoring display.

Figure 5.1 Fire Monitoring Display


3

To check the status of the:

Channels, click the XLS Channel Status button

Panels, click the XLS Panel Status button

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5 Monitoring Fire Panels

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Responding to Alarms
An alarm is generated whenever an abnormal condition or security breach occurs. Alarms
are typically associated with pointsfor example, the value of an analog point representing
a temperature sensor, may be above or below the acceptable range. Alarms may also be
generated when any important event occurs, such as a communications failure.
Note The Alarm field in the Status Line flashes red if there are any
unacknowledged alarms.

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6 Responding to Alarms

The Alarm Summary


Alarms are listed on the Alarm Summary, which provides a one-line description
of each alarm.
To call up the Alarm Summary:
1
Click the
(Alarm Summary) toolbar button. (Alternatively, select View
Alarms from the menu).

Figure 6.1 Alarm Summary


The following table describes the default alarm line items, starting from the left. When a
function is disabled, the original icon shape is retained, but the symbol changes to a minus
sign and its color changes to grey.
Note The alarm colors described below are the default alarm colors. Your system
may use custom alarm colors.

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The Alarm Summary

Alarm line item

Description

Disabled

Red and flashing: the alarm is urgent priority,


unacknowledged and the cause of the alarm still exists.
Red and not flashing: the alarm is urgent priority,
acknowledged and the cause of the alarm still exists.
Inverse color and flashing: the alarm is urgent priority,
unacknowledged and the cause that generated the
alarm no longer exists.
Yellow and flashing: the alarm is high priority,
unacknowledged and the cause of the alarm still exists.
Yellow and not flashing: the alarm is high priority,
acknowledged and the cause of the alarm still exists.
Inverse color and flashing: the alarm is high priority,
unacknowledged and the cause that generated the
alarm no longer exists.
Cyan and flashing: the alarm is low priority,
unacknowledged and the cause of the alarm still exists.
Cyan and not flashing: the alarm is low priority,
acknowledged and the cause of the alarm still exists.
Inverse color and flashing: the alarm is low priority,
unacknowledged and the cause that generated the
alarm no longer exists.
The alarm is urgent priority, has been responded to and
the cause of the alarm still exists.
The alarm is urgent priority, has been responded to, the
cause of the alarm no longer exists and is waiting to be
reset.
The alarm is high priority, has been responded to and
the cause of the alarm still exists.
The alarm is high priority, has been responded to, the
cause of the alarm no longer exists and is waiting to be
reset.
The alarm is low priority, has been responded to and
the cause of the alarm still exists.
The alarm is low priority, has been responded to, the
cause of the alarm no longer exists and is waiting to be
reset.

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6 Responding to Alarms

Alarm line item

Description
Ghost alarm (Faceplates and Point Detail Displays). An
unacknowledged alarm exists for the point and the
cause that generated the alarm no longer exists.

Time

The time and date at which the alarm was received.

Area

The area to which the point or device belongs.

Source

The point or device that caused the alarm.


If the point ID is too long to be fully displayed in the
alarm summary, it is truncated. To see the full name
place the mouse pointer over the partial point ID to
display the full point ID.

Condition

The alarm condition.

Priority

The priority of the alarm. The prefix letter indicates the


general priority:

Urgent

High

Low

If a number follows the letter, it represents the relative


priority within the general priority. For example, Urgent
alarms can vary from U15 (most urgent) to U00 (least
urgent).
Description

A description of the alarm.


If the description is too long to be fully displayed in the
alarm summary, it is truncated. To see the full
description place the mouse pointer over the partial
description to display the full description.

Value

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The value that triggered the alarm.

Disabled

Changing What is Shown in the Alarm Summary

Changing What is Shown in the Alarm Summary


Note

Depending on your security privileges, you may not be able to filter and sort the Alarm
Summary. The options that are not available to you are disabled and appear grayed out.
By default, the Alarm Summary shows all alarms, with the newest alarm at the top. You can
change the Alarm Summary by applying filters and sorting the summary.
Filtering the Alarm Summary allows you to show alarms that match the filter criteria and
hide alarms that do not match the filter criteria. For example, you can filter the Alarm
Summary to show alarms of a particular priority only, or you can filter the Alarm Summary
to show alarms for a particular area only. You can filter the Alarm Summary by any column
in the summary.
An easy way to filter the summary is to perform a like currently selected filter. For
example, if you want to see all alarms for a particular point. You can select an alarm for the
particular point, click the Source column and select (like currently selected). The Alarm
Summary is filtered to show all alarms in the summary that match the source of the
currently selected alarm.
Sorting allows you to set the order in which alarms appear in the summary. The sort order
can be ascending or descending. For example, you can sort alarms by date and time, in
ascending order. This means that alarms are listed in order of ascending date and time, that
is, the oldest alarm is listed at the top of the summary.
You can apply more than one filter at a time and you can also filter and sort at the same
time. When the Alarm Summary is filtered or sorted, the column by which you are filtering
or sorting is highlighted.
To filter the Alarm Summary:
Call up the Alarm Summary display
Click the column heading you want to filter by.
Select the filter you want to apply.

1
2
3

Example Scenario
You want to filter the Alarm Summary so that you see unacknowledged alarms of high
priority only.
Solution
Call up the Alarm Summary display.
Click the Priority column and select High.
Click the Alarm State column and select Unacknowledged.

1
2
3

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6 Responding to Alarms

The Alarm Summary changes to list unacknowledged alarms of high priority only.
To sort the Alarm Summary
1
Call up the Alarm Summary display
2
Click the column heading you want to sort by.
3
Select the sort order.
Example Scenario
You want to sort the Alarm Summary so that alarms are sorted in ascending order by area.
Solution
Call up the Alarm Summary display.
Click the Area column.
Select Sort Ascending.

1
2
3

The Alarm Summary changes to list alarms in ascending order according to the area.
To remove filtering:

Click Clear all Filters.


Tip

To revert to the default setting (removing all filtering and sort in descending time order), load the All
Alarms view (see Using Views on page 56 for details).

Using Views
You can change how information is displayed in the Alarm Summary by applying a
different view. A view contains the information about filtering and sorting, which alarm
line items are shown, the order they are shown in and the space provided for each item.
Figure 6.1, Alarm Summary on page 52 shows the default Alarm Summary.
There are several predefined views. These are:

Unacknowledged alarms; shows only unacknowledged alarms

Urgent alarms; shows only urgent alarms

Urgent and high alarms; shows only urgent and high alarms
There may be other views that have been configured for your system. Ask your supervisor
or an experienced colleague about other views and what information they display in the
Alarm Summary.
To apply a view:
Click the view list
Select the view from the list

1
2

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Changing What is Shown in the Alarm Summary

Using the Area Pane


The area pane provides a list of areas to which you have access. You can use the area pane
to filter the Alarm Summary to show alarms for a particular area only.
The area pane also provides a summary of the number of alarms in each area.
To display the area pane use either method:

Click the Show Area Pane icon

Click the Area list and click the Push Pin to dock the area pane
To hide the area pane use either method:

Click the Hide Area Pane icon

Click the Close icon in the Area Pane

Using the Details Pane


The Details pane shows the details of the currently selected alarm. If no alarm is selected,
the details pane is empty.
If the selected alarm is for a point, the details pane also provides links to the point detail
display and associated display.
To show or hide the Details pane:

Click the Details pane icon

Navigating the Alarm Summary


There are several ways to scroll the list of alarms on the Alarm Summary. You can:

Use your mouse and click on the scroll bar

Use your mouse wheel (if your mouse has one)

Use the Up and Down arrow keys on your keyboard

Press the <Page Up> and <Page Down> keys to scroll a page at a time

Press the <Home> key to go to the first alarm in the summary

Press the <End> key to go to the last alarm in the summary


Tip

If you want to use your keyboard keys or mouse wheel to scroll the Alarm Summary, you need click your
mouse in the summary grid to give it focus.

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6 Responding to Alarms

Pausing the Alarm Summary


You can pause the Alarm Summary to make it easier to read if alarms are occurring in rapid
succession. When the Alarm Summary is paused no new alarms are added to the summary,
however you can still acknowledge alarms and filter and sort the summary. Alarms that are
acknowledged or returned to normal while the summary is paused are shown with a
strikethrough.
To pause the Alarm Summary:

On the Alarm Summary display click Pause.

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Acknowledging Alarms

Acknowledging Alarms
In most systems, Station produces an alarm tone when a new alarm occurs. (Your system
may be configured not to do this.)
There are several ways of silencing or acknowledging alarms:
To:

Do this:

Silence the tone

Either:

Acknowledge a particular
alarm on the Alarm Summary

Acknowledge all alarms


currently visible on the Alarm
Summary

Click the
button.

(Alarm Acknowledge) toolbar

Press the appropriate keysee Keyboard Shortcuts on


page 136.

Either:

Select the alarm and click the


Acknowledge) toolbar button.

(Alarm

Right-click then select Acknowledge.

Click the Acknowledge Page button on the display.


Note that if there are any more unacknowledged alarms
in the list, you first have to display them before clicking
the Acknowledge Page button again.

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6 Responding to Alarms

Adding Comments to an Alarm


If required, you can add comments to alarms in the Alarm Summary. For example, you
might need to keep a record of your actions in response to an alarm.
To add a comment to an alarm:
1
Select the alarm to which you want to add a comment.
2
If the Details Pane is not visible, click the Show Details Pane button.
3
Select the Comments tab.
Any existing comments that are added to the alarm are displayed.
4
Type in your comment and click Save Comments.

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Viewing an Alarm Video Clip

Viewing an Alarm Video Clip


If your EBI has the Digital Video Manager installed as part of the system, you will be able
to view any video clip that may be linked with an alarm or event.
A video icon in the first column of the Alarm Summary indicates that a video clip is linked
to the alarm.
To:

Do this:

View the video clip

Either:

Double-click the
video clip icon associated
with the alarm listed in the summary.

Select the alarm in the Alarm Summary that contains


the video clip, then click the Associated Video link
on the Details pane.

Right click the alarm and select Associated Video


from the menu.

The video clip associated with the alarm will be displayed in a popup window.

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6 Responding to Alarms

Alarm Management Options


You may have one of two types of alarm management optionsyour supervisor or an
experienced colleague will know which type you use. If you use:

Three-stage Alarm Handling, see Using Three-stage Alarm Handling on page 62.

Structured Response Management, see Using Structured Response Management on


page 63.

Using Three-stage Alarm Handling


Note With Three-stage Alarm Handling, you cannot respond to an alarm until the
point that caused the alarm has returned to the non-alarm state.
Responding to an alarm involves the following stages:
1
Acknowledging the alarm
2
Following the appropriate set of instructions
3
Responding to the alarm
To acknowledge and respond to an alarm:
Acknowledge the alarmsee Acknowledging Alarms on page 59.
The Alarm Instructions display appears, which contains instructions for dealing with
that alarm.

Figure 6.2 Typical Alarm Instructions Display

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Alarm Management Options

2
3
4

Click the Acknowledge button to complete the acknowledgment task.


Follow the procedures listed on the Alarm Instruction display.
After you have carried out the instructions, click the Respond button.
The Alarm Response display appears, which lists a number of standard responses.

Figure 6.3 Typical Alarm Response Display


5

Click the Accept Response button that best describes what you actually did.
Alternatively, if you responded in a non-standard manner, type an appropriate note in
the Operator Definable Response field, and then click its Accept Response
button. (It is good practice to keep the note short because only the first 30 characters
appear in the Event Summary.)

Using Structured Response Management


With Structured Response Management, responding to an alarm involves:
1
Following the alarm instructions for the alarm.
2
Acknowledging the alarm.
3
Entering your response to the alarm.
4
Resetting the alarm to remove it from the Alarm Summary.

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To acknowledge an alarm:
1
Acknowledge the alarmsee Acknowledging Alarms on page 59.
The Alarm Instruction display appears, which contains instructions for dealing with
that alarm.

Figure 6.4 Typical Alarm Instructions Display


2
3
4

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Click the Acknowledge button to complete the acknowledgment task.


Follow the procedures listed on the Alarm Instruction display.
After you have carried out the instructions, click the Respond button.
The Alarm Response display appears, which lists a number of standard responses.

Alarm Management Options

Figure 6.5 Typical Alarm Response Display


5

Click the Accept Response button that best describes what you actually did.
Alternatively, if you responded in a non-standard manner, enter an appropriate note
in the Operator Definable Response field, and then click its Accept Response
button. (It is good practice to keep the note short because only the first 30 characters
appear in the Event Summary.)
In the Alarm Summary, the alarm icon changes to an asterisk (*) as described in the
section The Alarm Summary on page 52.
Click the Reset button on the Alarm Instruction display when the point that raised
the alarm has returned to its normal state.

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6 Responding to Alarms

Using the Alarm Banner


This topic is only applicable if your system has been configured to use an Alarm Banner.
The Alarm Banner can contain up to five alarms, and you can move it to wherever you
want on the screen. You can perform the same alarm management tasks using the Alarm
Banner as you can using the Alarm Summary.
To open the Alarm Banner, click the

(Alarm Banner) button on the toolbar.

If you want the Alarm Banner to always be visible, click the


will close when you call up another display.

(Push Pin)otherwise, it

Acknowledging Alarms
To acknowledge:

Do this:

A particular alarm

Either:

All alarms currently visible in the


Alarm Banner

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Select the alarm and click the


button.

(Alarm Acknowledge)

Right-click the alarm then select Acknowledge Alarm.

Click the Acknowledge Pane button.


If there are additional alarms, use the scroll bar to display
them.

Responding to Events
An event is any significant change in the system, and includes alarms and
operator actions.
To call up the Events display:
1
Select View Events Event Summary to see the list of events. (Alternatively,
click Events on the System Menu.)
Events are listed in chronological order, starting with the most recent event.
The display is automatically updated, which means that each new event
appears at the top of the list.

Figure 7.1 Events Summary Display


2

Tip

If you want stop new events from being added to the displaythis makes it easier to
read if events are occurring in rapid successionchange the Date & Time filters
from All Recent Events - Live to Today (snapshot). For details on using filters, see
Changing What is Shown in the Event Summary on page 68.

If the point ID or Description has been truncated, move your mouse pointer over the point ID or description
to display the full point ID or description.

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7 Responding to Events

Changing What is Shown in the Event Summary


Note

Depending on your security privileges, you may not be able to filter and sort the Event
Summary. The options that are not available to you are disabled and appear grayed out.
By default, the Event Summary shows a live summary of events. That is, current events
in the system database, with the newest events at the top.

Using Views
You can change how information displayed in the Event Summary by applying a different
view. A view contains the information about filtering and sorting, which event line items
are shown, the order they are shown in and the space provided for each item.
There are three predefined views. These are:

(all recent events with live updates)shows events as they are occurring.

(all todays events snapshot)shows all events that occurred today up until the view
was applied.

(all recent access events with live updates)shows all access-related events as they
are occurring.
There may be other views that have been configured for your system. Ask your supervisor
or an experienced colleague about other views and what information they display in the
Events Summary.
You can change the Event Summary to show all events for the current day and for each of
the last seven days. When you view events for the current day, you can manually update the
summary to show events as they are moved to the online archive.
Filtering the Event Summary allows you to show events that match the filter criteria and
hide events that do not match the filter criteria. For example, you can filter the Event
Summary to show events that occurred on a particular day, or you can filter the Event
Summary to show events for a particular area only.
Sorting allows you to set the order in which events appear in the summary. The sort order
can be ascending or descending. For example, you can sort events by date and time, in
ascending order. This means that events are listed in order of ascending date and time, that
is, the oldest event is listed at the top of the summary.
You can apply more than one filter at a time and you can also filter and sort at the same
time. When the Event Summary is filtered or sorted, the column by which you are filtering
or sorting is highlighted.

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Changing What is Shown in the Event Summary

Tip

When viewing the live events from the temporary event file (all recent events with live updates) you can only
filter on the Area, Priority and Category columns. All other filter menus are disabled. If you want to filter
on the other columns you need to change the Date & Time filter to something other than (all recent events live).
To filter the Event Summary:
1
Call up the Event Summary display
2
Click the column heading you want to filter by.
3
Select the filter you want to apply.
Example Scenario
You want to filter the Event Summary so that you see events that occurred yesterday.
Solution
1
Call up the Event Summary display.
2
Click the Date column and select Yesterday. The summary changes to show all
events that occurred yesterday.
The Event Summary changes to show events that occurred yesterday only.
Considerations

You cannot sort the live Event Summary display.


To sort the Event Summary
1
Call up the Event Summary display.
2
Click the column heading you want to sort by.
Note that you can only sort by Date & Time and Source.
3
Select the sort order.
Example Scenario
You want to sort the Events Summary so that events are listed in ascending order
according to point ID (0-9, A-Z).
Solution
1
Call up the Event Summary display.
2
Click the Source column.
3
Select Sort Ascending.
The Event Summary changes to list events in ascending order according to the point ID.
To remove filtering and sorting:

Click Clear All Filters.

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Adding Comments to an Event


If required, you can add comments to events in the Event Summary. For example, you
might need to keep a record of your actions in response to an event.
To add a comment to an event:
1
Select the event to which you want to add a comment.
2
If the Details Pane is not visible, click the Show Details Pane button.
3
Select the Comments tab.
Any existing comments that are added to the event are displayed.
4
Type in your comment and click Save Comments.

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Viewing an Event Video Clip

Viewing an Event Video Clip


If your EBI has the Digital Video Manager installed as part of the system, you will be able
to view any video clip that may be linked with an alarm or event.
A video icon in the first column of the Event Summary indicates that a video clip is linked
to the event.
To:

Do this:

View the video clip

Either:

Double-click the
video clip icon associated
with the event in the summary list.

Select the event in the Event Summary that contains


the video clip, then click the Associated Video link
on the Event Summary display.

Right-click the event and select Associated Video


from the menu.

The video clip associated with the event will be displayed in a popup window.

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Adding an Operator Recorded Event


If you notice an event (such as a safety issue) that is not recorded by the system, but that
you want included in the Event Summary, EBI allows you to manually record that event
into the system. Information, such as your user identification, date and time, and event
category are automatically stored with the newly created event.
For ease in filtering, your comments are generated as a special type of operator-added event
that can be selected as a sort criteria when events are displayed.

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To:

Do this:

Manually add an event to the


Event Summary

Either:

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Click the Generate Event button


on the
toolbar, then enter the comment into the message
zone.

Click the Generate Event button on the Event


Summary display, then enter your comment into the
message zone.

Responding to Access Events

Responding to Access Events


If you are responsible for security, you can call up a list of access-related events, such as
card accesses and denials at various readers throughout the system.
To call up a list of access events:
1
Select View Event Summary.
2
On the Event Summary select the predefined view (all recent access events with live
updates).
Initially, each event occupies a single line and shows, card number, door point ID,
names, and so forth.

Figure 7.2 Access Event Summary Display


3
4

If you want to see more details about each event, such as the door descriptor, select
the Full details checkbox.
If you want to freeze the displaythis makes it easier to read if events are occurring
in rapid successionclick the Pause button. (Click the Resume button to unfreeze
the display, and return it to its automatic update mode.)
If you want to see all events, select the predefined view (all recent events with live
update).

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Using Event Archiving


Ask your supervisor or an experienced colleague whether you system is licensed for Event
Archiving.
Event Archiving periodically captures events from the event journal and places them into
an event database, where they can be used for reporting and diagnostic purposes.
Depending on how your system is set up, events are automatically archived at specified
intervals, or an alarm is generated to alert you of the need to archive.
EBI provides a playback facility, so that you can run reports on events that have been
restored from archives.
As a security measure, you can use the EBI tampering alert feature to raise an alarm if any
event record is changed or altered in any way after it is captured.
To call up the Event Archiving Operations display:
1
Select View Events Event Archiving.

Figure 7.3 Event Archiving Operations Display


2

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You can now:


a)
Archive the events by clicking the Archive Now buttonsee Archiving
Events on page 76.
b) Check for tampering of event recordssee Checking Event Records for
Tampering on page 76.

Using Event Archiving

c)
d)
e)

Restore archived events by clicking the Restore buttonsee Restoring


Archived Events on page 76.
Remove restored archives by clicking the Remove button. The Remove button
appears when you have restored archives.
View the status of events collection and archiving.

Event Collection and Archive Status


The Event Archiving Operations display shows the current event collection and archiving
status, as described in the following table.
Status

Description

Event Archiving status

Shows the current status of events collection and


archiving. For a description of each status see the table
below.

Current event rate

Hourly average calculated on the previous 24 hours. Is


updated every hour.

Last archived

The last date and time that an archive ran.

Next archive scheduled for

The date and time of the next schedule archive.


Calculated using the last archive date and time and the
configured schedule.

The following table describes each possible archive status.


Archive status

Description

OK

Event Archiving is working normally.

Overload

Events are occurring so frequently that Event Archiving


is not able to capture them in a timely way. If you see
this status, refer the problem to your supervisor.

Failed

Events collection has failed.

Full Disk

There is not enough disk space to continue events


collection. Events collection is stopped until there is
sufficient disk space available.

Copy Mode

This is only applicable to a redundant system after


recovery from failure. Event Archiving is disabled while
the primary extended events database is being copied
off-line to the backup server.

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Archiving Events
Use the following procedure if:

Your system is not configured to automatically archive events

You want to archive events before the next scheduled archive


Considerations:

You can archive events to FileSystem, which may be a folder on the server disk itself
or on an available network fileserver.
To archive events to FileSystem:
1
Click the Archive Now button.
2
Type Y (for yes) at the confirmation prompt.

Restoring Archived Events


Occasionally, you may need to restore archived events from tape so that you can access
them.
Considerations

When restoring archives from FileSystem, use a UNC path rather than mapping a
drive to your local computer. For example, use \\myserver\archive instead of
f:\.
To restore archived events:
1
Click the Restore button.
2
Type Y (for yes) at the confirmation prompt. The Restore dialog box opens.
3
Select the required .dat file.
4
Click Open.

Checking Event Records for Tampering


Information about events is stored in your database in an encrypted format. As a security
measure, EBI can detect if any changes have been attempted or made to this data that is not
a part of the systems normal operation. EBI can be set up to automatically check all events
in the database before they are archived. Alternatively, if you have the appropriate security
level, you can also use the Check for Tampering button on the Event Archiving
Operations display to check the entire event database for tampering on an on-demand
basis. In either case, if tampering is detected, an alarm is raised.

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Using Event Archiving

If you use the Check for Tampering button to verify that the systems electronic records
are secure, you are prompted with a message alerting you that this could be a
time-consuming process, depending on the size of your databases.

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Responding to Messages
Messages are generated for many reasons. For example, when a point goes into
alarm, you may receive an explanatory message in addition to the alarm. Other
types of messages may also give you a set of procedures you are to perform, or
list some actions you must take before the message can be acknowledged.
There are two types of messages:

Informationalappear in the summary with an i icon.


When you acknowledge an informational message, it is removed from the
summary.

Confirmable (not currently used by EBI systems)appear in the summary with a c


icon.
When you acknowledge a flashing confirmable message it changes to a
static state. When confirmed, the message is removed from the summary.
Note The Message field in the Status Line flashes green if there are any
unacknowledged messages.
To call up the Message Summary, and acknowledge new messages:
1
Select View Message Summary.

Figure 8.1 Message Summary Display

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8 Responding to Messages

Changing What is Shown in the Message Summary


Note

Depending on your security privileges, you may not be able to filter and sort the Message
Summary. The options that are not available to you are disabled and appear grayed out.
By default, the Message Summary shows all messages, with the newest message at the top.
You can change the Message Summary by applying views, filters and sorting the summary.

Using Views
A view contains the information about filtering and sorting, which message line items are
shown, the order they are shown in and the space provided for each item.
The following views are predefined:

(all messages)shows all messages

(confirmable messages)shows confirmable messages only (not used on EBI


systems)

(informational messages)shows informational messages only


Your system may be set up with site-specific views. Ask your supervisor or an experienced
colleague about other views and what information they display in the Message Summary.
To apply a view:
1
Click the view list
2
Select the view from the list

Filtering and Sorting the Message Summary


Filtering the Message Summary allows you to show messages that match the filter criteria
and hide messages that do not match the filter criteria. For example, you can filter the
Message Summary to show messages of the type informational only.
Sorting allows you to set the order in which messages appear in the summary. The sort
order can be ascending or descending. For example, you can sort messages by date and
time, in ascending order. This means that messages are listed in order of ascending date and
time, that is, the oldest message is listed at the top of the summary.

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You can apply more than one filter at a time and you can also filter and sort at the same
time. When the Message Summary is filtered, the column by which you are filtering is
highlighted. When the Message Summary is sorted, the column by which you are sorting
has an up arrow to indicate Sort Ascending and a down arrow to indicate Sort Descending.
An easy way to filter the summary is to perform a like currently selected filter. For
example, if you want to see all messages for a particular point. You can select the message
for the particular point, click the Source column and select (like currently selected). The
Message Summary is filtered to show all messages in the summary that match the source of
the currently selected message.
To filter the Message Summary:
Call up the Message Summary display
Click the column heading you want to filter by.
Select the filter you want to apply.

1
2
3

Example Scenario
You want to filter the Message Summary so that you see informational messages.
Solution
Call up the Message Summary display.
Click the Message State column and select Informational.

1
2

The Message Summary changes to list messages that are of the type informational.
To sort the Message Summary
1
Call up the Message Summary display
2
Click the column heading you want to sort by.
3
Select the sort order.
Example Scenario
You want to sort the Message Summary so that messages are sorted in ascending order by
area.
Solution
Call up the Message Summary display.
Click the Area column.
Select Sort Ascending.

1
2
3

The Message Summary changes to list messages in ascending order according to the area.
To remove filtering and sorting:

Click Show All Messages.

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Using the Area Pane


The area pane provides a list of areas to which you have access. You can use the area pane
to filter the Message Summary to show messages for a particular area only.
To display the area pane use either method:

Click the Show Area Pane icon.

Click the Area list and click the Push Pin to dock the area pane.
To hide the area pane use either method:

Click the Hide Area Pane icon.

Click the Close icon in the Area Pane.

Using the Details Pane


The Details pane shows the details of the currently selected message. If no message is
selected, the details pane is empty.
To show or hide the Details pane:

Click the Details pane icon.

Navigating the Message Summary


There are several ways to scroll the list of messages on the Message Summary. You can:

Use your mouse and click on the scroll bar

Use the mouse wheel (if your mouse has one)

Use the Up and Down arrow keys on your keyboard

Press the <Page Up> and <Page Down> keys to scroll a page at a time

Press the <Home> key to go to the first message in the summary

Press the <End> key to go to the last message in the summary


Tip

82

If you want to use your keyboard keys or the mouse wheel to scroll the Message Summary, you need click
your mouse in the summary grid to give it focus.

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Changing What is Shown in the Message Summary

Pausing the Message Summary


You can pause the Message Summary to make it easier to read if messages are occurring in
rapid succession. When the Message Summary is paused no new messages are added to the
summary, however you can still acknowledge messages and filter and sort the summary.
Messages that are acknowledged while the summary is paused are shown with a
strikethrough.
To pause the Message Summary:

On the Message Summary display click Pause.

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Acknowledging Messages
There are several ways of acknowledging messages:
To:

Do this:

Acknowledge or confirm a single


message

Either:

Acknowledge all currently visible


messages

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Select the message and click the


Acknowledge) toolbar button.

(Alarm

Right-click the message then select


Acknowledge.

Press the appropriate keysee Keyboard


Shortcuts on page 136

Click the Acknowledge Page button on the display.

Adding Comments to a Message

Adding Comments to a Message


If required, you can add comments to messages in the Message Summary. For example, you
might need to add details about your response to a message.
To add a comment to a message:
1
Select the message to which you want to add a comment.
2
If the Details Pane is not visible, click the Show Details Pane button.
3
Select the Comments tab.
Any existing comments that have been added to a message are displayed.
4
Type in your comment and click Save Comments.

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Reporting Incidents
Note You only need to read this topic if you can see the
(Incident Report) button.
The Incident Report button calls up the IRIMS windowIRIMS is your incident
reporting application. Ask your supervisor or an experienced colleague for help
on filling in incident reports.
To report an incident that is not related to a specific EBI event or alarm, simply click the
button and fill in the report as instructed.
Often, however, you will report incidents related to a specific alarm or event. In
such cases, you must copy the alarm/event details to the report.
To copy alarm/event details to a report:
Click
(Alarm Summary) or
(Event Summary) to call up the Alarm
or Event Summary.
2
Click the alarm/event and then click
.
3
The alarm/event details are copied into the report.
If the alarm/event relates to an access point, the cardholder details are also
copied.
1

Figure 9.1 Typical Incident Report with Copied Alarm Details

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10

Producing Reports
Reports help you analyze system activity in many useful ways. For example, you may want a
report on:

Access-related alarms that were raised during the last 24 hours, grouped by
particular door/card reader

Who is currently in the building

The current values of a range of points


All reports need to be requested, either manually or automatically. Requesting a
report generates a new version, using the latest data. For example, if you have a
report called Weekly Status Report, you would need to request it each week so
that it contains the current weeks data. See Requesting a Report on page 90.
Depending on how a report is configured, it is printed, or saved to computer file
so that it can be viewed on screen or used by another program. If the report is designed to
be viewed on screen, you need to call it up after generating itsee Calling up a Report
on page 92.
For alarm, events and message summaries, you can use the Print As Report
feature to produce a printed report containing all, or a range of, the summary
information within the display.
Tip

If you simply want a printout as a snapshot of what is shown in Station, see Printing Station
Information on page 25.

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Requesting a Report
Note When you request a report, EBI creates a new version using the latest data.
For example, if you have a report called Weekly Status Report, you would need to
request on a weekly basis to ensure that the data is always up-to-date.
To request a report:
1
Select Action Request Report to see the list of reports. (Alternatively, click
Reports on the System Menu.)
For a description of the standard reports supplied with the system, see Standard
Report Types on page 93.

Figure 10.1 Reports Display


2
3
4
5

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Click the report you want to request.


If you want to change the reports default settings, click the Configure button to see
the configuration details.
Change these as appropriate.
Click the Request button to request the report.
A Request in progress message appears in the Message Zone. The document is
sent to the specified output device, either a printer or your screen.

Requesting a Report

Requesting a Report from the Command Zone


If you know the number or name of a report, you can request it from the Command Zone.
(Note that when you request a report this way, the report uses its default settings.)
For example, to request report 123:
Click the Command Zone.
Type rpt 123 and press <Enter>.

1
2

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Calling up a Report
If a report is designed to be viewed on your screen, you can call it up at any timejust like
any other display.
Note Calling up a report simply redisplays the last version that was generated. If
you want to update the reports contents, you must request it againsee Requesting
a Report on page 90.
For example, to call up report 123:
1
Click the Command Zone.
2
Type pr 123 and press <Enter>.

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Standard Report Types

Standard Report Types


The following table lists standard report types; however, your system will only have report
types that are applicable to your systems needs. Reports marked ACS in the Usage
column are only applicable to Access Control and Security.
Report type

Description

Usage

Access Data

Exports (and imports) access control


information to (from) an external file, so that it
can be viewed and edited by other applications
such as Microsoft Excel.

ACS

Access Level

Lists the zones and associated time periods


associated with the specified access levels.

ACS

After Hours Alarms

Lists the alarms and events that occurred during


a specified after hours period over a specified
time span.

Alarm and Event

Lists the alarms or events that occurred within


the specified time period.

Alarm Duration

Lists how long the specified points were in an


alarm condition.

All Points

Lists all values of a set of specified points using


a configurable set of filtering and sorting criteria.

Card Usage

Lists the number of times the specified cards


have been used, and the cardholder to which
each card is assigned.

ACS

Cardholder Details

Produces a detailed list of all cardholders which


match the specified criteria, one page per card.

ACS

Cardholder List

Lists all cards, or the cards that match the


specified criteria, and the cardholder to which
each card is assigned.

ACS

Cardholder Zone

Lists the specified zones and the cardholders


with access to the specified zones. Can be
sorted by zone name or cardholder.

ACS

Cross-Reference

Lists where the specified points are used within


your system, for example, in custom numbered
displays, reports, algorithms and so on.

Door History

Lists all cards presented to one or a number of


access points within the specified time period.

ACS

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10 Producing Reports

94

Report type

Description

FS90+

Lists FS90+ points and their values based on the


selection criteria you specify. (The FS90+ is a
fire panel.)

Generic Crystal Report

Runs a predefined Crystal Report. You can


specify a selection formula.

Group Card Trail

Lists the specified access events (entries, exits,


or denials) for a group of cards within the
specified time period.

Microsoft Excel

Enables you to request customized reports that


have been designed using Microsoft Excel.

Occupancy

Lists all cardholders currently in a specified zone


or zones. The zones must have been configured
for occupancy counting using Zone
Enforcement.

ACS

EBI-PeopleSoft Difference
Report

Available if the EBI-PeopleSoft Interface option is


installed. Lists employees whose details are recorded
in one database and not in the other.

ACS

Point State Changes

Lists the number of times the specified points


have changed state within a specified time
period.

Time Period

Lists the time period configurations that match


the specified criteria.

ACS

Zone Information

Lists the doors belonging to specified zones.

ACS

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Usage

ACS

Printing Reports from the Summary Displays

Printing Reports from the Summary Displays


If you have the appropriate security level, you can create a report from information that is
contained in the Alarm, Events or Message Summary displays. The data contained in the
display is presented in the same order as it appears in the display.
You can limit the amount of data your report contains by setting your filter criteria. For
example, you might include only the events that occurred after a certain time, or only those
messages that have been received on a given day. See Changing What is Shown in the
Alarm Summary on page 55. Additional information can be found in Changing What is
Shown in the Event Summary on page 68, or Changing What is Shown in the Message
Summary on page 80.
You can view the report from a separate window on your screen by clicking Print
Preview
. You can print the report on the default Windows printer, or you can select a
different printer if one is available.
When you click Print as Report
, the report is sent to the default printer, or the
printer you have selected from the Print Preview window.
A message indicates that a print preview or print request is in progress.
A message warns you if the generated report is more than 10 pages. You may want to
reduce the size of the report by redefining your filter criteria.
If your on-screen alarm data includes graphic indications of an alarm states, these alarm
states will be converted to text abbreviations in your report. A key to abbreviations is added
to the bottom of each report page.
To print a report from a summary display:
1
Call up the summary display that you want to use for a report.
2
Create your filter selection to display only the data you want in your report.
3
Click Print Preview to view the report on-screen.
4
Click Print As Report to create a printed report.
When the Print dialog box is displayed, set your printing options such as page
orientation, printer selection, and so on.
Note You can also export the report to a standard file format that can be read by
other applications.

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Communicating with Your


Colleagues
Station provides Message Pad for communicating with your colleagues.
The Message Pad is like a bulletin board in that it can be read by anyone who has
access to Station. As the name implies, the primary purpose of the notes are to
tell colleagues on the next shift about any important events.
To read the Message Pad:
1
Select View Message Pad. (Alternatively, click Message Pad on the
System Menu.)

Figure 11.1 Message Pad


To clear any existing notes and add your own notes:
Select View Message Pad.
Click the Clear button.
Click in the note area. (Alternatively, press <TAB> until the note area is highlighted.)
Start typing your note.
When you have finished, click the Save button.

1
2
3
4
5

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11 Communicating with Your Colleagues

To add to the existing note:


1
Select View Message Pad.
2
Click below the existing note.
Tip

You may need to press <Enter> to start a new line.


Start typing your note.

When you have finished, click the Save button.

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12

Controlling CCTV Cameras


Note You only need to read this topic if you can view video from CCTV
cameras in EBI.
The Camera Control option allows you to control CCTV cameras. For example,
you can:

Switch between cameras

Control camera direction if it is a Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) camera

Zoom in and out if it is a PTZ camera

Freeze the video image and copy it to the clipboard


(If you do not have Camera Control, you may only freeze the video image and
copy it to the clipboard.)
You use the CCTV Camera Control display to view video from and control
cameras and monitors. To call up this display, select Action CCTV Cameras.
Note Your system may have been set up to display the video signals on
dedicated monitors, or in a window within this display.

Figure 12.1 CCTV Camera Control Display

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Viewing a Camera Signal


To view a camera video signal:
1
Select the CCTV switcher from the Switcher list. (A switcher is a specialized
controller that connects cameras to monitors.)
In practice, you normally only have to select the switcher once because
Station remembers your selection.
2
Select the camera from the Camera list.
3
Select a monitor which corresponds to the video output connected to your
computer from the Monitor list.
Tip

100

Alternatively, you can switch to each camera or monitor in turn by repeatedly


clicking the Next or Prev button.

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Controlling a Camera

Controlling a Camera
You use your keyboards numeric keypad to control the camera functions such as
panning, tilting and zooming. (The numeric keypad is the group of keys on the
right-hand side of your keyboard.)
The displays Keypad Mapping section shows what each key does. For
example, pressing <4> moves the camera to the left, and that pressing </> causes the
camera to zoom in.

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Locking a Camera and Monitor


To prevent other operators from controlling the camera and monitor:
1
Click the Lock button.
Remember to click the Unlock button when you have finished, so that other
operators can control the camera and monitor.

Freezing a Video Signal


You can freeze the video and then copy the frozen image to the clipboard.
To freeze and copy the video signal:
1
Click the Freeze button to freeze the video signal.
The image status changes to Frozen.
2
Click the Copy button.
3
Paste the video image in another application, such as Microsoft Paint.
4
Click the Live button to unfreeze the video signal. The image status changes
to Live.

Adjusting the Brightness of a Video Signal


You use the Iris buttons at the bottom of the display to control the brightness of
the video. (The cameras iris controls the amount of light that reaches the
camera.)
Tip

If the video signals from all cameras are too light/dark, adjust the brightness of the
monitor, rather than each individual camera.
To increase the brightness:
1
Click the Open button. The iris starts opening.
2
Click the Stop button when the brightness is correct.
To decrease the brightness:
Click the Close button. The iris starts closing.
Click the Stop button when the brightness is correct.

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2

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Displaying Detailed Point


Information
To learn about:

Go to:

Point Detail displays, which show detailed information about every point

page 104

Group displays, which show important information about groups of related points

page 107

Quick list displays, which show basic information about groups of related points.

page 108

Trend displays, which display system information in a graphical manner.

page 109

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Using Point Detail Displays


A Point Detail display shows the current value of each parameter for a particular point.
You can also use a Point Detail display to disable the point or change parameter values,
providing you have the required security level. See Controlling Points on page 31.
Point Detail Displays have a standardized layout, as shown in the following figure.
The Face Plate is designed to look like a physical panel, and shows the main parameters for
the point.
The other parameters are shown to the right of the Face Plate, and are grouped according
to tab. For example, to see the alarm-related parameters, click the Alarms tab.
Tabs

Face Plate

Parameters

Calling up a Point Detail Display


There are several ways of calling up a Point Detail display.
To call it up for a point associated with a display object:
1
Click the display object to select it.
2
Click the
(Detail) toolbar button to call up the associated Point Detail display.
Tip

Alternatively, you can simply double-click the display object.


To call it up for the point in the Alarm Line:
1
Click the
(Detail) toolbar button.

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Using Point Detail Displays

To call it up for a point whose ID (or the first part of it) you know:
1
Type all or part of the point ID in the Command Zone, and then click the
(Detail) toolbar button.
2
If you typed only part of the ID, a list of matching points (and other items) appears.
Click the point name.
Tip

If your system uses DSA or point servers, information on some points you may need to access is stored on
remote computers. As a result, the first time you call up the points details you may need to enter the full
point ID. After this, using part of the point ID produces a matching point.

Displaying Point History


To see changes to a points PV (present value) over time:
1
Display the points Detail displaysee Calling up a Point Detail Display on
page 104.
2
Click the History tab. This tab contains a set of History buttons.
3
Select the appropriate graphing options. For example, to see changes at minute
intervals, select 1 minute from the Interval list.

Displaying Recent Events


To see a list of recent events of a point:
1
Display the points Detail displaysee Calling up a Point Detail Display on
page 104.
2
Click the Recent Events tab. This tab displays a list of recent events for the point.

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Using Faceplates
Some points can be controlled from a faceplate. A faceplate is a specialized type of popup
window that shows critical information about the point to which the object is linked. In
most cases, a faceplate is similar to the left-hand portion of the matching point detail
display.
You can have a total of four faceplates, or popup windows, or a combination of both,
visible at the same time. For example, if you already have three faceplates and one popup
windows visible, when you call up another faceplate, the oldest faceplate (or popup) is
replaced.
When you first call up faceplates, they are positioned in the bottom right-hand corner of
your monitor. You can move the faceplates by clicking and dragging the faceplate to
another position. Next time you call up the faceplate, the last position is remembered.
If you want faceplates to remain visible while you navigate to other displays, click the
pushpin
. Faceplates that you have pushpinned are not replaced if you call up more
faceplates.
If a point has a faceplate, click the associated display objectthis calls up the faceplate for
that point. You can then change parameter values.
Tip

106

If the point has a faceplate, when you move your mouse over the associated display object, the pointer changes
to a hand.

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Using Group Detail Displays

Using Group Detail Displays


A Group Detail display shows the main parameters for a set of up to eight related points.
The information is presented as if you were looking at a physical control panel. For
example, in the case of analog points, gauges are used to show the PVs.
Each group is identified by a number, and generally has a descriptive title.
To call up a group detail display by choosing it from list of groups:
1
Select View Group Summary to see the list of groups.
2
Select a group.
To call up a group detail display whose number you know:
1
Click the
(Group) toolbar button.
2
Type the group number in the Command Zone and press <Enter>.

Figure 13.1 Typical Group Detail Display


3

Tip

If required, you can display the groups trend and numerical history details by
choosing the appropriate option from the View As list.

You can call up another group by choosing it from the Group list.

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Using Quick Lists


A quick list lists the main parameters of a group of related points. For example, a quick list
could show the current value of every temperature sensor in a building.
Notes

If a suitable quick list does not exist, use the Quick View display. See Using the
Quick View Display on page 108.
To call up a quick list:
On the System Configuration Menu display, click Quick Lists to call up the Quick
Lists display.
2
Click the group you want to see.
3
If you want to see more information about a particular point, click it to call up the
point detail display.
1

Using the Quick View Display


You can use the Quick View display to quickly see the main properties of a range of related
points.
Notes

If you enter only the first part of the name in your search, EBI will find all matching
points. For example, Floor1 will find Floor1MainDoor, Floor1SideDoor and
so on.

You can use wildcard characters (* and ?) in your search. An asterisk (*) represents
one or more unknown characters, whereas a question mark (?) represents one
unknown character. For example:

*Door will find all points that end with Door, such as Floor1MainDoor,
Level2SideDoor and so on.

Floor?MainDoor will find points Floor1MainDoor, Floor2MainDoor


and so on.
To use the Quick View display:
1
On the System Configuration Menu display, click Quick Views to call up the Quick
View display.
2
Type your search criteria in Search for and then click Go.
3
If you want to see more information about a particular point, click it to call up the
point detail display.

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Using Trend Displays

Using Trend Displays


A trend display shows changes in point parameter values over time. Typical uses of trend
displays are to show changes in room temperature or power consumption over the day.
You can display trends in several ways, including:

Bar graphs

Line graphs

Numerical list of historical data

X-Y plot of the value of one point against another (that is, one point on the x-axis
and the other on the y-axis)
Each trend is identified by a number, and generally has a descriptive title.
To call up a trend by choosing it from list of trends:
1
Select View Trend Summary to see the list of trends.
2
Select a trend.
To call up a trend whose number you know:
Click the
(Trend) toolbar button.
Type the trends number in the Command Zone and press <Enter>.

1
2

Figure 13.2 Typical Trend

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13 Displaying Detailed Point Information

Tip

You can call up another trend by choosing it from the Trend list.

Modifying a Trend Display


Having called up a trend, you can modify it by changing the trends values.
To modify a trend:
1
Select the type of trend from the Type list.
2
Type the number of samples you want to see in the Samples field.
3
Select the sample interval from the Interval list.
You may also be able to select other points by typing point IDs in the Point ID fields.
However, you may need MNGR security level to do this.

Zooming in on a Trend Display


To zoom in on a trend:
1
Move the pointer to, for example, the top-left of the area of interest, and then drag
the pointer diagonally down to the bottom-right.
As you drag, a rectangle shows the area you are selecting.
2
Release the mouse button when the rectangle encloses the area of interestthe trend
now zooms into this area.
3
To zoom back out to the trends normal scale, click the
button at the bottom-left
of the trend.

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Monitoring System Status


The System Status displays provide detailed status information about your
systems hardware components, such as printers, controllers and channels.

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Monitoring Channel Status


A channel is a physical communications link, such as a network cable, between
the server and one or more controllers.
The Channels Status display shows the status of each communications channel, as
well as its type.
To call up the Channels Status display:
1
Select View System Status Channels. (Alternatively, click System Status on
the System Menu and then click Channels on the Navigation Pane.)

Figure 14.1 Channel Status Display


2

If you want to see more information about a channel, click it to call up the channels
Detail display. This shows Error Statistics and Barometer values that indicate the
health of the channel. (For a healthy channel, the Barometers Current value is less
than the Marginal limit.)
If you want to see information about the controller(s) attached to a particular channel
click the Controllers button.
Note If a channel fails, you can disable it by deselecting the Enable checkbox
this prevents error messages being raised on the channel. However, if you do this, you
must reselect the Enable checkbox after rectifying the problem to ensure that the
channel is re-enabled.

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Monitoring Point Server Status

Monitoring Point Server Status


The Point Servers Status Summary display shows the status of each point server. The
display shows the point server name, alias, and status.
To call up the Point Server Status Summary display:
1
Select View System Status Point Servers. (Alternatively, click System Status
on the System Menu and then click Point Servers on the Navigation Pane.)
2
If you want to see information about the controller(s) attached to a particular point
server click the Controllers button.

Figure 14.2 Point Servers Status Display

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Monitoring Controller Status


The Controllers Status display shows the status of each controller, as well as its type, and
the channel it is on.
To call up the Controllers Status display:
1
Select View System Status Controller. (Alternatively, click System Status on
the System Menu and then click Controllers on the Navigation Pane.)
(Note that the display will be slightly different if your controllers use dual
communication linkssuch controllers continue communicating with the server if
one link malfunctions.)

Figure 14.3 Controller Status Display


2
3

If you want to see a list of controllers for a particular point server or channel, select
the point server or channel from the list.
If you want to see more information about a controller, click it to call up the
controllers Detail display. This shows Error Statistics and Barometer values that
indicate the health of the controller. (For a healthy controller, the Barometers
Current value is less than the Marginal limit.)
Note If a controller fails, you can disable it by deselecting the Enable checkbox
this prevents error messages being raised on the controller. However, if you do this,
you must reselect the Enable checkbox after rectifying the problem to ensure that
the controller is re-enabled.

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Monitoring Station Status

Monitoring Station Status


The Stations Status display shows the status of each Station, as well as its keyboard type,
and current operator.
To call up the Stations Status display:
1
Select View System Status Stations. (Alternatively, click System Status on
the System Menu and then click Stations on the Navigation Pane.)

Figure 14.4 Station Status Display

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Monitoring Printer Status


The Printers Status display shows the status of each printer.
To call up the Printers Status display:
1
Select View System Status Printers. (Alternatively, click System Status on
the System Menu and then click Printers on the Navigation Pane.)

Figure 14.5 Printer Status Display


Note If a printer fails, you can disable the printer by clicking the Enable
checkbox. However, you must re-enable the printer after you have rectified the cause
of failure.

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Monitoring a Redundant Server System

Monitoring a Redundant Server System


A redundant server uses two servers that operate in parallel. During normal operation, the
primary server performs all tasks, and the backup server watches. However, if the primary
server fails, the backup server immediately takes over, without any interruption to your
system.
The Server Redundancy Status display shows the status of the two servers, and whether
they are synchronized.
To call up the Server Redundancy Status display:
Select View System Status Server Redundancy. (Alternatively, click System
Status on the System Menu and then click Server Redundancy on the
Navigation Pane.)

Figure 14.6 Redundant Server Status Display

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Monitoring Distributed Systems


In a Distributed System Architecture (DSA) configuration each server is responsible for
managing a specific part of your system.
The Distributed System Status display shows the status of each server, as well as its type.
To call up the Distributed System Status display:
1
Select View System Status Distributed Systems. (Alternatively, click System
Status on the System Menu and then click Distributed Systems on the
Navigation Pane.)

Figure 14.7 Distributed Servers Status Display

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Monitoring Downloads

Monitoring Downloads
When a cardholders access details are changed, the changes must be downloaded to the
appropriate controllers. You can check for download errors by calling up the Download
Error Summary.
To call up the display:
1
Select View System Status Download.

Figure 14.8 Download Error Summary Display


2

Click Failed opposite an entry in the list to see more information about why the
download attempt failed.

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Specialized Access Control


Procedures
To learn about:

Go to:

Deadman timer messages, and how to respond to them

page 122

Managing guard tours

page 124

Managing shifts

page 128

Sealing/unsealing an area

page 130

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15 Specialized Access Control Procedures

Responding to Deadman Timer Messages


Note You only need to read this topic if you can see the
Deadman Alarm) toolbar button.

(Acknowledge

The deadman timer ensures that you promptly acknowledge alarms, and that
you are at your Station. Because the deadman timer can be configured in several
ways, you need to ask your supervisor or an experienced colleague for detailed
instructions.
Whenever a deadman message appears in the Message Zone, you need to acknowledge it
by clicking the
toolbar button.
If you do not acknowledge the message within a specified time, a deadman point
will go into alarm, and you may be logged off.

Resetting the Deadman Timer Points


Your system may be set up so that you need to reset the deadman points to their
normal states if the deadman timer has logged you off Station, or if you failed to
respond to deadman message within the specified time.
To reset the deadman points:
1
Select View Deadman Timer to call up the Deadman Timer Status display.

Figure 15.1 Deadman Timer Status Display

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Responding to Deadman Timer Messages

Note As an operator, you cannot change the settings shown in this display.
Click the Reset Points button at the top of the display.

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Managing Guard Tours


A guard tour defines the points guards must visit as well as:

The time allowed to travel to each successive point

The actions guards must perform at each point


Alarms are raised if the guard deviates from the tourfor example, if the guard takes too
long (or not long enough) to reach the next point, or fails to perform a specified task.
You may need to manually start some tours; others may automatically start at the
programmed time.

Monitoring or Controlling a Guard Tour


To monitor or control a guard tour:
1
Select Configure Guard Tour to call up the Guard Tour display, which
summarizes the status of every guard tour.
For an explanation of statuses, see Guard Tour Statuses on page 126.

Figure 15.2 Guard Tours Display


2

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To control a tour, click the tour you want to control to call up the control display.

Managing Guard Tours

Figure 15.3 Guard Tour Control Display


3

You can now control the displayed tour as required. See:

Readying a Guard Tour

Starting a Guard Tour

Suspending a Guard Tour

Aborting a Guard Tour

Readying a Guard Tour


You only need to ready a guard tour if:

It has been suspended, and you want to restart it from the beginning. (The command
sets the tour to start at position 0.)

It is automatically activated, and you want to start it before the scheduled time. (After
readying the tour, you can then manually start it.)
To ready a guard tour:
1
Click the Ready button. A message appears in the Message Zone, asking you to
confirm your command.
2
Type y and then press <Enter>.

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Starting a Guard Tour


To start a guard tour:
1
Click the Start button. A message appears in the Message Zone, asking you to
confirm your command.
2
Type y and then press <Enter>.

Suspending a Guard Tour


To suspend a guard tour:
1
Click the Suspend button. A message appears in the Message Zone, asking you to
confirm your command.
2
Type y and then press <Enter>. Another message appears, asking you for a reason
for suspending the tour.
3
Type the reason (30 characters or less), and then press <Enter>.
To restart the tour from:

Where it left off, click the Start button.

The beginning, click the Ready button and then the Start button.

Aborting a Guard Tour


To abort a guard tour:
1
Click the Abort button. A message appears in the Message Zone, asking you to
confirm your command.
2
Type y and then press <Enter>. Another message appears, asking you for a reason
for aborting the tour.
3
Type the reason (30 characters or less), and then press <Enter>.

Guard Tour Statuses

126

Status

Description

Aborted

The tour has been aborted by an operator.

Complete

The tour is not running.

Delayed

The tour has been terminated because the guard has failed to arrive at
the next destination

Position

The guards last known position.

Ready

The tour is ready to start.

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Managing Guard Tours

Status

Description

Running

The tour is in progress.

Suspended

The tour has been suspended by an operator.

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Managing Shifts
Note

You only need to read this topic if you have the Shift Management option.

You use Shift Management to specify the date and time at which a team begins and ends a
shift. (A team is a pre-defined group of cardholders who work a particular shift, and who
therefore require access to the facility during that shift.)

Monitoring and Controlling a Shift


To monitor a shift, or to grant access to a team:
1
Select View Shift Management to call up the Shift Management display, which
summarizes the shift status of each team.

Figure 15.4 Shift Management Display


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You can now control shifts as required. See:

Specifying the Start of a Shift

Specifying the End of a Shift

Managing Shifts

Specifying the Start of a Shift


You need to specify the date and time at which the shift starts for each team. EBI then
automatically downloads the required access rights to the card readers at that time.
To specify the start of a shift:
1
Select the appropriate shift, such as Day or Night, from the Next Shift list.
2
Type the date in the Date field. Note that the format is of the form: dd-mmm-yy,
for example 26-Mar-03 (that is, 26th of March 2003).
3
Type the time in the Time field. Note that the time is in 24-hour format, for
example: 01:30 represents 1:30 am, and 23:00 represents 11 pm.

Specifying the End of a Shift


After a shift has started, you need to specify the date and time at which it ends. EBI then
automatically removes the teams access rights at that time.
To specify the end of a shift:
1
Select Off from the Next Shift list.
2
Type the date in the Date field. Note that the format is of the form: dd-mmm-yy,
for example 26-Mar-03 (that is, 26th of March 2003).
3
Type the time in the Time field. Note that the time is in 24-hour format, for
example: 01:30 represents 1:30 am, and 23:00 represents 11 pm.
Tip

The date can be entered in any of the following ways:

2603, which is converted to 26-Mar-03 (If you exclude the year, the current year is
automatically inserted)

260303, which is converted to 26-Mar-03

26 Mar 03, which is converted to 26-Mar-03

26-Mar-03

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Sealing and Unsealing an Area


Note You only need to read this topic if you have SMP controllers, and use the
Area Seal/unseal functionality.
The Area Seal/Unseal option simultaneously secures or unsecures a set of related points
within an area.
Each area has a seal status point that indicates whether the last seal/unseal operation was
successful. (Note that this point does not reflect the current status of the points within the
area.)
There are four seal/unseal procedures:

Testing a Seal

Sealing an Area

Sealing and Exiting an Area

Unsealing an Area
Sealing and unsealing an area is usually done using a custom display. Ask your supervisor or
an experienced colleague for the names of the appropriate displays used for sealing and
unsealing areas.

Testing a Seal
You should test the seal before sealing an area. This momentarily sets all points associated
with the area to their secure state.
To test a seal:
1
Call up the appropriate display and select the area you want to test.
2
Click the Test Seal button.
If all points secure:

The status of the seal status point changes to Seal

A Seal Successful message appears in the Message Zone


If any point fails to secure:

An alarm is generated for that point

The status of the seal status point changes to Fault

A Seal Unsuccessful message appears in the Message Zone

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Sealing and Unsealing an Area

Sealing an Area
To seal an area:
1
Call up the appropriate display and select the area you want to seal.
2
Perform a test seal. See Testing a Seal.
3
If the test seal was successful, click the Seal button.
The status of the seal status point changes to Seal and a Seal Successful message
appears in the Message Zone.
If the area does not seal:

An alarm is generated for any point that fails to enter its secure state

The status of the seal status point changes to Fault

A Seal Unsuccessful message appears in the Message Zone


You need to correct the points that did not seal correctly before attempting to seal again.

Sealing and Exiting an Area


The Seal and Exit procedure is identical to the Seal procedure except for the 60 second
delay that allows you to exit the area before it is sealed.

Unsealing an Area
To unseal an area:
1
Call up the appropriate display and select the area you want to unseal.
2
Click the Unseal button.
The status of the seal status point changes to Unseal and a Unseal Successful
message appears in the Message Zone.

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Reference Information
To learn about:

Go to:

Commands you can issue from the Command Zone

page 134

Keyboard shortcuts

page 136

Changing someones Station password

page 139

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16 Reference Information

Command Reference
After you have become familiar with your system, you can quickly issue frequently required
commands by typing them in the Command Zone.
Note Commands are case-insensitive. For example, you can type bye, BYE or
Bye to log off.
Command

Description

displayname <Enter>

Calls up the display whose name is displayname.

cardholdername <F11>

Displays the details of cardholdername.


If you only type part of the name, a list of matching
cardholders appears. You then click the appropriate
cardholder to display that persons details.

pointID <F12>

Calls up the points details.


If you only type the first part of the ID, a list of matching
points appears. You then click the appropriate point to
display its details.
If your system uses DSA or point servers, information
on some points you may need to access is stored on
remote computers. As a result, the first time you call up
the points details you may need to enter the full point
ID. After this, using part of the point ID produces a
matching point.
Note: EXCEL 5000 direct points are case-sensitive for the
initial point detail request.

bye <Enter>

If you use operator-based security, this command logs


you off Station.
If you use Station-based security, this command returns
Station to the oper security level.

134

callup n <Enter>

Calls up display n, (which can be either a number or a


name) while retaining the current file, record and field
numbers.

chgpsw <Enter>

Changes your password. (Only applicable if you use


operator-based security.)

display n <Enter>

Displays the description for error n.

fil n <Enter>

Changes the current file number to n.

fld n <Enter>

Changes the current field number to n.

R310

Command Reference

Command

Description

grp n <Enter>

Calls up group display n.

his n <Enter>

Displays the historical values for group n.

pag n <Enter>

Calls up display n (which can be either a number or a


name). For example, to call up display 295, you would
type: pag 295.

pf file <Enter>

Displays the contents of file.

pr n <Enter>

Calls up a numbered (n) or named (name) report,


without updating the reports contents.

pr name <Enter>

(Use the rpt command if you want to update the


contents.)
print file <Enter>

Prints the contents of file.

psw <Enter>

Changes to another security level.

rec n <Enter>

Changes the current record number to n. (Not


applicable to operators.)

rpt n <Enter>

Generates a numbered (n) or named (name) report.

rpt name <Enter>


tnd n <Enter>

Calls up trend display n.

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide

135

16 Reference Information

Keyboard Shortcuts
The keyboard shortcuts depend on the type of keyboard you use:

Shortcut Keys for a 12-function Keyboard on page 137

136

R310

Shortcut Keys for a 12-function Keyboard

Shortcut Keys for a 12-function Keyboard


The shortcuts are described according to general function:

Calling up Displays on page 137

Calling Up Specialized Displays on page 137

Focusing on Objects on page 138

Entering Data and Issuing Commands on page 138

Calling up Displays
To call up:

Press:

A display based on its name or number

F5

The next display in the current chain of related displays or the next set
of records in a list of records which spans more than one page.

PgUp

The previous display in the current chain of related displays or the


previous set of records in a list of records which spans more than one
page.

PgDown

The previous display

F8

The display associated with the selected object

F2

Calling Up Specialized Displays


To call up the:

Press:

Alarm Summary

F3

Event Summary

F6

Reports Summary

F7

Search display for cards/cardholders

F11

Search display for points and other system items

F12

System Menu

F1

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide

137

16 Reference Information

Focusing on Objects
In computing, the phrase giving an object focus means marking an object so that it can
be used or controlled in some way. For example, if you wanted to type a new value into a
field, you could press the <Tab> key until the field has focus (indicated by highlighting)
and then type the new value.
To move the focus to:

Press:

The next selectable object or editable field

Tab

The previous selectable object or editable field

Shift+Tab

Entering Data and Issuing Commands


To:

Press:

Acknowledge/silence an alarm

F4

Copy the selected item to the clipboard

Ctrl+C

Cut the selected item to the clipboard

Ctrl+X

Lower the value of the selected object

F10

Lower the value of the selected object by 10% (default setting)

Alt+F10

Paste the contents of the clipboard into the selected item

Ctrl+V

Raise the value of the selected object

F9

Raise the value of the selected object by 10% (default setting)

Alt+F9

Select the object that has focus

Backspace

Select the OP of the selected object

Alt+F12 *

Select the SP of the selected object

Alt+F11 *

Set the MD of the selected point to automatic

Alt+F6 *

Set the MD of the selected point to manual

Alt+F5 *

Set the MD of the selected point to normal

Alt+F7 *

* Applicable only to points with these types of parameters.

138

R310

Changing Someones Station Password

Changing Someones Station Password


Note You only need to read this topic if you use traditional operator-based
security, and you have MNGR security level.
You need to change a users password if the user has forgotten the old one. When changing
the password, remember that it:

Consists of a minimum of 5 and maximum of 40 letters/numbers, without spaces

Is case-sensitive
To change the password:
Select Configure Operator Security to see the list of users.
Click the user whose password you want to change. The users details appear. (You
can also change these details if required.)
3
Click the Change Password button. The Change Password dialog box opens.
4
Type the new password and press <Tab>.
5
Re-type the new password and click OK. (The new password is only accepted if the
two entries are identical.)
1
2

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide

139

16 Reference Information

140

R310

Glossary
access level
An access level represents a collection of one or more zone/time period pairs. See Understanding
Zones, Time Periods and Access Levels on page 40.
Alarm Line
Generally, this line displays the most recently unacknowledged alarm message. (The
Alarm Line may be hidden on your system, or it may be configured to operate in a
special manner.)
application
A computer program. Station and EBI are both applications, as is Microsoft Word.
click
The act of momentarily pressing the left mouse button. This is the standard way, in
Windows, of selecting an object. For example, to select something, you move the
pointer over the object and then click.
If you have a trackball or touch screen instead of a mouse, see Using a Trackball on page 19 or
Using a Touch Screen on page 19, respectively, for the equivalent action.
clipboard
A temporary storage space which you use to move text (or images) from one
application to another, using the Copy, Cut and Paste commands. For example, you
can use the clipboard to copy text from a word processor document and insert (paste) it
into Stations handover notes or an email message.
channel
A channel is a physical communications link between the server and one or more
controllers.
Command Zone
The right-hand part of the toolbar, where you can enter commands.

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide Glossary - 1

Glossary

controller
A controller is like a set of hands and eyes for your server. It controls and collects data
from field devices, such as card readers and conditioning units. See Introducing EBI and Station
on page 4.
display object
A discrete item on a display, such as a button or indicator, that is associated with a point
or a command. See Understanding Display Objects on page 26.
double-click
The act of momentarily pressing the left mouse button two times. This is the standard
way, in Windows, of selecting an object and performing an action. For example, to
display the details about a particular alphanumeric, you move the pointer over the
alphanumeric and then double-clickthis displays a window which shows the objects
details.
drag
The act of pressing and holding down the mouse button, diagonally moving the mouse,
and then releasing the mouse button. This is a standard way, in Windows, of resizing a
window, or selecting an area of the screen.
event
An event is any significant change in the system, including any commands you issue.
focus
In computing, focus means to mark an object so that it can be used or controlled in
some way. For example, if you want to enter data into a field, you need to give it focus
so that the text/number you type is inserted into that field.
MD (mode)
The point parameter that determines whether or not you can change the points SP (setpoint). For
example, you can change the SP if the MD is set to manual, but not if it is set to automatic.
Message Zone
The line below the toolbar where explanatory messages and prompts appear.
Navigation Pane
The section to the left of system displays that is reserved for menus. Clicking an entry in
the Navigation Pane calls up the associated display.
You can call up the top-level Navigation Menu by clicking the yellow triangle at the top
of the panel.

Glossary - 2

R310

Glossary

OP (output)
The point parameter that represents the raw (uncalibrated) value of a point. A calibration formula
or table is used to convert the OP to the PV (present value). In the case of a temperature sensor,
the formula might result in a PV of 100 degrees when the OP is 50%, and a PV of 200 degrees
when the OP is 100%. In the case of an electrical switch, the PV would be Off when the OP is
0, and On when the OP is 1.
parameter
An item of information about a point, such as its PV (present value) or SP (setpoint)
point
A point is a collection of information about a particular part of your system, such as a card reader
or motor. See Understanding Points on page 30.
PV (present value)
The point parameter that represents the points value, expressed in a meaningful formfor
example, if a point represents temperature, the PV would be expressed in degrees; if a point
represents a motors status, the PV might be On or Off .
right-click
The act of momentarily pressing the right mouse button. What happens depends upon where you
right-click. For example, in Station right-clicking selects the next object in a tab sequence. See
Using your Mouse (or its equivalent) on page 19.
scanning
The technique used to obtain data from, and send commands to, a controller.
SP (setpoint)
The point parameter that represents the desired value of a point. For example, if you wanted to
change a boilers temperature you would change the SP to the desired temperature.
Status Line
The Status Line provides an overview of your systems status. For example, a flashing red field
indicates that there is at least one unacknowledged alarm. See Understanding the Status Line on
page 12.
System Menu
The System Menu is a specialized display that provides quick access to the other major displaysit
is equivalent to the Table of Contents of a book.
Click the

button on the toolbar to call up the System Menu.

time period
A time period represents a specified set of times, during which associated cardholders have access
to the required zones. See Understanding Zones, Time Periods and Access Levels on page 40.

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide

Glossary - 3

Glossary

zone
A zone represents a physical space that is totally enclosed by card readers. This means that to enter
a zone, you must use your access card at a card reader, which then allows you to enter that zone.
See Understanding Zones, Time Periods and Access Levels on page 40.

Glossary - 4

R310

Index
A
access control
Access Configuration Menu button, 14
access levels, 40
access rights, 40
area, described, 130
Cardholder Menu button, 14
door, controlling and monitoring, 42
managing, 39
managing shifts, 128
responding to access events, 73
responding to events, 73
Search Cardholder button, 16
shift management, 128
time periods, 40
unlocking a door, 43
zones, 40
access levels, described, 41
Acknowledge/Silence Alarm button, 14
acknowledging
alarms, 59, 66
deadman timer, 122
messages, 84
Alarm Banner button, 14
Alarm Banner, using, 66
alarms
acknowledging, 59, 66
Alarm Line, 11
Alarm Summary button, 14
described, 51
management options, 62
responding to, 51
status (Status Line), 12
alphanumeric, described, 26
archiving

archiving events to tape, 76


requesting a report, 90
restoring archived events, 76
status, 75
using extended event, 74
area (access control)
described, 130
sealing an area, 131
sealing and exiting, 131
testing a seal, 130
unsealing an area, 131
Associated Display button, 14

B
building management
described, 47
global schedules,

48

C
calling up
displays, 23
files, 25
Point Detail display, 104
Point History, 105
Web pages, 25
Callup Display button, 15
camera
adjusting the brightness, 102
controlling, 99, 101
freezing, 102
selecting a monitor, 100
viewing, 100
card reader, 42
Cardholder Menu button, 14

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide Index - 1

Index
cardholders
managing, 44
searching for, 45, 46
cards
managing, 44
reader, 42
searching for, 45, 46
shifts, 128
CCTV
adjusting brightness, 102
controlling a camera, 101
freezing video, 102
locking a camera and monitor, 102
using, 99
viewing a camera signal, 100
CDA point
described, 30
channel
described, 112
disabling a failed, 112
status, monitoring, 112
chart, described, 26
Command Zone
commands, 134
described, 11
using, 16
commands (Command Zone)
entering, 16
list of, 134
communicating with colleagues, 97
communications link (channel), 112
communications status (Status Line), 12
controller
described, 4
disabling a failed, 114
status, monitoring, 114
custom displays, described,

D
date and time (Status Line),
deadman timer
button, 16

Index - 2

R310

12

described, 122
resetting, 122
responding to, 122
Detail/Search button, 16
disabling
channel, 112
controller, 114
point, 31
printer, 116
display objects
alphanumeric, 26
button, 26
chart, 26
checkbox, 26
described, 26
indicator, 26
list, 27
types of, 26
displaying (calling up)
displays, 23
reports, 92
displays
calling up, 23
custom, 5
described, 5
Group Detail, 107
name/number, 24
printing, 25
system, 5, 21
Trend Set, 109, 110
using, 21
distributed systems, described, 118
door
controlling and monitoring, 42
unlocking, 43
duress signon, 9

E
EBI, described, 4
electronic signature, 29
events
described, 67
Event Summary button,

15

Index
responding to, 67
exiting a sealed area, 131
export report files, 95
Extended Event Archiving,

item, searching for,

K
74

F
faceplates, 106
files, calling up, 25
finding a point, 134
fire panels, monitoring,
focus (term described),
forced sign on, 9

36

keyboard
shortcuts to commands,
types of, 20
using, 20

136

L
Lower button,

49
138

M
managing
building, 47
cardholders, 44
maximizing the Station window,
menu commands
described, 11

G
global schedules, 48
Group Detail displays
described, 107
Group button, 15
guard tour, 124
aborting, 126
described, 124
monitoring, 124
readying, 125
starting, 126
statuses, 126
suspending, 126

H
help, displaying, 38
history, displaying point, 105
HTML files, calling up, 25
HVAC Configuration button, 14

I
incidents
Incident Report button,
reporting, 87
indicator, described, 26
IRIMS, described, 87

15

16

18

menu, Navigation, 22
Message Pad
described, 97
Message status (Status Line), 12
Message Zone, described, 11
messages
acknowledging, 84, 122
described, 79
in Message Zone, 12
types of, 28
minimizing the Station window, 18
monitor, CCTV
locking, 102
using, 99
monitoring
channel status, 112
controller status, 114
fire panels, 49
printer status, 116
redundant system, 117
Station status, 115
system status, 111
mouse, using, 19

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide Index - 3

Index
moving the Station window,

18

Q
quick access lists, 108
Quick View display, 108

N
Navigate Back button, 15
Navigate Forward button, 15
navigation
menu, 22
pane, 22

O
Operator-based security,

P
Page Down button, 15
Page Up button, 15
pane, navigation, 22
parameters, point
changing, 31
described, 30
types of, 30
password
changing another users password,
changing your password, 8
Point Detail displays
calling up, 104
described, 104
points
controlling, 31
described, 30
detailed information about, 103
door-related, 42
faceplates, 106
finding, 134
history, displaying, 105
parameters, 30
Point Detail displays, 104
seal status, 130
types of, 30
printer status, monitoring, 116
printing displays, 25

Index - 4

R310

139

Raise button, 15
redundant system, monitoring, 117
Reload Page button, 15
reporting incidents, 87
reports
described, 89
export as files, 95
export report files, 95
generating, 90
Print As Report option, 95
requesting, 90
standard, 93
using, 89
viewing (calling up), 92
Reset button, 15
resetting the deadman timer, 122
resizing the Station Window, 18
responding to
access events, 73
alarms, 51
alarms and messages, 122
events, 67
messages, 79
restoring the Station window, 18

S
SafeBrowse
described, 25
using, 25
seal status point, described, 130
sealing an area, 130, 131
searching for
cardholder or card, 45, 46
point, 134
Search Cardholder button, 16
system item, 36

Index
security, access control
area, sealing/unsealing, 130
managing shifts, 128
responding to access events, 73
sealing/unsealing an area, 130
security, Station
privileges, 10
signing on (Operator-based), 8
signing on (Station-based), 9
types of, 7
user levels, 10
server
described, 4
distributed, described, 118
number (Status Line), 12
Set button, 15
setup file, Station, 10
shift
described, 128
monitoring, 128
specifying the end, 129
specifying the start, 129
shortcuts, keyboard, 136
signatures
dual, 29
electronic, 29
signing off
Operator-based security, 9
Station-based security, 9
signing on
Operator-based security, 8
Station-based security, 9
when forced, 9
Station
described, 5
monitoring its status, 115
setup file, 10
starting, 7
user security, 7
Station Window
main parts, 11
resizing, 18
Status Line, 12
toolbar, 14

zooming in and out, 18


Station-based security, 7
Status Line
described, 11
parts, 12
status, monitoring system, 111
system
distributed, monitoring, 118
system displays
described, 5
types of, 21
system item, searching for, 36
System Menu
button, 14
described, 23
system status, monitoring,

111

T
tampering, checking for, 76
team, described, 128
time periods, described, 41
toolbar buttons
Access Configuration Menu, 14
Acknowledge/Silence Alarm, 14
Alarm Banner, 14
Alarm Summary, 14
Associated Display, 14
Callup Display, 15
Cardholder Menu, 14
Deadman Timer, 16
Detail/Search, 16
Event Summary, 15
Group, 15
HVAC Configuration, 14
Incident Report Timer, 16
Lower, 15
Navigate Back, 15
Navigate Forward, 15
Page Down, 15
Page Up, 15
Raise, 15
Reload Page, 15
Reset, 15

Enterprise Buildings Integrator Operators Guide Index - 5

Index
Search Cardholder, 16
Set, 15
System Menu, 14
Trend, 15
Zoom, 16
toolbar, described, 11, 14
touch screen, using, 19
tour, guard
aborting, 126
described, 124
readying, 125
starting, 126
statuses, 126
suspending, 126
trackball, using, 19
Trend button, 15
Trend Set displays
described, 109
modifying, 110
zooming in on, 110

W
Web page
calling up, 25
printing, 25

Z
zones, described, 40
Zoom button, 16
zooming in and out, 18, 110

U
unlocking a door, 43
user (Station)
privileges, 10
security levels, 10
Status Line indication,
using
keyboard, 20
mouse, 19
touch screen, 19
trackball, 19

14

V
video (CCTV)
adjusting the brightness,
freezing, 102
viewing (calling up)
displays, 23
reports, 92

Index - 6

R310

102