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Servicing HP Networking Products

Volume 1Version 10.31

Copyright 2010 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.

The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and
services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing
herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial
errors or omissions contained herein.
This is an HP copyrighted work that may not be reproduced without the written permission of HP. You may not use
these materials to deliver training to any person outside of your organization without the written permission of HP.
Servicing HP Networking Products
Volume 1Rev. 10.31
HP Restricted Contact HP Networking for customer training materials.

Contents
Module 1 Switch Overview
Objectives .................................................................................................... 1-1
HP Switch Series ............................................................................................ 1-2
HP A Series .................................................................................................. 1-3
HP E Series ................................................................................................... 1-4
HP V Series................................................................................................... 1-5
Categorizing Switches .................................................................................... 1-6
Categorizing Switches Based on Form Factor or Manageability........................... 1-7
Categorizing Switches Based on the OSI Model ................................................ 1-9
Layer 1 ............................................................................................ 1-9
Layer 2 .......................................................................................... 1-10
Layer 3 .......................................................................................... 1-10
Layer 4 .......................................................................................... 1-10
Layer 2, 3, and 4 Switches ............................................................................ 1-11
Layer 2 Switch ................................................................................. 1-11
Layer 3 Switch ................................................................................. 1-11
Light Layer 3 Switches ..................................................................... 1-12
Layer 4 Switch ................................................................................ 1-12
Deployment Options ..................................................................................... 1-13
Data Center ................................................................................... 1-13
Core ............................................................................................. 1-13
Distribution .................................................................................... 1-14
LAN Access ................................................................................... 1-14
Summary ..................................................................................................... 1-15

Module 2 HP A Series Switch Overview


Objectives .................................................................................................... 2-1
A Series Switches .......................................................................................... 2-2
HP A3100-SI Switch Series ..............................................................................2-3
HP A3100-SI Switch Series (Cont.).................................................................... 2-5
HP A3100-SI Switch Series (Cont.).................................................................... 2-6
HP A3100-EI Switch Series .............................................................................. 2-7
HP A3100-EI Switch Series (Cont.) ................................................................... 2-8
HP A3600-EI Switch Series ............................................................................. 2-9
HP A3600-EI Switch Series (Cont.) .................................................................. 2-11
HP A3610 Switch Series ............................................................................... 2-12
HP A3610 Switch Series (Cont.) ..................................................................... 2-14
HP A5120G-SI Switch Series ......................................................................... 2-15
HP A5120G-SI Switch Series (Cont.) ............................................................... 2-16
HP A5120G-EI Switch Series ......................................................................... 2-17
Rev. 10.31

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A5120G-EI Switch Series (Cont.) ............................................................... 2-19


HP A5500G-SI Switch Series ......................................................................... 2-20
HP A5500G-EI Switch Series ......................................................................... 2-22
HP A5500G-EI Switch Series (Cont.) .............................................................. 2-24
HP A5800G Switch Series ............................................................................ 2-25
HP A5800G Switch Series (Cont.) ................................................................. 2-27
HP A5810 Switch......................................................................................... 2-29
HP IntelliJack Switch Series ........................................................................... 2-30
HP 6120 Blade Switches ............................................................................... 2-31
Categorization of A Series Switches ............................................................... 2-33
HP A Series Switches Categorized by OSI Layer .............................................. 2-34
Deployment Options for HP A Series Switches ................................................. 2-35
Deployment Options for HP A Series Switches ................................................. 2-36
HP Data Center Connection Manager ............................................................ 2-37
HP Data Center Connection Manager ............................................................ 2-38
Summary ................................................................................................... 2-40

Module 3 HP A Series Switch Hardware


Objectives .................................................................................................... 3-1
LEDs ............................................................................................................ 3-2
LED Types .................................................................................................... 3-3
Switch LEDs..................................................................................... 3-3
Module LEDs ................................................................................... 3-4
Port LEDs ........................................................................................ 3-4
Switch LEDs ................................................................................................. 3-5
Switch LEDs: Power LED .......................................................................... 3-6
Switch LEDs: RPS LED .............................................................................. 3-7
Switch LEDs: Mode Button and LED .......................................................... 3-8
Switch LEDs: Seven-Segment Display LED .................................................. 3-9
Power LED Is On/Red ....................................................................... 3-9
Switch LEDs: Seven-Segment Display LED ................................................. 3-10
Power LED Is Blinking Red ................................................................ 3-10
Power LED Is Blinking Green ............................................................ 3-10
Power LED Is On/Green .................................................................. 3-10
Switch LEDs: Seven-Segment Display LED ................................................. 3-12
Power LED Is On/Green and Mode LED Is Blinking Green ................... 3-12
Port LEDs .................................................................................................... 3-13
Port LEDs at Speed Mode Setting ................................................................... 3-14
Port LEDs at Duplex Mode Setting ........................................................... 3-15
Port LEDs at PoE Mode Setting ................................................................ 3-16
Dual-Personality Port LEDs ....................................................................... 3-17
Module LEDs: Module Status ......................................................................... 3-18
LEDs on the Installed Modules................................................................. 3-19
HP A Series Switch Modules ......................................................................... 3-20
Install a Module into an A Series Switch ......................................................... 3-21
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Contents

Prepare to Install the Module ............................................................ 3-21


Install the Module ........................................................................... 3-21
Hot-swapping and Hot-inserting Modules .................................................3-23
Modules for HP A3100-SI, A5120G-EI, A5500G-SI and A5500G-EI Switches ...... 3-24
Modules and Other Components for HP A5800G Switches .............................. 3-25
Modules and Other Components for HP A5800G Switches (Cont.) .............3-27
HP A Series SFP Transceivers......................................................................... 3-28
Installing an SFP Transceiver ......................................................................... 3-29
Disconnecting the Cable Connected to an SFP Transceiver ........................ 3-30
Removing an SFP Transceiver .................................................................. 3-31
Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers........................................................................3-32
Gigabit SFP Transceivers ............................................................................. 3-33
Gigabit SFP Transceivers (Cont.) ................................................................... 3-34
10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers ........................................................................... 3-35
Connectors and Cables ............................................................................... 3-36
Copper Cabling System ............................................................................... 3-37
Cable Specifications ............................................................................. 3-39
Connectors ........................................................................................... 3-41
Auto-Sensing MDIX Ports ........................................................................ 3-42
Redundant Power for A Series Switches ......................................................... 3-43
Two Power Supplies .................................................................................... 3-44
Install a Power Supply ................................................................................. 3-45
External RPS Devices for A Series Switches..................................................... 3-46
HP RPS 1000 A3 (8A Outputs) ............................................................... 3-47
HP RPS 1000 A3 (25A Outputs) ............................................................ 3-48
HP RPS 1000 A3 (25A Outputs, Cont.) ....................................................3-49
HP RPS 800 A ..................................................................................... 3-50
HP RPS 500 A3 .................................................................................... 3-51
HP RPS 500 A3 (Cont.) .......................................................................... 3-52
Switch Fan Tray ...........................................................................................3-53
Switch Fan Tray .......................................................................................... 3-54
Replacing Fan Trays on the A5800-24G-SFP Switch and the
A5800-48G Switch with 2 Slots ...................................................... 3-54
Summary ....................................................................................................3-55

Module 4 Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches


Objectives .................................................................................................... 4-1
HP A Series Software Images and Configuration Files ....................................... 4-2
Switch Boot Process ................................................................................ 4-3
Obtaining Software Image Files ............................................................... 4-4
Managing HP A Series Software Images ................................................... 4-5
Startup-Config and Running-Config........................................................... 4-6
Saving Configuration Files ....................................................................... 4-7
Selecting the Startup-Config File ............................................................... 4-8
Management Access with the CLI ................................................................... 4-9
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Management Interfaces ......................................................................... 4-10


HP A Series CLI Command Levels ............................................................ 4-11
Access to the CLI ................................................................................... 4-13
In-band Access ..................................................................................... 4-14
Out-of-Band Console Access ................................................................... 4-16
Remote Out-of-Band Console Access........................................................ 4-17
Authentication to User Interfaces ............................................................. 4-18
Password Authentication (Local)............................................................... 4-19
AAA Scheme Authentication (Local)........................................................ 4-20
AAA Scheme Authentication (Remote)...................................................... 4-21
Changing User Privilege Level ................................................................ 4-22
Navigate CLI Views .............................................................................. 4-23
CLI Help ............................................................................................. 4-25
Common CLI Commands ...................................................................... 4-26
Web Browser Interface Management Access................................................... 4-27
Access the Web Browser Interface.......................................................... 4-28
Navigate the Web Browser Interface ...................................................... 4-29
Find a Switchs IP Address: Device Detect Application............................... 4-30
Collect Diagnostic Information ...................................................................... 4-32
Diagnostic Information .......................................................................... 4-33
display version Command ..................................................................... 4-34
display startup Command ..................................................................... 4-35
display current-configuration and saved-configuration Commands .............. 4-36
display history-command Command ....................................................... 4-37
display diagnostic-information Command ................................................ 4-38
Solve Problems Using the Boot ROM Menu and CLI ........................................ 4-39
Boot ROM Menu .................................................................................. 4-40
Install New Software: Update the Boot ROM ............................................ 4-41
Install New Software: Use XMODEM ...................................................... 4-42
Install New Software: Transfer the File .................................................... 4-43
Install New Software: Complete the Boot ROM Update ............................. 4-44
Install New Software: Install New System Software ................................... 4-45
Install New Software: Set the New Software to Main ................................ 4-46
Bypass a Faulty Configuration ................................................................ 4-47
Use the Boot ROM Menu to Bypass the Configuration ............................... 4-48
Get IP Connectivity: Assign an IP Address ............................................... 4-49
Get IP Connectivity: Set Up a Default Route .............................................. 4-51
Back Up the Startup-Config to a TFTP Server ............................................ 4-52
Restore a Known Good Configuration: From a TFTP Server ........................ 4-54
Restore a Known Good Configuration: From the Switch Flash Memory ........ 4-56
Restore Factory Default Settings: Option 1 ............................................... 4-57
Restore Factory Default Settings: Option 2 ............................................... 4-59
Reboot the Switch................................................................................. 4-60
Replace a Switch ......................................................................................... 4-61
Replace a Switch: Backup Config Available............................................. 4-62
Upgrade the Software from the CLI ......................................................... 4-63
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Contents

Replace a Switch: Backup Config from Failed Switch ................................ 4-64


Replace a Switch: No Backup Config ..................................................... 4-65
Initial Setup ......................................................................................... 4-66
Set Up Management Access: Console Access with Password
Authentication.......................................................................................4-67
Set Up Management Access: Console Access with Scheme
Authentication...................................................................................... 4-68
Set Up Management Access: Telnet and Web Browser Interface
Access Requirements ............................................................................ 4-70
Set Up Management Access: Telnet Access with Password Authentication .... 4-71
Set Up Management Access: Telnet Access with Scheme Authentication ..... 4-72
Set Up Management Access: Authentication for the Web Browser
Interface ............................................................................................. 4-73
Set Up Management Access: Super Passwords ......................................... 4-74
Save Initial Setup Changes .................................................................... 4-75
Summary ................................................................................................... 4-77

Module 5 HP E Series Switch Overview


Objectives .................................................................................................... 5-1
Switches Formerly Branded 3Com.................................................................... 5-2
HP E4210 Switch Series ................................................................................. 5-3
HP E4210 Switch Series (Cont.) ...................................................................... 5-5
HP E4210G Switch Series .............................................................................. 5-6
HP E4500 Switch Series ................................................................................ 5-8
HP E4500G Switch Series ............................................................................ 5-10
HP E4500G Switch Series (Cont.) .................................................................. 5-12
HP E4510G Switch Series ............................................................................. 5-13
HP E4800G Switch Series ............................................................................ 5-15
HP E4800G Switch Series (Cont.) .................................................................. 5-17
HP E5500 Switch Series ............................................................................... 5-18
HP E5500 Switch Series (Cont.) ..................................................................... 5-20
HP E5500G Switch Series ............................................................................ 5-21
HP E5500G Switch Series (Cont.) .................................................................. 5-23
HP Switches ................................................................................................ 5-24
HP E2510 Switch Series ................................................................................ 5-25
HP E2510 Switch Series (Cont.) ..................................................................... 5-26
HP E2520 Switch Series ............................................................................... 5-27
HP E2520 Switch Series (Cont.) ..................................................................... 5-28
HP E26XX Switch Series ............................................................................... 5-29
HP E26XX Switch Series (Cont.) ..................................................................... 5-31
HP E26XX Switch Series (Cont.) .....................................................................5-32
HP E2810 Switch Series ............................................................................... 5-33
HP E29XX Switch Series .............................................................................. 5-34
HP E29XX Switch Series (Cont.) .................................................................... 5-36
HP E29XX Switch Series (Cont.) ..................................................................... 5-37
Rev. 10.31

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E4200 vl Switch Series ........................................................................... 5-38


HP E4200 vl Switch Series (Cont.) ................................................................ 5-40
HP E3500 Switch Series .............................................................................. 5-42
HP E3500 Switch Series (Cont.) .................................................................... 5-44
HP E3500 Switch Series (Cont.) .................................................................... 5-45
HP E5400 zl Switch Series........................................................................... 5-46
HP E5400 zl Switch Series (Cont.) ................................................................ 5-48
HP E5400 zl Switch Series (Cont.) ................................................................ 5-50
HP E5400 zl Switch Series (Cont.) ................................................................. 5-51
HP E6200-24G-mGBIC yl Switch ................................................................... 5-52
HP E6600 Switch Series ...............................................................................5-53
HP E6600 Switch Series (Cont.).....................................................................5-55
HP E6600 Switch Series (Cont.).................................................................... 5-56
HP E8200 zl Switch Series............................................................................ 5-57
HP E8200 zl Switch Series (Cont.) ................................................................. 5-59
HP Threat Management Services zl Module ................................................... 5-60
Categorizing E Series Switches...................................................................... 5-62
E Series Switches Categorized by OSI Functionality ........................................ 5-63
Deployment Options for E Series Switches ..................................................... 5-64
Deployment Options for E Series Switches ..................................................... 5-65
Summary ................................................................................................... 5-66

Module 6 HP E Series Switch Hardware


Objectives .................................................................................................... 5-1
LEDs ............................................................................................................ 5-2
LEDs on E Series Switches .............................................................................. 5-3
Locate LEDs on Formerly Branded 3Com Switches............................................. 5-5
Locate Basic Switch LEDs on HP Switches ......................................................... 5-6
Use Basic Switch LEDs to Troubleshoot Problems ......................................... 5-7
Switch LEDs: Temperature LED .................................................................. 5-9
Switch LEDs: Mode Select Button and Indicator LEDs ................................. 5-11
Switch LEDs: PoE ................................................................................... 5-13
Switch LEDs: RPS LED ............................................................................. 5-14
Switch LEDs: EPS LED ............................................................................. 5-15
Switch LEDs: Module LEDs ...................................................................... 5-16
Module LEDs .................................................................................. 5-16
Module LED in PoE Mode ................................................................ 5-17
Switch LEDs: Mgt or MM Status LED ........................................................ 5-18
Switch LEDs: CF and DIM LEDs ............................................................... 5-19
Switch LEDs: SSM LED ........................................................................... 5-21
Switch LEDs: Power Supply LED ...............................................................5-22
Interpreting Port LEDs on Switches .................................................................. 5-23
Link LED......................................................................................... 5-23
Mode LED...................................................................................... 5-23
Port LEDs at PoE Mode Setting ............................................................... 5-25
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Contents

Dual-Personality Port LEDs ....................................................................... 5-26


LEDs at StartupHP E5400 zl Switch ............................................................ 5-27
LED Behavior During the Self-Test ......................................................5-27
LED Behavior When the Self-Test Completes Successfully ......................5-27
Port LEDs as the Switch Modules Begin Normal Operational Mode ...... 5-28
Hardware Reset ........................................................................................... 5-29
Reset and Clear Buttons............................................................................... 5-30
Reset Button .................................................................................. 5-30
Clear Button .................................................................................. 5-30
Reset and Clear Button ................................................................... 5-30
Using a Hardware Reset to Revert to Factory Default Settings ............................5-32
HP E Series Switch Modules ......................................................................... 5-33
Hot-swapping or Hot-inserting Modules ......................................................... 5-34
Install a Different Type of Module ........................................................... 5-35
Checklist for Installing HP AllianceONE Services zl Modules ..................... 5-36
Install a Module ................................................................................... 5-38
Prepare to Install the Module ........................................................... 5-38
Install the Module .......................................................................... 5-38
Modules for the HP E4210G, E4500G, E4510G, E4800G, and
E5500G Switches ....................................................................................... 5-40
E4210G........................................................................................ 5-40
E4500G and E4510G .................................................................... 5-40
E4800G ........................................................................................ 5-41
E5500G ........................................................................................ 5-41
Modules for HP E2900 al, E3500 yl , E4200 vl, and E6200 yl Switches ........... 5-42
HP E2910 al Switch ......................................................................... 5-42
HP E3500 yl and E6200 yl Switches .................................................5-42
HP E4200 vl Switch Series .............................................................. 5-43
Modules for HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl Switches .......................................... 5-44
Fast Ethernet.................................................................................. 5-44
Gigabit Ethernet ............................................................................ 5-44
10 GbE ........................................................................................ 5-44
Appliances ................................................................................... 5-45
Modules for HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl Switches (Cont.) ................................ 5-46
HP E Series mini-GBICs and Transceivers ........................................................5-47
Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers Formerly Branded 3Com ................................... 5-48
Gigabit SFP Transceivers Formerly Branded 3Com .......................................... 5-49
10-GbE XENPak Transceivers Formerly Branded 3Com .................................... 5-50
10-GbE XFP Transceivers Formerly Branded 3Com ........................................... 5-51
10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers Formerly Branded 3Com ......................................... 5-52
HP Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers...................................................................5-53
HP Gigabit mini-GBICs................................................................................ 5-54
HP 10-GbE and 10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers .....................................................5-55
Install a mini-GBIC or SFP Transceiver ..................................................... 5-56
Install a Mini-GBIC or SFP Transceiver ...............................................5-57
Remove a Mini-GBIC or SFP Transceiver ............................................5-57
Rev. 10.31

vii

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Install a Module ................................................................................... 5-58


Redundant Power for HP Switches .................................................................. 5-59
Optional Redundant Power Supplies for Modular Switches............................... 5-60
Power Supplies for the HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl Switch Series ....................... 5-61
Power Cords for E5400 zl and E8200 zl Switch Power Supplies........................5-62
HP E4200 vl Switch Series Power Supply ....................................................... 5-63
HP E6600 Switch Redundant Power Supplies ................................................. 5-64
Install a Power Supply ................................................................................. 5-65
RPS Devices for Formerly Branded 3Com Switches .......................................... 5-66
HP RPS 1000 A3 ......................................................................................... 5-67
HP RPS 800 A and RPS 500 A3................................................................... 5-68
HP E630 Redundant/External Power Supply ...................................................5-69
Connecting RPS and EPS Ports to Switches ......................................... 5-70
HP E620 Redundant and External Power Supply .............................................. 5-71
RPS Port Operation ......................................................................... 5-71
EPS Port Operation ......................................................................... 5-71
Connecting RPS and EPS Ports to Switches .........................................5-72
HP E610 External Power Supply ..................................................................... 5-73
Connecting EPS Ports to Switches ...................................................... 5-73
HP zl Power Supply Shelf .............................................................................. 5-74
LEDs on the Power Supply Shelf .............................................................. 5-75
Switch Fan Trays .......................................................................................... 5-76
Replacing Fan Trays ........................................................................ 5-76
Reversing Air Flow on the E6600 Switch ........................................... 5-77
Summary .................................................................................................... 5-79

Module 7 Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches


Objectives .................................................................................................... 7-1
Managing HP E Series Switches ...................................................................... 7-2
HP E Series Switch Software Images and Configuration Files ...............................7-4
Managing Software Images on HP Switches ............................................... 7-5
Multiple Configuration Files on HP Switches................................................ 7-7
Management Options .................................................................................... 7-8
Management Interfaces .................................................................................. 7-9
Advantages of Using the CLI................................................................... 7-10
Advantages of Using the Menu Interface .................................................. 7-11
Advantages of Using the Web Browser Interface ....................................... 7-12
Management Users ....................................................................................... 7-13
User Authentication: Local ...................................................................... 7-14
User Authentication: Centralized ............................................................. 7-15
CLI..............................................................................................................7-16
Access to the CLI ..........................................................................................7-17
Serial Cables for HP Switches ................................................................. 7-18
CLI Privilege Levels ....................................................................................... 7-19
Operator ....................................................................................... 7-19
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Contents

Manager ....................................................................................... 7-20


Global Configuration ...................................................................... 7-20
Context Configuration ..................................................................... 7-20
Navigate the CLI Privilege Levels ............................................................. 7-21
CLI Help .............................................................................................. 7-23
Frequently Used CLI Commands .............................................................. 7-24
Diagnostic Information ................................................................................. 7-25
show version Command ......................................................................... 7-26
show config and show running-config Commands ..................................... 7-27
show config status and show history Commands ....................................... 7-28
show tech Command ............................................................................. 7-29
Software and File Management..................................................................... 7-31
Manage Software Images and Configuration Files ........................................... 7-32
Use a TFTP Server to Upgrade to a New Software Image ........................... 7-33
Use a USB Device to Upgrade to a New Software Image........................... 7-35
Boot from the Primary or Secondary Software Image ................................. 7-36
Copy the Running-Config to a TFTP Server ................................................ 7-37
Copy the Startup-Config to a TFTP Server ................................................. 7-38
Copy a Configuration File to a USB ......................................................... 7-39
Copy a Configuration File from a TFTP Server ........................................... 7-40
Copy a Configuration File from a USB ..................................................... 7-41
Determine Which Configuration File the Switch Is Using ............................. 7-42
Specify Which Configuration File the Switch Uses ..................................... 7-43
erase startup-config Command ......................................................................7-44
Monitor ROM Console ................................................................................. 7-45
Accessing the Monitor ROM Console ................................................ 7-45
Switch Replacement ..................................................................................... 7-47
Replace a Switch: Backup Config Available.............................................. 7-48
Assign an IP Address ............................................................................. 7-49
Assign a Default Gateway or Default Route .............................................. 7-50
Save Configuration Changes .................................................................. 7-51
Update the Software and Restore the Configuration ................................... 7-52
Replace a Switch: Back up Config from Failed Switch ...................................... 7-53
Replace a Switch: No Backup Config ............................................................. 7-54
Identify the Switch ................................................................................. 7-55
Configure an Operator Password ............................................................ 7-56
Configure a Manager Password .............................................................. 7-58
Menu Interface ............................................................................................ 7-59
Access the Menu Interface ............................................................................ 7-60
Operator-Level or Manager-Level Access .................................................. 7-62
Navigate the Menu Interface .................................................................. 7-64
Getting Help ........................................................................................ 7-65
Select the Switch Configuration Option .................................................... 7-66
Port Configuration ................................................................................. 7-67
Switch Setup Window............................................................................ 7-68
Reboot Required ................................................................................... 7-69
Rev. 10.31

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Updating Software ................................................................................ 7-70


Web Browser Interface ................................................................................. 7-72
Access the Web Browser Interface ................................................................. 7-73
View the Switch Status ........................................................................... 7-74
Configure Usernames and Passwords ....................................................... 7-75
Back Up the Configuration or Update the Switch Software ......................... 7-76
Troubleshooting .................................................................................... 7-77
Summary .................................................................................................... 7-78

Module 8 HP V Series Switch Overview


Objectives .................................................................................................... 8-1
HP V Series Overview .................................................................................... 8-2
HP V Series Portfolio ..................................................................................... 8-3
Unmanaged HP V Series Switches .................................................................. 8-4
HP V1410 Switch Series........................................................................... 8-5
HP V1405 Switch Series .......................................................................... 8-6
HP V1405 Switch Series (Cont.) ............................................................... 8-7
HP V1405 Switch Series (Cont.) ............................................................... 8-8
HP V1400 Switch Series .......................................................................... 8-9
Unmanaged HP V Series Switches Summary............................................. 8-10
Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches ............................................................. 8-11
HP V1910 Switch Series ......................................................................... 8-13
HP V1910 Switch Series (Cont.) ............................................................... 8-14
HP V1905 Switch Series ......................................................................... 8-15
HP V1905 Switch Series (Cont.) .............................................................. 8-16
HP V1900 Switch Series ......................................................................... 8-17
HP OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX ................................................. 8-18
HP V1810G Switch Series ....................................................................... 8-19
HP V1700 Switch Series ........................................................................ 8-20
Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches Summary ....................................... 8-21
Summary .................................................................................................... 8-22

Module 9 HP V Series Switch Hardware


Objectives .................................................................................................... 9-1
V Series LEDs ................................................................................................ 9-2
LED Types.............................................................................................. 9-3
Identify LEDs on HP V Series Switches ....................................................... 9-4
Identify LEDs on HP V1910, V1905, and V1900 Series Switches .................. 9-5
Identify LEDs on V1405C and V1405 Desktop Switches .............................. 9-7
Identify Dual-Personality and SFP Port LEDs ................................................ 9-8
Numbered LED or Port LED ............................................................... 9-8
Module LED .................................................................................... 9-9
Procedure for Power Failures ................................................................... 9-10
Procedure for Power Failures on PoE-Powered HP V1810G-8Switches ............ 9-11
HP V1400, V1410, and V1700 Switch Series Fault Condition ...................... 9-12
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Contents

HP V1910 Series Fault Condition ............................................................. 9-13


HP V1905 Series Fault Condition ............................................................ 9-14
HP V1900-8G and OfficeConnect Managed FX Switch Fault Conditions ...... 9-15
HP V1810G Switch Series Fault Condition ................................................ 9-16
Hardware Reboots and Resets ....................................................................... 9-17
Reboot HP V Series Switches .................................................................. 9-18
Reset HP V1810G Series Switches to Factory Default Settings ...................... 9-19
Reset HP V1700 Series Switches to Factory Default Settings ....................... 9-20
Accessories for V Series Switches ................................................................... 9-21
HP V Series Mini-GBICs .........................................................................9-22
HP V Series SFP Transceivers .................................................................. 9-23
HP V Series External RPS .............................................................................. 9-24
Summary .................................................................................................... 9-25

Module 10 Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches


Objectives .................................................................................................. 10-1
Management Overview of HP V Series ........................................................... 10-2
V Series Software Image Capacity .......................................................... 10-3
V Series Configuration File Capacity........................................................ 10-4
Privilege Levels for Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches ...........................10-6
Management Options for Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches .................10-8
CLI............................................................................................................. 10-9
Access the CLI: Serial Cables for HP V Series Switches ............................ 10-10
Access the CLI .................................................................................... 10-11
V1910 and V1905 Switch Series CLI ...................................................... 10-12
V1900-8G Switch CLI .......................................................................... 10-13
V1905-8-PoE CLI ................................................................................. 10-14
HP OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX CLI.......................................... 10-15
Basic CLI Tasks ................................................................................... 10-16
View System Information ...................................................................... 10-17
Assign a Static IP Address .................................................................... 10-19
Test Connectivity with a Ping................................................................. 10-20
Reset to Factory Default Settings ............................................................ 10-21
Install Software ................................................................................... 10-22
Set the Console Password ..................................................................... 10-23
Fail-Safe Mode .......................................................................................... 10-24
Fail-Safe Mode Overview ..................................................................... 10-25
Access Fail-Safe Mode on V1905 Series Switches ................................... 10-26
Use Fail-Safe Mode: V1905 Series Switches ........................................... 10-27
Access Fail-Safe Mode: V1900-8G Switches ........................................... 10-28
Use Fail-Safe Mode: V1900-8G Switches ............................................... 10-29
Web Browser Interface ............................................................................... 10-30
Access the Web Browser Interface......................................................... 10-31
Obtain an Unknown IP Address ............................................................ 10-32
Default V Series Switch IP Addresses ...................................................... 10-33
Rev. 10.31

xi

Servicing HP Networking Products

View System Information ...................................................................... 10-34


Reset to Factory Default Settings ............................................................ 10-35
Save Current Configurations ................................................................. 10-36
Set the IP Address ............................................................................... 10-37
Test Connectivity ................................................................................. 10-39
Restore and Backup Configurations ....................................................... 10-40
Set a Password ................................................................................... 10-42
Update Software ................................................................................. 10-44
Summary ..................................................................................................10-46

xii

Rev. 10.31

Switch Overview

Module 1

Objectives
This module introduces you to the HP switch portfolio. It also describes basic
networking switch technologies.
After completing this module, you should be able to:

Rev. 10.31

List features of the three HP switch series and the type of network to which each
series is targeted
Describe the different ways to classify switches, based on the switchs form
factor, manageability, or Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) functionality
Describe the differences among unmanaged, Web-managed, and managed
switches
Explain the different environments where switches are deployed

1 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP Switch Series
HP Switch Series
HP Switch Series
A Series
E Series
V Series

Categorizing Switches

Rev. 10.31

HP has divided its extensive product portfolio of ProCurve and 3Com switches into
the HP Advanced, or A; Essential, or E; and Value, or V, Series. The next few slides
will introduce you to these product series and their target business customer.

1 2

Rev. 10.31

Switch Overview

HP A Series
HP A Series
Designed for:
Large

or complex deployments

Includes:
Robust

networking solutions from the


H3C division of 3Com

Benefits:
Single

platform

Single-pane-of-glass

management

High

capability
design
Advanced power management
Best-in-class performance
Flexibility allowing for customization
Mission-critical

Rev. 10.31

The HP A Series is designed for customers with large or complex deployments


seeking advanced technology to drive competitive advantage through their IT
infrastructure at a lower cost of ownership. Built on robust networking solutions from
the H3C division of 3Com, the A Series offers the following advantages to these
customers:

Rev. 10.31

Single platform (a common operating system from edge to core)

Single-pane-of-glass management

High capability

Mission-critical design

Advanced power management

Best-in-class performance

Flexibility allowing for customization

1 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E Series
HP E Series
Designed for:
Business

customers with changing


networking needs

Includes:
Networking

solutions from ProCurve

and 3Com

Benefits:
Deployment

simplicity

Single-pane-of-glass
Industry-leading
Reduced

management

lifetime warranty

total cost of ownership

(TCO)
5

Rev. 10.31

Competitive advantage and cost-cutting initiatives have led businesses to seek a more
agile infrastructure that can adapt to the changing needs of customers, employees,
and the business itself. And in the current economic climate especially, the need for
flexible, scalable solutions is all the more pressing.
The HP E Series is designed for customers with changing networking needs who are
looking for essential and proven technology that is easy to use, easy to deploy,
reliable, future proof, and cost effective. Combining networking solutions from HP
ProCurve and 3Com, the E Series offers these customers:

1 4

Deployment simplicity

Single-pane-of-glass management

Industry-leading lifetime warranty

Reduced total cost of ownership (TCO)

Rev. 10.31

Switch Overview

HP V Series
HP V Series
Designed for:
Value-conscious

customers in
small office environments

Includes:
Networking

solutions from
ProCurve and 3Com

Benefits:
Plug-and-play
Ease

installation

of operation

Industry-leading

lifetime warranty
on most products

Rev. 10.31

Finally, the HP V Series is designed for value-conscious customers in small office


environments seeking reliable and easy-to-use connectivity solutions. The V Series
combines networking solutions from HP ProCurve and 3Com that offer the following
advantages:

Plug-and-play installation

Ease of operation

Rev. 10.31

Industry-leading lifetime warrantyThe majority of the V series switches have a


lifetime warranty, but for a complete overview go to
http://h10144.www1.hp.com/customercare/support/warranty/index.htm.

1 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

Categorizing Switches
Categorizing Switches
HP Switch Series
Categorizing Switches
Form factor
OSI Layer functionality
Deployment options

Rev. 10.31

This section describes how switches can be categorized based on their form factor,
manageability, and functionality. They can also be categorized based on where they
are deployed on the network. For example, switches that provide network access to
endpoint devices are often called LAN access or access layer switches.

1 6

Rev. 10.31

Switch Overview

Categorizing Switches Based on Form Factor or


Manageability
Categorizing Switches Based on Form Factor
or Manageability
Fixed-port switch
Stackable switch
Modular switch
Managed switch
Web-managed switch
Unmanaged switch
Non-blocking switch

Rev. 10.31

HP Networkings portfolio includes a variety of switch types, which support a variety


of options and capabilities. Sometimes the easiest way to categorize switches is
based on their form factor or their manageability. Understanding the following terms
will help you identify some of the key differences between switches.

Fixed-port switchA switch that has a limited, predefined number of ports.


Typically, a fixed switch is one rack unit (RU) and is a stackable switch as well.
Stackable switchA switch that can be connected to one or more other
stackable switches for ease of management and operation. Typically, stackable
switches have a fixed number of ports and are rack mountableeither a one or
two rack unit (RU).
Vendors implement stackable switches in different ways. For example, some
vendors use proprietary protocols, specialized management application, and
special-purpose ports to connect the stackable switches. With its newer stackable
switches, HP uses virtual IP stacking, in which all the stackable switches share a
virtual IP address. You can manage all the switches by accessing this virtual IP
address.
Note
Only older ProCurve stackable switches, such as the ProCurve 2512 and 2524
switches, require a stacking kit and special-purpose ports.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

Modular switchA switch that does not have a defined number of ports. The
switchs ports are part of a modulea hardware componentthat can be
inserted into or removed from the switch. The switchs port capacity is, therefore,
determined by which modules are installed.
Managed switchA switch that supports the Simple Network Management
Protocol (SNMP) and allows you to control each ports communication
parameters. For example, you can enable or disable a managed switchs
individual ports, configure link speeds, and determine duplex settings.
These are the minimum capabilities for a managed switch. Most managed
switches provide a variety of other features as well, such as local mirroring (also
called port mirroring), quality of service (QoS), and port security.

1 8

Web-managed switchA managed switch that is managed only through a


Web browser interface.
Unmanaged switchA switch that enables Ethernet devices to communicate but
does not have a management interface. You simply connect the switch to other
devices, and the network is operational. Unmanaged switches are intended for
networks that require basic connectivity and have little or no IT support. They are
cost-effective and offer intuitive and simple configuration.
Non-blocking switchA switch for which the backplane speed or internal
switching mechanism bandwidth is at least as large as the sum of the speeds of
all of the ports.

Rev. 10.31

Switch Overview

Categorizing Switches Based on the OSI Model


Categorizing Switches Based on the OSI
Model
7 Application Layer
6 Presentation Layer
5 Session Layer

4 Transport Layer
3 Network Layer
2 Data Link Layer
1 Physical Layer

Layer 2 Switch

Ethernet

Layer 3 Switch
Dynamic Routing
Protocols

Layer 4 Switch
Policy-Based
Switching
Application-Based
Prioritization

IP Static
Routes

OSI Protocol Stack


9

Rev. 10.31

Switches can also be categorized by their ability to perform functions that are
defined in the Open System Interconnection (OSI) model. Developed to ensure that
network devices interoperate, the OSI model divides network architecture into seven
layers which, from top to bottom, are the Application, Presentation, Session,
Transport, Network, Data-Link, and Physical Layers. This course focuses on layers 1-4.

Layer 1
The Physical Layer consists of the standards that control devices physical connections
to each other using, for example, cables and connectors. This layer controls the
transmission of information by specifying the mechanical and electrical
characteristics of the protocol: connector size, pin assignments, voltage levels, and so
forth. This layer can also deal with cable specificationshow far apart the
communication devices can be placed from one another, for example.
On switches, routers, and wireless devices, you can use the port LEDs (which are
sometimes called link lights) to monitor and troubleshoot the physical connection.
(The LEDs on HP Networking devices are described later in this course.)

Rev. 10.31

1 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

Layer 2
The Data Link Layer is primarily concerned with packaging data packets and
controlling their transmission between two endpoints as well as with arranging bits
received from the Physical Layer into logical frames. The Data Link Layer may detect
errors and corruption that occur at Layer 1, the Physical Layer.
The Data Link Layer is divided into two sub layers: the Media Access Control (MAC)
Layer and the Logical Link Control Layer. The MAC sublayer controls how a computer
sends data across a network and how the network will receive it. It also handles how
devices are permitted to transmit data. The Logical Link Control Layer dictates frame
synchronization and flow control.

Layer 3
The Network Layer uses logical addresses, or IP addresses, to facilitate
communication across networks. Routers and switches that operate at Layer 3
perform network routing functions. Using Layer 3 protocols such as IP, these devices
can connect multiple networks, determining which traffic should be routed to
Network A versus Network B versus Network C, and so on.
In addition, Layer 3 functions include error handling, congestion control, and packet
sequencing. This means that routers and Layer 3 switches might also perform
fragmentation and reassembly, and report delivery errors.

Layer 4
The Transport Layer handles the transfer of data between devices. Protocols
operating at this layer can use flow control and error control mechanisms to ensure
the delivery of data. TCP and UDP function at the Transport Layer.

1 10

Rev. 10.31

Switch Overview

Layer 2, 3, and 4 Switches


Layer 2, 3, and 4 Switches

Layer 2

Layer 3

Layer 4

Forward traffic based on


MAC address

Route traffic based on IP


address

Enable policy-based
switching
Support application-based
prioritization

10

Rev. 10.31

Layer 2 Switch
A Layer 2 switch forwards traffic based on the frames Layer 2 information
specifically the MAC address. Because the switch operates at Layer 2, it is also
sometimes called a bridge.

Layer 3 Switch
A Layer 3 switch can forward traffic based on the frames Layer 3 informationits IP
address, for exampleas well as based on Layer 2 information. A Layer 3 switch
functions as a router (although a Layer 3 switch does not support WAN connections
as described in Module 19: Router Overview). A primary differentiation between a
Layer 3 switch and a router is that the Layer 3 switch typically forwards traffic more
quickly than a router. This difference arises because the Layer 3 switch makes
forwarding decisions at the hardware-level, dynamically reprogramming hardware
with current routing information.
A Layer 3 switch can forward IP traffic between directly connected virtual LANs using
Layer 3 information. They can also exchange route information with other Layer 3
switches or routers. The IP forwarding capabilities of these switches make them ideal
distribution or core level devices.
In addition to forwarding traffic based on IP address, Layer 3 switches deal with
error handling, congestion control, and packet sequencing.

Rev. 10.31

1 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

Light Layer 3 Switches


Light Layer 3 switches can perform basic Layer 3 tasks. They can, for example,
facilitate static routing. They may also support Routing Information Protocol (RIP), but
they do not support Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) or other dynamic routing
protocols.

Layer 4 Switch
A Layer 4 switch supports policy-based switching and can prioritize or limit traffic
based on the type of application being used. To identify the application, the switch
examines the packet header and locates the port number, which is found in Layer 4,
the Transport Layer. Essentially, a Layer 4 switch can make switching decisions and
prioritize traffic based on multiple factors, such as IP address and TCP and UDP port
numbers.
For example, a company could configure policies to ensure that video-conferencing
traffic receives priority over FTP or HTTP traffic.

1 12

Rev. 10.31

Switch Overview

Deployment Options
Deployment Options

11

Rev. 10.31

Switches can also be categorized by where they are deployed on the network.

Data Center
The data center (often referred to in a mid-market business network as a server closet,
a scaled-down version of an enterprise data center) is home to a networks
computational power, storage, and applications. Data center switches often provide
front-to-back (reversible) airflow to reduce cooling expenses; redundant hotswappable power supplies and hot-swappable fan trays for resiliency; and enhanced
port buffering for demanding high-availability applications.

Core
The core is the backbone of the network, a central or common point where traffic
flows between users, their workgroups, and shared resources. Most inter-workgroup
traffic flows through the core, so it is important that networking devices located in the
core introduce little or no delay (latency). Core switches are usually wire-speed,
highly available devices.

Rev. 10.31

1 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

Distribution
Distribution switches are consolidation points for switches that connect directly to end
stations. Distribution points are often called Main Distribution Frames (MDF) or
Intermediate Distribution Frames (IDF) and may be part of a computer room.
Distribution points may include voice and data wiring. In large networks, the
distribution layer typically implements broadcast control among VLANs and
physically distinct LANs. The Layer 3 switches make broadcast control possible.

LAN Access
Switches at the LAN access layer connect directly to end stations, such as PCs,
laptops, and printers. A LAN access switch is the last switch between end stations
and shared network resources. LAN access switches are often located in wiring
closets, with cable runs that terminate in user cubicles or offices.

1 14

Rev. 10.31

Switch Overview

Summary
Summary
HP switches are divided into Advanced (A), Essential (E),
and Value (V) series.
HP switches can be categorized by form factor,
management options, OSI functionality, and network
deployment location.

12

Rev. 10.31

This module has introduced you to the HP Advanced (A), Essential (E), and Value (V)
series of switches, which encompass products from HP ProCurve, 3Com, and the
H3C division within 3Com. You are now familiar with the types of switches in each
series, and the customers for which each type was designed.
This module also looked at ways to categorize switches, based on form factors and
management options. It also introduced the roles that different types of HP switches
play within the OSI model, and where in the network you would find these HP
switches. You should now have a good idea of what types of switches you will
encounter when troubleshooting an HP customers network.

Rev. 10.31

1 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

1 16

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

Module 2

Objectives
This module introduces you to the HP A Series switches, which are designed to meet
the needs of large enterprise customers demanding high availability, high scalability,
and a comprehensive feature set for data centers, enterprise, and campus networks.
After completing this module, you should be able to:

Rev. 10.31

Describe the basic characteristics of each HP A Series switch


Classify A Series switches, based on the switchs form factor, manageability, and
Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) functionality
Explain the different environments for which each A Series switch is designed

2 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

A Series Switches
A Series Switches
A Series Switches
A3100-SI Switch Series
A3100-EI Switch Series
A3600-EI Switch Series
A3610 Switch Series
A5120G-SI Switch Series
A5120G-EI Switch Series
A5500G-SI Switch Series
A5500G-EI Switch Series
A5800G Switch Series
A5810 Switch
IntelliJack Switch Series
HP 6120 Blade Switches
Categorization of A Series Switches
HP Data Center Connection Manager
3

Rev. 10.31

This section describes HP A Series switches. With the exception of the HP 6120 Blade
Switches, the A Series switches were formerly branded H3C or 3Com switches. The
HP 6120 Blade Switches were formerly branded HP ProCurve.
If you are supporting a switch with an older name, use the Product Naming
Conversion Matrix, which is included with this course, to identify the new name and
find the related information in this course.
Note

This course does not cover the following A Series Switches. Use the
associated URL to access the hardware installation guide for each switch:
A12500 Switch Series
(http://www.h3c.com/portal/Technical_Support___Documents/
Technical_Documents/Switches/H3C_S12500_Series_Switches/)
HP A9500 Switch Series
(http://www.h3c.com/portal/Technical_Support___Documents/
Technical_Documents/Switches/H3C_S9500E_Series_Switches/)
HP A7500 Switch Series,
(http://www.h3c.com/portal/Technical_Support___Documents/
Technical_Documents/Switches/H3C_S7500E_Series_Switches/
HP A5820X Switch Series,
http://www.h3c.com/portal/Technical_Support___Documents/
Technical_Documents/Switches/H3C_5820X_Series_Switches/)
2 2

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A3100-SI Switch Series


HP A3100-SI Switch Series
A3100-8-SI
8 10/100 ports
1 10/100/1000 port
Throughput up to 2.68 mpps

A3100-16-SI
16 10/100 ports
1 10/100/1000 port
Throughput up to 3.87 mpps

Rev. 10.31

The HP A3100-SI Switch Series consists of fixed-port, Light Layer 3, managed switches
for enterprise networks.
A3100-SI switches are designed for the access layer: they provide 10/100 Mbps
downlink and 1000 Mbps uplink ports. They connect directly to endpoints using
10/100 ports and aggregate the traffic to higher capacity switches nearer the
network core using 10/100/1000 ports.
The HP A3100-8-SI switch includes the following:

Eight auto-sensing 10/100 ports


Note
Throughout this module, unless otherwise noted, a port listed as 10/100/1000
will be understood to be auto-sensing and auto-MDIX, to support Base-T
(copper) cabling, and to comply with IEEE 802.3 Type 10Base-T, IEEE 802.3u
Type 100Base-TX, and IEEE 802.3ab 1000Base-T Gigabit Ethernet. Similarly,
unless otherwise noted, a port listed as 10/100 Mbps will be understood to be
auto-sensing, to support Base-T (copper) cabling, and to comply with IEEE
802.3 Type 10Base-T and IEEE 802.3u Type 100Base-TX.

Rev. 10.31

One 10/100/1000 port

Throughput up to 2.68 mpps

One RJ-45 console port


2 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

The HP A3100-16-SI switch includes the following:

2 4

16 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

One 10/100/1000 port

Throughput up to 3.87 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A3100-SI Switch Series (Cont.)


HP A3100-SI Switch Series (Cont.)
A3100-24-SI
24 10/100 ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
Throughput up to 6.55 mpps

A3100-8-SI switch with 1


extended module slot
8 10/100 ports
1 module slot
Throughput up to 2.68 mpps
5

Rev. 10.31

The A3100-24-SI switch includes the following features:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two 10/100/1000 ports

Throughput up to 6.55 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A3100-8-SI switch with 1 extended module slot includes the following features:

Rev. 10.31

Eight auto-sensing 10/100 ports

One module slot

Throughput up to 2.68 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

2 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A3100-SI Switch Series (Cont.)


HP A3100-SI Switch Series (Cont.)
A3100-16-SI Switch with
2 Extended Module Slots
16 10/100 ports
2 module slots
Throughput up to 5.36 mpps

A3100-24-SI Switch with


2 slots
24 10/100 ports
2 module slots
Throughput up to 6.55 mpps
6

Rev. 10.31

The A3100-16-SI switch with 2 Extended Module Slots includes the following
features:

16 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two module slots

Throughput up to 5.36 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A3100-24-SI switch with 2 slots includes the following features:

2 6

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two module slots

Throughput up to 6.55 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A3100-EI Switch Series


HP A3100-EI Switch Series
A3100-8-EI switch
A3100-8-PoE-EI switch
8 10/100 ports
1 dual-personality port
Throughput up to 2.68 mpps
A3100-8 EI switchfanless
A3100-8-PoE EI switchPoE

Rev. 10.31

The HP A3100-EI Switch Series consists of fixed-port, Light Layer 3, managed switches
for enterprise networks.
A3100-EI switches are designed for the access layer: they provide 10/100 Mbps
downlink and 1000 Mbps uplink ports. They connect directly to endpoints using
10/100 ports and aggregate the traffic to higher capacity switches nearer the
network core using 10/100/1000 ports. The switches support static routes, and
allow users to assign the management VLAN an IP address.
The A3100-8-EI and A3100-8-PoE-EI switches include the following features:

Eight auto-sensing 10/100 ports


One dual-personality portthis port can be used as either a 10/100/1000 port
or a Small Form Factor Port (SFP). (SFPs provide a variety of options including
fiber optic; see Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for more information.)

Throughput up to 2.68 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A3100-EI switch is available in an AC and DC model.


There are a couple of differences between the two eight-port switches in this series:
the A3100-8-EI switch is fanless, and the A3100-8-PoE-EI switch provides Power over
Ethernet (PoE) on all Ethernet ports.

Rev. 10.31

2 7

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A3100-EI Switch Series (Cont.)


HP A3100-EI Switch Series (Cont.)
A3100-16-EI switch
A3100-16-PoE-EI switch
16 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 5.36 mpps
A3100-16 EI switchfanless

A3100-24-EI switch
A3100-24-PoE-EI switch
24 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 6.55 mpps
A3100-24 EI switchfanless
8

Rev. 10.31

The A3100-16-EI and A3100-16-PoE-EI switches include the following features:

16 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 5.36 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

Again, there are differences between the two switches: the A3100-16-EI switch is
fanless, and the A3100-16-PoE-EI switch provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.
The A3100-24-EI and A3100-24-PoE-EI switches include the following features:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 6.55 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A3100-24-EI switch is fanless, and the A3100-24-PoE-EI switch provides PoE on
all Ethernet ports.
The A3100-16-EI and A3100-24-EI switches are available in AC and DC models.

2 8

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A3600-EI Switch Series


HP A3600-EI Switch Series
A3600-24-EI switch
A3600-24-PoE-EI switch
24 10/100 ports
4 SFP ports
Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

A3600-24-SFP-EI switch
24 10/100 SFP ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
2 SFP ports
Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

Rev. 10.31

The HP A3600-EI Switch Series consists of fixed-port, Layer 3/4, managed switches.
The switches in this series support static routes, Open Shortest Path First (OSPF),
Routing Information Protocol (RIP), Protocol Independent Multicast Dense Mode (PIMDM), and PIM Sparse Mode (PIM-SM). In addition, these switches offer the latest
traffic-prioritization technologies to optimize applications on converged networks.
These features, coupled with advanced security features and reliability, make the
A3600-EI switches well-suited for the access and distribution layers in an enterprise
network.
The A3600-EI switches come with a variety of port options, including the 28-port
switches shown here. The A3600-24-EI and A3600-24-PoE-EI switches provide the
following features:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports


Four open SFP ports (See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for a list of
optional SFP transceivers that customers can purchase and install in these ports.)

Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A3600-24-PoE-EI switch provides PoE on all Ethernet ports. The internal power
supply provides a total PoE power of 300 watts to PoE-enabled devices such as IP
phones; optional supplemental power is available.

Rev. 10.31

2 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

The A3600-24-SFP-EI switch includes the following features:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

2 10

Two open SFP ports (See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for a list of
optional SFP transceivers that customers can purchase and install in these ports.)

Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A3600-EI Switch Series (Cont.)


HP A3600-EI Switch Series (Cont.)
A3600-48-EI switch
A3600-48-PoE-EI switch
48 10/100 ports
4 SFP ports
Throughput up to 11.78 mpps

10

Rev. 10.31

The A3600-48-EI and A3600-48-PoE-EI switches include the following features:

48 auto-sensing 10/100 ports


Four open SFP ports (See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for a list of
optional SFP transceivers that customers can purchase and install in these ports.)

Throughput up to 11.78 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A3600-48-PoE-EI switch provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.

Rev. 10.31

2 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A3610 Switch Series


HP A3610 Switch Series
A3610-24 switch with 2 GigT
and 2 SFP ports
24 10/100 ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
2 SFP ports
Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

A3610-24 switch with 4 SFP


ports
24 10/100 ports
4 SFP ports
Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

11

Rev. 10.31

The HP A3610 Switch Series includes fixed-port, Layer 3/4, managed switches. The
switches in this series support static routes, OSPF, and Border Gateway Protocol
(BGP).
This series provides intelligent network management switches intended for a network
environment where advanced features, high performance, and dense port distribution
are required. For enterprise networks, HP recommends deploying A3610 switches at
the access layer or distribution layer. For small to medium-sized networks, the
versatile A3610 switches can be deployed at the access layer or the network core.
The A3610-24 switch with 2 GbE and 2 SFP ports includes the following features:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Two open SFP ports

Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A3610-24 switch with 4 SFP ports includes the following features:

2 12

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Four open SFP ports

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

(See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for a list of optional SFP transceivers
that customers can purchase and install in the open SFP ports.)

Rev. 10.31

2 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A3610 Switch Series (Cont.)


HP A3610 Switch Series (Cont.)
A3610-24-SFP switch
2 10/100/1000 ports
24 Fast Ethernet SFP ports
2 SFP ports
Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

A3610-48 switch
48 10/100 ports
4 SFP ports
Throughput up to 13.1 mpps

12

Rev. 10.31

The A3610-24-SFP switch includes the following features:

Two auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

24 open Fast Ethernet SFP ports

Two open SFP ports

Throughput up to 9.53 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A3610-48 switch includes the following features:

48 10/100 ports

Four open SFP ports

Throughput up to 13.1 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

(See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for a list of optional SFP transceivers
that customers can purchase and install in the open SFP ports.)

2 14

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A5120G-SI Switch Series


HP A5120G-SI Switch Series
A5120-16G-SI switch
16 10/100/1000 ports
4 SFP ports
Throughput up to 29.8 mpps

13

Rev. 10.31

The HP A5120G-SI Switch Series consists of fixed-port, Light Layer 3, managed


switches designed for networks where high performance, high-density port access,
and easy installation are required. These switches can be deployed at the access
layer or at the distribution layer in enterprise networks that require gigabit
connectivity.
The A5120-16G-SI switch includes the following features:

Rev. 10.31

16 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four open SFP ports

Throughput up to 29.8 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

2 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A5120G-SI Switch Series (Cont.)


HP A5120G-SI Switch Series (Cont.)
A5120-24G-SI switch
24 10/100/1000 ports
4 SFP ports
Throughput up to 41.7 mpps

A5120-48G-SI switch
48 10/100/1000 ports
4 SFP ports
Throughput up to 77.4 mpps

14

Rev. 10.31

The A5120-24G-SI switch includes the following features:

24 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four open SFP ports

Throughput up to 41.7 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A5120-48G-SI switch includes the following features:

2 16

48 auto-sensing 10/100 /1000 ports

Four open SFP ports

Throughput up to 77.4 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A5120G-EI Switch Series


HP A5120G-EI Switch Series
A5120-24G-EI switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

A5120-24G-EI switch with 2


slots
A5120-24G-PoE-EI switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

15

Rev. 10.31

The HP A5120G-EI Switch Series consists of Gigabit Ethernet, managed switches.


They support static routes, giving them the designation of Light Layer 3 switches.
In a medium to large-sized enterprise or campus network, A5120G-EI switches can
be deployed at the access layer or distribution layer, providing high-performance
and large-capacity switching service. HP also recommends deploying the A5120G-EI
Switch Series at the access layer in data centers to deliver a high-density gigabit
speed server access solution.
The A5120-24G-EI switch includes the following features:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports


Four dual-personality portsEach port can be used as either a 10/100/1000
port or a Gigabit Ethernet SFP port (See Module 3: HP A Series Switch
Hardware for more information about supported SFP transceivers.)

Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A5120-24G-EI switch with 2 slots and the A5120-24G-PoE-EI switch include the
following features:

Rev. 10.31

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

2 17

Servicing HP Networking Products

Two open module slots (on the rear panel of the switch) (See Module 3: HP A
Series Switch Hardware for more information about supported modules.)

Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A5120-24G-PoE-EI switch provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.

2 18

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A5120G-EI Switch Series (Cont.)


HP A5120G-EI Switch Series (Cont.)
A5120-48G-EI switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 71.4 mpps

A5120-48G-EI switch with


2 slots
A5120-48G-PoE-EI switch
with 2 slots
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 130.9 mpps
16

Rev. 10.31

The A5120-48G-EI switch includes the following features:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 71.4 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A5120-48G-EI switch with 2 slots and the A5120-48G-PoE-EI switch with 2 slots
include the following features:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots (on the rear panel of the switch) (See Module 3: HP A
Series Switch Hardware for more information about supported modules.)

Throughput up to 130.9 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A5120-48G-PoE-EI switch with 2 slots provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.

Rev. 10.31

2 19

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A5500G-SI Switch Series


HP A5500G-SI Switch Series
A5500-24G-SI switch
A5500-24G-PoE-SI switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

A5500-48G-SI switch
A5500-48G-PoE-EI switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 130.9 mpps
17

Rev. 10.31

The HP A5500G-SI Switch Series consists of fixed-port, managed switches that


provide high-speed connections10/100/1000 and 10 GbE. These switches
support static routes and RIPmaking them Light Layer 3 switches.
Designed for converged networks, the A5500G-SI switches are deployed at the data
center, distribution layer, and even access layer in large enterprise networks. In small
networks, they can also be deployed as a core switch.
The A5500-24G-SI and A5500-24G-PoE-SI switches include the following features:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots (on the rear panel of the switch) (See Module 3: HP A
Series Switch Hardware for more information about supported modules.)

Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A5500-24G-PoE-SI switch provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.


The A5500-48G-SI and A5500-48G-PoE-EI switches include the following features:

2 20

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

Two open modules slots (on the rear panel of the switch) (See Module 3: HP A
Series Switch Hardware for more information about supported modules.)

Throughput up to 130.9 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A5500-48G-PoE-EI switch provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.

Rev. 10.31

2 21

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A5500G-EI Switch Series


HP A5500G-EI Switch Series
A5500-24G-SFP-EI switch
8 dual-personality ports
16 open SFP ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

A5500-24G-EI switch
A5500-24G-PoE-EI switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 95.2 mpps
18

Rev. 10.31

The HP A5500G-EI Switch Series is comprised of fixed-port, Layer 3/4, managed


switches that provide advanced security, reliability, and multi-service support
capabilities. They are a full Layer 3 switch, supporting static routes and the following
routing protocols:

RIP

OSPF

BGP

IS-IS

They also support multicast routing protocols PIM-DM and PIM-SM.


The A5500G-EI switches are deployed at the access layer, distribution layer, and
data center in large enterprise and campus networks. In medium and small-sized
networks, these switches can also be deployed at the core.
Designed for maximum flexibility, these switches are available with 24 or 48 GbE
ports. PoE and non-PoE models are available with open modules slots and dualpersonality ports for fiber optic flexibility.
The A5500-24G-SFP-EI switch includes the following features:

2 22

Eight dual-personality ports, which can be used either as 10/100/1000 ports or


SFP ports
16 open SFP ports
Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

Two open module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A5500-24G-EI and A5500-24G-PoE-EI switches include the following features:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

(See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for more information about supported
modules and SFP transceivers.)
The A5500G-EI switch is available in a DC and AC model.
In addition, the A5500-24G-PoE-EI switch provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.

Rev. 10.31

2 23

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A5500G-EI Switch Series (Cont.)


HP A5500G-EI Switch Series (Cont.)
A5500-48G-EI switch
A5500-48G-PoE-EI switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 130.94 mpps

19

Rev. 10.31

The A5500-48G-EI switches include the following features:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 130.94 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The A5500-48G-PoE-EI switch also provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.


(See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for more information about supported
modules and SFP transceivers.)

2 24

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A5800G Switch Series


HP A5800G Switch Series
A5800-24G-SFP flex-chassis
switch
24 SFP ports
4 SFP+ ports
1 module slot
Throughput up to 154.75 mpps

A5800-24G switch
A5800-24G-PoE switch
24 10/100/1000 ports
4 SFP+ ports
1 module slot
Throughput up to 155 mpps
20

Rev. 10.31

The HP A5800G Switch Series consists of fixed-port, managed Layer 3/4 switches.
They support:

Static routes

OSPF

RIP

IS-IS

They also support multicast routing protocols PIM-DM and PIM-SM.


The A5800G switches meet the requirements of the most demanding enterprise
networking applications. These switches offer the highest levels of resiliency and
secure connectivity, as well as the latest traffic-prioritization technologies to optimize
applications and ensure business continuity in converged networks. In addition, some
models feature PoE, with support for up to 20W per port, and are PoE+ ready.
The A5800G switches are optimized for deployment at the core in SMB networks or
at the distribution, data center, and access layers of enterprise campus networks.
The A5800-24G-SFP switch includes the following features:

Rev. 10.31

24 SFP ports

Four SFP+ ports

One open module slot


2 25

Servicing HP Networking Products

Throughput up to 154.75 mpps

One management port on the rear panel

One RJ-45 console port

One USB port

To access the console port or to use the USB port, you must open the panel under the
logo that is on the right side of the switchs front panel.

The A5800-24G-SFP also supports hot-swappable fans.


The A5800-24G and A5800-24G-PoE switches include the following features:

24 10/100/1000 ports

Four SFP ports providing 10-GbE speeds

One open module slotThis slot can accommodate an SFP slot module or
Ethernet port module

Throughput up to 155 mpps

One RJ-45 console port on the front panel

One USB port on the front panel

In addition, the A5800-24G-PoE switch provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.


(For more information about supported modules and SFP transceivers, see Module 3:
HP A Series Switch Hardware.)

2 26

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A5800G Switch Series (Cont.)


HP A5800G Switch Series (Cont.)
A5800-48G switch
A5800-48G-PoE switch
48 10/100/1000 ports
4 SFP+ ports
1 module slot
Throughput up to 190.4 mpps

A5800-48G switch with 2 slots


48 10/100/1000 PoE ports
4 SFP ports
2 module slots
1 OAP module slot
Throughput up to 211 mpps
21

Rev. 10.31

The A5800-48G and A5800-48G-PoE switches include the following features:

48 10/100/1000 ports

Four SFP+ ports providing 10-GbE speeds

One open module slot, which supports a SFP, SFP+, or 10/100/1000 port
module

Throughput up to 190 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

One USB port

To access the console port or to use the USB port, you must open the panel under the
logo that is on the right side of the switchs front panel.
In addition, the A5800-48G-PoE switch provides PoE on all Ethernet ports.
The A5800-48G switch with 2 slots includes the following features:

48 10/100/1000 PoE ports

Four SFP ports

Rev. 10.31

Two open module slots, which support SFP, SFP+, or 10/100/1000 port
modules

2 27

Servicing HP Networking Products

One Open Application Architecture (OAA) module slot, which supports an


optional firewall, wireless LAN (WLAN) access controller, or Intrusion Protection
System (IPS) module

Hot-swappable PoE module slot

Throughput up to 211 mpps

One RJ-45 console port on the front panel

One USB port on the front panel

Hot-swappable, redundant fans

The two open module slots are on the front panel. The OAP module slot and the PoE
module slot are on the rear panel. (See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for
more information about supported modules.)
The A5800-48G switch with 2 slots does not ship with a power supply or a PoE
module. Both must be purchased separately. Likewise, the two module slots are
empty.

2 28

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP A5810 Switch
HP A5810 Switch
A5810 Switch
48 10/100/1000 ports
2 SFP+ ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 101

mpps
Available in AC or DC

model

22

Rev. 10.31

Designed for enterprise networks, the A5810 switch can be deployed at the access
layer, data center, or distribution layer. In SMB networks, it can also be deployed at
the core. This switch provides the highest levels of resiliency and secure connectivity,
as well as the latest traffic-prioritization technologies to optimize applications and
ensure business continuity in converged networks.
The A5810 Switch is a fixed-port, managed, Layer 3/4 switch. It supports:

Static routes

OSPF

RIP

IS-IS

This switch also supports multicast routing protocols PIM-DM and PIM-SM.
It provides the following:

48 10/100/1000 ports

Two SFP+ ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 101 mpps

The switch is available in an AC or DC model.


Rev. 10.31

2 29

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP IntelliJack Switch Series


HP IntelliJack Switch Series
NJ1000G Switch
4 10/100/1000 ports
2 pass-through ports

NJ2000G IntelliJack Switch


4 10/100/1000 ports
2 pass-through ports

23

Rev. 10.31

The HP IntelliJack Switch Series is designed to increase network connections and


provide support for legacy analog and digital devices. Deployed at the access layer,
these Layer 2 switches are connected to an RJ-45 jack and mounted on the wall.
They can be powered by PoE or an optional 48V local power supply.
The NJ1000G switch is an unmanaged switch; the NJ2000G switch is a Webmanaged switch.
The NJ100G and NJ2000G switches provide the following:

Four 10/10/1000 ports


Two built-in pass-through ports for legacy telephone or additional LAN
connections

The switches can forward PoE on two ports if the customer has one of the following:

2 30

3Com Single-Port IEEE 802.3at Gigabit PoE Midspan Solution

3Com IntelliJack Gigabit Switch Power Supply

3Com Baseline Switch 2226 Plus

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP 6120 Blade Switches


HP 6120 Blade Switches
6120G/XG
16 internal 1-GbE downlinks
4 external 10/100/1000 uplinks
2 external 1-GbE SFP ports
1 external 10-GbE CX4 uplink
2 external 10-GbE XFP ports

6120XG
16 internal 1-GbE downlinks
8 external SFP+ 10-GbE uplinks

24

Rev. 10.31

Designed for the data center, the HP 6120G/XG and the 6120XG switches are
installed into an HP c-Class BladeSystem enclosure. (These switches were formerly
branded HP ProCurve.) Both are Layer 2, managed switches that support QoS
metering and security features such as 802.1X, MAC authentication, and Web
authentication. In addition, both can be automatically provisioned by HP Data
Center Connection Manager.
These blade switches are well-suited for data centers that require both 1 GbE and 10
GbE connections. They have a non blocking architecture and provide wire speed on
all uplinks and downlinks.
The 6120G/XG switch provides:

Rev. 10.31

16 internal 1-GbE downlinks

Four external 10/10/1000 uplinks

Two external 1-GbE SFP ports

One external 10-GbE CX4 uplink

Two external 10-GbE

One USB console port

2 31

Servicing HP Networking Products

The 6120XG switch provides:

2 32

16 internal 1-GbE downlinks

Eight external SFP+ 10-GbE uplinks

One USB console port

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

Categorization of A Series Switches


Categorization of A Series Switches
A Series Switches
Categorization of A Series Switches
A Series Switches Categorized by OSI Layer
Deployment for A Series Switches
HP Data Center Connection Manager

25

Rev. 10.31

The next section shows how A Series switches can be categorized as Layer 2, Light
Layer 3, and Layer 3/4 switches. It also provides a table that lists the environment in
which each switch can be installed: access layer, distribution layer, core, and data
center.

Rev. 10.31

2 33

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A Series Switches Categorized by OSI Layer


HP A Series Switches Categorized by OSI
Layer

26

Layer 2

Light Layer 3

Layers 3 and 4

6120

A3100-SI

A3600-EI

IntelliJack

A3100-EI

A3610

A5120G-SI

A5500G-EI

A5120G-EI

A5800G

A5500G-SI

A5810

Rev. 10.31

This table provides a quick reference for categorizing the A Series switches
according to OSI functionality they provide. Essentially, Layer 2 switches do not route
traffic (although they can support multiple VLANs). Light Layer 3 switches provide
limited routing capabilities. All of the Light Layer 3 switches shown here support static
routes; some also support one dynamic routing protocol (typically RIP). Layer 3/4
switches provide a full suite of routing capabilities. For example, they typically
support OSPF or BGP in addition to RIP and static routes.

2 34

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

Deployment Options for HP A Series Switches


Deployment Options for HP A Series
Switches
Switch

Access Layer

Distribution Layer

Core

Data Center

A3100-SI

A3100-EI

A3600-EI

A3610

A5120G-SI

A5120G-EI

A5500G-SI

A5500G-EI

(SMB networks)

A5800G

(SMB networks)

27

Rev. 10.31

The HP A Series switches include devices suitable for deployment at all layers of an
enterprise network: access layer, distribution layer, core, and data center. As this
slide illustrates, some switch series can be deployed in more than one layer,
depending on the needs of the company and its network.
HP positions the switches in these categories, but customers can deploy the switches
wherever they want. However, such deployments are typically exceptions rather than
common practice.
Note
The HP A Series includes switches that function at the core of enterprise networks.
However, support for these switches is not covered in this course.

Rev. 10.31

2 35

Servicing HP Networking Products

Deployment Options for HP A Series Switches


Deployment Options for HP A Series
Switches (Cont.)
Switch

Access Layer

Distribution Layer

A5810

IntelliJack

6120

28

Core

(SMB networks)

Data Center

Rev. 10.31

This slide shows the deployment options for the remaining A Series switches.

2 36

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

HP Data Center Connection Manager


HP Data Center Connection Manager
A Series Switches
Categorization of A Series Switches
HP Data Center Connection Manager

29

Rev. 10.31

Several of the A Series switches are designed specifically for the data center. Many
IT organizations spend a significant amount of time setting up and managing servers
in their data centers. The HP Data Center Connection Manager can help ease the
management of these servers.

Rev. 10.31

2 37

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP Data Center Connection Manager


HP Data Center Connection Manager
Two options:
DCM Controller, an appliance
DCM ONE Software, running on HP

ONE Services zl Module

Provisions servers with settings


such as IP addresses
Automates and formalizes
workflow processes

30

Rev. 10.31

Configuring the network for new server interfaces can be a time-consuming,


inefficient process. The process can be time-consuming because it requires manual
configuration. It can be inefficient because it requires the interaction of two groups
who may not be accustomed to working togetherserver administrators and network
administrators. Further, the process itself may not be well-documented.
HP Datacenter Connection Manager (DCM) is designed to automate the process of
provisioning a network for new server interfaces. By eliminating manual
configuration of network settings for each new server interface, DCM enables server
interfaces to be brought online quickly and easily with the appropriate settings
enforced.
DCM also helps server administrators and network administrators use a process for
provisioning servers. Rather than reacting to server administrators requests or
network conditions, network administrators can prepare in advance for new server
installations by configuring connections, which determine the network attributes for
server interfaces. Server administrators, on the other hand, have a process for
notifying network administrators that a new server interface is being installed. Server
administrators also know the type of information they must provide network
administrators about the server interface.

2 38

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Overview

DCM is available in two form factors:

DCM ControllerThis 1U hardware appliance can be mounted on a 19-inch


rack.
DCM ONE Software, which runs on an HP Open Network Ecosystem (ONE)
Services zl Module. This module can be installed in:

E5400 zl Switch Series

E8200 zl Switch Series

For more information about these switch series, see Module 5: HP E Series Switch
Overview.

Rev. 10.31

2 39

Servicing HP Networking Products

Summary
Summary
Features of HP A Series switches
Different ways to categorize switches
HP A Series switches and their position in the OSI model
Environments for which HP A Series switches are designed
DCM

28

Rev. 10.31

This module has introduced you to the HP A Series switches and outlined the features
that they provide. It has also explained how to categorize the A Series switches
according to their OSI functionality and the network layer where they can be
deployed.
Finally, this module introduced you to DCM, which allows network administrators
and server administrators to work together to provision the network for server
interfaces.

2 40

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Module 3

Objectives
This module outlines the basic HP A Series switch components and accessories that
you should be familiar with to provide support to A Series customers. After
completing this module, you should be able to:

Rev. 10.31

Operate the Mode button

Identify LEDs on the switch and use them to troubleshoot problems

Identify the module and Small Form Factor (SFP) transceiver options for A Series
switches

Install modules and SFP transceivers into A Series switches

Describe connector and cabling options for switches

Describe redundant and external power supply options for A Series switches

3 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

LEDs
LEDs
LEDs

LED Types

Switch LEDs

Port LEDs

Module LEDs

A Series Switch Modules


A Series SFP Transceivers
Connectors and Cables
Redundant Power for A Series Switches
Switch Fan Tray
3

Rev. 10.31

This section explains how to interpret the various LEDs found on A Series switches.
Because the LEDs for A Series switches vary, depending on their functionality, a
thorough examination of every LED on every A Series switch would require a
significant portion of the time allotted for this course. Instead, this section is designed
to help you identify different types of LEDs and use them to determine what is
happening on the switch. You should then be able to identify a switchs operating
condition at any given moment and begin to diagnose error conditions.
For a complete explanation of a switchs LEDs, refer to the Installation Manual for the
specific switch model.

3 2

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

LED Types
LED Types
Three types of LEDs indicate the status of the switch and its
components:
Switch LEDs (status of features that impact switch operation):
Power supply
Fans
Diagnostics

Module LEDs (status and activity of modules):


Module status and activity
PoE compatibility

Port LEDs (status and activity of specific ports):


Port activity
PoE compatibility and supply
Full-duplex operation
Connection speed
4

Rev. 10.31

An A Series switch may have one or more of three general types of LEDs:

Switch LEDs

Module LEDs

Port LEDs

Switch LEDs
Switch LEDs indicate hardware and status conditions that might affect switch
operation. Typical switch LEDs report on the status and operation of the following:

Rev. 10.31

Power supply

Fan

Self-test

Temperature

Redundant power supplies

External power supplies

Power over Ethernet (PoE)

3 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

Module LEDs
Module LEDs exist only on A Series switches with modules, such as the S5800-60CPWR switch. They provide information such as the following about the operation of a
particular module:

Module status

Module activity

PoE compatibility

Keep in mind that A Series switches offer a variety of functions and capabilities.
Although many switches have similar LEDs, not all switches have or need the same
LEDs. The preceding list includes the most common LEDs; it is not a comprehensive
list.
The next several slides will provide additional information about LEDs on the A Series
switches.

Port LEDs
Port LEDs provide information about the operating status of a specific port, including
the following:

3 4

Port activity

PoE compatibility and supply

Full-duplex operation

Connection speed

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Switch LEDs
Switch LEDs

Power LED

7-Segment
Digital LED

RPS status LED


Mode LED

Rev. 10.31

Most A Series switches have four switch LEDs:

Power LED

RPS LED

Mode LED (also called the port status LED mode switching button)

Seven-segment display LED

Some switches, however, may not have all of these LEDs.


Certain LED names and aspects of LED behavior may vary among switches. The next
several slides will cover other switch LEDs that are supported on various A Series
switches.

Rev. 10.31

3 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch LEDs: Power LED

Switch LEDs: Power LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

On

PWR (or SYS)


(green/yellow/red)

Green

Switch is powered on.

Red

Power-on self-test (POST) failed.

Blinking
Green

System is performing POST.

Yellow

POST failed on some ports.

Off

Switch is powered off.

Power LED
6

Rev. 10.31

Sometimes referred to as the System Status LED, the Power LED helps you determine
the working status of the switch. All A Series switches have a Power LED, marked by
PWR or SYS on the front of the switch.
The Power LED may be steady green, flashing green, steady red, flashing yellow, or
off. Each of these indicates a specific system status.
Most A Series switches have two startup modes: normal startup and fast startup. By
default, the system starts up in fast startup mode no self-test is performed. If you set
the startup mode to normal, the switch performs a self-test, and it will take
approximately five seconds for the switch to fully boot.
When the Power LED is on/green, the switch is started normally.
When the Power LED is blinking green, the system is performing a self-test.
When the Power LED is on/red, the self-test failed. The Power LED and Sevensegment display LED together indicate the result of the self-test. We will cover this
information later in the course.
When the Power LED is blinking yellow, the self-test failed on at least one port.
When the Power LED is off, the switch is powered off.

3 6

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Switch LEDs: RPS LED

Switch LEDs: RPS LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

On
RPS
(green/yellow)

Green

AC input is normal, and the RPS is in the position or


works normally.

Yellow

RPS input is normal, but the AC input fails or is not


connected.

Blinking

RPS is not connected or input is abnormal.

(green)
*All of the A5500G-EI switches have an RPS LED except the A5500-24G-SFP-EI.

RPS LED

Rev. 10.31

Several A Series switches support redundant power supplies (RPS), which are
discussed later in this module. Each of these switches has three input modes: AC
input, RPS input, and both. When using both power input modes, the AC power
input and RPS input work as backup for one another. However, the RPS will not
supply power to the PoE ports on PoE switches.
When the RPS LED is on/green, the AC input is normal, and the RPS is position and
works normally.
When the RPS LED is on/yellow, the RPS input is normal, but the AC input has failed
or is not connected.
When the Power LED is on/red, the RPS is not connected or input is abnormal.

Rev. 10.31

3 7

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch LEDs: Mode Button and LED

Switch LEDs: Mode Button and LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

On
Mode
(green/yellow)

Green

Port LEDs indicate port speed.

Yellow

Port LEDs indicate port duplex mode.

Blinking
(green)

Mode button
changes what is
displayed on the
Port LED for each
port.

Port LEDs indicate PoE power supply (on PWR


switches only).

Mode Button

Mode LED

Rev. 10.31

To optimize the amount of information that can be displayed for each port in the
limited space available, many switches rely on multiple-display LEDs, or Mode LEDs.
These LEDs can indicate more than one port condition and are controlled by the
Mode button. The Mode LED and the Port LEDs together indicate the operation status
for the ports. Pressing the Mode button changes the setting of the Mode LED and the
condition reported by the Port LEDs.
When the Mode LED is on/green, the Port LED indicates the speed at which each
port is operating.
When the Mode LED is on/yellow, the Port LED indicates the duplex mode in which
each port is operating.
When the Mode LED is blinking green on PoE-enabled switches, the Port LED
indicates the PoE status of the port.
To change the setting of the port Mode LED, press the Mode button and cycle
through the settings until you reach the desired one. (Mode LEDs are discussed in
more detail later in the module when port LEDs are described.)
Other switches may have different mode settings. If you have questions concerning
the behavior of switch LEDs on a particular switch, consult the switchs Installation
Manual.

3 8

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Switch LEDs: Seven-Segment Display LED

Switch LEDs: Seven-Segment Display LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

Power LED is On/Red


Seven-Segment
Display LED

Displays F

Fan failure

Displays t

Over-temperature alarm.

Seven-Segment
Display LED

Rev. 10.31

Another multiple-display LED on the A Series switches is the Seven-segment display


LED. The Seven-segment display LED works together with the Power LED (and the
Mode LED on PoE-enabled switches) to indicate the switchs operating status.
In this and the following several slides, we will discuss the meaning of the many
Power LED/Seven-segment display LED combinations.

Power LED Is On/Red


First, let us look at the statuses indicated by the Seven-segment display LED when the
Power LED is on/red. When the Power LED is on/red and the Seven-segment display
LED displays F, a switch fan has failed. When the Power LED is on/red and the
Seven-segment display LED displays t, the switch has exceeded its maximum
temperature.

Rev. 10.31

3 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch LEDs: Seven-Segment Display LED

Switch LEDs: Seven-Segment Display LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

Power LED is Blinking Red


Seven-Segment
Display LED

Blinking Number

Self-test (POST) failed. The LED flashes the test


ID of the failed test.

Power LED is Blinking Green

Seven-Segment
Display LED

Displays Numbers Oneby-One

POST running. The LED displays the POST test


ID.

Clockwise Rotating Bar

Software loading.

Power LED is On/Green

Seven-Segment
Display LED

10

Displays C

Switch is the command switch in the cluster.

Displays S

Switch is cluster member.

Displays c

Switch is waiting to join cluster.

Displays a Number

Member ID of the switch in the cluster.

Rev. 10.31

Power LED Is Blinking Red


Now, let us look at the statuses indicated by the Seven-segment display LED when the
Power LED is blinking red. When the Power LED is blinking red and the Sevensegment display LED flashes a number (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or 9), the self-test
(POST) failed. The flashing number indicates the POST test ID of the failed test.
Consult the Installation Manual for information about test IDs.

Power LED Is Blinking Green


Next, let us look at the statuses indicated by the Seven-segment display LED when the
Power LED is blinking green. The Power LED blinks green while it is running the
POST. During this time, the Seven-segment display LED will display the specific
number of each test ID as it is run. When the test completes, a bar rotates clockwise
around the Seven-segment display LED.

Power LED Is On/Green


HPs Intelligent Resilient Framework (IRF) allows you to cluster a group of
interconnected switches to be managed as a single common fabric with one IP
address; this increases network resilience, performance and availability while
simultaneously reducing operational complexity.

3 10

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

The Seven-segment display LED indicates the cluster status of the switch when the
Power LED is on/green. In this case, the Seven-segment display LED should be
interpreted as follows:

Rev. 10.31

Displaying C means the switch is the command switch in the IRF cluster.

Displaying S means the switch is an IRF cluster member.

Displaying c means the switch is waiting to join an IRF cluster.

Displaying a specific number means that the number displayed is the switchs
member ID in the IRF cluster.

3 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch LEDs: Seven-Segment Display LED

Switch LEDs: Seven-Segment Display LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

Power LED is On/Green AND Mode LED is Blinking Green


Seven-Segment
Display LED

11

Displays PoE Signs

LED indicates the percentage of the switchs


maximum PoE power that is being used

Rev. 10.31

Power LED Is On/Green and Mode LED Is Blinking Green


The Seven-segment display LED indicates one additional status on PoE-enabled
switches. On a PoE-enabled switch, when the Mode LED is blinking green and the
Power LED is on/green, the Seven-segment display LED indicates the percentage of
the switchs maximum PoE power that is being used. For example, a single bar across
the bottom of the LED indicates that zero to twenty percent of the totally PoE power
the switch can provide is being used.

3 12

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Port LEDs
Port LEDs

A3610-24 Switch with 4 SFP Ports

LED in the top row corners

HP A3100-8-EI Switch
Port LEDs to the side of switch
12

Rev. 10.31

Port LEDs communicate information regarding specific ports rather than information
concerning the switch in general. This slide and the next several slides examine port
LEDs and explain how to interpret their behavior.
The slide illustrates two different locations for port LEDs. On some switches, such as
the A3100-8-EI switch, all Ethernet port and switch LEDs are located together on one
side of the switch, as shown above. On other switches, such as the A3610-24 switch
with 4 SFP ports, however, switch LEDs are located together on one side of the
switch, but each port has one port LED, which is located in the top corners of the top
row of ports.

Rev. 10.31

3 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

Port LEDs at Speed Mode Setting


Port LEDs at Speed Mode Setting
LED

State

Meaning

Mode LED is Steady Green

Port

On

Port is enabled. LED flashes quickly when sending and


receiving link signal.

Green

Port operating at highest speed.

Yellow

Port operating at low speeds.

Blinking (yellow)

Port has failed POST.

Off

Port is down.

One Port LED per port

13

Rev. 10.31

Mode LED
(Steady Green)

On most A Series switches, each port has one LED. This Port LED interacts with the
Mode LED to communicate information regarding the specific port, such as the
active, link, duplex, and speed statuses of the port.
As explained earlier, the operation of the Mode LED is controlled by the Mode
button on the switch chassis, and the current selection is revealed by the LEDs color.
Press the Mode button to change from one mode to the next. A green Mode LED
means the Port LED is in speed mode.
A green Port LED indicates that the port is operating at its maximum speed (1000
Mbps or100 Mbps, depending on the switch). The LED flashes quickly when the port
is enabled and receiving a link signal. A yellow Port LED indicates that the port is
operating at slower speeds (10/100 Mbps or10 Mbps, depending on the switch).
The LED flashes quickly when the port is enabled and receiving a link signal. If the
Port LED is off, then the port is either not receiving a link beat, or the port has been
disabled.

3 14

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Port LEDs at Duplex Mode Setting

Port LEDs at Duplex Mode Setting


LED

State

Meaning

Mode LED is Steady Yellow

Port

On

Port is enabled. LED flashes quickly when sending and


receiving link signal.

Green

Port operating in full-duplex mode.

Yellow

Port operating in half-duplex mode.

Blinking (yellow)

Port has failed POST.

Off

Port is down.

One Port LED per port

14

Rev. 10.31

Mode LED
(Steady Yellow)

You can use the Mode button to check the duplex mode of each port. Press the
button until the Mode LED displays yellow.
In Duplex Mode, a Port LED displays green if the port is operating in full-duplex
mode (meaning data can be transmitted in two directions simultaneously). The Port
LED displays yellow if the port is operating in half-duplex mode (meaning data can
be transmitted in one direction at a time).
If the Port LED is blinking yellow, the port failed POST.
If the Port LED is Off, the port is not in use or is down.

Rev. 10.31

3 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

Port LEDs at PoE Mode Setting

Port LEDs at PoE Mode Setting


LED

State

Meaning

Mode LED is Blinking Green


On
Green

Port is supplying PoE power.

Yellow

PoE power supply failure.


Connected device is not powered by PoE.

Blinking

Port

Green

Connected devices power requirements exceed the


ports maximum PoE power supply.
Switch does not have enough available PoE power to
support the connected device.

15

Yellow

Port has failed POST.

Off

Port is down.

Rev. 10.31

You can use the Mode LED to check the PoE status on each port. Press the button until
the Mode LED is blinking Green.
When the Mode LED is set to PoE mode, a green Port LED indicates that the
corresponding port is configured to provide PoE power to the connected device. If the
Port LED is yellow, the PoE power supply has failed, or the connected device is not
using PoE.
If the Port LED is blinking green when the Mode LED is set to PoE mode, the switch
does not have enough power to provide PoE to the connected device.
If the Port LED is blinking yellow, the port failed POST.
If the Port LED is Off, the port is not in use or is down.

3 16

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Dual-Personality Port LEDs

Dual-Personality Port LEDs


LED

State

Meaning

Mode LED is Steady or Blinking Green


Port

On (green)

(speed mode)

Port is operating at highest speed. LED flashes quickly


when sending and receiving link signal.

Blinking (yellow)

Port has failed POST.

(PoE mode)

Off

Port is down.

Mode LED is Steady Yellow

Port
(duplex
mode)

On (green)

Port is operating in full-duplex mode. LED flashes


quickly when sending and receiving link signal.

Blinking (yellow)

Port has failed POST.

Off

Port is down.

Mode LED
16

Rev. 10.31

Many A Series switches feature dual-personality ports. Companies can use each
dual-personality port for a Gigabit Ethernet link, or they can purchase an SFP
transceiver, which supports other types of links. (Available SFP transceivers for A
Series switches are listed later in this module.)
If the 10/100/1000Base-T port is in use, the LED for that port will reflect this use.
Likewise, if the SFP port is in use, the LED for that port will be engaged.

Rev. 10.31

3 17

Servicing HP Networking Products

Module LEDs: Module Status


Module LEDs: Module Status
LED
SLOT 1

State

Meaning

Green

Module is installed and operating normally.

Blinking (yellow)

Module type is incorrect or is not working properly.

Off

No module is installed.

A5800-48G switch

Module Status LED

17

Rev. 10.31

This slide shows the Module LEDs, using the A5800-48G switch as an example. The
Module LEDs on the other switches may not be exactly the same, but you should be
able to easily identify them. You can also consult each switchs Installation Manual
for a thorough explanation of the switchs LEDs.
The A5800G switches have numbered LEDs, each one corresponding to one of the
switchs module slots. For example, since the A5800-48G switch only has one
module slot, the LED is labeled SLOT1. If the Module LED is on, a module has been
installed in the corresponding slot and is operating correctly. If the lettered Module
LED is off, the corresponding slot is empty. If the LED is blinking yellow, the
corresponding module is not the correct type of module, not installed properly, or is
malfunctioning.

3 18

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

LEDs on the Installed Modules

LEDs on the Installed Modules


LED

Port
(SFP+ or
10/100/1000)

Speed Mode State*

Meaning

Green

Port is operating at the highest speed (10 Gbps or


1000 Mbps). LED flashes quickly when port is
sending or receiving data.

Yellow

Port is operating at the lowest speed (1 Gbps or


10/100 Mbps). LED flashes quickly when port is
sending or receiving data.

Blinking (yellow)

Port has failed POST.

Off

Port is down.

Duplex Mode State*

Meaning

Green

Port is operating in full-duplex mode. LED flashes


quickly when port is sending or receiving data.

Yellow

Port is operating in half-duplex mode. LED flashes


quickly when port is sending or receiving data.

Blinking (yellow)

Port has failed POST.

Off

Port is down.

*The Port LEDs on some modules are not affected by the Mode button.
18

Rev. 10.31

After you install a module, you can use the LEDs on the module itself to monitor the
status of ports. Port LEDs on modules function in much the same way as those on the
switch itself.
On some modules, the Mode button changes the information that the Port LED
reports. If you press the Mode button until the Mode LED displays a solid green, the
modules Port LEDs are in speed mode. (This mode is also sometimes referred to as
rate mode.) In this mode, a Port LED is green if the port is transmitting at its highest
speed. Depending on the module installed, the highest speed might be 10 Gbps or
1000 Mbps. If a Port LED is yellow, the port is operating at its lowest speed, such as
1 Gbps or 10/100 Mbps.
If you press the Mode button until the Mode LED displays yellow, the modules Port
LEDs are in duplex mode. If the Port LED is green, the port is operating in full-duplex
mode. (The ports on some modules support only full duplex.) If the Port LED is yellow,
it is operating in half-duplex mode.
On other modules, the Mode button does not affect the Port LED. For example, the
modules installed into the A5120G-EI switches are not affected by the Mode button.

Rev. 10.31

3 19

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A Series Switch Modules


HP A Series Switch Modules
LEDs
A Series Switch Modules

Installing Modules

Requirements for Hot-Swapping Modules

A Series Switch Modules and Other Components

A Series SFP Transceivers


Connectors and Cables
Redundant Power for A Series Switches
Switch Fan Tray
19

Rev. 10.31

This section explains how to both install and hot-swap modules. It also provides a
table that lists the switches that provide expansion modules and the supported
modules.

3 20

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Install a Module into an A Series Switch


Install a Module into an A Series Switch
1. Remove the blank
panel covering the
switchs module slot.
2. Insert the module into
the guides.
3. Push in the two levers
on the front of the
module.
4. Tighten the screws.

20

Rev. 10.31

Prepare to Install the Module


Before you begin installing a module, make sure that the module is supported by the
switch. Then, either remove a slot cover from the modular switch or remove a
previously installed module. To remove a slot cover or a module, use a Phillips-head
screwdriver to loosen the two screws securing the module in the slot. (You should
retain the slot cover for future use.) After loosening the screws on an installed module,
pull the levers at the bottom of the module toward you. You can then slide the module
out of the switch.

Install the Module


Avoid electrostatic discharge problems by handling the modules only by their
bulkheads. To install the module, complete these steps:

Rev. 10.31

1.

Insert the module into the slot, using the guides on the side of the switch chassis.

2.

Push on the outer edge of the module (near both screws), sliding it in until you
feel resistance. (Modules are designed with low-force connectors. Fully insert the
module into its slot, but be careful to not push too vigorously.)

3.

Push in the two levers at the bottom of the module. This will slide the module
further into the switch until it the face of the module is flush with the face of the
switch. The levers will rest against the front of the module.

3 21

Servicing HP Networking Products

4.

After the module is fully inserted, insert the two retaining screws to secure the
module in place. The screws should be tightened until they are secure but not
over-tightened.
Note
If you do not use one or more of the slots, make sure that the slot cover plate is
still attached over the slot for safe operation and proper switch cooling. You
should not have more than one module slot uncovered at a time.

3 22

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Hot-swapping and Hot-inserting Modules

Hot-swapping and Hot-inserting Modules


Hot-swappable:
Remove the current

module
Replace the module with

another of the same type

Hot-insert:
Install a new module

without rebooting

21

Rev. 10.31

A Series switches that have expansion modules support hot-swapping, which allows
you to replace a module without interrupting the operation of the switch. To hot-swap
a module, you must replace a module with one of the same type. The replaced or
new module is then immediately operational; you do not have to reboot the switch.
A Series switches also support hot-inserting, allowing you to install a module without
shutting down the switch.

Rev. 10.31

3 23

Servicing HP Networking Products

Modules for HP A3100-SI, A5120G-EI, A5500G-SI


and A5500G-EI Switches
Modules for HP A3100-SI, A5120G-EI,
A5500G-SI, and A5500G-EI Switches
Switch

Module

A3100-8-SI Switch with 1 extended


module slot
A3100-16-SI Switch with 2 extended
module slots
A3100-24-SI Switch with 2 Slots

HP 1 Port Gig-T 3100 SI Module


HP 1 Port Gig-SX SC 3100 SI Module
HP 1 Port Gig-LX SC 3100 SI Module
HP S3100-SI 1PT 100MB FX MM MDL
HP 1-Port 10/100Base-T POE 3100 SI Module

A5120-24G-EI Switch with 2 Slots


A5120-24G-PoE-EI
A5120-48G-EI Switch with 2 Slots
A5120-48G-PoE-EI Switch with 2 Slots

HP 2-Port 10-GbE A5500 Local Connection Module


HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5500/E4800/E4500 Module
HP 2-Port 10-GbE XFP A5500 Module
HP 1-Port 10-GbE XFP A5500 Module

A5500G-SI Switch Series

HP 1-Port 10-GbE XFP A5500 Module


HP 2-Port 10-GbE XFP A5500 Module
HP 2-Port 10-GbE A5500 Local Connection Module

A5500G-EI Switch Series

HP 1-Port 10-GbE XFP A5500 Module


HP 2-Port 10-GbE XFP A5500 Module
HP 2-Port 10-GbE A5500 Local Connection Module
HP 2-Port GbE SFP A5500/E4800 Module

22

Rev. 10.31

This slide lists the modules that can be installed in:

The three A3100-SI switches that support modules

The four A5120G-EI switches that support modules

The A5500G-SI Switch Series

The A5500G-EI Switch Series

For an up-to-date list of modules, visit the HP Networking Web site.

3 24

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Modules and Other Components for HP A5800G


Switches
Modules and Other Components for HP
A5800G Switches
Switch

Module

A5800-24G-SFP

HP A5800 300W DC Power Supply


HP A5500 150WAC Power Supply
HP A5500 150WDC Power Supply
HP A5800 2RU Spare Fan Assembly
HP 4-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module
HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module
HP 16-Port SFP A5800 Module
HP 16-Port Gig-T A5800 Module

A5800-24G
A5800-24G-PoE
A5800-48G
A5800-48G-PoE

HP A5800 300W AC Power Supply


HP A5800 750W DC Power Supply
HP A5800 750W AC PoE Power Supply
HP A5500 150WAC Power Supply
HP A5500 150WDC Power Supply
HP A5800 300W DC Power Supply
HP 4-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module
HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module
HP 16-Port SFP A5800 Module
HP 16-Port Gig-T A5800 Module

23

Rev. 10.31

This page and the next one list the components for the A5800G Switch Series. Keep
in mind that power supplies, fan trays, and PoE modules are hot-swappable.
The A5800-24G-SFP switch supports the following modules, power supplies, fan
modules, and PoE modules:

HP A5800 300W DC Power Supply

HP A5500 150WAC Power Supply

HP A5500 150WDC Power Supply

HP A5800 2RU Spare Fan Assembly

HP 4-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module

HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module

HP 16-Port SFP A5800 Module

HP 16-Port Gig-T A5800 Module

The A5800-24G, A5800-24G-PoE, A5800-48G, and A5800-48G-PoE switches


support the following modules:

Rev. 10.31

HP A5800 300W AC Power Supply

HP A5800 750W DC Power Supply


3 25

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A5800 750W AC PoE Power Supply

HP A5500 150WAC Power Supply

HP A5500 150WDC Power Supply

HP A5800 300W DC Power Supply

HP 4-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module

HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module

HP 16-Port SFP A5800 Module

HP 16-Port Gig-T A5800 Module

For an up-to-date list of modules for each switch, visit the HP Networking Web site.

3 26

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Modules and Other Components for HP A5800G Switches


(Cont.)

Modules and Other Components for HP


A5800G Switches (Cont.)
Switch

Module

A5800-48G Switch with 2 Slots

HP A5800 300W AC Power Supply


HP A5800 750W AC PoE Power Supply
HP A5500 150WAC Power Supply
HP A5500 150WDC Power Supply
HP A5800 300W DC Power Supply
HP A5820 VPN Firewall Module
HP 4-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module
HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module
HP 16-Port SFP A5800 Module
HP 16-Port Gig-T A5800 Module
HP PoE A5800 Module

A5810 Switch (AC)


A5810 Switch (DC)

HP A5800 300W AC Power Supply


HP A5800 300W DC Power Supply

24

Rev. 10.31

The A5800-48G switch with 2 slots supports the following modules:

HP A5800 300W AC Power Supply

HP A5800 750W AC PoE Power Supply

HP A5500 150WAC Power Supply

HP A5500 150WDC Power Supply

HP A5800 300W DC Power Supply

HP A5820 VPN Firewall Module

HP 4-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module

HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5800 Module

HP 16-Port SFP A5800 Module

HP 16-Port Gig-T A5800 Module

HP PoE A5800 Module

The A5810 switch supports the following modules:

Rev. 10.31

HP A5800 300W AC Power Supply

HP A5800 300W DC Power Supply


3 27

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A Series SFP Transceivers


HP A Series SFP Transceivers
LEDs
A Series Switch Modules
A Series SFP Transceivers

Installing an SFP transceiver


Disconnecting the Cable Connected to the SFP Transceiver
Removing an SFP transceiver
Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers
Gigabit SFP Transceivers
10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers

Connectors and Cables


Redundant Power for A Series Switches
Switch Fan Tray
25

Rev. 10.31

The next section explains how to install or remove an SFP transceiver. It also lists the
A Series switches and the SFP transceivers they support.

3 28

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Installing an SFP Transceiver


Installing an SFP Transceiver
1. Pivot the clasp on
the transceiver up- it
should catch a knob
on the top of the
transceiver.
2. Hold both sides of
the transceiver and
gently push it into
the socket until you
feel the spring tabs
catch in the socket.
26

Rev. 10.31

To install an SFP transceiver, complete the following steps:


1.

Remove any fibers from the transceiver before installing it.

2.

Pivot the clasp on the transceiver up until it catches a knob on the top of the
transceiver.

3.

Hold the transceiver on both sides and push the transceiver into the socket until it
makes firm contact with the socket. You should be able to feel the top and
bottom clasp release catch.

If you are installing a transceiver in an area with limited space, you can gently push
on the front face of the transceiver instead of holding it by the sides during
installation.

Rev. 10.31

3 29

Servicing HP Networking Products

Disconnecting the Cable Connected to an SFP Transceiver

Disconnecting the Cable Connected to an


SFP Transceiver
1. Use your thumb to
apply gentle
pressure to the
connector.
2. Pull the clasp on
the cable out.

27

Rev. 10.31

To disconnect a cable connected to an SFP transceiver, complete the following steps:


1. Use your thumb to apply gentle pressure to the connector and loop your
forefinger through the ring attached to the cable connector, as shown in the
picture above.
2. Pull the clasp on the cable out in a parallel direction.
It is very important to make sure you pull the cable directly backward; if you try to
pull the cable in a direction that is not parallel to the socket, you could damage the
clasp or triangular fillister, which is a part of the socket that connects to the clasp to
keep the cable from slipping out while installed.

3 30

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Removing an SFP Transceiver

Removing an SFP Transceiver


1. Disconnect the fiber
cable from the
transceiver.
2. Pivot the clap down
to a horizontal
position.
3. Gently pull the
transceiver out of the
socket.

28

Rev. 10.31

To remove an SFP transceiver, complete the following steps:


1.

Disconnect the fiber cable from the transceiver.

2.

Pivot the clasp down to a horizontal position.

3.

Hold the transceiver on both sides and gently pull it out of the socket.

Make sure to pivot the clasp down to a horizontal position. Doing so releases the
spring tabs from the socket. If you try to pull the transceiver out with the clasp in
vertical position and the spring tabs still caught in the socket, you could damage the
spring tabs or the transceiver socket.

Rev. 10.31

3 31

Servicing HP Networking Products

Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers


Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers
A3100-EI

A5500G-EI

A5800G

HP X115 100M
SFP LC FX

HP X110 100M
SFP LC LX

HP X115 100M
SFP LC BX 10-U
HP X115 100M
SFP LC BX 10-D

A3600-EI

A3610

A5120G-SI

A5120G-EI

HP X110 100M
SFP LC LH40

HP X110 100M
SFP LC LH80

29

Rev. 10.31

This table shows which A Series switches support Fast Ethernet SFP transceivers.

3 32

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Gigabit SFP Transceivers


Gigabit SFP Transceivers
A3100EI

A3100SI

A3600EI

A3610

HP X125 1G SFP LC
SX

HP X120 1G SFP LC
LX

HP X120 1G SFP LC
BX 10-U

HP X120 1G SFP LC
BX 10-D

A5120GSI

A5120GEI

A5500GEI

A5800G

HP X125 1G SFP LC
LH40 1310nm

HP X120 1G SFP LC
LH40 1550nm

HP X125 1G SFP LC
LH70

HP X125 1G SFP
RJ45 T

30

Rev. 10.31

This table shows which A Series switches support Gigabit SFP transceivers.
(Additional Gigabit SFP transceivers are listed on the following page.)

Rev. 10.31

3 33

Servicing HP Networking Products

Gigabit SFP Transceivers (Cont.)


Gigabit SFP Transceivers (Cont.)
The remaining Gigabit SFP transceivers are supported only
by the A3100-EI Switch Series:
HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1470
HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1490
HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1510
HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1530
HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1550
HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1570
HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1590
HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1610

31

Rev. 10.31

The A3100-EI Switch Series also supports the Gigabit SFP transceivers listed below.

3 34

HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1470

HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1490

HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1510

HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1530

HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1550

HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1570

HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1590

HP X170 1G SFP LC LH70 1610

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers


10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers
A5800G Switch Series
HP X130 10G SFP+ LC SR
HP X130 10G SFP+ LC LRM
HP X130 10G SFP+ LC LR

32

Rev. 10.31

This table lists the 10-GbE SFP+ transceivers the A5800G Switch Series supports:

Rev. 10.31

HP X130 10G SFP+ LC SR

HP X130 10G SFP+ LC LRM

HP X130 10G SFP+ LC LR

3 35

Servicing HP Networking Products

Connectors and Cables


Connectors and Cables
LEDs
A Series Switch Modules
A Series SFP Transceivers
Connectors and Cables

Copper Cabling System

Cable Specifications

Connectors

Auto-Sensing MDIX Technology

Redundant Power for A Series Switches


Switch Fan Tray
33

Rev. 10.31

This section examines the connector and cable specifications for A Series switches.
The interface-connector-cable combination can have a significant impact on the
performance of the network and should therefore be given careful consideration.
The section also discusses the auto-sensing MDIX feature available on every A Series
switch port.

3 36

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Copper Cabling System


Copper Cabling System
TIA/EIA-568-A defines a performance rating system for UTP
cable and connecting hardware:
Category 3 performance is defined up to 16MHz.
Category 4 performance is defined up to 20MHz.
Category 5 performance is defined up to 100MHz.
Category 6 performance is defined up to 200MHz.

Impedance and structural return loss


Attenuation
Propagation delay

34

Rev. 10.31

In 1991, the Electronic Industries Association published standard EIA-568,


Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling Standard, which specified the
use of voice-grade unshielded twisted pair (UTP) as well as shielded twisted pair for
in-building data applications. At that time, the specification was felt to be adequate
for the range of frequencies and data rates found in office environments.
Up to that time, the principal interest for LANs was in the range of data rates from 1
Mbps to 16 Mbps. As users migrated to higher performance workstations and
applications, companies were increasingly interested in providing LANs that could
operate up to 100 Mbps over inexpensive cable. In response to this need, the
Electronic Industries Association issued EIA-568-A in 1995. The new standard reflects
advances in cable and connector design and test methods. It specifies 150-ohm
shielded twisted pair and 100-ohm unshielded twisted pair.
EIA-568-A recognizes three categories of UTP cabling:

Rev. 10.31

Category 3UTP cables and associated connecting hardware that have


transmission characteristics specified up to 16MHz.

Category 4UTP cables and associated connecting hardware that have


transmission characteristics specified up to 20MHz.

Category 5UTP cables and associated connecting hardware that have


transmission characteristics specified up to 100MHz.

3 37

Servicing HP Networking Products

Of these, Category 3 and Category 5 cable have received the most attention for
LAN applications. Category 3 corresponds to the voice-grade cable found in many
office buildings. Over limited distances, and with proper design, data rates of up to
16Mbps should be achievable with Category 3. Category 5 is a data-grade cable
that is becoming increasingly common for pre-installation in new office buildings.
Over limited distances and with proper design, data rates of up to 100Mbps should
be achievable with Category 5.
A key difference between Category 3 and Category 5 cable is the number of twists
in the cable per unit distance. Category 5 is much more tightly twisted, typically 3 to
4 twists per inch compared to 3 to 4 twists per foot for Category 3. The tighter
twisting is more expensive but provides much better performance than Category 3.
EIA-568-A specifies the expected performance of Category 3 and 5 UTP, as well as
the more expensive shielded twisted pair STP. The first parameter used for
comparison, attenuation, is fairly straightforward. The strength of a signal falls off
with distance over any transmission medium. For copper wire media, attenuation is
generally logarithmic and therefore is typically expressed as a constant number of
decibels per unit distance. Attenuation introduces three considerations for the
designer:

First, a received signal must have sufficient magnitude so that the electronic
circuitry in the receiver can detect and interpret the signal.

Second, the signal must maintain a level sufficiently higher than noise in order to
be received without error.

Third, attenuation is an increasing function of frequency.

Near-end crosstalk, as applied to twisted-pair wiring systems, is the coupling of the


signal from one pair of conductors to another pair. These conductors may be the
metal pins in a connector or wire pairs in a cable. The term near end refers to
coupling that takes place when the transmit signal entering the link couples back to
the receive conductor pair at that same end of the link; that is, the near transmitted
signal is picked up by the near receive pair.
Enhanced Category 5 and Category 6 specify cable performance characteristics to
higher levels.

3 38

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Cable Specifications

Cable Specifications

35

Interface Type

Cable Supported

Maximum Distance

100/1000Base-T

Category 5 UTP

100 meters

1000Base-LX

Single-mode (9 micron)

10 kilometers

1000Base-LH

Single-mode (9 micron)

70 kilometers

1000Base-LX

Multimode (62.5 or 50 micron)

550 meters

1000Base-SX

Multimode (62.5 micron)

220 meters

1000Base-SX

Multimode (50 micron)

500 meters

100Base-FX

Multimode (62.5 or 50 micron)

2 kilometers

10GBASE-ER

Single-mode (9 micron)

40 kilometers

10GBASE-LR

Single-mode (9 micron)

10 kilometers

10GBASE-SR

Multimode (62.5 micron) and


Multimode (50 micron)

33 meters and
300m

10GBASE-LRM

Multimode (62.5 or 50 micron)

220 meters

Rev. 10.31

When the IEEE began to define the specifications for transmission of Ethernet frames
at 1 Gbps, they recognized the need to allow it to work over a variety of media. The
approved cable types and their maximum distances are shown in the table above.
Note that you must use the best-quality fiber cables to achieve the maximum
distances. (These guidelines are for a point-to-point link between two switches or
between a switch and a station.)
An important goal for Gigabit Ethernet is to provide backward compatibility with
existing standards for 10Base-T, 100Base-TX, and 100Base-FX.
Although the 10Base-T standard allows for voice-grade unshielded twisted pair
cabling (Category 3 UTP), 100Base-T requires data-grade cable known as Category
5 UTP. To support 1000Base-T (known as IEEE 802.3ab), the Category 5 UTP
standard has been enhanced to impose some additional restrictions. When using
1000Base-T over existing wiring, you must verify that the cabling complies with
Category 5E (addendum 5 to the TIA-568-A standard, which is also known as
ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-A-5). Many existing Category 5 installations are suitable for
gigabit over copper, but because signals are sent over all four pairs, the cabling
system must adhere to using all four pairs and should be tested for attenuation, nearend crosstalk (NEXT), and far-end crosstalk (FEXT).
1000Base-T can be used when the distance between switches is short. For example,
it may be used for several switches in the same room or for short distances between
a switch and servers with gigabit network adapters. 1000Base-T can also be used
over distances up to 100 meters between floors or wiring closets.
Rev. 10.31

3 39

Servicing HP Networking Products

Another option for connecting network devices is fiber optic cable, which is available
in single mode and multimode. One difference between these two types of cables is
in the diameter of the glass channel down the center of the cable (also known as the
core). Another difference is in the way that signals are transmitted through the
core.
In single mode fiber, a laser generates a single signal that travels straight down the
center of the channel in what is called coaxial mode. The signal is constrained in a
narrow (9-micron diameter) core and is carried over long distances. With single
mode fiber, the 1000Base-LX standard specifies up to 10 kilometers; however, single
mode fiber is capable of carrying a signal up to 70 kilometers using long-haul
transceivers known as Gigabit-LH.
In multimode fiber, the transmitter generates multiple light signals that are reflected
off the internal walls of the cable. The variance in propagation of the signals
translates into a shorter distance before attenuation makes the signal
indistinguishable. In general, a smaller diameter constrains the signal more than a
larger diameter; 50-micron multimode fiber allows a distance up to 500 meters,
while 62.5-micron fiber supports a distance up to 220 meters.
The 100Base-FX standard specifies multimode fiber at a maximum supported
distance of 2 kilometers. So, while the media may be compatible for an upgrade
from 100Base-FX to 1000Base-SX or LX, you should always verify the distance.
Gigabit Ethernet requires single mode cable for distances that are over 550 meters.
At times you may need to use multimode fiber at distances exceeding 550 meters. In
this situation you may need to consider how many available strands of fiber are
currently installed and determine whether traffic could be carried over multiple links.
Although 100Base-FX transceivers use LEDs to generate light signals, both 1000BaseLX and 1000Base-SX transceivers use lasers due to Gigabit Ethernets high data rate.
However, the properties of laser-generated signals make it better suited to single
mode fiber; multiple light rays generated by a laser (over multimode fiber) will
interfere with each other, severely limiting the maximum distance.
It should be noted that, with the exception of Gigabit-LH, these are standards-driven
specifications. Recent developments in technologies have allowed for greater
distances in the gigabit fiber technologies. Much of this is dependent upon the
quality of the fiber used in the installation. Many vendors now claim greater
distances than previously stated when the standards were finalized. In some
situations HP now supports 10 kilometers on single-mode fiber for Gigabit Ethernet.
IEEE 802.3ae defines the standard for 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10 GbE), which provides
data rates of 10 gigabits per second over fiber optic cable. 10BASE-ER and
10GBASE-LR run on single-mode fiber optic cable. 10GBASE-SR and 10BASE-LRM
run on multimode fiber optic cable.

3 40

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Connectors

Connectors

LC

MTRJ

RJ-45

36

Rev. 10.31

The connector type describes the port pin assignments and the attachment port.
The most common interface on todays switches and routers is the RJ-45. It supports
UTP cable (Category 3, 4, 5, 5e, and 6) and data rates from 10 to 1000 Mbps
(maximum distance is 100 m).
Another common interface is the MTRJ. It is a multi-mode fiber connector with the
same form factor as the RJ-45, but internally it has a send and a transmit fiber. It
supports a 100 Mbps data rate up to a distance of 2 km.
For fiber optic ports, there are several port connectors. Typically, the LC connectors
attach to SFP transceivers or mini-GBICs. They provide the smallest footprint and thus
the greatest port density.
Note
D4 is an older-style connector found in older military and government
infrastructures.

The interface-connector-cable combination can have a significant impact on the


performance of the network. Be careful and note that a particular type of connector
does not ensure a particular type of cable. An LC could be connecting either
multimode or single mode. The SFP transceivers or mini-GBICs look the same, so you
must be sure to read the label.

Rev. 10.31

3 41

Servicing HP Networking Products

Auto-Sensing MDIX Ports

Auto-Sensing MDIX Ports


All A Series switches support auto-MDIX:
Automatically reverses transmit and receive pins as needed
Allows you to use a straight through cable even when the connecting

device requires a crossover cable


Also automatically negotiate speed with end device

37

Rev. 10.31

By default, A Series switch ports provide auto-MDIX, which automatically reverses


transmit and receive pins as needed. This means that even in situations in which you
would normally need a crossover cable, you can still use a straight-through cable. For
example, some DSL routers require a crossover cable. Because A Series switches
have auto-MDIX, however, you can use a regular straight-through cable to connect to
these types of devices.
In addition, A Series switch ports automatically negotiate speed with the end device.
You can change this default setting to configure a particular speed.

3 42

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Redundant Power for A Series Switches


Redundant Power for A Series Switches
LEDs
A Series Switch Modules
A Series SFP Transceivers
Connectors and Cables
Redundant Power for A Series Switches

Two Power Supplies

Installing a Power Supply

External RPS

Switch Fan Tray


38

Rev. 10.31

This section examines options for providing A Series switches with sources of
redundant power. Redundant power protects the entire network: if the primary source
of power fails, the network will continue operating without disruption.

Rev. 10.31

3 43

Servicing HP Networking Products

Two Power Supplies


Two Power Supplies
The A5800-48G switch with 2 slots and the A5800-24GSFP switch support two power supplies.
The power supply modules are hot-swappable and provide
backup in case one power supply fails.

39

Rev. 10.31

Some switches support redundant, load-sharing power supplies, which are installed
in the back of the switch. To provide true redundancy, this second power supply
should be connected to a different AC power source than the other supply. Then, if
one AC power source fails, the switch will continue to run.

3 44

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Install a Power Supply


Install a Power Supply
1. Insert the power supply
into an open power
supply slot.
2. Push the power supply
all the way back until
the power supply face
is flush with the back
face of the switch.
3. Tighten the screws.

40

Rev. 10.31

To install the power supply, complete the following steps:


1. Using Philips-head screwdriver, loosen and remove the screws holding the slot
cover or existing power supply in place.
2. Install the power supply into an open power slot as shown in this slide.
Caution
The switch power supplies are hot-swappable; they can be installed while the
switch is receiving power from the supply in another slot. But, as indicated by the
caution statement on the power supply, the supply must not be connected to AC
power before being installed.

3. Push the power supply all the way into the switch chassis until the face of the
power supply is flush with the back face of the switch.
4. Insert and tighten the screws to secure the power supply.

Rev. 10.31

3 45

Servicing HP Networking Products

External RPS Devices for A Series Switches


External RPS Devices for A Series Switches
A Series switches support:
HP RPS 1000 A3
HP RPS 800 A
HP RPS 500 A3

41

Rev. 10.31

A Series switches also support external power supplies, which provide power
redundancy. External redundant power supplies are crucial to providing high network
availability by ensuring that connected switches can continue operating even if the
main power supply fails.
Customers can use one of three RPSs with A Series switches:

RPS 1000 A3

RPS 800 A

RPS 500 A3

In addition to providing redundancy, the RPS 1000 A3 provides additional PoE.

3 46

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

HP RPS 1000 A3 (8A Outputs)

HP RPS 1000 A3 (8A Outputs)


Redundant power for switches
Additional power for PoE-enabled switches
A Series switches supported:
A3600-EI Switch Series

A3610 Switch Series

A3600-24-EI

A3610-24 with 4 SFP Ports

A3600-48-EI

A3610-24 with 2 GigT and 2 SFP


Ports

A3600-24-SFP-EI

A3610-24-SFP
A3610-48

42

Rev. 10.31

The RPS 1000 A3 is the only RPS that provides additional power for PoE-enabled
switches. The unit has two power inputs and eight total output connections; two of the
outputs are 25A (amp) outputs, and other six are 8A. The slide shows the switches
that can be connected to the 8A outputs.
The RPS 1000 A3 provides up to 2900 W of power with two power modules
installed.
The RPS 1000 A3 (8A outputs) can be used in conjunction with the following:

Rev. 10.31

A3600-24-EI

A3600-48-EI

A3600-24-SFP-EI

A3610-24 with 4 SFP Ports

A3610-24 with 2 GigT and 2 SFP Ports

A3610-24-SFP

A3610-48

3 47

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP RPS 1000 A3 (25A Outputs)

HP RPS 1000 A3 (25A Outputs)


Redundant power for switches
Additional power for PoE-enabled switches
A Series switches supported:
A3610 Switch Series

A5800G Switch Series

A3610-24 with 4 SFP


Ports

A5800-24G-PoE

A3610-24 with 2 GigT


and 2 SFP Ports

A5800-48G-PoE

A3610-24-SFP

A5800-48G with 2 slots

A3610-48

43

Rev. 10.31

The RPS 1000 A3 can be used in conjunction with the following switches and those
listed on the next page:

3 48

A3610-24 with 4 SFP Ports

A3610-24 with 2 GigT and 2 SFP Ports

A3610-24-SFP

A3610-48

A5800-24G-PoE

A5800-48G-PoE

A5800-48G switch with 2 slots

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

HP RPS 1000 A3 (25A Outputs, Cont.)

HP RPS 1000 A3 (25A Outputs, Cont.)


A3600-EI Switch
Series

A5120G-EI Switch
Series

A5500G-SI Switch
Series

A5500G-EI Switch
Series

A3600-24-SFP-EI

A5120-24G-PoE-EI

A5500-24G-PoE-SI

A5500-24G-PoE-EI

A3600-48-PoE-EI

A5120-48G-PoE-EI
with 2 Slots

A5500-48G-PoE-SI

A5500-48G-PoE-EI

A3600-24-EI

A5500-24G DC-EI

A3600-48-EI
A3600-24-SFP-EI

44

Rev. 10.31

This table continues the list of switches that can be used with the1000 A3 (25A
outputs):

Rev. 10.31

A3600-24-SFP-EI

A3600-48-PoE EI

A3600-24-EI

A3600-48-EI

A3600-24-SFP-EI

A5120-24G-PoE-EI

A5120-48G-PoE-EI Switch with 2 Slots

A5500-24G-PoE-SI

A5500-48G-PoE-SI

A5500-24G-PoE-EI

A5500-48G-PoE-EI

A5500-24G DC-EI

3 49

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP RPS 800 A

HP RPS 800 A
Redundant power for switches
A Series switches supported:
A5500G-EI Switch Series

A5800G Switch Series

A5500-48G-EI

A5800-24G
A5800-24G-SFP

45

Rev. 10.31

The RPS 800 A provides redundant power for A Series switches. Unlike the RPS 1000
A3, however, the RPS 800 A does not provide PoE.
The 800-A supports the following switches:

3 50

A5500-48G-EI

A5800-24G

A5800-24G-SFP

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

HP RPS 500 A3

HP RPS 500 A3
Redundant power for switches
A Series switches supported:

46

A3600-EI Switch Series

A3610 Switch Series

A5120G-EI Switch Series

A3600-24-EI

A3610-24 with 4 SFP


Ports

A5120-24G-EI with 2
Slots

A3600-48-EI

A3610-24 with 2 GigT


and 2 SFP Ports

A5120-24G-EI

A3600-24-SFP-EI

A3610-24-SFP

A5120-48G-EI with 2
Slots

A3610-48

A5120-48G-EI

Rev. 10.31

The RPS 500 A3 provides redundant power for A Series switches. It does not provide
additional PoE. It supports the following switches:

Rev. 10.31

A3600-24-EI

A3600-48-EI

A3600-24-SFP-EI

A3610-24 with 4 SFP Ports

A3610-24 with 2 GigT and 2 SFP Ports

A3610-24-SFP

A3610-48

A5120-24G-EI Switch with 2 Slots

A5120-24G-EI

A5120-48G-EI Switch with 2 Slots

A5120-48G-EI

3 51

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP RPS 500 A3 (Cont.)

HP RPS 500 A3 (Cont.)

47

A5500G-EI Series

A5500G-SI Series

A5500-24G EI

A5500-24G SI

A5500-24G DC EI

A5500-48G SI

Rev. 10.31

The 500 A3 RPS also supports the following switches:

3 52

A5500-24G-EI

A5500-24G DC-EI

A5500-24G-SI

A5500-48G-SI

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Switch Fan Tray


Switch Fan Tray
LEDs
HP A Series Switch Modules
HP A Series SFP Transceivers
Connectors and Cables
Redundant Power for A Series Switches
Switch Fan Tray
Hot-Swappable Switch Fan Tray

48

Rev. 10.31

This section examines the A Series switches which support hot-swappable fan trays,
and provides instructions on how to swap out the fans.

Rev. 10.31

3 53

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch Fan Tray


Switch Fan Tray
Supported on:
A5800-24G-SFPswitch
A5800-48G with 2 slots

switch (shown here)

49

Rev. 10.31

The A5800-24G-SFP switch and the A5800-48G with 2 slots switch have fan trays
that can be replaced if a problem occurs. Both switches ship with the fans already
installed, but replacements can be hot-swapped in case a fan tray fails.
The fan trays for each switch are listed below.

LSW1BFAN (For the A5800-24G-SFP switch)

LSW1FAN (For the A5800-48G switch with 2 slots)

Replacing Fan Trays on the A5800-24G-SFP Switch and the A5800-48G


Switch with 2 Slots
You can hot-swap the fan trays on the A5800-24G-SFP switch and the A5800-48G
switch with 2 slots as long as the new tray is installed within 2 minutes of removing
the previous tray. If the system operates for more than two minutes without the fan
trays installed, the chassis will overheat.
For both switches, the fan trays are on the back panel. To replace the fan tray,
complete these steps:
1. Loosen and then remove the screws securing the fan tray in place.
2. Using the handle on the installed fan tray, pull the fan tray out of the switch
chassis.
3. Insert the new fan tray into the switch chassis and push until it is firmly seated.
4. Insert and tighten the screws on the new fan tray.
3 54

Rev. 10.31

HP A Series Switch Hardware

Summary
Summary
Use LEDs to monitor status of the switch and to troubleshoot problems
Learn how to install modules and transceivers.
Review RPS options for A Series switches
Learn how to install fan trays.

50

Rev. 10.31

This module introduced you to the basic hardware components for A Series switches.
To review what you have learned, make sure that you can explain the basic types of
LEDs on A Series switches and review the information these LEDs can provide you
when you are at a customer site.
In addition, you should learn how to install modules and SFP transceivers as well as
switch fan trays. Finally, review the RPS options for A Series switches.

Rev. 10.31

3 55

Servicing HP Networking Products

3 56

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Module 4

Objectives
In the previous module, you learned how to identify fault conditions and other
problems on an HP A series switch by examining its LEDs. To deal with these
problems, you might need to collect more information from one of the switchs
management interfaces, bypass a fault configuration or install a new software image.
Or, if you are installing a new switch to replace a failed one, you must get the switch
up and running the customers configuration.
You will now learn the basics of gaining access management to HP A Series
switches, navigating their management interfaces, and completing the necessary
tasks. By the time that you have completed this module, you will be able to:

Manage configurations and software on A Series switches

Access the A Series switches CLI out-of-band and in-band

Identify the command levels of the CLI and navigate the CLI

Use the CLI help functions to find the correct syntax for commands

Perform basic management tasks in the CLI

Replace a failed switch and, if possible, restore the customers configuration

Rev. 10.31

Access the Boot ROM menu to solve problems with lost passwords or corrupted
software
Set up access to the Web browser interface

4 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP A Series Software Images and Configuration


Files
HP A Series Software Images and
Configuration Files
HP A Series Software Images and Configuration Files

Software Images

Configuration Files

Management Access with the CLI


Management Access with the Web Browser Interface
Collect Diagnostic Information
Solve Problems Using the Boot ROM Menu and CLI
Replace a Switch

Rev. 10.31

Later in this module, you will learn some processes for solving the problems that you
learned how to identify in the previous module. For these processes to make sense,
however, you first need some background knowledge. The first two sections of this
module provide this background knowledge, starting with the concepts of software
images and configuration files.
The operating system (OS) for HP A switches is contained in a software image file
that is loaded when the switch boots up. The switchs particular settings, such as IP
settings, port settings, and so forth, are stored in configuration files.
This section teaches you about how these files are stored, managed, and loaded for
active use. You must understand these concepts so that you can correctly install new
software when a switchs software is corrupted or otherwise not working. Similarly,
you might need to download a working configuration file to a switch with faulty
settings or to a replacement switch.

4 2

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Switch Boot Process

Switch Boot Process

Boot ROM
Two pieces
of code

System software image

1 Boot ROM runs

Hardware is
initialized

System software
image runs

Rev. 10.31

When you apply power to a switch, the switch begins to boot. First the Boot ROM
code is loaded. This code manages the boot process. As this code runs, the switchs
hardware is initialized and checked. When this step completes successfully, the Boot
ROM calls up and begins to boot the system software image, which contains the
actual OS for the switch.

Rev. 10.31

4 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

Obtaining Software Image Files

Obtaining Software Image Files

FTP server

A Series switch

TFTP server
NVRAM flash memory
Stored as files

System software

System software

System software

Rev. 10.31

The Boot ROM code and system software image are stored in the switchs flash
memory (its non-volatile random access memory [NVRAM]), which is maintained
when the switch is powered down. HP sometimes issues updates to the software. This
software can be downloaded to the switchs NVRAM from a File Transfer Protocol
(FTP) or Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server.
On most A Series switches, the Boot ROM and the system software are stored in
separate files and are updated separately. Most updates affect the system software
image only, but sometimes the Boot ROM code must be updated first. The release
notes should indicate whether you need to do so.

4 4

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Managing HP A Series Software Images

Managing HP A Series Software Images


A Series switch

NVRAM (flash memory)

System software

System software
System software

Main
attribute
Backup
attribute

System software

System software
6

Rev. 10.31

An HP A Series switch can store multiple Boot ROM and software image files in its
flash memory, but only one image runs. You can control the image to which the
switch is booted by setting the main and backup attributes.
The switch boots the software with the main attribute first. If this software fails to boot
for some reason, the switch attempts to boot the software with the backup attribute.
Only one software image file has the main attribute, and only one has the backup
attribute. However, the same file can have both attributes.
The Boot ROM code, when it is stored in a separate file, is similarly marked with
main and backup attributes.

Rev. 10.31

4 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

Startup-Config and Running-Config

Startup-Config and Running-Config

A Series switch

1 System boots up

Startup-config

Running-config

Configuration
is changed

Running-config
File saved in NVRAM
flash memory

Rev. 10.31

When the switch boots up, it applies the settings that are stored in one of the
configuration files stored in flash memory. This file is called the startup-config file
because it is applied whenever the switch boots up.
The settings that are loaded from the startup-config become the running-config. You
can make changes to the running-config, and the new settings become the new
running-config. The running-config is stored in RAM and is not preserved when the
switch is powered down.

4 6

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Saving Configuration Files

Saving Configuration Files


A Series switch

Running-config

Configuration
is saved

NVRAM (flash memory)

Named file
Named file

Named file

Rev. 10.31

You can preserve the settings in the running-config by saving them to a named file in
the flash memory. The HP A Series switches can store multiple configuration files.

Rev. 10.31

4 7

Servicing HP Networking Products

Selecting the Startup-Config File

Selecting the Startup-Config File


A Series switch

NVRAM (flash memory)

Saved file

Saved file

Main
attribute
Backup
attribute

Startup-config

Startup-config
if main fails

Saved file
Saved file
9

Saved file

Rev. 10.31

Just as an A Series switch can store multiple software images, but only one is booted,
only one of the saved configuration files is the startup-config that is applied when the
switch boots up. The switch first uses the saved file that is marked with the main
attribute as the startup-config. If this file is corrupt and cannot be applied, the file
with the backup attribute becomes the startup-config file.
The rules for setting the main and backup configuration file are the same as those for
image files:

4 8

One file can be marked with the main attribute

One file can be marked with the backup attribute

The main and backup file can be the same file (but do not have to be)

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Management Access with the CLI


Management Access with the CLI
HP A Series Software Images and Configuration Files
Management Access with the CLI

Introduction to the CLI


CLI Privilege Levels
Accessing the CLI In-band and Out-of-Band
Local and Remote Management Authentication
Navigating the CLI
CLI Tips and Shortcuts

Management Access with the Web Browser Interface


Collect Diagnostic Information
Solve Problems Using the Boot ROM Menu and CLI
Replace a Switch
10

Rev. 10.31

You will now learn about different ways to access and manage HP A Series switches,
beginning with an introduction to the CLI, which is one of the main management
interfaces for these switches. You will learn about the command privilege levels so
that you can obtain the correct level for the commands that you need to use. You will
find out how to access the CLI in several different ways, and how to authenticate
when necessary.
You will then learn the basics of navigating the CLI with the help of some tips and
shortcuts.

Rev. 10.31

4 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

Management Interfaces

Management Interfaces
HP A Series switches support:
CLI
Web browser interface
SNMP*

*Not discussed in this course


11

Rev. 10.31

You can manage HP A Series switches in several different ways.


In a Command Line Interface (CLI), you type commands that change the switchs
configuration settings. All settings can be configured through the CLI, making it the
most comprehensive management option.
A Web browser interface is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that you access by
contacting the switch with your Web browser. You might find this interface easier to
use, particularly because it includes online help for various settings. However, you
may not be able to reach this interface when the switch is experiencing problems,
making the CLI your principal management option.
One final notethe HP A Series switches can participate in an SNMP solution. In
such a solution, network administrators manage a solution centrally from an SNMP
server, which collects information from and issues commands to SNMP agents
residing on infrastructure devices. Because you will be managing individual devices,
this course will not discuss SNMP.

4 10

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

HP A Series CLI Command Levels

HP A Series CLI Command Levels


HP A Series switches

CLI
Command levels

12

Visitor
Diagnosis commands such as ping
and traceroute

Monitor
Basic read-only commands

System
Services configuration commands
(read-write)

Manager
System (files, users) management
commands (read-write)

Rev. 10.31

On HP A Series switches, each CLI command is associated with one of four


command levels:

Level 0Visitor
Visitor level commands, such as ping and traceroute, help you diagnose a
device and find connectivity problems.

Level 1Monitor
Monitor commands display information about configuration settings and event
logs. They also provide debugging for more in-depth troubleshooting. These
commands are read-only; in other words, the command reads information from
the current configuration or stored logs, but they do not write changes to the
switchs configuration.

Level 2System
System commands, which are read-write, primarily relate to configuring the
services that the switch provides. For example, configuring IP settings, port
settings, routing protocols, and so forth, are system level commands. Some
commands related to saving configuration changes are also found at the system
level.

Rev. 10.31

4 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

Level 3Manage
Manage commands, which are also read-write, deal with managing the switchs
file system as well as management users. For example, at this level, you can add
management users, change the users rights or password, and so forth.

The command levels are user-configurable (using manage level commands). For
example, you could change a particular display command from monitor level to
system level. However, most customers leave the command levels at the default
settings, so when you learn the syntax for particular commands a bit later, you will
learn the default level for that command.

4 12

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Access to the CLI

Access to the CLI

In-band

Ethernet
connection

13

Out-of-band

HP A Series switches

Direct serial connection


to console port

Rev. 10.31

There are two basic ways that you can reach the CLI:

In-band
With in-band access, you use the Ethernet connection on your management
station to contact the switch over the network at its management IP address. You
can connect your station directly to one of the switchs ports, as shown in the
slide, but this is not necessary. As long as the switch has network connectivity,
you can reach it from any port in the LAN.

Out-of-band
An out-of-band connection is devoted to the communication between your
management station and the switch. Using a serial cable, you connect the
console port on your station directly to the console port on the switch. This form
of access does not require the switch to have network connectivity, which often
makes it a good choice when the device is experiencing problems. You do,
however, need physical access to the switch.

Rev. 10.31

4 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

In-band Access

In-band Access
Telnet
SSH (encrypted)

HP A Series switches

Ethernet
connection

CLI
<ASwitch> ping 172.16.1.2
User interface
PING 172.16.1.2: 56 data bytes,
VTY0 - N
press CTRL_C to break
C
User privilege level = 0 Reply from 172.16.1.2: bytes=56

Sequence=1 ttl=255 time=25 ms

14

Rev. 10.31

You can use one of two protocols to establish an in-band management session to
the CLI:

Telnet

SSH

The protocols seem similar from a users viewpointyou will see the same CLIbut
SSH is more secure because it encrypts the traffic flowing between the switch and
your management station. The encryption prevents hackers from capturing packets
and learning information about the customers infrastructure.
You will need a terminal session application that supports Telnet or SSH to establish
the session with the switch. Examples include TeraTerm and PuttY, which are freely
downloadable.
When you establish an in-band management session with the CLI, the switch assigns
you to a user interface, which controls the settings for the session. The user interfaces
for in-band sessions are labeled VTY. Each management user who connects to the
switch at the same time is assigned to a different interface. The interfaces are
differentiated by number, with the first user being assigned to 0, the next to 1, and so
forth. The number of separate sessions that are allowed varies from device to device.

4 14

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Each user interface (for example, VTY0 and VTY1) has its own settings. The most
important setting for your purposes is the user privilege level, which determines the
level of commands that a user connected to that interface can issue. The user
privilege levels correspond with the command levelsvisitor, monitor, system, and
manage. A user at a particular level can enter all the commands at his or her own
level and levels below. For example, a manage user can issue all commands.
By default, the user privilege level for VTY interfaces is 0 (visitor). A customer could
have altered this setting, so you should ask. In addition, other settings can override
this privilege level. You will learn more later in this module.

Rev. 10.31

4 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

Out-of-Band Console Access

Out-of-band Console Access


Cable
RJ-45 to DB-9 adapter cable

Terminal
software settings:

HP A Series switches
Serial connection

Baud rate = 9,600


Data rate = 8
Parity = None
Stop bits = 1
Flow control = None

CLI
<ASwitch> system-view
[ASwitch]

User interface
AUX0
User privilege level = 3

15

Rev. 10.31

To obtain out-of-band console access to a switch, you must use the proper cable to
connect your station to the switch. This RJ-48 to DB-9 adapter cable ships with the
switch. One connector on this switch is an Ethernet connector and fits in the console
port on the switch. The DB-9 connector fits in your stations console port.
Most terminal session software that supports Telnet or SSH, including TeraTerm and
PuttY, also support console sessions. You can also create a console session using
Windows HyperTerminal. You must set the proper settings, which are listed on the
slide, in your software. Otherwise, you might not see the CLI at all, or the text might
be garbled.
When you establish a console session with an A Series switch, you are assigned to a
user interface that is labeled AUX. The A Series switches about which you are
learning support one console port and thus one console session labeled AUX0. The
default user privilege level for the AUX interface is manager (3).

4 16

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Remote Out-of-Band Console Access

Remote Out-of-band Console Access


You can connect to the console port through a modem.
The modem must use the correct settings.
HP A Series switches

Serial connection to the


console port

Modem

PSTN

Modem

CLI
<ASwitch> system-view
[ASwitch]

16

Rev. 10.31

Some of the HP A Series switches offer a means to connect to the console port
remotely. The customer must connect the console port to a modem that is connected
to the PSTN. On your end, you must connect your management station to a modem
that can reach the customers modem. You can then dial in to the modem and access
the console port.
For this solution to work, the customers modem must use the correct settings (because
the customer might have any type of modem, this course will not document how to
implement the settings):

Rev. 10.31

Answers automatically after the first ring

Ignores DTR and RTS signals

Disables flow control

Forces DSR to high level

Disables returning command response and result

4 17

Servicing HP Networking Products

Authentication to User Interfaces

Authentication to User Interfaces


Authentication method set per-user interface
User interface
VTY1 5

User interface
AUX0

Authentication:
C
None, Password*
or Scheme (AAA)

Authentication:
C
None*, Password,
or Scheme (AAA)
HP A Series switches

Ethernet connection

Serial
connection to
console port

*Default setting
17

Rev. 10.31

You might be prompted to authenticate when you establish your management


session. HP A Series switches support several types of authentication, which the
following slides discuss in more detail:

None, which actually means that you do not need to authenticate but are
immediately granted the user privilege level set on the interface
Password
Scheme (part of an Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting [AAA]
solution)

The authentication method is set per-user interface. The default setting for all VTY
interfaces is password while the default setting for the AUX interface is none. If you
are attempting to access a configured switch, you should talk to the customer and
find out which method is being used on the interface that applies to your connection.

4 18

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Password Authentication (Local)

Password Authentication (Local)


Password set locally on the user interface
1. Switch prompts for password.
2. Management user types password.
3. Switch validates password and grants the access set for
the user interface (AUX0 or VTY0-n).

Ethernet or console
connection

18

Rev. 10.31

Lets look at password and scheme authentication in more detail, beginning with
password.
When a user connects to a user interface set to password authentication, the switch
prompts for a password. The management user submits the password, which the
switch validates against the password set for that user interface and stored locally on
the switch. If the password matches, the switch allows the user to connect, granting
the user the privilege level set for that interface.

Rev. 10.31

4 19

Servicing HP Networking Products

AAA Scheme Authentication (Local)

AAA Scheme Authentication (Local)


The switch authenticates users against its list of local users:
1. Switch prompts for credentials.
2. Management user types username and password.
3. Switch validates credentials and grants the access level
and type set for that user.
Ethernet or console
connection
1
2
bob
*******

19

Local users
terminal/telnet
3 bob
*******
manage (3)
mary
telnet
*******
system (2)

Rev. 10.31

When an interface enforces scheme authentication, the switch refers to schemes that
are configured on the switch globally to decide how to authenticate the user. First,
you will look at a local scheme because this is the default setting for VTY interfaces.
With a local scheme, management users are authenticated against user accounts
configured on the switch itself. Each user account has its own privilege level, which
determines the level of commands that the user can enter. Note that, if the user is not
assigned a privilege level, he or she receives level 0 even if the interface itself is set
to a higher level. In addition, the account specifies the type of management access
that the user is allowed (whether console or Telnet and so forth).
When you attempt to connect to a user interface using the scheme method, you must
know the credentials for a user stored on the switch, the user privilege level that you
will receive, and the type of access that you are allowed.

4 20

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

AAA Scheme Authentication (Remote)

AAA Scheme Authentication (Remote)


Users authenticate to a remote RADIUS or TACACS server
4. Server validates login credential
against its database and send
results to switch.
5. Switch grants access level and
type set for user.

1. Switch prompts for user name and


password.
2. User supplies user name and
password.
3. Switch forwards login credentials to
server.

bob 2
*******

Ethernet or console
connection
20

RADIUS or
TACACS
server

Rev. 10.31

A user interface might be set to a remote authentication scheme. Such a scheme


references a RADIUS or TACACS server, which is responsible for authenticating the
management user. The switch still prompts the user for his or her username and
password when the user initiates a management session. But the switch then forwards
the credentials to the external server. This server both checks the validity of the
credentials and assigns the user to a privilege level. When you need to access a user
interface using this type of authentication, you will need the credentials of a user
stored on the network server with the attribute for the privilege level that you need.

Rev. 10.31

4 21

Servicing HP Networking Products

Changing User Privilege Level

Changing User Privilege Level


Command: super <level>
Higher to lower always allowed
Lower to higher requires super password set for that level

Super password location set by user interfaces super user


authentication method:
Password
HWTACACS
Both

21

Rev. 10.31

As you have learned, you are assigned to a particular user privilege level when you
establish your management session. However, you can change privilege levels by
entering the super command and typing the number of the level to which you want to
change. For example, you can type: super 3.
You are always allowed to move to levels that are lower than your current level.
Someone might do so before handing off the control of the terminal session to a
lower-level administrator. However, if you attempt to move to a higher level, you must
enter the super password set for that level (even if you originally logged in at the
level that you are trying to reach).
The super passwords location is set by the user interfaces super user authentication
method. If it is set to password (the default), you must know the super password
configured on the switch. If the switch does not have a super password for the level
that you are attempting to reach, you will not be permitted to change levels. If the
super user authentication method for your interface is HWTACACS, you must enter
the password set on the external TACACS server.
Note
An interface might also be set for both methods, in which case, one of the
methods is a backup method. For example, HWTACAS is the primary method,
but the server cannot be reached, so the password is checked against the
switchs local super password.

4 22

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Navigate CLI Views

Navigate CLI Views

system-view
User privilege
level System (2)

User view: <device name>

quit
return
Ctrl+Z

System view: [device name]


quit

Other command views


Ex. [device name-ui-aux0]

22

Rev. 10.31

The A Series switch CLI is divided into several different views, each of which contains
a set of related commands. You must be in the correct view to enter a particular
command. For example, the super command about which you just learned must be
entered from the user view. From now on, whenever you are introduced to a
command, you will be told which views support that command.
Note that a view, which is related to logical organization, is different from a
command level, which is related to security. A view might contain commands
associated with several different command levels.
You can determine your current view by examining the CLI prompt.
When you first connect, you are in the user view, which is indicated by angle
brackets (< >) around the switchs device name. The user view provides commands
related to troubleshooting and viewing settings as well as to managing
configurations.
From the user view, you can change to system view, which is the central point for all
views in which settings are configured. The prompt changes to indicate that you are
in the system view, square brackets ([ ]) replacing the angle brackets. To reach the
system view from the user view, enter the system-view command. Note that this is a
system level (2) command, so users at the visitor and monitor level must remain in the
user view.

Rev. 10.31

4 23

Servicing HP Networking Products

The system view branches into several other command views, some of which
themselves lead to more command views. The slide shows an example of a
command viewthe AUX0 user interface view, in which you configure settings for
that interface. The prompt also changes to indicate the command view, adding a
string that is specific to the view. For example, the prompt for the AUX0 user interface
command view is [device name-ui-aux0].
Use the quit command to move back one viewfor example, from a command
view to the system view or from the system view to the user view. Many user view
commands can only be entered from the user view, so you might want to move to
that view quickly. At any point, you can enter return to move directly to the user
view.

4 24

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

CLI Help

CLI Help
Display the commands available at the current view:
<device name>?

Display the options available for a command:


<device name> terminal ?

Display the commands that begin with the string:


<device name> c?

Display hotkeys:

Switch displays a list of commands beginning with


those letters.

<device name> display hotkey


23

Rev. 10.31

You do not have to memorize the exact syntax for every command because the CLI
provides help functions.
Enter ? at the command prompt to see a list of all commands that are available at
that view as well as descriptions of those commands. Most commands include
multiple options from which you must choose. To see all options that are available for
a command, enter ? after the command, making sure to separate the command and
? with a space. If the option itself leads to more options, type ? again to see those.
You will know that the command is complete when you see <cr> listed as the option.
If you know the letter or letters with which the command starts, you can type those
letters followed by ? (with no space). All commands that begin with those letters in
that view are displayed.
Finally, the CLI supports several hotkeys, which allow you to repeat commands,
cancel commands, and so forth. Enter the display hotkey command to see a list
of the keys and an explanation of their function.

Rev. 10.31

4 25

Servicing HP Networking Products

Common CLI Commands

AAA Scheme Authentication (Remote)


Users authenticate to a remote RADIUS or TACACS server
4. Server validates login credential
against its database and send
results to switch.
5. Switch grants access level and
type set for user.

1. Switch prompts for user name and


password.
2. User supplies user name and
password.
3. Switch forwards login credentials to
server.

bob 2
*******

Ethernet or console
connection
20

RADIUS or
TACACS
server

Rev. 10.31

The table in the slide provides a reference for commands that you will often use in
managing an HP A Series switch. Most of these commands support several options.
For example, for the copy command, you must specify the source file and the
destination file, or, for the display command, you must enter the option for the type
of information that you want to view. Remember that you can use ? to see a list of
valid options.
The undo options function depends on the command in front of which it is placed. It
can disable a function, remove a configuration, or restore the default setting for a
configuration.
The table divides commands according to their command level. Note that some
display and reset commands are at the monitor level (1) and some are at the system
level (2).

4 26

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Web Browser Interface Management Access


Web Browser Interface Management Access
HP A Series Software Images and Configuration Files
Management Access with the CLI
Management Access with the Web Browser Interface
Access the Interface
Navigate the Interface
Find a Switchs IP Address
Collect Diagnostic Information
Solve Problems Using the Boot ROM Menu and CLI
Replace a Switch

25

Rev. 10.31

Lets leave the CLI for the moment and briefly examine another option for managing
HP A Series switches: the Web browser interface.

Rev. 10.31

4 27

Servicing HP Networking Products

Access the Web Browser Interface

Access the Web Browser Interface


URL = Switch IP address or FQDN
Login (same user privilege levels as CLI)

26

Rev. 10.31

The Web browser interface offers an easy and intuitive way to manage HP A Series
switches. Because you require IP connectivity to the switch in order to reach this
interface, you will probably use it less often than the CLI in support situations. In
addition, the Web browser interface is not available at factory default settings.
However, you should still know how to reach the interface when it is available.
To access the interface, simply open a compatible Web browser such as Internet
Explorer (IE) and enter the switchs management IP address for the URL. (You can
also use the fully-qualified domain name (FQDN) if your management station uses a
DNS server that knows how to resolve the switchs hostname.)
Log in with the credentials that the customer gives you. Management access to the
Web browser interface is divided into similar levels as the CLI. If you do not have
manager access, some windows and settings will not be available.

4 28

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Navigate the Web Browser Interface

Navigate the Web Browser Interface


Switch name

Navigation bar

Port status

27

Select a task

Rev. 10.31

When you first access the Web browser interface, you are at the Device Summary >
Device View window. This window shows the status for all of the ports on the switch.
(To see what the different colors mean, click the Color Key tab.) The lower pane
displays the switchs hostname, MAC address, software version, and other key
information.
To access other windows, use the navigation bar at the left. The slide shows the tasks
that branch out from the Administration level. To complete a task, click it and follow
the guidelines in the interface.

Rev. 10.31

4 29

Servicing HP Networking Products

Find a Switchs IP Address: Device Detect Application

Find a Switchs IP Address


Device Detect Application

28

Rev. 10.31

As mentioned, you will usually access the HP A Series switch via a console session
for troubleshooting. But imagine that you do not have physical access to the switch or
are locked out of console access. You must access the switch through an inline
management session such as the Web browser interface (or Telnet or SSH to the CLI).
But this requires you to know the switchs IP address. The customer might be able to
tell you. But if not, you might find discovering the switchs address problematic. You
can search the DHCP leases for an address assigned to the switchs MAC address if
the customer allows you.
But the 3Com Device Detect Application offers an easier solution. This application is
provided with the A Series switches, and you can also download it from the HP
Networking Web site. Simply install the software on your management station, run
the software, and follow these steps:
1.

In the first window, select the network adaptor on which you are connected to
the switch. (You can have a direct connection or a connection through the LAN).
Click Next.

2.

Next, select the scope for the discovery and click OK:

4 30

Perform discovery on subnetSelect this option when you know or suspect


that the switch has an IP address on the same subnet as your management
station.

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

3.

Rev. 10.31

Perform discovery on IP rangeWhen you have less idea of the switchs IP


address, you should select this option. Enter the range of viable IP
addresses in the LAN. (You could also enter a range of most likely
addresses, and, if the discovery fails, run the application again with a
different range.)

The Discovered Devices window lists the switches as they are detected. You can
select a switch and click open to access its Web browser interface.

4 31

Servicing HP Networking Products

Collect Diagnostic Information


Collect Diagnostic Information
HP A Series Software Images and Configuration Files
Management Access with the CLI

29

Management Access with the Web Browser Interface


Collect Diagnostic Information
Solve Problems Using the Boot ROM Menu and CLI
Replace a Switch

Rev. 10.31

With this background in the HP A Series switches software, configuration files, and
management interfaces, you are ready to learn about troubleshooting. You will begin
by learning some CLI commands that are useful for collecting diagnostic information.
(To issue these commands, you must create a terminal session to the CLI and log in
as you learned how to do earlier.)

4 32

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Diagnostic Information

Diagnostic Information
Collect information about the
switch:
Version
Configuration
Recent commands

Save out complete diagnostic


information.

30

Rev. 10.31

You will learn how to view the switchs software version and other system information,
the configuration files that are in use and the contents of the files, and recently issued
commands.
You will also learn how to create a file with complete diagnostic information.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

display version Command

display version Command


Monitor (1)
Display information about the switchs software image:
<ASwitch> display version

System boot file version

H3C Comware Platform Software


Comware Software, Version 5.20, Feature 1110
Copyright (c) 2004-2010 Hangzhou H3C Tech. Co., Ltd. All rights reserved.
H3C S5800-32C-PWR uptime is 0 week, 0 day, 8 hours, 25 minutes
H3C S5800-32C-PWR with 2 Processor
512M bytes SDRAM
4M bytes Nor Flash Memory
512M bytes Nand Flash Memory
Config Register points to Nand Flash
Hardware Version is Ver.B
CPLD Version is 003
Boot ROM version
BootRom Version is 102
[SubSlot 0] 24GE+4SFP Plus+POE Hardware Version is Ver.B
[SubSlot 1] No Module

31

Rev. 10.31

The display version command is available at the monitor level and from any
view. Use this command to find out whether the system software image and the Boot
ROM code are up-to-date. The command also displays other information such as the
system uptime and the memory capacities.

4 34

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Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

display startup Command

display startup Command


Monitor (1)
Display which saved configuration is being used as the startup:
<ASwitch> display startup
MainBoard:
Current startup saved-configuration file: NULL
Next main startup saved-configuration file:
flash:/aa.cfg
Next backup startup saved-configuration file:
flash: /bb.cfg

startup-config that the


switch booted

Saved file that will booted


Saved file that will booted
if the main fails

32

Rev. 10.31

As you learned, an HP A Series switch can hold multiple configuration files. When
you need to know which file is acting as the actual startup-config, enter another
monitor level command: display startup. (You can be in any view.)
The command displays the current startup-configthat is, the file that was applied
when the switch last bootedas well as the file that is marked as the startup-config
for the next time the switch boots. It also shows the file marked as the backup startupconfig in case the main one fails to load.
In the example in the slide, the switch was at factory default settings when it loaded
(NULL configuration file). The switch has since been configured, and the
configurations have been saved to two named files, aa.cfg and bb.cfg, the first of
which was marked as the main startup config and the second as the backup. Each
file preserves the running-config at the time that the file was saved. (The runningconfig now might match either file or neither).
Note that this command does not tell you anything about the settings within the
configuration files. You will learn the commands for that next.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

display current-configuration and saved-configuration Commands

display current-configuration and savedconfiguration Commands


System (2)
Display the configurations in the running-config or startup-config :
<ASwitch> display [current-configuration | saved-configuration]
version 5.20, Test 5310
#
sysname ASwitch
#
domain default enable system
3-8
#
telnet server enable
#
multicast routing-enable
#
vlan 1
#
domain system
access-limit disable
---- More ---33

Running-config
(dynamic memory)

Configuration selected as main


startup-config (NVRAM)

Rev. 10.31

To see the actual settings within the running-config or startup-config, you must be at
the system command level but can be at any view.
Enter display current-configuration to see the settings in the running-config,
which are important because these settings are currently in effect. Enter display
saved-configuration to see the settings in the main startup-config, which will be
the settings applied whenever the switch boots up in the future.
The slide illustrates how the configurations settings are displayed to the terminal.
Each applied configuration is displayed in one line, but the output only includes
settings that deviate from the default settings. Global configurations are displayed
first, then port configurations, and then user interface configurations. If the terminal
runs out of room before the entire configuration has been displayed, you see
- - - -More- - - -. Press [Spacebar].
When you add the by-linenum option to either of the commands, a number is
added at the beginning of each line, enabling you to refer to particular settings more
easily as you troubleshoot.

4 36

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Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

display history-command Command

display history-command Command


Monitor (1)
Display the recent command history:
[ASwitch] display history-command
system-view
vlan 2
port Gig 1/0/27
quit
Most recent command

34

Rev. 10.31

Sometimes you will be configuring a switch and want to double-check what you just
did. Or you might be brought in to troubleshoot a problem and need to see what
changes have been made to the switch recently. The most recently entered commands
are stored in the history buffer, which holds ten commands by default but can be
enlarged. The display history-command command outputs the history buffer to
the terminal, beginning with the least recent command in the buffer and proceeding
to most recent (expect for the display-history command itself).
Note that commands are displayed exactly as they were entered, so you will not see
the full command if the user who entered the command in shortened form.
The display history-command is a monitor level command that can be entered
from any view.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

display diagnostic-information Command

display diagnostic-information Command


Monitor (1)
Compile detailed information about the switchs operation and
configuration:
<ASwitch> display diagnostic-information
Save or display diagnostic information (Y=save,
N=display)? [Y/N]:n
=================================================
===============display clock===============
=================================================
08:54:16 UTC Fri 11/15/2008
===================================================
===============display version===============
========================================
---- More ----

35

Rev. 10.31

Another monitor level command, display diagnostic-information, combines


the output for several display commands to give you a detailed view into the switchs
operation and configuration. When you enter the command, you are given the
option to output the information to a saved file (press [y]) or to the terminal (press
[n]). If you choose to save the information to a file, you can then transfer that file off
of the switch (youll learn how later).
The slide shows the beginning of the output if you choose to display the diagnostic
information.

4 38

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Solve Problems Using the Boot ROM Menu and CLI


Solve Problems Using the Boot ROM Menu
and CLI
HP A Series Software Images and Configuration Files
Management Access with the CLI
Management Access with the Web Browser Interface
Collect Diagnostic Information
Solve Problems Using the Boot ROM Menu and CLI

Access the Boot ROM Menu


Install New Software
Bypass a Faulty Configuration

Replace a Switch

36

Rev. 10.31

You will now learn basic processes for accessing a switch that cannot be accessed
by normal means. You will then learn some tasks that can help to get the switch
running again.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

Boot ROM Menu

Boot ROM Menu


Access the Boot ROM to solve problems when the switch is
faulting or the configuration locks you out.
2 Boot the switch

1 Open a console session


3 Boot ROM runs

Boot ROM

4 Hardware
is initialized
When prompted, 5
press [Ctrl+B]
The boot process
6
is interrupted
37

Rev. 10.31

The Boot ROM menu offers a fail-safe means of managing the switch when other
methods have failedwhether due to corrupted software, to a startup-config with
settings that lock you out, to a forgotten password, or to another cause.
To access the Boot ROM menu, you must initiate a console session with the switch,
power cycle it, and monitor the boot process. As you learned earlier, the boot ROM
loads first, after it loads but before the software loads, you are presented with the
option to press [Ctrl+B]. Doing so interrupts the boot process and takes you into
the Boot ROM menu. Pay attention, you have only five seconds to press [Ctrl+B]
or even one second if the customer has changed the switch to boot quickly.
You will be prompted to enter a password. By default, the password is empty; simply
press [Enter]. The customer should tell you if a password has been set.

4 40

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Install New Software: Update the Boot ROM

Install New Software


Update the Boot ROM

Install new image when the current is corrupted


BOOT MENU
1. Download application file to flash
2. Select application file to boot
3. Display all files in flash
4. Delete file from flash
5. Modify bootrom password
6. Enter bootrom upgrade menu
7. Skip current configuration file
8. Set bootrom password recovery
BOOT MENU
9. Set switch startup mode
1. Update full BootRom
0. Reboot
2. Update extended BootRom
Enter your choice(0-9): 6
3. Update basic BootRom
0. Return to boot menu
Enter your choice(0-9): 1

38

Rev. 10.31

In the first support situation that you will examine, the switch is unable to boot
completely due to corrupted or faulty software. You have accessed the Boot ROM
menu, and now you must install the new software.
First, obtain the software image file (it should have a .bin extension) and save it to
your management workstation. As you learned earlier, you might need to update
both the Boot ROM code and the system software file (also called application file).
The two updates might be contained in the same file, or you might need to obtain
two. In either case, you must update the Boot ROM code.
Lets go through that process step by step:
1.

First enter 6 for Enter bootrom upgrade menu.

2.

You need a full upgrade. Enter 1.

The process continues on the next slide.

Rev. 10.31

4 41

Servicing HP Networking Products

Install New Software: Use XMODEM

Install New Software


Use XMODEM

XMODEM transfers work even if the switch has no IP


connectivity
BOOT MENU
1. Set TFTP protocol parameter
2. Set FTP protocol parameter
3. Set XMODEM protocol parameter
Enter your choice(0-3): 3
BOOT MENU
1.* 9600
2. 19200
3. 38400
Fastest
4. 57600
5. 115200
0. Return
Enter your choice (0-5):
39

Match

Rev. 10.31

You have several options for downloading the new software to the switch. In this
course, you will learn how to use XMODEM because this type of transfer works even
when the switch has no IP connectivity. Select 3 for Set XMODEM protocol
parameter.
Next, the Boot ROM menu presents several choices for the baud rate, which
determines how quickly the file can be transferred. As you learned earlier, you set the
baud rate on your terminal session software to 9600 for sessions with the switch CLI.
(For this reason, 9600 is starred as the current baud rate.) However, you can set the
baud rate higher for a faster file transfer and typically should. Select the rate that you
want in the Boot ROM menu.
You must then match that rate in your terminal software settings. The slide shows the
Setup > Serial port window in TeraTerm as an example. You should refer to the help
for your terminal software.

4 42

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Install New Software: Transfer the File

Install New Software


Transfer the File

BOOT MENU
Press enter key when ready
Now please start transfer file with XMODEM
protocol.
If you want to exit, Press <Ctrl+X>.
Loading ...CCCCCCCCCC

40

Rev. 10.31

After you have set your terminal software to the correct baud rate, press Enter in the
Boot ROM menu. You are prompted to begin the file transfer. You must initiate this
transfer from your terminal software. The slide shows the process for TeraTerm. You
select File > Transfer > XMODEM > Send. In other software, you might select Send
file from a menu and then choose XMODEM for the protocol.
You will be prompted to browse to the software file that you saved to your
management station. Do so. As the software transfers and installs, the Boot ROM
menu will print Loading CCCCCCCCC to the terminal.
Be patient. Even at the fastest baud rate, XMODEM transfers are quite slow
compared to TFTP and FTP transfers. The process will take tens of minutes.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

Install New Software: Complete the Boot ROM Update

Install New Software


Complete the Boot ROM Update

When prompted, complete the installation:


1. Update the basic boot ROM.
2. Update the extended boot ROM.
3. Change your baud rate back to 9600.
4. Return to the main menu.

41

Rev. 10.31

You will see this message after the Boot ROM has installed successfully:
Loading ...CCCC Done!
Will you Update Basic BootRom? (Y/N):
1.

Enter Y to update the basic sections of the Boot ROM.

3.

When prompted again, enter Y to update the extended sections.

4.

Change the baud rate on your terminal software back to 9600.

5.

Return to main menu (0).

You must reboot the switch for the Boot ROM code to take effect. However, you will
first install the new system software file.

4 44

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Install New Software: Install New System Software

Install New Software


Install New System Software

Follow a process similar to updating the bootROM:


1.

Choose to download an application file.

2.

Choose XMODEM
for the method.

3.

42

Set the correct baud


rate and send the file.

BOOT MENU
1. Download application file to flash
2. Select application file to boot
3. Display all files in flash
4. Delete file from flash
5. Modify bootrom password
6. Enter bootrom upgrade menu
7. Skip current configuration file
8. Set bootrom password recovery
9. Set switch startup mode
0. Reboot
Enter your choice(0-9): 1

Rev. 10.31

Installing the system software is very similar to installing the Boot ROM; therefore,
you will not receive as much detail about the process.
First, you will enter 1 to download the application file to flash. Again, you will be
presented with several choices for the file transfer. Select XMODEM and set the baud
rate, preferably to 115200, first in the Boot ROM menu and then in your terminal
session software. Finally, initiate the file transfer from your terminal session software.

Rev. 10.31

4 45

Servicing HP Networking Products

Install New Software: Set the New Software to Main

Install New Software


Set the New Software to Main

After transferring the new software:


1.

Set the new file to the main software.

2.

Return to the main Boot ROM menu (0).

3.

Reboot the switch (0).

BOOT MENU
Writing
flash.....................................................
................Done!
Please input the file attribute (Main/Backup/None) M
Done!

43

Rev. 10.31

When the new software has successfully installed, the Boot ROM menu displays the
message shown in the slide. Enter M to set the software to the main software that is
loaded when the switch boots.
Then enter 0 to return to the main Boot ROM menu and 0 again to reboot the switch.
The switch should now be able to boot successfully. Access its CLI and use the
display commands that you learned earlier to verify that the customers configuration
is running. You should also enter ping <IP address> to verify connectivity.

4 46

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Bypass a Faulty Configuration

Bypass a Faulty Configuration


Forgotten password
Locked out of management interfaces
Other critical failure
1. Access the Boot ROM Menu.
2. Bypass the configuration.
3. If possible:
a. Get IP connectivity.
b. Backup the current startup-config.
c. Restore a known good configuration.
4. Restore factory default settings (last resort).
5. Reboot.

44

Rev. 10.31

In the next troubleshooting situation, the switchs configuration is causing problems so


severe that management access is cut off. Perhaps the user has forgotten the
password; perhaps the IP settings are incorrect and the console access is disabled;
perhaps no one has management access. Or the network and services settings
themselves could be causing switch and network failures.
You will access the Boot ROM menu and bypass the configuration. You will then use
the CLI to load a known good configuration on the switch. Preferably, you will be
able to set up IP settings on the switch so that you can back up the faulty startupconfig. The customer and your manager can then work together to troubleshoot and
find the problem with the configuration. You can then restore the fixed configuration
or another known good configuration to the switch.
Otherwise, you might be able configure the switch to use a known good
configuration file that is stored in its flash memory. As a last resort, your manager
might tell you to restore the switch to its factory default settings.
When the switch has been restored to a known good configuration (or factory
defaults), reboot it.
You will now learn the details for completing this process.

Rev. 10.31

4 47

Servicing HP Networking Products

Use the Boot ROM Menu to Bypass the Configuration

Use the Boot ROM Menu to Bypass the


Configuration
The switch reloads at factory default settings.
BOOT MENU
1. Download application file to flash
2. Select application file to boot
3. Display all files in flash
4. Delete file from flash
5. Modify bootrom password
6. Enter bootrom upgrade menu
1 7. Skip current configuration file
8. Set bootrom password recovery
9. Set switch startup mode
2 0. Reboot
Enter your choice(0-9): 7

45

Rev. 10.31

First, open a console session with the switch, reboot it, and access the Boot ROM
menu as you learned how to do earlier. When you are presented with choices, enter
7 for Skip current configuration file. Confirm that you want to bypass
the current configuration (enter Y). Finally, select 0 to reboot the switch.
Let the switch boot without interrupting the process. The factory default settings will
be applied. After bootup, you will have complete access to the switch because at
these settings, console access requires no password and grants manager level rights.

4 48

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Get IP Connectivity: Assign an IP Address

Get IP Connectivity
Assign an IP Address

System (2); system view


Create the VLAN and configure it as the management VLAN:
<ASwitch>
Assign
an IPsystem-view
address
[ASwitch] vlan <ID>
System
(2);
system
view
[ASwitch-vlan<ID>] port <type> <ID>
[ASwitch-vlan<ID>] quit
[ASwitch] management-vlan <ID>

Set the VLANs IP address:


[Aswitch] interface Vlan-interface <ID>
[ASwitch-Vlan-interface<ID>] ip address [dhcp-alloc |
<address> [mask | length]>

46

Rev. 10.31

To complete the initial setup, you will need to establish IP connectivity between the
switch and the rest of the LAN. Then you can restore a configuration to the switch,
copy new software to the switch, manage the switch in-band, and so forth. An A
Series switch, at its final configuration, will often support multiple IP addresses and
perhaps a complex routing configuration. You will simply learn how to configure one
IP address so that you can complete basic tasks.
First, obtain this information from the customer:

The VLAN ID on which the switch can connect to the LAN


Whether the switch should receive a DHCP IP address or a static one and, in the
case of the latter, what this IP address should be

You might also consider connecting a switch Ethernet port directly to your
management station, in which case you should use VLAN 1 and an IP address on
the same subnet that you statically configure on your Ethernet interface.
Then follow this process:
1.

You should be at the system view. Create a VLAN, using the ID given to you by
the customer. For example:
[ASwitch] vlan 67

Rev. 10.31

4 49

Servicing HP Networking Products

2.

You must connect a port on the switch to another switch port using an Ethernet
cable. (Or connect the switch to your management station.) Assign this port to
this VLAN. For example, enter:
[ASwitch-vlan67] port GigabitEthernet 1/0/1

3.

Move back to the system view:


[ASwitch-vlan67] quit

6.

You must generally assign the IP address to the management VLAN, which is
VLAN 1, by default. In fact, on Layer 2 A Series switches, the management
VLAN is the only VLAN that can have an IP address. If the customer gave you a
different VLAN ID from VLAN 1, change the management VLAN with this
command:
management-vlan <ID>

For example:
[ASwitch] management-vlan 67

4.

Create an IP interface for the VLAN. For example:


[ASwitch] interface Vlan-interface 67

5.

Set the IP address. A static IP address consists of the dotted IPv4 format address
and either the prefix length or the subnet mask. For example:
[ASwitch-Vlan-interface67] ip address 10.0.67.12 24

To set the interface to DHCP instead, enter this command:


[ASwitch-Vlan-interface67] ip address dhcp

4 50

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Get IP Connectivity: Set Up a Default Route

Get IP Connectivity
Set Up a Default Route

System (2); system view only


Set up a default IP route to a router.
[ASwitch] ip route-static 0.0.0.0 0 <router IP address>

Example
[ASwitch] ip route-static 0.0.0.0 0 10.1.67.1

Visitor (0)
Verify connectivity to your management station or other TFTP server:
[ASwitch] ping <IP address>

47

Rev. 10.31

At this point, the switch can communicate on the one subnet on which it has an
address. If the switch received a DHCP address, it probably also received a default
route, which gives it full connectivity. But if you assigned the switch a static IP
address, you must configure a default route yourself.
The command for creating a static default route is shown in the slide. For example,
from the system view, enter:
ip route-static 0.0.0.0 0 10.1.67.1

(There are more options for this command, but this form works for your purposes.)
You should now test connectivity with the ping command. Ping your management
station. Or, if you are planning to transfer configurations to and from other locations,
ping those IP addresses.

Rev. 10.31

4 51

Servicing HP Networking Products

Back Up the Startup-Config to a TFTP Server

Back Up the Startup-Config to a TFTP Server


System (2); user view only
Back up the (main) startup-config to a TFTP server:
<ASwitch> backup startup-configuration to <server address>
[<file>]

Example
<ASwitch> backup startup-configuration 10.1.1.20
ASwitch_051610.cfg

A Series switch
Startup-config

ASwitch_051610.cfg
TFTP
10.1.67.20

48

Rev. 10.31

The customer probably has configurations in the startup-config that he or she wants
to preserve. In addition, someone needs to analyze the file and determine what is
introducing the problems. Therefore, you will upload the file from the switch memory
by backing it up.
You will learn how to back up the file to a TFTP server because you can easily obtain
such a server from a free Internet download. Then all you have to do is install the
TFTP server on your management station and run the application; no configuration
should be required.
Note
HP A Series switches can also transfer files to an FTP server. You would need to
obtain the address of an FTP server from the customer and possibly credentials
as well. This course will not cover transferring files via FTP.

Once you have the TFTP server running, enter this command from user view (you
need system level access) to back up the startup-config:
<ASwitch> backup startup-configuration to <server address> [<file>]

4 52

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Replace <server address> with the TFTP servers IP address (the address on your
management station if you installed the server there). If you enter a filename, use a
.cfg extension to ensure that the configuration can be restored to the switch when
necessary. If you decide not to enter a filename, the file is stored on the TFTP server
under the name specified for the main startup-config file on the switch.
For the example shown in the slide, you enter:
<ASwitch> backup startup-configuration to 10.1.67.20
ASwitch_051610.cfg

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

Restore a Known Good Configuration: From a TFTP Server

Restore a Known Good Configuration


From a TFTP Server

System (2)
Restore the startup-config from a TFTP server:
<ASwitch> restore startup-configuration
from <server address> <file.cfg>
ASwitch_051610.cfg

TFTP server
10.1.1.20

Running-config
Startup-config

Note: System must be rebooted


after copy
A Series Switch

49

Rev. 10.31

If the problem with the startup-config is as simple as forgotten password, you or the
customer can simply edit the configuration file with a text editor and read the
password (if it was stored in non-encrypted form). Or you could set the AUX0
interface to none authentication so that the customer can access the switch with this
startup-config and set a new password.
For example:
user-interface aux 0
authentication-mode scheme
idle-timeout 0 0
becomes:
user-interface aux 0
authentication-mode none
idle-timeout 0 0
In many cases, you will send the file to your technical experts. They might send you a
good configuration. Or the customer might have a known good configuration that
was saved earlier. In either case, copy the known good configuration to your
management station or other TFTP server.

4 54

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

You can then restore the startup-config from a TFTP server. You need system level
access and must be at the user view. Enter this command:
<ASwitch> backup startup-configuration from <server address>
<filename>

You must specify the TFTP servers IP address and the filename as stored on the
server. For example:
<ASwitch> backup startup-configuration to 10.1.67.20
ASwitch_051610.cfg

After the command executes successfully, the configuration file is saved to the switchs
flash memory and is set as the main startup-config file. However, the settings do not
take effect until the switch reboots.

Rev. 10.31

4 55

Servicing HP Networking Products

Restore a Known Good Configuration: From the Switch Flash


Memory

Restore a Known Good Configuration


From the Switch Flash Memory

Monitor (1); user view


View the current startup-config.
<ASwitch> display startup

Manage (3); user view


View all files in flash.
<ASwitch> dir

System (2); user view


Change the startup-config.
<ASwitch> startup saved-configuration <file.cfg> main

50

Rev. 10.31

Instead of restoring a configuration that was saved to an external location, you can
configure the switch to use a configuration file that is stored in its flash memory. For
example, the customer might have saved an earlier configuration there that will serve
to get the switch back up and running.
First view the current startup-config files using the display startup command. To
see other configuration files that can potentially work as the startup-config, enter dir
from the user view.
When you have found a good candidate for the startup-config, enter the following
command (which requires system level access but must be entered from the user view:
<ASwitch> startup saved-configuration <file.cfg> main
For <file.cfg>, type the exact name of the file that you discovered with the dir
command.
(You can use a similar command, startup saved-configuration
<file.cfg> backup, to set a backup option.)
The new startup-config will be applied after you reboot the switch.

4 56

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Restore Factory Default Settings: Option 1

Restore Factory Default Settings


Option 1

System (2): Delete the startup-config and reset to factory default settings.
<ASwitch>
The saved
<ASwitch>
The saved

reset saved-configuration [main]


configuration file will be erased. Are you sure? [Y/N]:y
reset saved-configuration backup
configuration file will be erased. Are you sure? [Y/N]:y

Saved file A

1
2
51

Saved file B

Saved file A
Saved file A

Main
attribute reset saved[main]

Saved file B

Backup
attribute reset saved backup

reset saved [main]

Saved file A

reset saved backup

Rev. 10.31

Instead of restoring a configuration file, you might be told to restore the switch to the
factory default settings.
To do so successfully, you must think back to an HP A Switchs bootup process. The
switch first attempts to load the main startup-config; if that file is corrupt or nonexistent (set to NULL), the switch attempts to load the backup startup-config; if that file
also is corrupt or non-existent, the switch loads the factory default settings. Therefore,
to get the switch to boot at factory defaults, you must set both the main and backup
startup-config files to NULL, either by deleting the files or by removing the main and
backup attributes from them.
This slide shows the commands for the first approach. The reset savedconfiguration or reset saved-configuration main commands both delete the
main startup-config file. The reset saved-configuration backup command
deletes the backup startup-config file.
For example, an A Series switch has several saved configuration files. File A is set as
the main startup-config, and file B, as the backup. When you enter reset savedconfiguration, file A is deleted. However, file B still exists, and if you reboot now
this file will be loaded rather that the factory default settings. To return to the factory
defaults, you must enter reset saved-configuration backup, which, in this
example, deletes file B.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

The second example shown in the slide illustrates an important nuance of the reset
saved-configuration command. When a file is set as both the main and backup
startup-config file, this command only erases the specified attribute and not the file
itself. For example, file A is set as the main and backup startup-config, and you enter
reset saved-configuration. Now file A is only the backup startup-config, and
there is no main startup-config. But if you reboot the switch now, the switch will still
boot file A instead of the factory defaults. Remember: the backup startup-config is
loaded when a main one does not exist. To revert to factory defaults, you must enter
reset saved-configuration backup, which now deletes file A entirely since the
backup attribute is the only one that it has.
In short, if you want to delete the startup-config and revert to factory defaults, you
can do so with one command (reset saved-configuration) only if your switch
has no backup startup-config. If it does have a backup, you must enter both the main
and backup versions of the reset saved-configuration command even when the
same file is set as main and backup.

4 58

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Restore Factory Default Settings: Option 2

Restore Factory Default Settings


Option 2

System (2)
Reset to factory default settings but preserve the current files
<ASwitch>
<ASwitch>
The saved
<ASwitch>

startup saved-configuration <main filename> backup


reset saved-configuration backup
configuration file will be erased. Are you sure? [Y/N]:y
undo startup saved-configuration

Saved file A

startup saved-configuration
A.cfg backup

Saved file B
Saved file A

2
3
52

Saved file A

Saved file A
Saved file B

reset saved-configuration
backup
undo startup savedconfiguration

Saved file A
Saved file A

Rev. 10.31

Sometimes you will need to revert a switch to its factory-default settings, but the
customer still wants to preserve the current startup-config file (or files). You can meet
this requirement with one command when the switch has no backup startup-config.
Simply enter the undo saved-configuration command, which removes the main
attribute from the main startup-config file, but preserves the file itself. When the switch
reboots, it loads the factory default settings because no main or backup startupconfig is specified.
The slide displays the proper commands for meeting this requirement when the
customers switch has both a main and a backup startup-config file. (The process is
complicated slightly because there is no undo saved-config backup command.)
First, move the backup attribute from the backup startup-config to the main startupconfig by entering startup saved-configuration <filename> backup,
specifying the filename of the main startup-config. The former backup file is
preserved in the flash memory but no longer plays a role in the boot process.
The main startup-config file, file A, now has both the main and backup attributes, so
you can enter reset saved-configuration backup to set the backup startupconfig to NULL without deleting the file.
Finally, enter undo startup saved-configuration to take file A out of the boot
process without deleting it. Now the switch will boot at the factory default settings,
but the customers configurations remain intact.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

Reboot the Switch

Reboot the Switch


System (2); user view only
When a working configuration is saved to the startup-config,
reboot the switch:
<ASwitch> reboot
Start to check configuration with next startup configuration file,
please wait.
........DONE!
This command will reboot the device. Continue? [Y/N]: y

53

Rev. 10.31

When you have a working configuration on the switch and set to the main startupconfig, you must reboot the switch. Move to the user view and enter reboot.
When the switch has booted with the new startup-config, access its CLI and verify
that the new configuration is function. (The customer can log in, the switch has IP
connectivity, and so forth.)

4 60

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Replace a Switch
Replace a Switch
HP A Series Software Images and Configuration Files
Management Access with the CLI

Management Access with the Web Browser Interface


Collect Diagnostic Information
Solve Problems Using the Boot ROM Menu and CLI
Replace a Switch

54

Restore a Backup Configuration


Create a Basic Configuration

Rev. 10.31

Sometimes you cannot repair a switch. You are simply called on to remove the failed
switch and install a replacement. This section guides you through the basic process.

Rev. 10.31

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Replace a Switch: Backup Config Available

Replace a Switch
Backup Config Available

Does the
customer have a
backup config?

55

Yes

1. Install the new switch.


2. Access the CLI via a
console session.
3. Get IP connectivity.
4. Update software
(optional).
5. Restore the config.

Rev. 10.31

Ideally, the customer has a backup config for the failed switch. If this is the case, you
simply need to follow this process:
1.

Install the new switch as you learned how to do in Module 3: HP A Series


Switch Hardware.

2.

Access the CLI via a console session.

3.

Set up IP connectivity for the switch.

4.

Update the software from the CLI, if necessary. (The replacement switch might
not be running the same software as the failed switch.)

5.

Restore the backup configuration.

You have already learned how to access the CLI and complete all of these steps
except for updating the software from the CLI. The next slide explains how to
complete this task with TFTP (FTP is another option not discussed in this course).

4 62

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Upgrade the Software from the CLI

Upgrade the Software from the CLI


Manage (3)
Obtain the software image from a TFTP server:
<ASwitch> tftp <server address> get <file1.bin> [<fileA.bin>]

System (2)
Upgrade the software:
<ASwitch> bootrom update file <fileA.bin> slot 1

System (2)
Upgrade the software:
<<ASwitch> boot-loader file <fileA.bin> slot [all | <id>]
[main | backup]

56

Rev. 10.31

First, you must obtain the necessary system software image and copy it to your
TFTP server. Remember to check whether the switch needs an accompanying Boot
ROM; check the current Boot ROM version with the display version command
and see whether it corresponds with the required version in the software images
release notes.
Once the necessary file or files are on the TFTP server, transfer them to the switch
using the tftp command shown in the slide. You must specify the IP address of the
TFTP server as well as the filename for the software image stored on the server. You
can optionally specify a new name for the image file on the switch; otherwise, the
image is saved with the same filename that it has on the server. Remember to upload
the boot ROM update, as well, if it is a different file.
To upgrade the software, you must specify the new files as the files to be booted
when the switch next reboots.
For the Boot ROM update, move to the user view and enter the bootrom update
command shown in the slide, specifying the correct file for the Boot ROM.
To update the system software image, enter the boot-loader update command,
again specifying the appropriate file. You can set the image to the main one or to
the backup one, but, of course, you should set it to the main one if you want it to
take effect.
Finally, enter reboot to force the new software to load.

Rev. 10.31

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Replace a Switch: Backup Config from Failed Switch

Replace a Switch

Backup Config from Failed Switch

Does the
customer have
a backup
config?
No

57

Can you
access the
failed switch
at all?

Yes

1. Access the failed


switch.
2. Back up the config.
3. Install the new switch.
4. Access the new switchs
CLI via a console
session.
5. Get IP connectivity.
6. Update software
(optional).
7. Restore the config.

Rev. 10.31

If the customer does not have a backup config that you can restore to the
replacement switch, investigate whether you can reach the failed switch at all.
Perhaps the switch is being replaced due to failed ports but is still reachable through
the CLI. Perhaps, although it has been decided that the switch must be replaced, you
can still reach the switchs CLIeven if you must access the Boot ROM menu to do
so.
If you can reach the switch CLI, back up the configuration as you learned how to do.
Then follow the same process that you just learned: installing the new switch, getting
it up and accessible through IP, updating the software, and restoring the
configuration.

4 64

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Replace a Switch: No Backup Config

Replace a Switch
No Backup Config

Does the
customer have
a backup
config?
No

Can you
access the
failed switch
at all?
No

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
58

Install the new switch.


Access the new switchs CLI via a console session.
Get IP connectivity.
Update software (optional).
Identify the switch.
Set up management access (optional).
Save the config.

Rev. 10.31

Finally, you will consider a situation in which you cannot obtain a backup
configuration to load on the replacement switch. In this case, you will simply install
the new switch, configure basic IP settings, and update its software, if necessary. You
are quite familiar with this process by now.
At that point, the switch will be up and running. You can configure a few more
settings if the customer wants. You might identify the switch with a unique name, and
you might set up some rudimentary management access controls. However, for the
sake of security, the customer might prefer its own IT staff to set up the management
access.
Then you will save the configuration; an experienced administrator will take over
from there.

Rev. 10.31

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Initial Setup

Initial Setup
You can configure:
A unique system name
Contact information, such as phone extension or email address
Physical location information, such as building and wiring closet
System view

System (2)

[ASwitch] sysname <name>


[<name>] snmp-agent sysinfo location <location>
[<name>] snmp-agent sysinfo contact <contact>

Manage (3)

Prompts reflect new name

59

Rev. 10.31

As part of the basic setup, configure the switchs system name, contact information,
and physical location so that management users can identify the switch.
The first command shown in the slide gives the switch a unique system name. After
you enter the command, the command prompt changes. For example:
[ASwitch] sysname MySwitch
[MySwitch]

Note that this command must be entered at the system view and is also a system level
command.
The next two commands require manager access and only apply if this switch is part
of a SNMP solution. They inform the SNMP server where the switch is located and
who is responsible for managing it. For example:
[ASwitch] snmp-agent sysinfo location ClosetA_Shelf2
[ASwitch] snmp-agent sysinfo location Swami C

4 66

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Set Up Management Access: Console Access with Password


Authentication

Set Up Management Access


Console Access with Password Authentication

Manager (3)
Protect console access to the switch by setting a password on the AUX
user interface:
<ASwitch> system-view
[ASwitch] user-interface aux 0
[ASwitch-ui-aux0] authentication-mode password
[ASwitch-ui-aux0] set authentication password [simple |
cipher] <password>

60

Rev. 10.31

Although many customers will want to set up management access on their own,
sometimes you might need to implement some preliminary protection. As you recall,
console access to the switch is unprotected by default. You can quickly add a
password by using the commands shown in the slide.
1.

Move to system view.


<ASwitch> system-view

2.

Access the user interface that controls console access.


[ASwitch] user-interface aux 0

3.

Change the authentication mode from none to password:


[ASwitch-ui-aux0] authentication-mode password

4.

Then set the password. It is best practice to use the cipher option, which stores
the password in encrypted form in the configuration file. (The user still enters the
password in plaintext.) For example:
[ASwitch] set password cipher myp@ss

Rev. 10.31

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Set Up Management Access: Console Access with Scheme


Authentication

Set Up Management Access


Console Access with Scheme Authentication

Manager (3): Protect console access by:


Enforcing scheme authentication on the AUX user interface
Creating user accounts
<ASwitch> system-view
[ASwitch] local-user <username>
[ASwitch-luser-<username>] set password [simple | cipher]
<password>
[ASwitch-luser-<username>] authentication-attribute level
<level>
[ASwitch-luser-<username>] service-type terminal
[ASwitch-luser-<username>] quit
[ASwitch] user-interface aux 0
[ASwitch-ui-aux0] authentication-mode scheme

61

Rev. 10.31

Instead of setting a password that is specific to the AUX user interfaces, you can
enforce scheme authentication on the interface. Scheme authentication allows the
customer to have several different management users with different credentials and
user privilege levels.
You can implement scheme mode authentication in many ways that are beyond the
scope of this course. But at the factory default settings, the switch uses a local
authentication scheme. The basic process for creating local users and applying
scheme authentication to console sessions follows:
1.

If you are not at the system view, move there.

2.

Create a local user. For example:


[ASwitch] local-user manager

3.

Set the users password. Again, it is best practice to store the password in
encrypted form:
[ASwitch-luser-manager] set password cipher mgrpa$$

4.

Assign the user a user privilege level. For example:


[ASwitch-luser-manager] authentication-attribute level 3

5.

Specify that the user is allowed console access:


[ASwitch-luser-manager] service-type terminal

4 68

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

6.

Move back to the system view:


[ASwitch-luser-manager] quit

7.

Access the AUX interfaces as you learned how to do on the previous slide:
[ASwitch] user-interface aux 0

8.

Change the authentication mode from none to scheme.


[ASwitch-ui-aux0] authentication-mode scheme

Rev. 10.31

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Set Up Management Access: Telnet and Web Browser Interface


Access Requirements

Set Up Management Access

Telnet and Web Browser Interface Access Requirements

Telnet or HTTP server enabled (default setting)


[ASwitch] telnet server enable
[ASwitch] ip http enable

IP connectivity to the switchs management IP address


Authentication configured
Ethernet connection
IP connectivity

62

Rev. 10.31

If the customer wants you to set up management access, you should typically also
configure Telnet so that the switchs CLI can be reached in-band. Similarly, you might
need to set up Web browser interface access.
Note
As you learned, SSH access is more secure than Telnet; however, the setup is
correspondingly more complex and beyond the scope of this course.

The switch must meet certain conditions to allow users to log in with a Telnet or Web
browser interface session. The appropriate servers must be enabled as they are by
default. In case you need to re-enable the services, the slide includes the commands.
Enabling Telnet requires manage level access, but a system level user can enable the
Web server.
The Telnet or Web user also requires IP connectivity to the switchs management IP
address, which you learned how to set earlier. Finally, you need to establish a
method for authenticating the Telnet or Web users. The next slides explain how to set
up several forms of authentication.

4 70

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Set Up Management Access: Telnet Access with Password


Authentication

Set Up Management Access


Telnet Access with Password Authentication

Manage (3); user interface view


Set the password:
[ASwitch] user-interface vty 0 <n>
[ASwitch-ui-vty0-<n>] set authentication password [simple |
cipher] <password>

Set the interfaces privilege level (optional, default 0):


[ASwitch-ui-vty0-<n>] user privilege level <level>

63

Rev. 10.31

By default, VTY user interfaces, which control Telnet access, enforce password
authentication. However, the interfaces have no default password, so users cannot
log in. If the customer wants password authentication for Telnet, you must simply set
the password:
1.

From the system view, access the VTY user interfaces. You can configure an
entire range of interfaces at once by entering the low and high number in the
range after the vty option. If you do not know the number of interfaces, use the
help command:
[ASwitch] user-interface vty 0 ?

The terminal outputs the range of valid inputs. Once you know the high number
in the range, you can enter the correct command. For example:
[ASwitch] user-interface vty 0 3

2.

Specify the password, indicating whether the password should be encrypted or


stored in plaintext. For example:
[ASwitch-ui-vty0-3] set authentication password cipher tel%p@ss

3.

All management users who log in through an interface that enforces password
authentication receive the privilege level set for that interface, which is 0 by
default on VTY interfaces. Use the command shown in the slide to set the
privilege level desired by the customer for Telnet access. For example:
[ASwitch-ui-vty0-3] user privilege level 2

Rev. 10.31

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Set Up Management Access: Telnet Access with Scheme


Authentication

Set Up Management Access


Telnet Access with Scheme Authentication

Manage (3); user interface view


Set the interfaces authentication mode to scheme:
[ASwitch] user-interface vty 0 <n>
[ASwitch-ui-vty0-<n>] authentication-mode scheme
[ASwitch-ui-vty0-<n>] quit

Manage (3); system view


Create a user or grant an existing user the Telnet service type:
[ASwitch] local-user <username>
[ASwitch-luser-<username>] set password [simple | cipher]
<password>
[ASwitch-luser-<username>] authentication-attribute level
<level>
[ASwitch-luser-<username>] service-type telnet

64

Rev. 10.31

Alternatively, you can force Telnet users to authenticate according to the AAA scheme
configured on the switchwhich, for the purposes of this course, is to use the switchs
list of local users. To enable Telnet users to log in using these local user accounts,
enter these commands from system view:
[ASwitch] user-interface vty 0 <n>
[ASwitch-ui-vty0-<n>] authentication-mode scheme

Next, you must create local user accounts for the Telnet managers. If you have
already created such users for other purposes, users can use those accounts to log in
over Telnet. However, you must authorize the user for Telnet access by entering the
service-type telnet command in the view for that local user account.
The slide displays all the commands that are necessary for creating a new user (other
commands are available but beyond the scope of this course). Remember to set the
user privilege level (otherwise, it will be 0 despite what you set on the user interface).
Note
When you enter the service-type telnet command from the local user
interface view, the switch adds Telnet as a valid type of access without changing
the access that is currently allowed. For example, you created an account that
specified the terminal service type for a local user. Then you accessed the local
user account and specified Telnet for the service type. Now the user can log in
through a console or a Telnet session. If you want to remove a service type, you
must enter the undo commandfor example, undo service-type terminal.
4 72

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Set Up Management Access: Authentication for the Web Browser


Interface

Set Up Management Access


Authentication for the Web Browser Interface

Web users must:


Log in with AAA credentials
Be granted Telnet for the service type

You can use the same local users as for Telnet access.

Ethernet connection
1
2
bob
*******
65

Local users
3

bob
terminal/telnet
*******
manage (3)
mary
telnet
*******
system (2)

Rev. 10.31

As you recall, for users to log in to the Web browser interface using HTTP, they must
be able to reach the switchs management IP address, and the switchs HTTP services
must be enabled. The users must also be able to authenticate, and this slide explains
how to ensure that they can.
No specific user interface exists for controlling management users access to the Web
browser interface. Web users must always log in with AAA credentials; for your
purposes, this means that the switch must have a list of local users. Because the Web
browser interface categorizes users in the same four levels as the CLI, the user
account should also specify a user privilege level. In addition, the service type must
include Telnet. If you have already created accounts for users allowed Telnet access,
these users will automatically have Web access as well.

Rev. 10.31

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Set Up Management Access: Super Passwords

Set Up Management Access


Super Passwords

Manage (3) or System (2)*


Set super passwords to allow users to move to higher privilege levels
[ASwitch] super password level <level> [simple | cipher]
<password>

*Cannot set super password for level 3


66

Rev. 10.31

As you learned, a user must enter a super password to access a command level that
is higher than the current level. By default, there are no super passwords, so users
cannot change levels. If the customer wants to enable this functionality for command
levels 1, 2, or 3, you must use the command shown in the slide to set the local super
passwords.
You must be in the system view to enter the command, and you must have at least
system level access; however, manager access is required to set the manager level
(3) super password.
For example, enter:
[ASwitch] super password level 3 cipher super3!
[ASwitch] super password level 2 cipher super2!
[ASwitch] super password level 1 cipher super1!

4 74

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Save Initial Setup Changes

Save Initial Setup Changes


System (2)
Save configuration changes to the startup-config:
<ASwitch> save [safely] [main]

OR
<ASwitch> save <file.cfg>
<ASwitch> startup saved-configuration <file.cfg> [main]

Example
<ASwitch> save safely

67

Rev. 10.31

The time has come to turn the switch over to the customer. To ensure that the settings
are not lost, save them to the current startup-config. (You can be in any view.) The first
command shown in the slide offers the easiest way to do so.
It is best practice to use the safely option; the command executes more slowly but
the current configuration is protected in case the switch loses power or reboots during
the save.
For example, enter:
<ASwitch> save safely main

The following command has the same effect:


<ASwitch> save safely

The following commands have the same effect, but do not save the configuration
safely:
<ASwitch> save main
<ASwitch> save

You will be prompted to use the current startup-config file name. You can also specify
a different name; in either case, the configuration is set as the main startup-config.
Instead of saving the configurations to the startup-config with one command, you can
separate the process in two. First enter the save command with a file name and no
other options. For example:
<ASwitch> save mycfg.cfg
Rev. 10.31

4 75

Servicing HP Networking Products

Then set the file as the main or backup startup-config using the command shown in
the slide. This process enables you to save changes to a file and later decide to
apply them to the startup-config.
Once you have saved your changes, you have completed your share of the
configuration.

4 76

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches

Summary
Summary
Software images
Configuration files
CLI command levels and views
Management access through:
CLI
Web browser interface
Boot ROM Menu

Solving problems with Boot ROM Menu and CLI


Replacing switches
68

Rev. 10.31

In this module, you have acquired a background knowledge of HP A Series software


images, boot process, and configuration files. You can access an HP A Series
switchs CLI using a console or a Telnet session, and you can navigate through the
various views. You understand that you must have the correct user privilege level to
enter certain commands, and you can move to higher privilege levels using super
passwords.
You can reach a switch on its Web browser interface and navigate through the
windows.
When a switch is otherwise inaccessible, you can access the Boot ROM Menu and
install new software or bypass a configuration that is causing problems. With the
Boot ROM Menu and a variety of CLI commands at your disposal, you can complete
basic support tasks.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

4 78

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

Module 5

Objectives
This module introduces you to the HP E Series switches, which are designed for
customers who want essential and proven technology. To help meet their business
goals, these customers require future-proof, easy-to-use, secure networking solutions.
After completing this module, you should be able to:

Rev. 10.31

Describe the basic characteristics of each HP E Series switch


Classify each HP E Series switch based on its form factor, manageability, and
Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) functionality
Explain the different environments for which each E Series switch is designed

5 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switches Formerly Branded 3Com


Switches Formerly Branded 3Com
Formerly Branded 3Com Switches
HP E4210 Switch Series
HP E4210G Switch Series
HP E4500 Switch Series
HP E4500G Switch Series
HP E4800G Switch Series
HP E5500 Switch Series
HP E5500G Switch Series
HP Switches
Categorizing E Series Switches

Rev. 10.31

The E Series includes switches that were previously branded as 3Com switches and
switches that were previously branded as HP ProCurve switches.
This section outlines the basic features of the formerly branded 3Com switches that
are now part of the E Series.

5 2

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E4210 Switch Series


HP E4210 Switch Series
E4210-8 Switch
E4210-8-PoE Switch
8 10/100 ports
1 dual-personality port
Throughput up to 2.7 mpps
E4210-8-PoE SwitchPoE on 4 10/100
ports

E4210-16 Switch
E4210-16-PoE Switch
16 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 5.4 mpps
E4210-16-PoEPoE ports on 8 10/100

ports

Rev. 10.31

The E4210 Switch Series consists of fixed-port, managed Fast Ethernet switches. These
Layer 2 switches also support stackable scalability with a single-IP address.
Designed for companies that are looking for economical network solutions, these
switches can be deployed at the access layer in enterprise branch offices and small
workgroup networks.
The E4210-8 and E4210-8-PoE switches include the following:

Eight 10/100 auto-sensing ports

One dual-personality port

Throughput up to 2.7 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

AC power supply

The E4210-8-PoE switch provides PoE power on four 10/100 ports.

Rev. 10.31

5 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

The E4210-16 and E4210-16-PoE switches include the following:

16 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 5.4 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

AC power supply

The E4210-16-PoE switch provides PoE on eight 10/100 ports.


For information about the SFP transceivers supported on these switches, see
Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

5 4

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E4210 Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E4210 Switch Series (Cont.)
E4210-24 Switch
E4210-24-PoE Switch
24 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 6.6 mpps
E4210-24-PoE SwitchPoE on all

10/100 ports

E4210-48 Switch
48 10/100 ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
2 SFP ports
Throughput up to 13.1 mpps

Rev. 10.31

The E4210-24 switch includes the following:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 6.6 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

AC power supply

The E4210-24-PoE switch also provides PoE on all 10/100 ports.


The E4210-48 switch includes the following:

48 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two 10/100/1000 ports

Two SFP ports

Throughput up to 13.1 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

AC power supply

For information about the SFP transceivers supported on these switches, see
Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

Rev. 10.31

5 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E4210G Switch Series


HP E4210G Switch Series
E4210-24G Switch
E4210-24G-PoE Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 95.2 mpps
E4210-24G-PoE SwitchPoE on all

10/100 ports

E4210-48G Switch
24 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 131.0 mpps
6

Rev. 10.31

The E4210G Switch Series consists of fixed-port, managed Gigabit Ethernet switches.
Designed to be deployed at the access layer, these switches support static routing,
making them Light Layer 3 switches. All the switches in this series have open module
slots to allow for expansion, and they support stackable scalability.
The E4210-24G and E4210-24G-PoE switches include the following:

20 10/100/1000 auto-sensing ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots

Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

AC power supply

The E4210-24G-PoE switch provides PoE power on all 10/100/1000 ports.

5 6

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

The E4210-48G switch includes the following:

24 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots

Throughput up to 131.0 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

AC power supply

For information about the SFP transceivers supported on these switches, see
Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

Rev. 10.31

5 7

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E4500 Switch Series


HP E4500 Switch Series
E4500-24 Switch
E4500-24-PoE Switch
24 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 6.5 mpps
E4500-24-PoE SwitchPoE on

10/100 ports

E4500-48 Switch
E4500-48-PoE Switch
48 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 10.1 mpps
E4500-48-PoE SwitchPoE on

10/100 ports

Rev. 10.31

The E4500 Switch Series consists of fixed-port, managed, Fast Ethernet switches.
They are Light Layer 3 switches, supporting static routes and RIP. They also support
stackable scalability with a single-IP address management.
This switch series is designed for companies that need economical access layer
connectivity in enterprise and branch office networks.
The E4500-24 switch includes the following:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 6.5 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

AC power supply

The E4500-24-PoE switch also provides PoE on all 10/100 ports.

5 8

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

The E4500-48 switch includes the following:

48 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 10.1 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

AC power supply

The E4500-48-PoE switch supports PoE on all 10/100 ports.


For information about the SFP transceivers supported on these switches, see
Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

Rev. 10.31

5 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E4500G Switch Series


HP E4500G Switch Series
E4500-24G Switch
E4500-24G-PoE Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 module slots
Throughput up to 95.2 mpps
E4500-24G-PoE SwitchPoE on all

10/100/1000 ports

Rev. 10.31

The E4500G Switch Series includes fixed-port, managed, Gigabit Ethernet switches.
Like the E4500 Fast Ethernet switches, the E4500G switches support static routes and
RIP, making them Light Layer 3 switches. They also support stackable scalability with
single-IP address management.
The E4500G switches can be deployed at the access or distribution layer. They are
particularly well-suited for medium-sized businesses and small enterprises that want to
build a converged network. For example, when an IP phone is connected to an
E4500G switch, the switch automatically detects the phone and dynamically assigns
the phones port to a voice VLAN.
The E4500-24G switch includes the following:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

AC power supply

One RJ-45 console port

The E4500-24G-PoE switch provides PoE on all 10/100/1000 ports.

5 10

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

Customers can purchase 10-GbE modules and install them in the open module slots.
They can also install SFP transceivers in the SFP ports. For more information, see
Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

Rev. 10.31

5 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E4500G Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E4500G Switch Series (Cont.)
E4500-48G Switch
E4500-48G-PoE Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 module slots
Throughput up to 131 mpps
E4500-48G-PoEPoE on all

10/100/1000 ports

Rev. 10.31

The E4500-48G switch includes the following:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 131 mpps

AC power supply

One RJ-45 console port

The E4500-48G-PoE switch provides PoE on all 10/100/1000 ports.


Customers can purchase 10-GbE modules and install them in the open module slots.
They can also install SFP transceivers in the SFP ports. For more information, see
Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

5 12

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E4510G Switch Series


HP E4510G Switch Series
E4510-24G Switch
E4510-24G-PoE Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 module slots
Throughput up to 95.2 mpps
E4510-48G-PoE SwitchPoE on

all 10/100/1000 ports

E4510-48G Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 module slots
Throughput up to 131 mpps
10

Rev. 10.31

The E4510G Switch Series includes fixed-port, managed, Gigabit Ethernet switches.
These switches support static routes, making them Light Layer 3 switches. (However,
they do not support dynamic routing protocols.) They also support stackable
scalability with single-IP address management.
The E4510G switches can be deployed at the access or distribution layer.
The E4510-24G and the E4510-24G-PoE switches provide the following:

20 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 95.2 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

The E4510-24G-PoE switch also provides PoE on all 10/100/1000 ports. It has a
total of 370W for PoE.

Rev. 10.31

5 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

The E4510-48G switch includes the following:

44 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 131 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

Customers can purchase 10-GbE modules and install them in the open module slots.
They can also install SFP transceivers in the SFP ports. For more information, see
Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

5 14

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E4800G Switch Series


HP E4800G Switch Series
E4800-24G Switch
E4800-24G-PoE Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 module slots
Throughput up to 107.2 mpps
E4800-24G-PoE SwitchPoE on all

10/100/1000 ports

E4800-24G-SFP Switch
16 SFP ports
8 dual-personality ports
2 module slots
Throughput up to 107.2 mpps
11

Rev. 10.31

The E4800G Switch Series includes fixed-port, managed, Gigabit Ethernet switches.
These Layer 3/4 switches support static routes and dynamic routing protocols RIP,
OSPF, BGP, and IS-IS. They also support multicast routing protocols PIM-SM and PIMDM.
With support for stackable scalability with single-IP address management, these
switches can be deployed:

At the access or distribution layer of large enterprise networks and campus


networks
In the core of medium and small-sized enterprise networks

The E4800-24G and E4800-24G-PoE switches include the following:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 107.2 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

AC/DC power supply with a connection for a redundant power system (RPS)

The E4800-24G-PoE switch provides PoE on all 10/100/1000 ports.

Rev. 10.31

5 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

The E4800-24G-SFP switch includes the following:

Eight dual-personality ports for 10/100/1000 connections or SFP transceivers

16 SFP ports

Two open module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 107.2 mpps

AC/DC power supply with a connection for an RPS

One RJ-45 console port

Customers can purchase 10-GbE modules and install them in the open module slots.
They can also install SFP transceivers in the SFP ports. For more information, see
Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

5 16

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E4800G Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E4800G Switch Series (Cont.)
E4800-48G
E4800-48G-PoE Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
2 module slots
Throughput up to 142.9 mpps
E4800-48G-PoE SwitchPoE on all

10/100/1000 ports

12

Rev. 10.31

The E4800-48G and E4800-48G-PoE switches include the following:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two open module slots (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 142.9 mpps

AC/DC power supply with a connection for an RPS

One RJ-45 console port

The E4800-48G-PoE switch supports PoE on all 10/100/1000 ports. It provides up


to 15.4 W on a port with a total PoE budget of 370W. Customers can use an RPS for
supplemental PoE power.
Customers can purchase 10-GbE modules and install them in the open module slots.
They can also install SFP transceivers in the SFP ports. For more information, see
Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

Rev. 10.31

5 17

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E5500 Switch Series


HP E5500 Switch Series
E5500-24 Switch
E5500-24-PoE Switch
24 10/100 ports
4 Gigabit SFP ports (factory-installed)
Throughput up to 9.5 mpps
E5500-24-PoEPoE on all 10/100

ports

E5500-24-SFP Switch
24 open SFP ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
2 Gigabit SFP ports (factory-installed)
Throughput up to 9.5 mpps

13

Rev. 10.31

The E5500 Switch Series includes fixed-port, managed switches that provide
stackable scalability with single-IP address management. These Layer 3/4 switches
support static routes, dynamic routing protocols RIP and OSPF, and multicast routing
protocols PIM-DM and PIM-SM.
The E5500 switches can be deployed at the access layer or distribution layer in
medium and large-sized networks.
The E5500-24 and E5500-24-PoE switches provide the following:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Four Gigabit SFP ports (1000Base-X), which are factory installed

Throughput up to 9.5 mpps

AC and/or DC power supply with a connection for an RPS

One RJ-45 console port

The E5500-24-PoE switch supports PoE+ on its 10/100 ports.

5 18

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

The E5500-24-SFP switch includes the following:

24 open SFP ports

Two auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Two Gigabit SFP ports (1000Base-X), which are factory-installed

Throughput up to 9.5 mpps

AC and/or DC power supply with a connection for an RPS

One RJ-45 console port

For the E5500-24-SFP switch, customers can purchase SFP transceivers to install in the
24 open SFP ports. For more information, see Module 6: HP E Series Switch
Hardware.

Rev. 10.31

5 19

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E5500 Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E5500 Switch Series (Cont.)
E5500-48 Switch
E5500-48-PoE Switch
48 10/100 ports
4 Gigabit SFP ports (factory-installed)
Throughput up to 13.1 mpps
E5500-48-PoEPoE on all 10/100

ports

14

Rev. 10.31

The E5500-48 switch includes the following:

48 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Four Gigabit SFP ports (1000Base-X), which are factory-installed

Throughput up to 13.1 mpps

AC and/or DC power supply with a connection for an RPS

One RJ-45 console port

The E5500-48-PoE switch supports PoE on its 10/100 ports.

5 20

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E5500G Switch Series


HP E5500G Switch Series
E5500-24G Switch
E5500-24G-PoE Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
1 module slot
Throughput up to 136.9 mpps
E5500-24G-PoE SwitchPoE on all

10/100/1000 ports

E5500-24G-SFP Switch
20 SFP Gigabit ports
4 dual-personality ports
1 module slot
Throughput up to 136.9 mpps
15

Rev. 10.31

The E5500G Switch Series consists of fixed-port, managed Gigabit switches.


Supporting static routes; dynamic routing protocols RIP, OSPF, BGP; and multicast
routing protocols PIM-DM and PIM-SM, these Layer 3/4 switches also provide
stackable scalability.
The E5500G switches can be deployed at the access layer or distribution layer in
medium and large-sized networks. On smaller networks, they may be deployed at
the core.
The E5500-24G and E5500-24G-PoE switches include the following:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

One open module slot (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 136.9 mpps

AC and/or DC power supply with a connection for an RPS

One RJ-45 console port

The E5500-24G-PoE switch provides PoE on 24 10/100/1000 ports.

Rev. 10.31

5 21

Servicing HP Networking Products

The E5500-24G-SFP switch includes the following:

20 SFP Gigabit ports (1000Base-X), which are factory-installed and ready to


provide connections

Four dual-personality ports

One open module slot (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 136.9 mpps

AC and/or DC power supply with a connection for an RPS

One RJ-45 console port

Customers can purchase a 1-GbE or 10-GbE module and install it in the open
module slot. They can also install SFP transceivers in the SFP ports. For more
information, see Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

5 22

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E5500G Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E5500G Switch Series (Cont.)
E5500-48G Switch
E5500-48G-PoE Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
1 module slot
Throughput up to 172.6 mpps
E5500-48G-PoE SwitchPoE on all

10/100/1000 ports

16

Rev. 10.31

The E5500-48G and E5500-48G-PoE switches include the following:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

One open module slot (on the rear panel)

Throughput up to 172.6 mpps

AC and/or DC power supply with a connection for an RPS

One RJ-45 console port

The E5500-48G-PoE switch provides PoE on 48 10/100/1000 ports.


Customers can purchase a 1-GbE or 10-GbE module and install it in the open
module slot. They can also install SFP transceivers in the SFP ports. For more
information, see Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

Rev. 10.31

5 23

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP Switches
HP Switches
Formerly Branded 3Com Switches
HP Switches
HP E2510 Switch Series
HP E2520 Switch Series
HP E26XX Switch Series
HP E2810 Switch Series
HP E29XX Switch Series
HP E3500 Switch Series
HP E4200 vl Switch Series
HP E5400 zl Switch Series
HP E6200 yl-24G-mGBIC Switch
HP E6600 Switch Series
HP E8200 zl Switch Series
HP Threat Management Services zl Module

Categorizing E Series Switches


17

Rev. 10.31

The next section outlines the E Series switches that were previously branded HP
ProCurve switches.

5 24

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E2510 Switch Series


HP E2510 Switch Series
E2510-24 Switch
24 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 6.5 mpps
Fanless

E2510-48 Switch
48 10/100 ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
2 open SFP ports
Throughput up to 13 mpps
18

Rev. 10.31

The HP E2510 Switch Series features four fixed-port, Layer 2, managed switches. This
series offers a choice of either Fast Ethernet or Gigabit connectivity, with support for
fiber uplinks. In addition, these switches support single IP address management for a
virtual stack of up to 16 switches.
Designed primarily for small-to-medium business (SMB), these switches are deployed
at the access layer. The fanless, quiet operation of the E2510-24 switch makes it an
ideal solution for SMBs that have open space work environments. (The other models
have fans.)
The E2510-24 switch provides the following features:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 6.5 mpps

One RJ-45 serial console port

The E2510-48 switch provides the following features:

Rev. 10.31

48 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Two open SFP ports

Throughput up to 13 mpps

One RJ-45 serial console port


5 25

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E2510 Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E2510 Switch Series (Cont.)
E2510-24G Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

E2510-48G Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 71.4 mpps

19

Rev. 10.31

The E2510-24G and E2510-48G switches provide higher speed links than the other
two switches in this series. The E2510-24G switch supports the following features:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

One RJ-45 serial console port

The E2510-48G switch supports the following features:

5 26

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 71.4 mpps

One RJ-45 serial console port

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E2520 Switch Series


HP E2520 Switch Series
E2520-8-PoE Switch
8 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 4.1 mpps
Up to 15.4W PoE per port
Fanless

E2520-24-PoE Switch
24 10/100 ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 6.2 mpps
Up to 15.4W PoE per port
20

Rev. 10.31

The HP E2520 Switch Series consists of four Layer 2 switchesall of which provide
PoE. In addition to PoE, two models support Fast Ethernet connections, while two
provide Gigabit Ethernet connections. PoE and high-speed connections make these
switches an attractive choice for SMBs that want to implement voice, video, and
wireless APs on their network. These switches provide connectivity at the access layer.
The E2520-8-PoE switch includes the following:

Eight auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 4.1 mpps

Up to 15.4W PoE per port

Fanless operation

One RJ-45 console port

The E2520-24-PoE switch includes the following:

Rev. 10.31

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

2 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Two dual-personality ports.

Throughput up to 6.2 mpps

Up to 15.4W PoE per port

One RJ-45 console port


5 27

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E2520 Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E2520 Switch Series (Cont.)
E2520-8G-PoE Switch
8 10/100/1000 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 14.8 mpps
Up to 15.4W PoE per port
Fanless

E2520-24G-PoE Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 35.7 mpps
Up to 15.4W PoE per port
21

Rev. 10.31

The E2520-8G-PoE switch includes the following:

Eight auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 14.8 mpps

Up to 15.4W PoE per port

Fanless operation

One RJ-45 console port

The E2520-24G-PoE switch includes the following:

5 28

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

Up to 15.4W PoE per port

One RJ-45 serial console cable

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E26XX Switch Series


HP E26XX Switch Series
E2615-8-PoE Switch
8 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 4.1 mpps
Fanless
PoE

E2610-24-PPoE Switch
24 10/100 ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
2 SFP ports
Throughput up to 9.5 mpps
PoE on 12 ports
22

Rev. 10.31

The HP E26XX Switch Series includes the following switches:

E2615-8-PoE switch

E2610-24-PPoE switch

E2610-24 switch

E2610-24-PoE switch

E2610-48 switch

E2610-48-PoE switch

These fixed-port, managed switches support static routes, giving them the designation
of Light Layer 3 switches. Four switches in the series also provide PoE.
The E26XX switches are designed primarily for the access layer, connecting devices
such as endpoints, printers, other peripherals, and servers to the network. They
provide a cost-effective solution for customers who are building converged enterprise
networks.
The E2615-8-PoE switch includes the following:

Rev. 10.31

Eight 10/100 ports

Two dual-personality ports

Fanless operation
5 29

Servicing HP Networking Products

PoE (except on dual-personality ports)

7.5 W on up to eight ports

15.4W on up to four ports

Up to 4.1 mpps throughput

The E2610-24-PPoE switch features:

5 30

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

PoE

Up to 126 W distributed over 12 PoE ports

Up to 15.4 W on eight ports or an average of 10.5 Watts on 12 ports

Two open SFP ports

Up to 9.5 mpps throughput

One RJ-45 serial console port

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E26XX Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E26XX Switch Series (Cont.)
E2610-24 Switch
E2610-24-PoE Switch
24 10/100 ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
2 SFP ports
Throughput up to 9.5 mpps

Differences:
E2610-24-PoE switchPoE on

10/100/1000 ports
E2610-24fanless

23

Rev. 10.31

The E2610-24 and E2610-24-PoE switches feature:

24 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Two open SFP ports

Up to 9.5 mpps throughput

One RJ-45 serial console port

The E2610-24-PoE switch provides up to15.4 W on all 24 ports. The E2610-24


switch, on the other hand, is fanless for silent operation.

Rev. 10.31

5 31

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E26XX Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E26XX Switch Series (Cont.)
E2610-48 Switch
E2610-48-PoE Switch
48 10/100 ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
2 SFP ports
Throughput up to 13 mpps
E2610-48-PoE SwitchPoE on

10/100/1000 ports

24

Rev. 10.31

The E2610-48 and E2610-48-PoE switches feature:

48 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Two open SFP ports

Up to 13.0 mpps throughput

One RJ-45 serial console port

Each switchs two 10/100/1000 ports operate independentlythey are not dualpersonality ports.
In addition, the E2610-48-PoE switch provides a total of 406 W. It can deliver 15.4
W on 24 ports or 8.4 W on 48 ports.
Note
The E2610-PoE switches can connect to an EPS/RPS to provide backup power
and additional power for PoE. These switches support the HP ProCurve 600
Redundant External Power Supply (J8168A) or the HP ProCurve 610 External
Power Supply (J8169A).

5 32

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E2810 Switch Series


HP E2810 Switch Series
E2810-24G Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

E2810-48G Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 71.4 mpps

25

Rev. 10.31

The HP E2810 Switch Series consists of two fixed-port, stackable Gigabit switches
with Layer 2 capabilities. Deployed at the access layer, these switches are designed
for networks requiring secure, high-performance connectivity along with advanced
traffic monitoring and prioritization. This series is a cost-effective, easy-to-use solution
with a shallow, stackable form for customers who have smaller wiring closets.
The E2810-24G switch includes the following features:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

One RJ-45 serial console port

The E2810-48G switch includes the following features:

Rev. 10.31

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 71.4 mpps

One RJ-45 serial console port

5 33

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E29XX Switch Series


HP E29XX Switch Series
E2915-8G-PoE Switch
8 10/100/1000-T ports
2 dual-personality ports
Fanless
PoE
Throughput up to 14.8 mpps

26

Rev. 10.31

The HP E29XX Switch Series provides Gigabit Ethernet connectivity for companies
that are implementing high-performance networks. The series includes five fixed-port
switchesfrom a very compact eight-port switch to 24-port and 48-port switches.
These switches support static routes and RIP, making them Light Layer 3 switches.
The E29XX switches can be deployed at the access layer in enterprises, remote
branch offices, and converged networks and at the server access layer in the data
center. The E2915-8G-PoE switch is designed for organizations that must deploy
access-layer switches in open spaces.
The E2915-8G-PoE switch features:

Eight 10/100/1000-T ports

Two dual-personality ports

Fanless operation

Kensington lock slot (lock sold separately)

Up to 14.8 mpps

One RJ-45 serial console port

This switch has a compact footprint with flexible deployment options.

5 34

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

The E2915-8G-PoE switch can also power up to eight devices that use 7.5 watts, such
as IP video cameras, IP phones, and wireless access points (APs). In addition, the
switch can dynamically allocate up to 15.4 watts of power to each port, with a total
of 67 watts available across the eight ports.

Rev. 10.31

5 35

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E29XX Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E29XX Switch Series (Cont.)
E2910-24G al Switch
E2910-24G-PoE+ al Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
1 open module slot
Throughput up to 95 mpps
E2910-24G-PoE+ al
Up to 15.4W per port for PoE
Up to 30W per port for PoE+

27

Rev. 10.31

The E2910-24G al and E2910-24G-PoE+ al switches feature:

20 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

One open module slot (rear panel)

Throughput up to 95 mpps

One RJ-45 serial console port

USB port

The E2910-24G-PoE+ al switch supports up to 15.4W per port for PoE or up to 30W
per port for PoE+. It also detects and provides power to pre-standard PoE devices.
Customers can purchase modules that support 10 GbE connections for the open
module slot on the rear panel. For more information, see Module 6: HP E Series
Switch Hardware.

5 36

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E29XX Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E29XX Switch Series (Cont.)
E2910-48G al Switch
E2910-48G-PoE+ al Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
1 open module slot
Throughput up to 131 mpps
E2910-48G-PoE+ al
Up to 15.4W per port for PoE
Up to 30W per port for PoE+

28

Rev. 10.31

The E2910-48G al and E2910-48G-PoE+ al switches feature:

44 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

One open module slot

Throughput up to 131 mpps

One RJ-45 serial console port

USB port (rear panel)

The E2910-48G-PoE+ al switch supports up to 15.4W per port for PoE or up to 30W
per port for PoE+. It also detects and provides power to pre-standard PoE devices.
Customers can purchase modules that support 10 GbE connections for the open slot.
For more information, see Module 6: HP E Series Switch Hardware.

Rev. 10.31

5 37

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E4200 vl Switch Series


HP E4200 vl Switch Series
E4204 vl Switch
4 open module slots
Throughput up to 24 mpps

E4204-44G-4SFP Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
2 open module slots
4 open SFP ports
Throughput up to 24 mpps

E4202-72 vl Switch
72 10/100 ports
2 open module slots
Throughput up to 22.4 mpps
29

Rev. 10.31

The HP E4200 vl Switch Series provides a flexible, cost-effective, modular solution as


an alternative to stackable switches. The Light Layer 3 switches support routing based
on static routes. (They do not support dynamic routing protocols.)
These switches are excellent platforms for expansionfor example, adding new users
at the access layer of the network. They can be deployed at the access layer of
large, complex networks or at the core, distribution, and access layers of SMB
networks.
The series includes three models that have a four-module form factor:

E4204 vl switch

E4204-44G-4SFP switch

E4202-72 vl switch:

The E4204 vl switch ships with four open module slots. Depending on which modules
the customer purchases, it supports a maximum of 96 10/100 ports or 96
10/100/1000 ports or 16 SFPs or a combination of these. It also has a RS-232C DB9 console port.
In addition, the switch has a throughput of up to 24 mpps.

5 38

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

The E4204-44G-4SFP switch ships with the following features:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports:

One HP Switch vl 24-Port Gig-T Module

One ProCurve Switch vl 20-Port Gig-T + 4-Port SFP Module

Two open module slots

Four open SFP ports

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

Throughput up to 24 mpps

Depending on which modules the customer installs in the two open module slots, the
switch can support a maximum of 48 10/100 ports or 92 10/100/1000 ports or 12
SFPs or a combination of these.
The E4202-72 vl switch ships with the following features:

72 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Two open module slots

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

Throughput up to 22.4 mpps

Depending on which modules the customer installs in the two open module slots, the
4202-72 vl switch supports a maximum of 120 10/100 ports or 48 10/100/1000
ports or eight mini-GBICs or a combination.

Rev. 10.31

5 39

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E4200 vl Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E4200 vl Switch Series (Cont.)
E4208 vl Switch
8 open module slots
Throughput up to 48 mpps

E4208-68G-4SFP vl Switch
68 10/100/1000 ports
5 open module slots
4 open SFP ports
Throughput up to 48 mpps

E4208-96 vl Switch
96 10/100 ports
4 open module slots
Throughput up to 48 mpps
30

Rev. 10.31

The E4200 vl Switch Series includes three models that have an eight-module form
factor:

E4208 vl switch

E4208-68G-4SFP vl switch

E4208-96 vl switch:

The E4208 vl switch ships with eight open module slots. Depending on which
modules the customer installs, this switch can support a maximum of 192 10/100
ports or 192 10/100/1000 ports or 32 mini-GBICs or a combination. It also has
one RS-232C DB-9 console port for management access.
In addition, the switch has a throughput of up to 48 mpps.
The E4208-68G-4SFP vl switch ships with the following features:

5 40

68 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports:

Two HP Switch vl 24-Port Gig-T Modules (J8768A)

One HP Switch vl 20-Port Gig-T + 4-Port SFP Module (J9033A)

Four open SFP ports

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

Five open module slots

Throughput up to 48 mpps
Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

The switch can support a maximum of 120 10/100 ports or 188 10/100/1000
ports or 24 mini-GBICs.
The E4208-96 vl switch ships with the following features:

96 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

One HP Switch vl 24-Port 10/100-TX Module (J8765A

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

Four open module slots

Throughput up to 48 mpps

The switch can support a maximum of 192 10/100 ports or 96 10/100/1000 ports
or 16 mini-GBICs.

Rev. 10.31

5 41

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E3500 Switch Series


HP E3500 Switch Series
E3500-24G-PoE yl switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
1 open module slot (rear panel)
Throughput up to 75.7 mpps
PoEup to 15.4W per port

E3500-24G-PoE+ yl switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
1 open module slot (rear panel)
Throughput up to 75.7 mpps
PoEup to 30 W per port
31

Rev. 10.31

The HP E3500 Switch Series includes both Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet fixedport, managed switches. Built on the HP ProVision ASIC, these switches are designed
to be future-proof. The ProVision ASIC enables HP to program new intelligent features
into the switch software; customers can then upgrade their software to take
advantage of these new features.
Note

The E3500 Switch Series uses the same software as other ProVision ASIC
switches: HP E5400 zl Switch Series, HP E6200 yl Switch, and HP
E8200 zl Switch Series.
These switches are full Layer 3/4 switches, supporting static routes, RIP, and OSPF. (A
premium license is required to enable OSPF.)
The E3500 yl switches provide Gigabit Ethernet connections, and customers can
purchase a module and install it in the rear panel to add 10-GbE connections to the
E3500 yl switches. With these high-speed connections, the E3500 yl switches can be
deployed at the access layer of large, complex networks or at the server access layer
in the data center. In SMB networks, the E3500 yl models can be deployed at the
distribution layer or core of SMB networks.
The E3500 switches (with no yl in the name) provide Fast Ethernet connections, with
the option of installing four SFP transceivers or mini-GBICs for uplinks. The E3500
switches can be deployed at the access layer of large, complex networks.
5 42

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

The E3500-24G-PoE yl switch includes the following features:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Total of 398 W of PoE, for up to 15.4W on 10/100/1000 ports

One open module on the rear panel

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

One USB port

Throughput up to 74 mpps

The E3500-24G-PoE+ yl switch supports the same features, with some minor
differences. The E3500-24G-PoE+ yl switch supports PoE+ (802.3at), which means
that it can provide up to 30W per port. It also has an RJ-45 console port (rather than
an RS-232C DB9 console port).

Rev. 10.31

5 43

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E3500 Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E3500 Switch Series (Cont.)
E3500-48G-PoE yl switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
1 open module slot (rear panel)
Throughput up to 111.5 mpps
PoEup to 15.4W per port

E3500-48G-PoE+ yl switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
1 open module slot (rear panel)
Throughput up to 111.5 mpps
PoE+up to 30W per port
32

Rev. 10.31

The E3500-48G-PoE yl switch includes the following features:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Total of 398 W of PoE, for up to 15.4W on 10/100/1000 ports

One RS-232C DB-9 console port located at the back of the switch

One USB port located at the back of the switch

Throughput up to 111.5 mpps

The E3500-48G-PoE+ yl switch supports the same features, with some minor
differences. The E3500-48G-PoE+ yl switch supports PoE+ (802.3at). It has a total of
698 W of PoE power, supplying up to 30 W per port. It also has an RJ-45 console
port (rather than an RS-232C DB9 console port).

5 44

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E3500 Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E3500 Switch Series (Cont.)
E3500-24 Switch
E3500-24-PoE Switch
20 auto-sensing 10/100 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 8.9 mpps
PoEup to 15.4W per port

E3500-48 switch
E3500-48-PoE switch
44 auto-sensing 10/100 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 12.5 mpps
33

Rev. 10.31

There are four Fast Ethernet switches in the E3500 series. The E3500-24 and E350024-PoE switches include:

20 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 8.9 mpps

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

The E3500-24-PoE switch also provides a total of 398 W of PoE power, with up to
15.4 W per port.
The E3500-48 and E3500-48-PoE switches include:

44 auto-sensing 10/100 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Throughput up to 12.5 mpps

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

The E3500-48-PoE switch also provides a total of 398 W of PoE power, with up to
15.4 W per port.

Rev. 10.31

5 45

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E5400 zl Switch Series


HP E5400 zl Switch Series
E5406 zl Switch
6 open module slots
2 open power supply slots
Throughput up to 240.2 mpps

E5406-48G zl switch
48 10/100/1000 ports
1 Switch zl 875W Power Supply (1

open power supply slot)


4 open module slots
Throughput up to 240.2 mpps

34

Rev. 10.31

Like the HP E3500 Switch Series, the HP E5400 zl Switch Series is built on the
ProVision ASIC. These switches are designed for vigorous network environments
driven by the highest requirements for performance, security, mobility, and
convergence. The E5400 zl Switch Series offers capabilities at Layer 2, 3, and 4,
providing advanced intelligent edge capability in a modular (6-slot and 12-slot) form
factor. All models have open power supply slots for redundant power.
Note

The E5400 zl Switch Series uses the same software as other ProVision
ASIC switches: HP E3500 Switch Series, HP E6200 yl Switch, and HP
E8200 zl Switch Series.
The E5400 zl switches support a variety of modules for network connectivity
providing 10/100/1000 ports (with and without PoE or PoE+) or SFP ports. These
switches also support modules that provide application services, firewall, VPNs, and
wireless services. For more information about these modules, see Module 6: HP E
Series Switch Hardware.
The E5400 zl series includes six switch chassis options: The six-slot E5406 zl switch
does not ship with any power supplies or modulesall slots are empty. Depending
on the modules the customer purchases, the E5406 zl switch supports a maximum of
144 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports or 24 10-GbE ports or 144 mini-GBICs, or a
combination. It also supports up to 240.2 mpps throughput.
5 46

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

The E5406 zl switch also supports up to two power supplieseither an HP Switch zl


875 W Power Supply or an HP Switch zl 1500 W Power Supply. To provide
redundancy, each power supply should be connected to different AC power sources.
Then, if one AC power source fails, the switch will continue to run.
The E5406-48G zl switch has the following features:

48 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports (two HP Switch zl 24-Port 10/100/1000


PoE Modules)

One HP Switch zl 875W Power

Integrated PoE on all 10/100/1000 ports

One open slot for additional 875W or 1500W (220V only) power supply

Optional connection to an external power supply for more power


Note
The HP zl Power Supply Shelf can provide up to 1800 watts of PoE power to the
switch if the internal PoE power supply should fail or as additional PoE power to
the switchs PoE ports is needed.

Four open module slots

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

One USB port

Throughput up to 240.2 mpps

The E5406-48G zl switch supports a maximum of 144 auto-sensing 10/100/1000


ports or 16 10-GbE ports or 96 mini-GBICs, or a combination.
Note
The 5400 zl switch can also function as a distribution switch.

Rev. 10.31

5 47

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E5400 zl Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E5400 zl Switch Series (Cont.)
E5406-44G-PoE+/4SFP zl Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 open module slots
4 open SFP ports
Throughput up to 240.2 mpps
PoE+

35

Rev. 10.31

The E5406-44G-PoE+/4SFP zl switch ships with the following:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports (one HP 24-Port 10/100/1000 PoE+ zl


Module and one 10/100/1000 PoE+ and 4-Port Mini-GBIC zl Module)

One HP Switch zl 1500 W Power Supply

Integrated PoE+ on all 10/100/1000 ports

One open slot for additional power supply

Optional connection to an external power supply for more power


Note
The HP zl Power Supply Shelf can provide up to 1800 watts of PoE power to the
switch if the internal PoE power supply should fail or as additional PoE power to
the switchs PoE ports is needed.

5 48

Four open module slots

Four open SFP ports

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

One USB port

Throughput up to 240.2 mpps

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

With the purchase of additional modules, the E5406-44G-PoE+/4SFP zl switch


supports a maximum of 16 10-GbE ports or 140 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports or
100 mini-GBICs or a combination.

Rev. 10.31

5 49

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E5400 zl Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E5400 zl Switch Series (Cont.)
E5412 zl Switch
12 open module slots
4 open power supply slots
Throughput up to 480.3 mpps

E5412-96G zl Switch
96 10/100/1000 ports
2 Switch zl 875W Power Supplies

(2 open power supply slots)


8 open module slots
Throughput up to 480.3 mpps

36

Rev. 10.31

The 12-slot E5412 zl switch does not ship with any power supplies or modules; all
module slots are empty. Depending on the modules the customer purchases, the
5412zl switch supports a maximum of 288 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports or 48
10-GbE ports or 288 mini-GBICs or a combination.
It also provides up to 480.3 mpps throughput.
The E5412-96G zl switch has the following features:

96 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports (four HP Switch zl 24-Port 10/100/1000


PoE Modules)

Two Switch 875W zl Power Supplies

Integrated PoE on all 10/100/1000 ports

Two open slots for additional 875W or 1500W (220V only) power supply

Optional connection to an external power supply for more power

Eight open module slots

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

One USB port

Throughput up to 480.3 mpps

The E5412-96G zl switch supports a maximum of 288 auto-sensing 10/100/1000


ports or 32 10-GbE ports or 192 mini-GBICs, or a combination.
5 50

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E5400 zl Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E5400 zl Switch Series (Cont.)
E5412-92G-PoE+/4 SFP zl Switch
96 10/100/1000 ports
8 open module slots
4 open SFP ports
Throughput up to 480.3 mpps
PoE+

37

Rev. 10.31

The E5412-92G-PoE+/4SFP zl switch has the following features:

96 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports (three HP ProCurve 24-Port 10/100/1000


PoE+ zl Modules and one HP ProCurve 20-Port 10/100/1000 PoE+ and 4-Port
mini-GBIC zl Module)

Four open SFP ports

Eight open module slots

Two HP ProCurve 1500W PoE+ zl Power Supplies

One RS-232C DB-9 console port

One USB port

Throughput up to 480.3 mpps

Integrated PoE on all 10/100/1000 ports

Two open slots for additional 1500W power supply

Optional connection to an external power supply for more power

The E5412-92G-PoE+/4SFP zl switch supports a maximum of 32 10-GbE ports or


284 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports or 196 mini-GBICs or a combination

Rev. 10.31

5 51

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E6200-24G-mGBIC yl Switch
HP E6200-24G-mGBIC yl Switch
24 open SFP ports
One open module slot
Throughput up to 75.7 mpps

38

Rev. 10.31

The HP E6200-24G-mGBIC yl switch is a fixed-port switch that provides Layer 2, 3,


and 4 capabilities in a 1U stackable format; it is intended to aggregate network
traffic from the edge of the network to the core.
The E6200-24G-mGBIC yl switch has the following features:

24 open SFP ports

One open module slot on the back panel

Throughput up to 75.7 mpps

The open module on the back panel supports the ProCurve Switch yl 10-GbE 2-Port
CX4 + 2-Port X2 Module, which provides two 10-GbE ports and two open transceiver
slots.
Note

The E6200-24G-mGBIC yl switch uses the same software as other


ProVision ASIC switches: HP E3500 Switch Series, HP E5400 zl Switch
Series, and HP E8200 zl Switch Series.

5 52

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E6600 Switch Series


HP E6600 Switch Series
E6600-24G Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Up to 35.7 mpps

E6600-24G-4XG Switch
20 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
4 SFP+ 10-GbE ports
Up to 75.7 mpps

39

Rev. 10.31

The HP E6600 Switch Series consists of managed, Layer 3/4 switches. Built on the
HP ProVision ASIC, these switches are optimized for the server access layer in a data
center. They have front-to-back airflow so that they can be installed at the top of a
server rack. To provide uninterrupted service, the switches support redundant, hotswappable power and redundant, hot-swappable fans.
The E6600 switches also perform Layer 3 routing, supporting RIP, OSPF, and static
routes. In addition, they provide advanced security features and QoS.
The E6600 series includes five switches. The E6600-24G switch provides the
following:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Up to 35.7 mpps

Rev. 10.31

Two power supply slots with one HP E6600 Switch Power Supply included with
purchase
One RS-232C DB-9 console port

5 53

Servicing HP Networking Products

The E6600-24G-4XG switch provides the following:

20 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Four SFP+ 10-GbE ports

Up to 75.7 mpps

Two power supply slots with one HP E6600 Switch Power Supply included with
purchase
One RS-232C DB-9 console port

(See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for more information about supported
mini-GBICs and SFP transceivers.)

5 54

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E6600 Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E6600 Switch Series (Cont.)
E6600-24XG Switch
24 SFP+ 10-GbE ports
Up to 240.2 mpps

40

Rev. 10.31

There is one more 24-port switch in the E6600 series. The E6600-24XG switch
includes the following:

24 SFP+ 10-GbE ports


Two power supply slots with one HP E6600 Switch Power Supply included with
purchase

Up to 240.2 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

One RJ-45 out-of-band management port

(See Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware for more information about supported
mini-GBICs and transceivers.)

Rev. 10.31

5 55

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E6600 Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E6600 Switch Series (Cont.)
E6600-48G Switch
44 10/100/1000 ports
4 dual-personality ports
Up to 71.4 mpps

E6600-48G-4XG Switch
48 10/100/1000 ports
4 SFP+ 10-GbE ports
Up to 130.9 mpps

41

Rev. 10.31

The E6600-48G switch provides the following:

44 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four dual-personality ports

Two power supply slots with one HP E6600 Switch Power Supply included with
purchase

Up to 71.4 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

One RJ-45 out-of-band management port

The E6600-48G-4XG switch provides the following:

48 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports

Four SFP+ 10-GbE ports

5 56

Two power supply slots with one HP E6600 Switch Power Supply included with
purchase

Up to 130.9 mpps

One RJ-45 console port

One RJ-45 out-of-band management port

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E8200 zl Switch Series


HP E8200 zl Switch Series
E8206 zl Switch
6 open module slots
2 open power supply slots
(1 power supply required)
1 management module and
1 open management module
2 fabric modules
1 system support module
1 chassis/fan tray
Throughput up to 240.2 mpps
42

Rev. 10.31

Built on the ProVision ASIC, the HP E8200 zl Switch Series includes highperformance, highly available, modular switches that enable unified core-to-edge
network solutions. To ensure system continuity and enhance network productivity, they
provide platform and software high-availability features. They also function as Layer
3/4 switches, supporting static routes and dynamic routing protocols RIP and OSPF.
The E8200 zl switches support a variety of modules for network connectivity
providing 10/100/1000 ports (with and without PoE or PoE+) or SFP ports. These
switches also support modules that provide application services, firewall, VPNs, and
wireless services. For more information about these modules, see Module 6: HP E
Series Switch Hardware.
The E8200 zl switch can be deployed at any network layer in large, complex
networks and in data centers.
The E8206 zl switch has the following features:

Rev. 10.31

Six open module slots

Two open power supply slots (one required)

One HP ProCurve Switch 8200zl Management Module

Two HP ProCurve Switch 8200zl Fabric Modules

One HP ProCurve Switch 8200zl System Support Module

5 57

Servicing HP Networking Products

One HP ProCurve Switch 8212zl Chassis/Fan Tray

Throughput up to 240.2 mpps

The E8206 zl switch supports a maximum of 288 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports


or 48 10-GbE ports or 288 mini-GBICs or a combination

5 58

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

HP E8200 zl Switch Series (Cont.)


HP E8200 zl Switch Series (Cont.)
E8212 zl Switch
12 open module slots
4 open power supply slots
(2 power supplies required)
1 management module and 1
open management module
2 fabric modules
1 system support module
1 chassis/fan tray
Throughput up to 480.3 mpps
43

Rev. 10.31

The E8212 zl switch has the following features:

12 open module slots

Four open power supply slots (two required)

One ProCurve Switch 8200zl Management Module

Two ProCurve Switch 8200zl Fabric Modules

One ProCurve Switch 8200zl System Support Module

One ProCurve Switch 8212zl Chassis/Fan Tray

Throughput up to 480.3 mpps

The E8212 zl switch supports a maximum of 288 auto-sensing 10/100/1000 ports


or 48 10-GbE ports or 288 mini-GBICs, or a combination.

Rev. 10.31

5 59

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP Threat Management Services zl Module


HP Threat Management Services zl Module
Monitor mode:
IDS

Routing mode:
Firewall
IPS
VPN
User authentication
NAT
Routing
High availability (HA)

Installed in a 5400 zl or 8200 zl


Series switch

Logging
44

Rev. 10.31

The HP ProCurve Threat Management Services zl Module is designed to help protect


companies from threats that originate both inside and outside the corporate network.
Installed into an E5400 zl or E8200 zl Series switch, the module can function in one
of two modes:

Monitor mode

Routing mode

In monitor mode, the TMS zl Module functions as an intrusion detection system (IDS).
Traffic is mirrored to the modules internal port, and the module scans it for threats,
such as worms, viruses, denial of service (DoS) attacks, and other threats. If the TMS
zl Module detects suspicious traffic, it can send a notification message.
In routing mode, the TMS zl Module provides several security features. It has a
firewall, which can filter traffic on the internal network, identifying and blocking
attacks. In addition, the firewall supports access policies, allowing companies to
control routed traffic.
In routing mode, the TMS zl Module can also function as an instruction prevention
system (IPS). The module detects the same types as threats as it does in monitor
mode. In routing mode, however, the TMS zl Module can take action against such
threats.

5 60

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

The TMS zl Module supports virtual private networks (VPNs), which protect traffic that
passes through an untrusted network such as the Internet or a wireless network that
does not offer encryption.
In addition to these three main security features, the TMS zl Module in routing mode
provides user authentication, network address translation (NAT), high availability,
and logging.

Rev. 10.31

5 61

Servicing HP Networking Products

Categorizing E Series Switches


Categorizing E Series Switches
Formerly Branded 3Com Switches
HP Switches
Categorizing E Series Switches
E Series Switches Categorized by OSI Layer
Functionality
Deployment Options for E Series Switches

45

Rev. 10.31

The final section in this module provides two at-a-glance references: The first helps
you quickly identify the OSI functionality of each E Series Switch. The second shows
you the deployment options for these switches.

5 62

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

E Series Switches Categorized by OSI Functionality


E Series Switches Categorized by OSI
Functionality
Layer 2

Layer 3 Lite

Layers 3 and 4

HP E4210

HP E4500

HP E4800G

HP E4210G

HP E4500G

HP E5500

HP E2510

HP E4510G

HP E5500G

HP E2520

HP E26XX

HP E3500

HP E2810

HP E29XX

HP E5400 zl

HP E4200 vl

HP E6200 yl
HP E6600
HP E8200 zl

46

Rev. 10.31

As you can see here, the HP E Series provides switches to meet the needs of a wide
range of customersfrom companies needing only Layer 2 functionality to
organizations requiring advanced Layer 3/4 functionality.

Rev. 10.31

5 63

Servicing HP Networking Products

Deployment Options for E Series Switches


Deployment Options for E Series Switches
Switch

Access Layer

Distribution Layer

HP E4210

HP E4210G

HP E4500

HP E4500G & E4510G

HP E4800G

HP E5500

HP E5500G

47

Core

Data Center

Rev. 10.31

The E Series also includes switches that can be deployed at any layer of large,
complex networks or SMB networks.

5 64

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Overview

Deployment Options for E Series Switches


Deployment Options for E Series Switches
Access Layer

Distribution Layer

Core

HP E2510

HP E2520

HP E2810

HP E26XX

HP E29XX

HP E3500

HP E4200 vl

HP E5400zl

HP E6200 yl

48

HP E6600
HP E8200 zl

Data Center

Rev. 10.31

Again, these switches are designed primarily for large, complex networks and some
SMBs. Customers with large enterprises will typically deploy HP A Series switches,
while many SMBs will use HP V Series switches.

Rev. 10.31

5 65

Servicing HP Networking Products

Summary
Summary
E Series Switches
Formerly Branded 3Com switches
HP switches

Categorizing E Series Switches

49

Rev. 10.31

This module has introduced the HP E Series switches. You have learned how to
recognize these switches and how to classify them according to several factors:

5 66

Whether they are fixed-port or modular

Whether they provide Gigabit or Fast Ethernet connectivity

Whether they provide PoE or PoE+

Whether they function as Layer 2, Light Layer 3, or Layer 3/4

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Module 6

Objectives
This module outlines the basic components and accessories that you should be
familiar with to provide support for HP E Series switches. After completing this
module, you should be able to:

Rev. 10.31

Identify E Series switch LEDs and use them to diagnose and troubleshoot
problems
Identify E Series switches that support the Mode Select button and use it to
gather diagnostic information about the switches
Identify E Series switches that support a hardware reset and use it to return the
switches to factory default settings
Identify E Series switches that have a Clear button and use it to erase
management passwords
Identify the types of module, mini-GBIC, and transceiver options available for HP
E Series switches
Recognize which E Series switches support modules, mini-GBICs, and
transceivers into HP E Series switches
Describe redundant and external power supply options for E Series switches

6 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

LEDs
LEDs
LEDs
LED Types
LEDs on HP Managed Switches
Port LEDs

Hardware Reset
HP E Series Switch Modules
HP E Series mini-GBICs and Transceivers
Redundant Power for HP E Series Switches

Rev. 10.31

LEDs are one of the most useful tools you have for diagnosing and troubleshooting
problems. This section outlines the types of LEDs on most HP E Series switches and
explains how to interpret them.

6 2

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

LEDs on E Series Switches


LEDs on E Series Switches
Purpose:
Monitor switch operations
Troubleshoot problems

Three main types of LEDs:


Switchstatus of features that impact switch operation
Modulestatus of modules (modular switches only)
Portstatus and activity of specific ports:

Rev. 10.31

LEDs report the status of switch operations, such as the switchs self test, power over
Ethernet (PoE), general power supply, and network activity on each portto name
just a few. If the switch experiences a problem, the LEDs immediately reflect it. By
viewing and interpreting the LEDs, you can begin to pinpoint and identify the
problem.
Like most managed switches, the HP E Series switches have three main types of LEDs:

Switch LEDsThese LEDs report on the status of features that impact switch
operation. You can use switch LEDs to determine at the status of hardware
components, such as:

Power supply

Fan

Self-test

Temperature

Redundant power supplies

External power supplies

Switch LEDs can also show the status of functionality such as Power over
Ethernet (PoE).

Rev. 10.31

6 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

6 4

Module LEDsThese LEDs report on the status of the modules that are installed
in a modular switch such as HP E4200 vl Switch Series, HP E5400 zl Switch
Series, and HP E8200 zl Switch Series.

Module status

Module activity

PoE compatibility

Port LEDsThese LEDs report on the status and activity of each port in the
switch.

Port activity

PoE compatibility and supply

Full-duplex operation

Connection speed

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Locate LEDs on Formerly Branded 3Com Switches


Locate LEDs on Formerly Branded 3Com
Switches
Similar to LEDs on formerly branded H3C switches
For more information about LEDs on these switches, refer to
Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware.
7-Segment
Digital LED

Power LED
RPS status LED
Module 1LED
Module 2 LED

Mode button
5

Rev. 10.31

As you know, the HP E Series includes two groups of switches:

Switches that were previously branded as 3Com switches

Switches that were previously branded as HP ProCurve switches

The LEDs on these two groups of switches vary slightly. The LEDs on the 3Com
switches are similar to those on the H3C switches that are part of the HP A Series. If
you are servicing a 3Com switch, refer to Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware
for information about LEDs.
(For a complete explanation of a particular switchs LEDs, refer to the Installation and
Getting Started Guide for the specific switch model. These guides are available on
the HP Web site.)
The remainder of this section will focus on the switches that were previously branded
HP ProCurve.

Rev. 10.31

6 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

Locate Basic Switch LEDs on HP Switches


Locate Basic Switch LEDs on HP Switches

Test LED

Fan LED

Power LED
Fault LED
Locator LED
(Blue)

Rev. 10.31

HP switches have several basic LEDs:

Power LED

Fault LED

Locator LED

Test LED

Fan LED
Note
The remainder of this section covers the LEDs on switches that were previously
branded HP ProCurve switches. For information about switches that were formerly
branded 3Com (including the E4210, E4210G, E4500, E4500G, E4800G,
E5500, and E5500G), see Module 3: HP A Series Switch Hardware.

The slide shows where each of these LEDs are located on an E5400 zl switch.
Because the LEDs are clearly identified, you should be able to easily locate them on
other switches.

6 6

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Use Basic Switch LEDs to Troubleshoot Problems

Use Basic Switch LEDs to Troubleshoot


Problems
LED

State

Meaning

Power (green)

On

Switch is receiving power

Fault (orange)

Off
Off

Switch is not receiving power


Normal state

Blinking

Switch is experiencing fault condition

On
On or
blinking

Failed self-test; check other LEDs


Distinguishes switch from other switches

Locator

Test (green)

Fan (green)

Off
Off

Normalswitch is not undergoing self-test

On

Self-test/initialization in progress

Blinking
On

Switch component has failed self-test


Cooling fan is operational

Blinking

Cooling fan failurecheck Fault LED

Rev. 10.31

The slide lists basic switch LEDs on HP E Series switches. By examining these basic
switch LEDs, you can begin to isolate or eliminate problems. When the LEDs are on,
they indicate the following:

PowerThe switch is receiving power.

FaultIf the fault light is on, the switch has failed its self-test.
If the fault LED is blinking, the switch is experiencing a fault condition. For
example, a hardware failure may have occurred on the switch, one of the switch
modules, an individual port, a power supply, or a fan. The Status LED for the
module or other device that is experiencing the fault will flash simultaneously.
You will learn more about other fault conditions later in this module.

Locator LEDIf you use a Telnet session or a Web browser session to manage a
switch that is in a room that houses many switches, you may not be able to
easily locate the physical switch chassis. You can activate the blue Locator LED,
which will then either glow solid or begin to flash, allowing you to find the
switch.
TestThe self-test is underway.
A blinking Test LED indicates that the test has failed. If this happens, the Fault
LED will flash simultaneously. (If the self-test is completed successfully, the LED
turns off.)

Rev. 10.31

6 7

Servicing HP Networking Products

FanThe fan is operating normally.


A blinking LED indicates that the fan has failed.

6 8

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Switch LEDs: Temperature LED

Switch LEDs: Temperature LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

Tmp

On/Off*
(green)

Switch temperature conditions are normal.

On/Blinking
(orange)

An abnormal temperature condition has been


detected.

*Off or on (green) indicates normal temperatures, depending on the switch.

PoE LED
Tmp LED
Fan LED
Test LED

Rev. 10.31

Most HP switches have a Tmp LED, which indicates the switch temperature condition:

On/GreenThe switch temperature is normal.


Blinking/OrangeAn abnormal temperature condition has been detected on
the switch.
Note
On some switchesE5400 zl switches, for examplethe temperature LED stays
off at normal switch temperature and only turns on when there is a temperature
anomaly. Keep in mind, though, that a blinking orange temperature LED always
indicates abnormal switch temperature.

If the Tmp LED is blinking orange, you should check the room where the switch is
housed. For example, make sure the temperature of the room is not too high and
there is sufficient airflow around the switch. If you are servicing an E6600 switch, you
may want to check the air flow direction. See the Switch Fan Trays section at the
end of this module.
If the switch is an E5400 zl or E8200 zl switch, make sure that the customer has
followed the guidelines for installing the modules. For example, if the customer has
an HP Threat Management Services (TMS) zl Module or an HP AllianceONE
Services zl Module, you must verify that the switch chassis does not exceed a certain
temperature. If the module is installed in the left side of the switch, the temperature

Rev. 10.31

6 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

should not exceed 50 degrees C. If the module is on the right side, the temperature
should not exceed 40 degrees C.

6 10

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Switch LEDs: Mode Select Button and Indicator LEDs

Switch LEDs: Mode Select Button and


Indicator LEDs
Switch LEDs

State

Meaning

Indicator

On/Off
(green)

Indicates the setting of the Mode LEDs, based on what


has been selected with the Mod e Select button:
Actdisplays port activity
FDxdisplays ports operating in full duplex
Maxdisplays ports operating at maximum speed
(100 Mbps or 1000 Mbps)
PoEdisplays status of PoE on the port

Mode Select
button

Indicator LEDs
(Act, FDx, Spd, PoE)
9

Mode Select button changes what is

displayed on the Mode LED for each port.

Rev. 10.31

To optimize the amount of information that can be displayed for each port in the
limited space available, many switches rely on multiple-display LEDs, or Mode LEDs.
These LEDs can indicate more than one port condition and are controlled by the
Mode Select button. Pressing the Mode Select button changes the setting of the Mode
LED and the condition reported by the LED.
For example, the Mode LED in the slide above can indicate one of four port
conditions:

Port activity

Ports operating at full duplex

Ports operating at maximum speed

Network events possibly requiring operator attention

To change the setting of the port Mode LED, press the Mode Select button and cycle
through the settings until you reach the desired one. (Mode LEDs are discussed in
more detail later in the module when port LEDs are described.)
In addition to the Mode LEDs, switches have Indicator LEDs, which display the
switchs current mode setting. For example, the HP E2610-24 switchs indicator LEDs
match its Mode LED settings:

Rev. 10.31

ActMode LEDs are indicating network activity.

FDxMode LEDs are indicating ports operating at full-duplex.


6 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

SpdMode LEDs are indicating ports operating at maximum speed.


Note
On some switches, the Mode Select button changes the information that is
displayed by the Module LEDs or the port Link LED. These functions are described
later in this module.

PoEIf the PoE indicator LED is lit, the Link and Mode LEDs indicate PoE status:

6 12

Link LED

OnPoE is enabled on the port.

OffPoE is disabled on the port.

Slow BlinkingInternal PoE fault on this port.

Fast BlinkingThe port is denied PoE power or has an external load


fault.

Mode LED

OnPoE power is be supplied on this port.

OffPoE is not being supplied on this port.

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Switch LEDs: PoE

Switch LEDs: PoE


Switch LED

State

Meaning

PoE
(green/orange)

On (green)

Normal operationready to supply PoE power

Off

Off during boot process only

Slow blinking*
(orange)

Internal hardware failure

Rapid
Blinking**
(orange)

External power supply fault


PoE has been denied to one or more ports.

*Blinking on/off approximately once every 1.6 seconds


**Blinking on/off cycle approximately once every .5 seconds

PoE LED
Tmp LED
Fan LED
Test LED
10

Rev. 10.31

Switches that support PoE are equipped with a PoE LED. (This LED is not the Mode
LED at the PoE setting.) Interpret the PoE LED as follows:

On/GreenA green PoE LED indicates that the switch is ready to provide PoE
power. This is normal behavior for switches capable of supplying PoE power.
Blinking/OrangeA blinking orange PoE LED indicates that one or more of the
switchs ports has experienced a fault condition. In this case, the switchs Fault
LED will blink simultaneously. If it is a self-test failure, the Test LED will blink
simultaneously. When the Mode Select button is used to put the LEDs in PoE
mode, the Mode LED will also blink simultaneously.
When both the PoE and the Fault LED are blinking, the type of error condition is
indicated by the speed of the blinking:

Slow blinking (approximately one flash every 1.6 seconds)indicates an


internal hardware failure

Rapid blinking (approximately one flash every .5 seconds)indicates a


fault on an external power supply

When the PoE LED is blinking but the Fault LED is not, the switch is experiencing
an oversubscription condition. In other words, not enough power is available for
each port that demands it. When set at PoE mode, the Mode LED for the port or
ports that are not receiving power will also blink.

Rev. 10.31

6 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch LEDs: RPS LED

Switch LEDs: RPS LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

RPS Status
(green)

On

HP E600 RPS/EPS unit is connected, operating correctly, and


could be powering the switch.

Blinking

HP E600 RPS/EPS unit is connected but powering another


switch; HP 600 unit has experienced a fault.

Off

HP E600 RPS/EPS not connected or is not powered on.

RPS LED
11

Rev. 10.31

Some HP switches support redundant power supplies (RPS), which are discussed later
in this module. If the internal power supply in a switch fails, the RPS will immediately
provide all the power necessary to keep the switch running. However, the RPS will not
supply power to the PoE ports on PoE switches.
A switchs RPS LED indicates the status of the RPS:

6 14

On/GreenAn RPS is connected and operating correctly. The RPS could be


currently powering the switch.

Blinking/OrangeThe RPS is connected but has experienced a fault.

LED OffThe RPS is not connected or is not powered on.

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Switch LEDs: EPS LED

Switch LEDs: EPS LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

EPS Status
(green)

On

Switch is connected to a RPS/EPS or EPS and receiving power.

Blinking

The External Power Supply has experienced a fault:

Off

PoE is oversubscribed.

Switch software may not support the EPS function.

There is a fan, power, or temporary fault.

Switch detects the EPS but cannot communicate with it.

External Power Supply is not connected or is not powered on.

EPS LED
12

Rev. 10.31

An External Power Supply (EPS) provides power to:

PoE ports on PoE switches if the switchs internal AC power supply fails

PoE modules on switches

EPS units are discussed in more depth later in this module.


The EPS LED indicates the EPS status for a switch that supports a connection to such a
device:

On/GreenThe switch is connected to an EPS and is receiving power from it.


Blinking/OrangeThe EPS is connected but has experienced a fault or is
unplugged.
OffThe switch is not connected to an EPS or the EPS is not powered on.

To view the PoE status of a module (if the module and the switch support this
capability), you can use the Mode Select button as described on the following page.

Rev. 10.31

6 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch LEDs: Module LEDs

Switch LEDs: Module LEDs


LED

State

Meaning

Module

On (green)

Module is installed and operational.

Off

Module is not installed.

Blinking
(orange)

Module LED briefly blinks when a module is hot swapped.


Prolonged blinking signifies module has failed.

On (green)

Module slot supports PoE

Blinking

Internal slot fault or insufficient power

Off

Module in slot is not a PoE module.

Module in PoE
Mode*

*Not available on all switches

Module LEDs

13

Rev. 10.31

Module LEDs
Modular switches such as the E5400 zl and E8200 zl switches have lettered LEDs,
each one corresponding to one of the switchs module slots. If a lettered Module LED
is on, a module has been installed in the corresponding slot and is operating
correctly. If the lettered Module LED is off, the corresponding slot is empty.
If the LED is blinking orange, the corresponding slot or module is experiencing a fault
condition. If this happens, the Fault LED will also blink to notify you that there is a
fault condition.
A fault condition may indicate that the module has experienced a hardware failure. It
may also indicate that the switch is running a version of the software that does not
support the module. For example, the TMS zl Module requires the E5400 zl and
E8200 zl switch to run software version K.13.55 or above. If you install a TMS zl
Module in a switch that is running an earlier version of the software, the Module LED
and the Fault LED will blink. You can simply upgrade the switch software to the
required version to remedy this problem.
Note
The Module Status LED flashes very briefly when a module is being hot swapped.
If the LED flashes for a prolonged time, the module in the corresponding slot has
failed its self-test or encountered some other fault condition.

6 16

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Module LED in PoE Mode


Like Port Mode LEDs, the Module LEDs can be controlled by the Mode Select button.
That is, pressing the Mode Select button can change the information that the Module
LEDs display.
For example, if the Mode Select button has been used to put the Port Mode LEDs in
PoE Mode, then the Module LEDs will convey information relating to each module
slots PoE status. A green Module LED indicates that the corresponding slot is
supporting PoE power. A blinking Module LED indicates that there is a PoE internal
fault in the slot, a PoE load fault, or simply not enough power for the corresponding
slot. If the Module LED is off, the corresponding module does not support PoE or the
slot is empty.

Rev. 10.31

6 17

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch LEDs: Mgt or MM Status LED

Switch LEDs: Mgt or MM Status LED


Switch LED

State

Mgmt (E5400 zl)/


On (green)
MM Status (E8200 zl)
Off
Blinking
(orange)

Meaning
Management module is installed and fault free.
Switch is powered off.
There is a fault on the Management module.

Mgmt LED

14

Rev. 10.31

The HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl switches support removable Management modules


and have an LED to communicate the status of these modules. The E5400 zl switches
have the Mgmt LED, and the E8200 zl switches have the MM Status LED.

On/GreenThe module has been installed and is functional.

OffThe switch is powered off.

Blinking/OrangeThe module is experiencing a fault.

The E8200 zl switches support redundant Management modules to support missioncritical operations. When two Management modules are installed and powered on,
one Management module is active, and the other module operates in standby mode.
In addition to the MM Status LED, the E8200 zl switches have a bank of MM State
LEDs to show the status of each Management module:

6 18

ActvThis LED is green if the management module is active.

StbyThis LED is green if the management module is in standby mode.

DwnThis LED is green if the management module is shut down.

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Switch LEDs: CF and DIM LEDs

Switch LEDs: CF and DIM LEDs


E5400 zl & E8200
zl Switch LED

State

Meaning

CF

On (green)

Compact Flash is fault free.

Off

Compact Flash status is unknown.

Blinking (orange)

Compact Flash has a fault or alert condition.

On (green)

Dual In-line Memory Module (DIM) is fault free.

Off

DIM status is unknown.

Blinking (orange)

DIM has a fault or alert condition.

DIM

CF LED
DIM LED

15

Rev. 10.31

The HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl switches also have LEDs that show the status of the
internal Compact Flash (CF) memory and the Dual In-Line Memory Module (DIM)
status. (An emerging standard for RAM circuits, the DIM enables a 64-bit data path.)
On the E8200 zl switches, these LEDs are listed as Component Status on the
Management module, as shown on the next slide.
The CF LED has three different states:

On/GreenThe Compact Flash status is known and is fault free.

OffThe Compact Flash status is unknown.

Blinking/OrangeThe Compact Flash has a fault or an alert condition. Check


the other LEDs to help identify the problem.

If the CF, Fault, and Self Test LEDs are blinking, the Compact Flash failed
self-test.

If the CF and Fault LEDs are blinking, an operational fault has occurred.

If the CF LED is blinking rapidly (400 milliseconds, or ms, On and 400ms


Off), an operational alert occurred and is unresolved. (For example,
Compact Flash might not be present.)

The DIM LED also has three states:

Rev. 10.31

On/GreenThe DIM status is known and fault free.

OffThe DIM status is unknown.


6 19

Servicing HP Networking Products

6 20

Blinking/Orange The DIM has a fault or an alert condition. Check the other
LEDs to help identify the problem

If the DIM, Fault, and Self Test LEDs are blinking, DIM failed self-test.

If DIM and Fault LEDs are blinking, an operational fault has occurred.

If the DIM LED is blinking rapidly (400ms On and 400ms Off), an


operational alert occurred and is unresolved.

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Switch LEDs: SSM LED

Switch LEDs: SSM LED


E8200 zl
Switch LED

State

Meaning

SSM

On (green)

Communication with the System Support Module (SSM) is


good.

Off
Blinking (orange)

System Support
Module

16

No communication with the SSM, or no SSM is installed.


Communication link to the SSM is bad, or the SSM has
failed.
Component Status LEDs
CF
DIM
SSM

Rev. 10.31

In addition to the CF and DIM LEDs, the E 8200 zl switches have a third Component
Status LEDthe SSM LED. This LED shows if the Management module can
communicate with the system support module (SSM) module:

On/GreenThe communication link with the SSM is good.

OffThe communication link with the SSM is down, or no SSM is installed.

Rev. 10.31

Blinking/OrangeThe communication link with the SSM is bad, or the SSM


itself has failed

6 21

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch LEDs: Power Supply LED

Switch LEDs: Power Supply LED


Switch LED

State

Meaning

Power or
Internal Power

On (green)

Power supply is installed.

Off

Power supply is not installed.

Blinking (orange)

Power supply installed is not plugged in or has


experienced a fault.

Internal Power LEDs (1-4)

17

Rev. 10.31

Switches may also have Power or Internal Power LEDs, which correspond to the
power slots located at the back of the switch. If a supply is plugged into an active
AC power source, the corresponding Internal Power LED will turn on.
If an Internal Power LED is blinking, the power supply installed in the position
corresponding to the number is not plugged in to an active AC power source or has
experienced a fault. The switch Fault LED will blink simultaneously.

6 22

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Interpreting Port LEDs on Switches


Interpreting Port LEDs on Switches
LED

State

Meaning

Link
(green)

On

Port is enabled and receiving link signal.

Off

No active network cable is connected to the port.


The port is not receiving link beat or sufficient light.
The port has been disabled through switch management.

Blinking
Mode
(green)

Port has failed self test; the Fault, Self Test LEDs, and appropriate
module status LEDs flash simultaneously.
Mode LEDs display network activity information based on the
setting dictated by the Mode Select button, such as Full Duplex
operation, speed, or activity.

One Link LED per port


One Mode LED
per port
18

Rev. 10.31

Port LEDs communicate information regarding specific ports rather than information
concerning the switch in general. On some switches, port LEDs are located together
on one side of the switch. On other switches, such as the one shown here, each port
has two port LEDs, which are located at the bottom or top of the port.

Link LED

Mode LED

These LEDs communicate information regarding the specific port.

Link LED
The green Link LED indicates that the port is enabled and receiving a link signal. If
the Link LED is off, then the port is either not receiving a link beat, or the port has
been disabled.
Note
In certain Mode settings, the significance of the Link LED can change, as
described on the next page.

Mode LED
As explained earlier, the operation of the Mode LED is controlled by the Mode Select
button on the switch chassis, and the current selection is revealed by the Indicator
LEDs on the switch. Press the Mode Select button to change from one mode to
the next.
Rev. 10.31

6 23

Servicing HP Networking Products

On each Mode LED, the information indicated by an On status is determined by the


current mode setting. For example, many switches have these settings, which indicate
the following when the Mode LED is on:

ActThe port is experiencing network activity.

FDxThe port is operating in full duplex mode.

Spd or SpeedThe port is operating at full speed (100 Mbps or 1000 Mbps
depending on the switch and the port).

If the switch supports PoE the Mode LED might bet set to PoE, as described on the
next page.

6 24

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Port LEDs at PoE Mode Setting

Port LEDs at PoE Mode Setting


Port LED

State

Meaning

Link (green)

On

Indicates that the port is configured to enable PoE power delivery to


the connected device

Off

Indicates that PoE power delivery has been disabled to that port

On

Indicates the port is providing PoE power

Off

Port is not providing PoE power

Mode
(green)

Push Mode button


until it is in PoE
mode.

One Link LED per


port
One Mode LED
per port; can
operate in PoE
mode

19

Rev. 10.31

In a switchs default state, its port Link LEDs indicate whether the corresponding ports
are connected to devices and receiving link signals.
If the PoE indicator LED is lit, the Link and Mode LEDs indicate PoE status:

Link LED:

On: PoE is enabled on this port

Off: PoE is disabled on this port.

Slow Blinking: Internal PoE fault on this port.

Fast Blinking: This port is denied PoE power or has an external load fault.

Mode LED:

On: PoE power is be supplied on this port

Off: PoE is not being supplied on this port.


Note
The Mode LED setting is changed, as explained earlier in this module, by
pressing the Mode Select button.

Rev. 10.31

6 25

Servicing HP Networking Products

Dual-Personality Port LEDs

Dual-Personality Port LEDs


Port LED

State

Meaning

T/S
(green)

On

T indicates 10/100/1000Base-T RJ-45 port is enabled.


S indicates SFP port is enabled

Port 47S

Port 47T

20

Rev. 10.31

Many HP switches feature dual-personality ports. Companies can use each dualpersonality port for a Gigabit Ethernet link, or they can purchase a mini-GBIC or SFP
transceiver, which supports other types of high-speed links. (Available mini-GBICs or
SFP transceivers are listed later in this module.)
HP switches that support dual-personality ports have an additional port LED: the T/M
LED. This LED indicates whether:

6 26

The 10/100/1000Base-T RJ-45 port is enabled (T)

The mini-GBIC port is enabled (M)

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

LEDs at StartupHP E5400 zl Switch


LEDs at StartupHP E5400 zl Switch
During the self test:
Power, Fault, and switch LEDs turn on.
After 30 seconds, all LEDs on modules, such as port LEDs, turn on.
Fault LED lights up and then turns off.
Chassis LEDs turn orange and then off.
Test, Fan, and Power LEDs turn green and stay on.
Test and Fan LEDs turn off.

Power LED
Fault LED
Locator LED
(Blue)

Switch LEDs

Port LEDs
21

Rev. 10.31

Now that you understand the different types of LEDs on HP switches, you should
become familiar with the behavior of LEDs as a switch starts up. By watching the
LEDs, you should be able to determine whether or not a switch is booting
successfully. This slide provides an examplethe startup process for the HP E5400 zl
switch.

LED Behavior During the Self-Test


When you power on a switch, the Power, Fault, switch, and module LEDs turn on
initially. Then, after approximately 30 seconds, all of the module LEDs turn on as the
modules receive power and code is downloaded to them. The Fault LED turns off,
and all the chassis LEDs turn off except the Power, Self Test, Fan Status, and Power
Status LEDs.
When the download of code to the modules is completed, the module LEDs turn off.
You may see each port LED turn on briefly, in sequence, as the port is tested.
For the duration of the self-test, the Self Test LED stays on.

LED Behavior When the Self-Test Completes Successfully


When the switch successfully completes its self-test, the Power LED stays on. The
Status LEDs on the switch chassis stay on for the devices installed, including the LEDs
that correspond to each switch module installed, the LEDs that correspond to each
power supply installed, and one LED for all the fans.
The Fault and Self Test LEDs should then go off.
Rev. 10.31

6 27

Servicing HP Networking Products

Port LEDs as the Switch Modules Begin Normal Operational Mode


As switch modules begin to operate normally, the ports become active. If the ports
are connected to active network devices, the Link LEDs stay on, and the Mode LEDs
behave according to the mode selected. In the default mode (Activity), the Mode
LEDs should flicker, showing network activity on the ports. If the ports are not
connected to active network devices, the LEDs will stay off.

6 28

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Hardware Reset
Hardware Reset
LEDs
Hardware Reset

Reset and Clear Buttons


Restoring Switches to Factory Defaults

HP E Series Switch Modules


HP E Series mini-GBICs and Transceivers
Redundant Power for HP E Series Switches

22

Rev. 10.31

You may sometimes need to reboot a switch or return it to factory default settings. On
some HP switches, you can perform a hardware reset and use switch buttons to return
the switch to factory default settings. (You can also access the switchs command line
interface to reboot the switch or return it to factory default settings, as explained in
the next module.)

Rev. 10.31

6 29

Servicing HP Networking Products

Reset and Clear Buttons


Reset and Clear Buttons
Some HP switches have Reset and Clear buttons.
Reset button
Initiates a warm reboot
Clears any temporary error conditions that may have occurred
Executes the switch self-test
Resets all network activity counters to zero
Activates recently installed transceivers and modules
Clear button
Deletes any CLI passwords when pressed by itself for at least 1 second
Reset and Clear button together
Restore factory default settings when pressed in a specific pattern

23

Rev. 10.31

Some HP switches (such as the HP E5400 zl Switch Series and the HP E8200 zl
Switch Series, and the HP E3500 Switch Series) have Reset and Clear buttons. These
buttons can be used alone or together to execute particular tasks.

Reset Button
The Reset button is used to reboot the switch while it is powered on. This action
deletes configuration changes not written to memory, clears any temporary error
conditions that may have occurred, executes the switch self-test, and resets all
network activity counters to zero.
If a switch does not have a Reset button, you can simply disconnect it from its power
source.

Clear Button
The Clear button, when pressed by itself for at least one second, deletes the
management passwords configured on the switch.

Reset and Clear Button


The Clear and Reset buttons can be pressed simultaneously to return the switch to its
factory default configuration. Such action clears the current startup-configas well as
any changes made to the running-configand restores the factory default
configuration to the switch.

6 30

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

The startup-config is the configuration that is stored on the switch and read into
memory when the switch is rebooted. After a switch is powered on, the configuration
it is using is called the running-config. When you make a configuration change to the
switch, it automatically becomes part of the running-config. If you want the change to
be permanent, you must explicitly save the change to the startup-config. If you do not
save the change to the startup-config, the switch does not retain the setting when it is
shut down or rebooted.
You will learn more about the startup-config and the running-config in Module 7:
Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches.

Rev. 10.31

6 31

Servicing HP Networking Products

Using a Hardware Reset to Revert to Factory Default


Settings
Using a Hardware Reset to Revert to Factory
Default Settings
Reset Clear
Button Button

1. On switches that have Reset and Clear buttons,

simultaneously press both buttons.


2. Continue to press the Clear button while releasing the

Reset button.
3. When the Self Test LED flashes, release the Clear button.

Flashing
Self Test LED

Reset
Button
24

Clear
Button

Rev. 10.31

On switches that have both Reset and Clear buttons, you can use these buttons to
return a switch to its factory default settings. This process will remove all
configurations in the startup-config and running-config and may temporarily create
network connectivity issues.
If you are restoring the factory default settings for a reason other than configuration
problems, you should save the valid switch configuration prior to performing the
factory default reset. Module 7: Basic Configuration of E Series Switches discusses
this process in detail.
To restore a switch to its factory default configuration using the Reset and Clear
buttons, complete these steps.
1.

Using a pointed object, simultaneously press both the Reset and Clear buttons
on the front of the switch. The Power and Fault LEDs light up. (These LEDs are
described in the next section of this module.)

2.

Continue to press the Clear button while releasing the Reset button.

3.

When the Self Test LED begins to blink, release the Clear button. It can take up
to 30 seconds for the LED to blink, depending on the switch model.

After the switch completes its self-test, it will begin operating using its factory default
settings.
6 32

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP E Series Switch Modules


HP E Series Switch Modules
LEDs
Hardware Reset
HP E Series Switch Modules
Requirements for Hot-swapping and Hot-inserting

Modules
Installing Modules
Modules Supported by HP Switches

HP E Series mini-GBICs and Transceivers


Redundant Power for HP E Series Switches
25

Rev. 10.31

This section lists the requirements for hot-swapping or hot-inserting a module into a
switch chassis and explains how to install a module. Finally, it provides a table that
lists which modules are supported by each HP E Series modular switch.

Rev. 10.31

6 33

Servicing HP Networking Products

Hot-swapping or Hot-inserting Modules


Hot-swapping or Hot-inserting Modules
Hot-swappingreplace a module with a module of the same type
(including model and revision) while the switch is powered on.
Hot-insertinginstall a new module in an empty slot while the switch is
powered on.
In both cases, the module is immediately activated.
Hot-swapping

Hot-inserting

26

Rev. 10.31

HP modular switches support both hot-swapping and hot-inserting. These features


allow you to replace a module or install a new module without interrupting the
operation of the switch. To hot-swap a module, you must replace a module with one
of the same type. That is, both modules must have the exact same model number:
Note
A revision product does not have the same module number as the original
product: For example, HP devices JxxxA and JxxxBwhere xxx represents the
same series of numbers, and B signifies a revision of Aare not the same
product. The two modules would not be hot-swappable.

To hot-insert a module, you simply add a module in a slot where one was not
previously installed. You can perform either task while the switch is operational. The
replaced or new module is then immediately operational; you do not have to reboot
the switch.

6 34

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Install a Different Type of Module

Install a Different Type of Module


If you replace a module with a different type of module,
you must reboot the switch to activate the new module.

27

Rev. 10.31

Sometimes, however, you may need to replace a module with a different type of
module. For example, you may want to remove a 100Base-FX module and install a
Gigabit-SX module in its place. In this circumstance, you must reboot the switch after
the new module is installed so the switch processor can properly initialize and
configure the new module type.
Until the switch is rebooted, the module will not operate, the Module Status LED will
continue to flash, and all the LEDs on the module will stay on continuously.

Rev. 10.31

6 35

Servicing HP Networking Products

Checklist for Installing HP AllianceONE Services zl Modules

Checklist for Installing HP AllianceONE


Services zl Modules
Temperature requirements
Number of modules
supported in each chassis
Required switch software
version

HP Threat Management Services zl Module

Module licensing

28

Rev. 10.31

The E5400 zl and E8200 zl switches support HP AllianceONE Services zl Modules,


which provide additional network services. For example, one of these modules, the
Threat Management Services zl Module, provides a firewall, virtual private networks
(VPNs), and an intrusion detection system/intrusion prevention system (IDS/IPS).
HP AllianceONE Service zl Modules have requirements that other modules do not.
When installing such modules, check the following:

6 36

Temperature requirementsThe module may have specific temperature


requirements. For example, the TMS zl Module requires the chassis temperature
to be 50 Celsius if the module is installed on the left side of the chassis and 40
Celsius if it is installed on the right side.
Number of modules supported in each chassisOn the E5406 zl, E5412 zl,
and E8212 zl switches, you can install up to four HP AllianceOne Services zl
Modules in the same chassis. If you attempt to install a fifth module, that module
will not boot. On the E8206 zl switch, you can install up to two such modules in
the same chassis.

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Rev. 10.31

Required switch softwareSome modules require the switch to be running a


certain version of the software (or above). For example, the TMS zl Module
requires the E5400 zl or E8200 zl switch to be running software K.13.55 or
above. If the switch is running a lower version of the software, it will not
recognize the module. In this case, you must update the switch software with the
required version. Download the switch software from the HP Networking Web
site and follow the instructions outlined in Module 7: Basic Configuration of HP E
Series Switches.
Module licensingSome modules, such as the TMS zl Module, have their own
licensing requirements. Consult the modules installation manual for specific
instructions.

6 37

Servicing HP Networking Products

Install a Module

Install a Module
1. Wearing an ESD
preventive wrist strap,
insert the module into
the guides on the switch.
2. Push the module on the
outer edges (near both
screws), sliding it in until
you feel resistance.
3. Push in the two levers on
the front of the module.
4. Tighten the screws.

29

Rev. 10.31

Prepare to Install the Module


Before you begin installing a module, make sure that the module is supported by the
switch. Then, either remove a slot cover from the modular switch or remove a
previously installed module. To remove a slot cover or a module, use either a flatbladed or Torx T-10 screwdriver to loosen the two screws securing the module in the
slot. (You should retain the slot cover for future use.)
If you are removing a module from an HP E5400 zl or E8200 zl switch, pull the
levers at the bottom of the module toward you. You can then slide the module out of
the switch.
If you are removing a module from another modular switch, such as the E4200 vl
switch, there are no levers so you will simply slide the module out of the switch
chassis.

Install the Module


Avoid electrostatic discharge problems by wearing an ESD preventive wrist strap and
handling the modules only by their bulkheads. To install the module, complete these
steps.
1. Insert it the module into the slot, using the guides on the side of the switch
chassis.

6 38

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

2. Push the module near both screws, sliding it in until you feel resistance. The
module will protrude from the switch approximately inch, or 1.3 centimeters.
Modules employ low-force connectors. Fully insert the module into its slot, but be
careful to not push too vigorously.
3. Push in the two levers at the bottom of the module. This will slide the module
further into the switch until it the face of the module is flush with the face of the
switch. The levers will rest against the front of the module.
Again, if you are installing a module into a different modular switch such as the
E4200 vl switch, you can skip this step because the modules do not have levers.
4. After the module is fully inserted, insert the two retaining screws to secure the
module in place. The screws should be tightened until they are secure but not
over-tightened.
Note
If you do not use one or more of the slots, make sure that the slot cover plate is
still attached over the slot for safe operation and proper switch cooling. You
should not have more than one module slot uncovered at a time.

Rev. 10.31

6 39

Servicing HP Networking Products

Modules for the HP E4210G, E4500G, E4510G,


E4800G, and E5500G Switches
Modules for HP E4210G, E4500G,
E4510G, E4800G, and E5500G Switches
Switch

Module

E4210G

HP 1-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module


HP 2-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module
HP 2-Port 10-Gig LCM E45/E48 Module

E4500G/E4510G

HP
HP
HP
HP

1-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module


2-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module
2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5500/E4800/E4500 Module
2-Port 10-Gig LCM E45/E48 Module

E4800G

HP
HP
HP
HP
HP

2-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module


2-Port 10-Gig LCM E45/E48 Module
1-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module
2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5500/E4800/E4500 Module
2-Port GbE SFP A5500/E4800 Module

E5500G

HP 8-Port SFP E5500 Module


HP 1-Port 10-GbE E5500 Module XENPAK
HP 2-Port 10-GbE E5500 Module XFP

30

Rev. 10.31

This slide shows the modules that the E4210G, E4500G, E4510G, E4800G, and
E5500G Switch Series support. (Check the HP Networking Web site for an up-todate list of modules.)

E4210G

HP 1-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module

HP 2-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module

HP 2-Port 10-Gig LCM E45/E48 Module

E4500G and E4510G

6 40

HP 1-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module

HP 2-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module

HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5500/E4800/E4500 Module

HP 2-Port 10-Gig LCM E45/E48 Module

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

E4800G

HP 2-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module

HP 2-Port 10-Gig LCM E45/E48 Module

HP 1-Port 10-Gig XFP E45/E48 Module

HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ A5500/E4800/E4500 Module

HP 2-Port GbE SFP A5500/E4800 Module

E5500G

Rev. 10.31

HP 8-Port SFP E5500 Module

HP 1-Port 10-GbE E5500 Module XENPAK

HP 2-Port 10-GbE E5500 Module XFP

6 41

Servicing HP Networking Products

Modules for HP E2900 al, E3500 yl , E4200 vl,


and E6200 yl Switches
Modules for HP E2900 al, E3500 yl, E4200
vl, and E6200 yl Switches
Switch

Modules

HP E2910 al

HP 2-Port 10-GbE CX4 al Module


HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ al Module
HP 10-GbE al Interconnect Kit

HP E3500 yl & E6200 yl

HP Switch yl 10-GbE 2-Port CX4 + 2-Port X2 Module


HP 10-GbE 2-Port SFP+/ 2-Port CX4 yl Module

HP E4200 vl

HP
HP
HP
HP
HP
HP

31

Switch
Switch
Switch
Switch
Switch
Switch

vl
vl
vl
vl
vl
vl

4-Port Mini-GBIC Module


12-Port 100-FX MTRJ Module
24-Port 10/100-TX Module
20-Port Gig-T + 4-Port SFP Module
24-Port Gig-T Module
1-Port 10-GbE X2 Module

Rev. 10.31

This slide shows the modules that the HP E2910 al, E3500 yl, and E6200 yl fixedport switches support. These switches have an open module slot on their rear panel.
This slide also shows the modules that the E4200 vl Switch Series supports. This
series consists of modular switches. (Check the HP Networking Web site for an up-todate list of modules.)

HP E2910 al Switch

HP 2-Port 10-GbE CX4 al Module

HP 2-Port 10-GbE SFP+ al Module

HP 10-GbE al Interconnect Kit

HP E3500 yl and E6200 yl Switches

6 42

HP Switch yl 10-GbE 2-Port CX4 + 2-Port X2 Module

HP 10-GbE 2-Port SFP+/ 2-Port CX4 yl Module

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP E4200 vl Switch Series


The HP E4200 vl Switch Series supports the following modules:

Rev. 10.31

HP Switch vl 4-Port Mini-GBIC Module

HP Switch vl 12-Port 100-FX MTRJ Module

HP Switch vl 24-Port 10/100-TX Module

HP Switch vl 20-Port Gig-T + 4-Port SFP Module

HP Switch vl 24-Port Gig-T Module

HP Switch vl 1-Port 10-GbE X2 Module

6 43

Servicing HP Networking Products

Modules for HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl Switches


Modules for HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl
Switches
Switch

Modules

HPE 5400 zl & E8200 zl


Fast Ethernet Modules

HP 24-Port 10/100 PoE+ zl Module

32

Gigabit Modules

HP
HP
HP
HP

Switch zl 24-Port 10/100/1000 PoE Module


Switch zl 20-Port 10/100/1000 + 4-Port Mini-GBIC Module
24-Port 10/100/1000 PoE+ zl Module
20-Port 10/100/1000 PoE+ and 4-Port Mini-GBIC zl Module

10 GbE Modules

HP
HP
HP
HP

Switch zl 4-Port 10-GbE X2 Module


4-Port 10GbE SFP+ zl Module
Switch zl 24-Port Mini-GBIC Module
Switch zl 4-Port 10-GbE CX4 Module

Appliances

HP
HP
HP
HP

ONE Services zl Module


Threat Management Services zl Module
Threat Management Services zl Module with 1-year IDS/IPS subscription
ProCurve Manager Plus Agent with ProCurve ONE Services zl Module

Rev. 10.31

The HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl Switch Series support the same Fast Ethernet,
Gigabit, 10 GbE, and Appliance modules. (Check the HP Networking Web site for
an up-to-date list of modules.)

Fast Ethernet

HP 24-Port 10/100 PoE+ zl Module

Gigabit Ethernet

HP Switch zl 24-Port 10/100/1000 PoE Module

HP Switch zl 20-Port 10/100/1000 + 4-Port Mini-GBIC Module

HP 24-Port 10/100/1000 PoE+ zl Module

HP 20-Port 10/100/1000 PoE+ and 4-Port Mini-GBIC zl Module

HP Switch zl 4-Port 10-GbE X2 Module

HP 4-Port 10GbE SFP+ zl Module

HP Switch zl 24-Port Mini-GBIC Module

HP Switch zl 4-Port 10-GbE CX4 Module

10 GbE

6 44

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Appliances

Rev. 10.31

AllianceONE Services zl Module

HP Threat Management Services zl Module

HP Threat Management Services zl Module with 1-year IDS/IPS subscription

HP ProCurve Manager Plus Agent with ProCurve ONE Services zl Module

6 45

Servicing HP Networking Products

Modules for HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl Switches


(Cont.)
Modules for HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl
Switches (Cont.)
Switch

Module

HP E5400 zl & E8200 zl


WLAN Services

HP MSM765zl Mobility Controller

HP E8200 zl Only

33

HP
HP
HP
HP
HP

Switch
Switch
Switch
Switch
Switch

8200zl Management Module


8200zl Fabric Module
8200zl System Support Module
8212zl Chassis/Fan Tray
8212zl Fan Tray

Rev. 10.31

The E5400 zl and E8200 zl Switch Series also support WLAN services with the
addition of the HP MultiService Mobility Controller. For more information about this
controller, see Module 15: HP Series E Wireless Overview.
For power supplies, customers have several options. Depending on their power and
PoE requirements, they can purchase 875 W power supplies, 1500 W power
supplies, or 1500 W PoE+ power supplies.
In addition, the E8200 zl Switch Series supports some modules that the E5400 zl
switch does not.

6 46

Switch 8200zl Management Module

Switch 8200zl Fabric Module

Switch 8200zl System Support Module

Switch 8212zl Chassis/Fan Tray

Switch 8212zl Fan Tray

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP E Series mini-GBICs and Transceivers


HP E Series mini-GBICs and Transceivers
LEDs
Hardware Reset
HP E Series Switch Modules
HP E Series mini-GBICs and Transceivers
Transceivers Formerly Branded 3Com
HP mini-GBICs and Transceivers
Installing a mini-GBIC or SFP Transceiver
Installing a Transceiver

Redundant Power for HP E Series Switches


34

Rev. 10.31

The next section lists the mini-GBICs and transceivers supported on E Series switches.
It also illustrates how to install a mini-GBIC and a transceiver.

Rev. 10.31

6 47

Servicing HP Networking Products

Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers Formerly Branded


3Com
Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers Formerly
Branded 3Com
E4210
HP X114 100M SFP LC
FX

E4210G

E4500

E4500G &
E4510G

HP X110 100M SFP LC


LX10

E5500

HP X114 100M SFP LC


BX-D

HP X114 100M SFP LC


BX-U

35

E5500G

HP X110 100M SFP LC


LX
HP X110 100M SFP LC
FX Dual Mode

E4800G

Rev. 10.31

Some of the formerly branded 3Com switches in the HP E Series support Fast
Ethernet SFP transceivers.
Note that the HP X110 100M SFP LC FX Dual Mode and the HP X110 100M SFP LC
LX10 Dual Mode should be deployed in pairs. Likewise the HP X114 100M SFP LC
BX-D and the HP X114 100M SFP LC BX-U should be used in pairs.

6 48

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Gigabit SFP Transceivers Formerly Branded 3Com


Gigabit SFP Transceivers Formerly Branded
3Com
E4210

E4210G

E4500

E4500G
& 4510G

E4800G

E5500

E5500G

HP X124 1G SFP LC SX

HP X124 1G SFP LC LX

HP X125 1G SFP RJ45 T


HP X124 1G SFP LC LH70

36

Rev. 10.31

All of the formerly branded 3Com switches in the HP E Series support Gigabit SFP
transceivers.

Rev. 10.31

6 49

Servicing HP Networking Products

10-GbE XENPak Transceivers Formerly Branded


3Com
10-GbE XENPak Transceivers Formerly
Branded 3Com
E4210

E4210G

E4500

E4500G
E4800G
& 4510G

E5500

E5500G

HP X130 10G XENPAK


SC LX4

HP X134 10G XENPAK


SC LR

HP X134 10G XENPAK


SC SR

HP X130 10G XENPAK


CX4

HP X134 10G XENPAK


SC ER

37

Rev. 10.31

The E4210G and E5500G Switch Series support 10-GbE XENPak Transceivers.

6 50

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

10-GbE XFP Transceivers Formerly Branded 3Com


10-GbE XFP Transceivers Formerly Branded
3Com
E4500G
& 4510G

E4800G

HP X134 10G XFP LC


LR

HP X134 10G XFP LC


SR

HP X130 10G XFP


CX4

HP X134 10G XFP LC


ER

E4210

38

E4210G

E4500

E5500

E5500G

Rev. 10.31

The E4500G, E4510G, E4800G, and E5500G Switch Series support 10-GbE XFP
transceivers.

Rev. 10.31

6 51

Servicing HP Networking Products

10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers Formerly Branded 3Com


10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers Formerly Branded
3Com
E4500G
& 4510G

E4800G

HP X130 10G SFP+ LC


LR

HP X130 10G SFP+ LC


SR

HP X130 10G SFP+ LC


LRM

E4210

39

E4210G

E4500

E5500

E5500G

Rev. 10.31

The E4500G, E4510G, and E4800G Switch Series also support 10-GbE SFP+
transceivers.

6 52

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers


HP Fast Ethernet SFP Transceivers
E2510

E2520

E26XX

E2810

E29XX

E3500

E4200
vl

E6200
yl

E6600

E5400 zl
& E8200 zl

HP 100-FX
SFP-LC
Transceiver

HP 100-BX-D
SFP-LC
Transceiver

HP 100-BX-U
SFP-LC
Transceiver

40

Rev. 10.31

The next slides list the mini-GBIC and transceivers supported on the switches formerly
branded HP ProCurve. All of these switches support Fast Ethernet mini-GBICs.

Rev. 10.31

6 53

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP Gigabit mini-GBICs
HP Gigabit mini-GBICs
E2510

E2520

E26XX

E2810

E29XX

E3500

E4200
vl

E6200
yl

E6600

E 5400 zl
& 8200 zl

HP Gigabit-SXLC Mini-GBIC

HP Gigabit-LX
LC Mini-GBIC

HP Gigabit-LHLC Mini-GBIC

HP Gigabit
1000Base-T
Mini-GBIC

HP 1000-BX-D
SFP-LC MiniGBIC

HP 1000-BX-U
SFP-LC MiniGBIC

41

Rev. 10.31

All of the HP switches also support Gigabit mini-GBICs, allowing customers to add
high-speed fiber links to their switches.

6 54

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP 10-GbE and 10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers


HP 10-GbE and 10-GbE SFP+ Transceivers
E5400 zl &
E8200 zl

E3500

E4200 vl

E6200 yl

HP 10-GbE X2-CX4

HP 10-GbE CX4 Media


Converter

E29XX

E6600

HP 10-GbE X2-SC ER

HP 10-GbE X2-SC LR

HP 10-GbE X2-SC SR

HP 10-GbE X2-SC LRM

HP 10-GbE SFP+ SR

HP 10-GbE SFP+ LR

HP 10-GbE SFP+ LRM

42

Rev. 10.31

The HP E29XX, E3500, E4200 vl, E6200 yl, E5400 zl, E6600, and E8200 zl Switch
Series support transceivers that provide 10-GbE transmission speeds.

Rev. 10.31

6 55

Servicing HP Networking Products

Install a mini-GBIC or SFP Transceiver

Install a mini-GBIC or SFP Transceiver


For formerly branded 3Com
switches, follow instructions
in Module 3: HP A Series
Switch Hardware.
On HP switches, hold the
mini-GBIC by the black
rubber grip and gently
insert it into the slot until it
clicks into place.

43

Rev. 10.31

As you know, the former 3Com switches are similar to the HP A Series switches. For
information about installing an SFP transceiver, see Module 3: HP A Series Switch
Hardware. For other E Series switches, use the process outlined below.
You can install or remove a mini-GBIC or SFP transceiver without powering off the
switch. When you install a mini-GBIC or SFTP transceiver, it is immediately
operational if the switch software supports it. Before you install the mini-GBIC or SFP
transceiver, you should always check the documentation to ensure that the switch is
running the software version required to support that mini-GBIC or SFP transceiver.
You should also keep the following in mind:

The SFP ports operate only at full duplex. Half duplex operation is not
supported.
Ensure the network cable is not connected when you install or remove a miniGBIC or SFP transceiver.

Many SFP ports on HP switches are one part of a dual-personality port. They have a
corresponding 10/100/1000Base-T RJ-45 port. If a mini-GBIC or SFP transceiver is
installed in the SFP port, the corresponding RJ-45 port is disabled and cannot be
used.
Caution
Use only supported HP mini-GBICs or SFP transceivers with your switch. Non-HP
mini-GBICs and SFP transceivers are not supported, and using them may result in
product malfunction.
6 56

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Install a Mini-GBIC or SFP Transceiver


Hold the mini-GBIC or SFP transceiver by its rubber grip and gently insert it into a
SFP port on the switch until the mini-GBIC or transceiver clicks into place.

Remove a Mini-GBIC or SFP Transceiver


You should disconnect the network cable from the HP mini-GBIC or SFP transceiver
before removing it from the switch.
Depending on when you purchased your HP mini-GBIC or SFP transceiver, it will
have one of three different release mechanisms: a plastic tab on the bottom of the
GBIC, a plastic collar around the GBIC, or a wire bail.
To remove a mini-GBIC that has the plastic tab or plastic collar, push the tab or collar
toward the switch until you see the mini-GBIC release from the switch (you can see it
move outward slightly), and then pull it from the slot.
To remove a mini-GBIC that has the wire bail, lower the bail until it is approximately
horizontal, and then using the bail, pull the mini-GBIC from the slot.

Rev. 10.31

6 57

Servicing HP Networking Products

Install a Module

Install a Module
For some switches, you must first install a module that
supports transceivers.
On some switches, you install this module on the rear panel.

Open transceiver slots


44

Rev. 10.31

Some of the fixed-port switches in the E Series include a module slot on their front or
back panel. For example, the HP E3500 yl and E6200 yl switches have a module
slot on their back panel. For these modules, you purchase an HP Switch yl 10-GbE 2Port CX4 + 2-Port X2 Module, which includes two 10-GbE CX4 ports and two
additional transceiver slots. Customers can increase their high-speed links by
purchasing two additional transceivers for the open slots.

6 58

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Redundant Power for HP Switches


Redundant Power for HP Switches
LEDs
Hardware Reset
HP E Series Switch Modules
HP E Series mini-GBICs and Transceivers
Redundant Power for HP E Series Switches
Redundant Power Supplies for Modular Switches
Formerly Branded 3Com Redundant Power Supply

(RPS) devices
HP RPS and External Power Supply (EPS) devices
45

Rev. 10.31

This section examines options for providing HP E Series switches with redundant
power. Redundant power protects the entire network: if the primary source of power
fails, the network will continue operating without disruption.

Rev. 10.31

6 59

Servicing HP Networking Products

Optional Redundant Power Supplies for Modular


Switches
Optional Redundant Power Supplies for
Modular Switches
All HP modular switches support optional redundant, loadsharing power supplies.

AC Power

46

Slot for Additional


Power Supply

Fan Tray

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series modular switches support redundant, load-sharing power supplies. On


the HP E4200 vl, E5400 zl, and E8200 zl Switch Series, the power supplies are
installed on the switch rear panel.
To provide true redundancy, the two power supplies should be connected to different
power sources. Then, if one power source fails, the switch will continue to run. (The
photo above also shows the E5406 zl switch fan tray, which is discussed later in this
module.)
Note
Some HP modular switches, despite their redundancy options, are operational
with only one functioning power supply source. The E5412 zl, and E8212 zl
switches, however require at least two installed and functioning power supplies,
or the switches will not be fully operational.

6 60

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Power Supplies for the HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl


Switch Series
Power Supplies for HP E5400 zl and E8200
zl Switch Series
875W zl Power
Supply J8712A
(110-127/
200-240 VAC)
1500W zl Power
Supply J8713A
(220 VAC only)
1500W PoE+ zl
Power Supply
J9306A
(110-127/
200-240 VAC)

47

Chassis
Power

PoE
Power

PoE+
Power

600W

273W

600W

900W

600W

300W/
900W

300W/
900W

8212 zl/5412 zl:


Up to 4 power
supplies, 3600W
PoE/PoE+
8206 zl/5406 zl:
Up to 2 power
supplies, 1800W
PoE/PoE+
(Additional
PoE/PoE+ with
HP Power Shelf)

Rev. 10.31

The E8200 zl and E5400 zl switches do not ship with power supplies. Customers
must purchase one or more of the following power supplies:

HP 875W PoE zl Power Supply

HP 1500W PoE zl Power Supply

HP 1500W PoE+ zl Power Supply

The 875W zl Power Supply supplies 273 watts for PoE power. The 1500W zl Power
Supply provides up to 900 watts for PoE power, and the1500W PoE+ zl Power
Supply provides up to 900 watts for PoE or PoE+ power.
The E8212 zl and E5412 zl switches support up to four power supplies; the E8206 zl
and E5406 zl switches support up to two. As a result, the E8212 zl and E5412 zl can
supply up to 3600 watts of PoE/PoE+ power, depending on the power supplies
installed, and the E8206 zl and E5406 zl can supply up to 1800 watts.
These power supplies can also be used with the HP zl Power Supply Shelf to provide
additional PoE/PoE+ power of up to 1800 watts.
All three power supplies provide 600 watts of chassis power to the switch.

Rev. 10.31

6 61

Servicing HP Networking Products

Power Cords for E5400 zl and E8200 zl Switch


Power Supplies
Power Cords for HP E5400 zl and E8200 zl
Power Supplies
The E8200 zl and E5400 zl power cords are sized to meet
the increased current requirements of PoE.
These power cords may not be found in a typical
environment.
J8712A and J9306A use a C15 (notched) power cord.
J8713A uses a C19 power cord.

Typical
Plug Connecter

48

J8712A 875W Power Supply


J9306A 1500W Power Supply
Plug Connecter

J8713A 1500W Power Supply


Plug Connecter

Rev. 10.31

The power cords available for the E8200 zl and E5400 zl switches are sized for the
increased current that can be drawn to meet the needs of PoE. As a result, these
power cords may not be found in a typical environment, and power cords
borrowed from other products will not work in most instances. You must use the
cords shown here.

6 62

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP E4200 vl Switch Series Power Supply


HP E4200 vl Switch Series Power Supply
One power supply ships with the E4200 vl switch.
Customers can purchase an additional power supply for
redundancy:
HP gl/xl/vl Switch Redundant Power Supply

49

Rev. 10.31

The HP E4200 vl Switch Series ships with one power supply, but customers can
purchase an additional power supply for redundancy. To provide the best protection,
customers should connect each power supply to a different power source.

Rev. 10.31

6 63

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E6600 Switch Redundant Power Supplies


HP E6600 Switch Power Supplies
Designed for the data center
Ships with one power supply, but supports two

50

Rev. 10.31

Although the E6600 is not a modular switch, it supports a redundant power supply.
Because this switch is designed for the data center, continual uptime is critical. The
second power supply helps protect against loss of power. Again, for the best
protection customers should connect each power supply to a different power source.
The E6600 switch ships with one power supply; customers must purchase the second
power supply separately.

6 64

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Install a Power Supply


Install a Power Supply
1. Insert the power
supply into an open
power supply slot.
2. Push the power
supply all the way
back until the power
supply face is flush
with the back face of
the switch.
3. Tighten the screws.
51

Rev. 10.31

To install the power supply, complete the following steps:


1. Using either a flat-bladed or TorxT-10 screwdriver, loosen and remove the screws
holding the slot cover or existing power supply in place.
2. Install the power supply into an open power slot as shown in this slide.
Caution
The switch power supplies are hot-swappable; they can be installed while the
switch is receiving power from the supply in another slot. But, as indicated by the
caution statement on the power supply, the supply must not be connected to AC
power before being installed.

3. Push the power supply all the way into the switch chassis until the face of the
power supply is flush with the back face of the switch.
4. Insert and tighten the screws to secure the power supply.

Rev. 10.31

6 65

Servicing HP Networking Products

RPS Devices for Formerly Branded 3Com Switches


RPS Devices for Formerly Branded 3Com
Switches
Formerly branded 3Com and H3C switches
support the same RPS devices. These devices were
previously branded H3C:
HP RPS 1000 A3
HP RPS 800 A
HP RPS 500 A3

52

Rev. 10.31

In addition to purchasing redundant internal power supplies, customers can protect


their network by installing a redundant power supply (RPS). An RPS can be
connected to more than one switch, providing power if the switchs internal power
supply fails.
The former 3Com switches support the same RPS devices that the former H3C
switches support. (For more information about these RPS devices, see Module 3: HP
A Series Switch Hardware.)

6 66

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP RPS 1000 A3
HP RPS 1000 A3
Redundant power for switches
Additional power for PoE-enabled switches
E Series switches supported:
HP E4210-24-PoE
HP E4210G switches
HP E4500 PoE switches
HP E4500G PoE switches
HP E4800 PoE switches
HP E5500G switches
53

Rev. 10.31

The RPS 1000 A3 provides both redundant power for switches and additional power
for PoE-enabled switches. If customers are using a former 3Com switch that provides
PoE, they should use the RPS 1000 A3.

Rev. 10.31

6 67

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP RPS 800 A and RPS 500 A3


HP RPS 800 A and RPS 500 A3
Redundant power for switches
RPS 800 A:
HP E4800-48G

RPS 500 A3
HP E4800-24G
HP E5500-24
HP E5500-24-SFP
HP E5500-48
HP E5500-24G
HP E5500-24G-SFP
HP E5500-48G
54

Rev. 10.31

The RPS 800 A and RPS 500 A3 support the non-PoE switches listed here.

6 68

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP E630 Redundant/External Power Supply


HP E630 Redundant/External Power Supply
Redundant power
Provides redundant power for one

switch

External power for HP IEEE


802.3af and IEEE 802.3at
PoE-compatible devices
Provides PoE for two switches
Supplies 398 Watts to each switch

55

Rev. 10.31

Customers with HP switches (previously branded HP ProCurve) have several options


for external redundant power and additional PoE power. For example, the HP E630
Redundant/External Power Supply (RPS/EPS) can provide a maximum of 185W RPS
power and 398W PoE power to each switch.
The HP E630 RPS/EPS supports the follow switches.

Rev. 10.31

RPS only

E2910-24G al switch

E2910-48G al switch

E3500-24-PoE switch

E3500-48-PoE switch

E3500-24G-PoE yl switch

E3500-48G-PoE yl switch

E6200 yl switch

EPS and RPS

E2910-24G-PoE+ al switch

E2910-48G-PoE+ al switch

6 69

Servicing HP Networking Products

These switches must be running the following minimum software versions:

The E2910 PoE+ al switches require W.14.35 or later.

The E3500 PoE-enabled switches require K.14.52 or later.

Connecting RPS and EPS Ports to Switches


To connect the RPS and EPS ports to switches, push the RPS or EPS cable plug into
the RPS/EPS port until the thumb screws engage with the screw holes in the unit.
Then, tighten the thumb screws.
When the E630 RPS/EPS is powered on and connected to a switch, the device
connected LED on the RPS/EPS should go on to confirm it is connected to a poweredon switch. If the LED does not go on, check the connection between the E630
RPS/EPS and the switch.

6 70

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP E620 Redundant and External Power Supply


HP E620 Redundant and External Power
Supply
Redundant power
Provides redundant power for up to two switches at the same time

External power for HP IEEE 802.3af PoE-compatible devices


Provides PoE for two switches
Supplies 398 Watts to each switch

56

Rev. 10.31

The HP E620 Redundant and External Power Supply provides both RPS and EPS to
the following switches:

E3500 Switch Series

E2910 al Switch Series

E6200 yl Switch

RPS Port Operation


The E620 RPS/EPS can provide redundant power to two switches at one time. It can
provide up to 195 Watts of power at +12 VDC to each switch.
The E620 RPS/EPS can detect switches connected to each RPS port and also the
status of their primary AC power supply. The unit supports a hot-plug feature: you
can connect or disconnect switches to the RPS ports without causing disruption to
either device.

EPS Port Operation


The E620 RPS/EPS supports two EPS ports that can provide power to PoE capable
switches through EPS cables. It can provide PoE power to a switch as a primary
source or as a backup to a switch that has its own internal PoE power supply.
Each EPS port operates can provide up to 398 Watts of PoE power at 50VDC each.

Rev. 10.31

6 71

Servicing HP Networking Products

Connecting RPS and EPS Ports to Switches


To connect the E620 RPS/EPS to a switch, complete these steps.
1. Push the RPS or EPS cable plug into the desired portusually located at the
back of the switchuntil the thumb screws engage with the screw holes in the
unit.
2. Tighten the thumb screws.
When power is on for the E620 RPS/EPS and for the connected switch, the Device
Connected LED will light to confirm a powered-on switch is at the other end of the
cable.
Note
When connecting devices to the E620 RPS/EPS, be sure to use only the cables
supplied with the unit.

6 72

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

HP E610 External Power Supply


HP E610 External Power Supply
Provides external power for HP IEEE 802.3af PoEcompatible devices
Four EPS ports, which are grouped into pairs
Supplies a maximum of 408 Watts for each pair of ports (total of 816

Watts)
408 Watts to one device in a pair
204 Watts to each device in a pair

Supported switches:
HP 2610 PoE Switch Series

57

Rev. 10.31

HP also offers the E610 External Power Supply, an EPS-only unit that supports the HP
E2610 PoE Switch Series.
The E610 EPS has four EPS ports, which are grouped into pairs. For each pair of
ports, the ProCurve E610 EPS provides a maximum of 408 W. If you connect a
device to only one port in a pair, that device receives the entire 408 Watts. If you
connect a device to each port in a pair, each device receives 204 Watts, or half of
the available power for the pair of ports.

Connecting EPS Ports to Switches


To connect an EPS port to a switch, complete the following steps:
1. Push one end of the EPS cable plug into the EPS port on the E610 EPS and the
other end into the appropriately labeled EPS port of the switch until the tabs on
the cable connectors click into place.
2. After the connectors click, the connection is complete.
Be sure to use only the cables supplied with the E610 EPS.

Rev. 10.31

6 73

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP zl Power Supply Shelf


HP zl Power Supply Shelf
Provides additional power for
PoE on:

3U

E5400 zl switch
E8212 zl switch

Holds up to two power supplies, which


are sold separately

Chassis is 24.7 cm (9.75 in.) deep.

Connects to one or two E5400 zl or E8200 zl


switches through a 2m EPS cable

58

Rev. 10.31

The HP zl Power Supply Shelf supports the E5400 zl switch and the E8212 zl switch,
providing additional power for PoE. (If you need additional power for PoE on the
E3500 switches, you should purchase the E620 RPS/EPS.)
The Power Supply Shelf is a 3U chassis that holds up to two power supplies. These
power supplies are sold separately from the Power Supply Shelf, allowing you to
install the power supplies that meet your networks power requirements. You can
choose from the same two power supplies that are available to power the E5400 zl
switch and E8100 zl switch:

875W zl Power Supply

1500W zl Power Supply

HP 1500W PoE+ zl Power Supply

To connect the Power Supply Shelf to an E5400 zl switch or E8212 zl switch, use the
2m EPS cable that ships with the Power Supply Shelf.
Caution
The switch power supplies are hot-swappable, but the power supply must be
disconnected from AC power before being installed or removed.

6 74

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

LEDs on the Power Supply Shelf

LEDs on the Power Supply Shelf

Fault and
power LEDS

Power status

EPS (PoE)
port status
EPS
port 1

Fault and
power LEDs
59

EPS
port 2

Rev. 10.31

The power LED has a simple function: it is on if the Power Supply Shelf is on, and off
if the Power Supply Shelf is off.
During normal operation, the fault LED is off. If it is on, an error has occurred with
one of the EPS ports. Check the EPS port status LED to determine which one is
experiencing the problem.
The power status LED is green if the corresponding power supply is installed and
plugged in. This LED is off if no power supply is installed. If the power supply is
experiencing a problem or if it is not plugged in, the power status LED flashes
orange.
Two LEDs report the status of each EPS port:

Rev. 10.31

Device connected LEDThis LED is on if there is a valid connection to an E5400


zl Switch. It is off if there is no connection.
Power status LEDThis LED is on if the power supply is providing power to a
connected E5400 zl switch. It is off if there is not a valid connection to the
E5400 zl or E8212 zl switch. If the LED is flashing orange, there is a fault
condition on the corresponding power supply.

6 75

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch Fan Trays


Switch Fan Trays
Supported on:
HP E5400 zl Switch Series
HP E8200 zl Switch Series
HP E6600 Switch Series

HP E8212zl Switch
60

HP E8212zl Fan
Tray

Rev. 10.31

The E5400 zl, E6600, and E8200 zl Switch Series have fan trays, which can be
replaced if a problem occurs.

Replacing Fan Trays


You can hot-swap the fan trays on these switches. However, you should replace the
fan tray within 3 minutes after you remove the previous tray. The switches will shut
down if you do not install the new fan tray within 3 minutes because the switch
chassis will overheat.
The fan trays are on the back panel. To replace the fan tray on the E5400 zl and
E8200 zl switches, complete these steps:

6 76

1.

Loosen and then remove the screws securing the fan tray in place.

2.

Using the handle on the installed fan tray, pull the fan tray out of the switch
chassis.

3.

Insert the new fan tray into the switch chassis and push until it is firmly seated.

4.

Insert and tighten the screws on the new fan tray.

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Reversing Air Flow on the E6600 Switch


If you are servicing an E6600 switch and the temperature LED is on, you may want
to evaluate the airflow direction. In a four-post rack mount, you must ensure that the
air flow direction in an E6600 switch is from the cold side to the hot side of the aisle.
If necessary, reverse the direction of the fans to provide adequate switch cooling.
By default, the air flows from the back panel to the front panel. If the cool side of the
aisle is the front panel, you may need to change the default direction so that air
flows from the front panel to the back panel instead.
1.

Remove the fan tray assembly.


a.

Unscrew the retaining screws.

b.

Hold the two retaining screws, and then pull the fan tray assembly straight
out.

5.

Using a T10 screwdriver, remove the four retaining screws.

6.

Lift the fan assembly from the fan tray high enough to turn it over.

7.

Rotate the fan assembly 180 degrees and replace the fan assembly into the fan
tray, sheet metal side up.

8.

Take care to align the sensing pin between the two sensors and replace the 4
retaining screws.

9.

Slide the fan tray assembly into the switch.

10. Tighten the retaining screws

Rev. 10.31

6 77

Servicing HP Networking Products

Note

If you reverse the direction of the fans to provide adequate


switch cooling, ask the customer if he or she wants to record
the preferred air-flow direction for this switch in the CLI. To do
so, enter the following command at the global configuration
context:
system fan-pref-airflow-dir { port-to-power | power-to-port }

A syslog message is then generated if the fan tray is installed


in the wrong direction in the future. For information about
entering commands, see Module 7: Basic Configuration of E
Series Switches.

6 78

Rev. 10.31

HP E Series Switch Hardware

Summary
Summary
LEDs indicate the state of the switch and its ports.
Some HP E Series switches are equipped with Reset and Clear buttons
for deleting passwords and returning switches to default settings.
Pressing the Mode Select button changes the function of the Mode LED.
HP E Series switches support GBIC and transceiver options; modular
switches support interchangeable modules.
Redundant and external power supply options are available for most HP
E Series switches.

61

Rev. 10.31

This module presented the following concepts:

Rev. 10.31

You can use switch LEDs to assess the state of the switch and its ports.
Some HP E Series switches are equipped with Reset and Clear buttons, which
allow you to delete passwords and return the switches to factory default settings.
You can press the Mode Select button to change the function of the Mode LED.
This allows you to gather more information about the operation of the switch.
HP E Series switches support mini-GBICs and transceivers, which allow
customers to increase their switch capacity with high-speed connections.
Modular switches support interchangeable modules.
Redundant and external power supply options are available for many HP E
Series switches.

6 79

Servicing HP Networking Products

6 80

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Module 7

Objectives
This module discusses fundamental aspects of HP E Series switch management,
including management options, management interfaces, commands, and tasks. After
completing this module, you should be able to:

Rev. 10.31

Identify management users for each HP E Series switch and describe their
different levels of switch access
List the management interfaces available on each HP E Series switch and
describe the advantages of using each interface
Explain how to establish a management session with each HP E Series switch
and begin using a management interface to configure the switch
Navigate through and perform fundamental switch management tasks within
the CLI, menu interface, or Web browser interface on HP E Series switches

7 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

Managing HP E Series Switches


Managing HP E Series Switches
Switches Formerly Branded 3Com
Run the same base software as HP A Series
switches
Use the instructions in:
Module 4: Basic Configuration of HP A
Series Switches

Switches Formerly Branded HP


ProCurve
Run versions of the HP switch software
Follow instructions outlined in this module

Rev. 10.31

As you are aware, the HP E Series includes two main groups of switches: those
previously branded as 3Com switches and those previously branded as HP ProCurve
switches. The switches that were formerly branded 3Com run the same base software
as the A Series switches:

HP E4210 Switch Series

HP E4210G Switch Series

HP E4500 Switch Series

HP E4500G Switch Series

HP E4800G Switch Series

HP E5500 Switch Series

HP E5500G Switch Series

To access and manage these switches, use the instructions outlined in Module 4:
Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches.
The remaining switches in the HP E series run versions of the HP switch software:

7 2

HP E2510 Switch Series

HP E2520 Switch Series

HP E26XX Switch Series

HP E2810 Switch Series


Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

HP E29XX Switch Series

HP E3500 Switch Series

HP E4200 vl Switch Series

HP E5400 zl Switch Series

HP E6200-24G-mGBIC yl Switch

HP E6600 Switch Series

HP 8200 zl Switch Series

In this module, these switches are referred to as HP switches, which run HP switch
software. For these switches, follow the instructions outlined in this module:

Rev. 10.31

7 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP E Series Switch Software Images and


Configuration Files
Software Images and Configuration Files
Switch Software and Configuration Files

Software Images

Configuration Files

Management Options
CLI
Diagnostic Information
Software and File Management
Switch Replacement Menu Interface
Menu Interface
Web Browser Interface
4

Rev. 10.31

Before you access the HP E Series switches that run HP switch software, you should
understand how these switches store software images and configuration files.

7 4

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Managing Software Images on HP Switches

Managing Software Images on HP Switches

NVRAM (flash memory)

Primary Image
Secondary Image

Rev. 10.31

In Module 4: Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches, you learned that switches


have boot ROM code and a software image. The boot ROM code loads first. After
checking and initializing the hardware, the boot ROM loads the software image.
Note
If you are servicing a switch in the E4210, E4210G, E4500, E4500G, E4800G,
E5500, or E5500G Switch Series, use the instructions in Module 4: Basic
Configuration of HP A Series Switches. These switches run the same base
software as the HP A Series switches.

You also learned that HP periodically releases updates for many of its switches. These
updates might provide new features or improve switch performance. Most of the time,
software updates do not require a boot ROM update. If a boot ROM update is
required, however, the release notes will notify you.
For some switches, HP provides the boot ROM update and the software image
update as two separate files. For the HP switches described in this module, however,
HP more often provides both the boot ROM update and the software image update
in the same file
The HP switches described in this module have two flash memory areas where
software images can be stored. Because the two areas can store different images,
you can keep a copy of the previous software image as well as the latest software
image. You can then reboot to the previous software image if necessary.
Rev. 10.31

7 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

On these HP switches, the two software images are referred to as:

7 6

Primary image

Secondary image

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Multiple Configuration Files on HP Switches

Multiple Configuration Files on HP Switches


HP switches (except the E2810 Switch Series) store up to
three configuration files:
Determine which configuration file the switch should use when booting

with a particular software image


Test a new configuration and ensure that the switch reboots with a
trusted configuration if an unattended reboot occurs
Boot
command

P r im a r y B oot P a t h
Secondary Boot Path

Startup-Config Options:
File Memory slot 1

File Mem or y s lot 2

Running-config

File Memory slot 3

By default, the switch uses the configuration file stored in memory

slot 2.

Rev. 10.31

With the exception of the HP E2810 Switch Series, switches that run HP switch
software allow you to store up to three configuration files. When you save multiple
configuration files on the switch, each configuration file is stored in one of three
memory slots, which are numbered 1 to 3.
You will learn more about managing multiple configuration files later in this module.

Rev. 10.31

7 7

Servicing HP Networking Products

Management Options
Management Options
Switch Software and Configuration Files
Management Options

Management Interfaces

Management Users

CLI
Diagnostic Information
Software and File Management
Switch Replacement Menu Interface
Menu Interface
Web Browser Interface
7

Rev. 10.31

When you service the following HP switches, you can use one of three management
interfacesthe CLI, the menu interface, or the Web browser interface.

HP E2510 Switch Series

HP E2520 Switch Series

HP E26XX Switch Series

HP E2810 Switch Series

HP E29XX Switch Series

HP E3500 Switch Series

HP E4200 vl Switch Series

HP E5400 zl Switch Series

HP E6200-24G-mGBIC yl Switch

HP E6600 Switch Series

HP 8200 zl Switch Series

Whichever management interface you decide to use, you should log in as a


manager-level user if you need to make configuration changes on the switch.

7 8

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Management Interfaces
Management Interfaces

CLI
Menu interface
Web browser interface
SNMP (not covered in this course)

Rev. 10.31

The HP switches listed on the previous page support the following management
interfaces:

CLI

Menu interface

Web browser interface

SNMP management interface (accessed through an SNMP management


console)

The CLI is the most comprehensive interface to use. The menu interface is often useful
when you are configuring many features at one time or if you are looking for an
organized way to view and configure a subset of switch configuration options. For
example, you can configure all the ports and view all the settings for the ports from
one window in the menu interface.
The Web browser interface provides user-friendly switch access; some networking
professional use this interface to monitor switch activity.
HP switches also support management through an SNMP management console.
However, this course does not cover the SNMP management interface.

Rev. 10.31

7 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

Advantages of Using the CLI

Advantages of Using the CLI


Provides access to the complete set of management options
Enables quick, detailed system configuration
Provides help for determining available options
Supports out-of-band or Telnet access

Enter the ? Help key to


view a list of available
commands.

Rev. 10.31

The CLI offers several advantages:

It is the only interface that provides access to the complete set of management
options.

It enables quick, detailed system configuration.

It is accessible out-of-band or in-band.

For novice users with limited experience, the CLI may at first seem the most daunting
of the available management interfaces. As explained later in this module, help keys
are available at each level, making it easier to use the CLI.

7 10

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Advantages of Using the Menu Interface

Advantages of Using the Menu Interface


Provides quick, easy management access to a menu-driven
subset of switch configuration and performance features
Allows you to access the switch out-of-band or in-band
Allows faster navigation
Menu-driven
subset of
configuration
features

10

Rev. 10.31

The menu interface provides several advantages for switch management:

It provides quick and easy access to a menu-driven subset of configuration and


performance features.

It allows you to manage the switch in-band or out-of-band.

It enables faster navigation through switch setup and configuration options.

It eliminates the need to know or memorize CLI commands.

The menu interface can be particularly useful when you are configuring many
features at one time. Keep in mind, however, that it does not provide the same
comprehensive set of commands as the CLI does.

Rev. 10.31

7 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

Advantages of Using the Web Browser Interface

Advantages of Using the Web Browser


Interface
Familiar Web browser interface
More visual cues, colors, status
bars, device icons, and so on
Easy navigation

11

Rev. 10.31

With the K.15.XX switch software release, the Web browser interface on the HP
E3500, E5400 zl, E6200 yl, E6600, and E8200 zl Switch Series was updated. The
Web agent introduced in this version is enabled by default and improves usability.
The Web browser interface offers users the following management advantages:

Familiar browser interface

More visual cues, colors, status bars, device icons, and so on

Easy navigation

The Web browser interface is usually not as comprehensive as the CLI interface. Still,
its user friendly format and mouse-click navigation schemecharacteristics consistent
with commonly used Web browserscan make it the preferred management
interface of network experts and novices alike.

7 12

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Management Users
Management Users

E3500-24G-PoE yl Switch

Operator
Read-only access
Manager
Read-write access

12

Rev. 10.31

The HP switches described in this module offer two levels of switch management
access:

Operatorgrants the user read-only access to the switch

Managergrants the user write access

When a network administrator logs in as operator, he or she can only view


information about the switch. The Operator cannot make configuration changes.
When a network administrator logs in as Manager, he or she can make changes to
the switch configuration.

Rev. 10.31

7 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

User Authentication: Local

User Authentication: Local


Management passwords are stored on the switch.

1. Switch prompts for username and password.


2. Management user types username and password.
3. Switch validates username and password and grants
appropriate access.

13

Rev. 10.31

Both the Operator and the Manager level can and should be password protected.
There are two ways organizations can set up management user authentication: local
or centralized. When you visit a customer site, ask the network administrator if the
company is using local or centralized authentication for management users.
With local authentication, management usernames and passwords are stored locally
on the switch. In this case, the switch compares the login credentials that the user
enters with those that are configured and stored on the switch.
You can configure one password for each management user. You can configure one
password for the manager level and one password for the operator level. All users
with a particular access level share the same login credentials.
When a management user logs in, he or she receives the access-level assigned to the
password. If the supplied password matches the operator level, the user is given
read-only access. If the password matches the manager level, the user is given readwrite access.
If the customer is using local authentication, simply ask for the password assigned to
the manager user.

7 14

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

User Authentication: Centralized

User Authentication: Centralized


1. Switch prompts for username and
password.
2. Manager or operator supplies
username and password.

3. Switch forwards login credentials to


server.
3

14

Server validates
login
credential
4. Server
validates
login
against its database
credential
against and
its send
results to switch.
database
and send results to
switch.
5. Switch grants appropriate access
level. grants appropriate
5. Switch
access level.

Rev. 10.31

With centralized authentication, usernames and passwords are stored on a server


(such as a RADIUS server or a TACACS+ server) that the switch can access through
the network. A benefit of this approach is that each switch user can be given a
unique username and password and granted appropriate switch access.
If the customer is using centralized authentication, you will need to ask for a
username and password that provide manager-level access.

Rev. 10.31

7 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

CLI
CLI
Switch Software and Configuration Files
Management Options
CLI

In-band or out-of-band management


Serial cables for HP switches
CLI Privilege Levels
CLI Tips and Shortcuts

Diagnostic Information
Software and File Management
Switch Replacement Menu Interface
Menu Interface
Web Browser Interface
15

Rev. 10.31

The following slides discuss the CLI management interface in detail. The CLI userprivilege levels are explained and several of the CLI fundamental commands are
outlined.

7 16

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Access to the CLI


Access to the CLI

In-band

Out-of-band

HP E Series switches

Ethernet
connection

16

Direct serial connection


to console port

Rev. 10.31

If you decide to use the CLI, you can access it in-band or out-of-band. If you are
replacing a switch, you will need to use one of the following:

Out-of-bandYou can establish a console connection and begin configuring


the switch. To establish a consol connection, use the settings listed below in the
terminal session software (such as Tera Term or Microsoft HyperTerminal):

9600 bps

8 data bits

No parity

1 stop bit

XON/XOFF flow control

In-bandBy default, HP switches are configured to receive a dynamic IP


address from a DHCP server. If the customer has a network DHCP server, you
can connect the switch to the network and ask the network administrator who
manages the DHCP server to tell you the IP address leased to the switch. You
can then use Telnet or Secure Shell (SSH) to access the switch.

If you need to review out-of-band or in-band management, see Module 4: Basic


Configuration of HP A Series Switches.

Rev. 10.31

7 17

Servicing HP Networking Products

Serial Cables for HP Switches

Serial Cables for HP Switches

17

DB-9 to DB-9 Serial Cable


(5184-1894)

RJ-45 to DB-9 Adapter Cable


(5188-3836)

HP E3500-24G-PoE yl Switch
HP E3500-48G-PoE yl Switch
HP E3500-24 Switch
HP E3500-24-PoE Switch
HP E3500-48 Switch
HP E3500-48-PoE Switch
HP E4200 vl Series Switch
HP E5400 zl Series Switch
HP E6200-24G-mGBIC yl Switch

HP E2510 Series Switch


HP E2520 Series Switch
HP E26XX Series Switch
HP E2810 Series Switch
HP E29XX Series Switch
HP E3500-24G-PoE+ yl Switch
HP E3500-48G-PoE+ ylSwitch
HP E8200 zl Series Switch

Rev. 10.31

The slide above lists the appropriate serial cable for the switches that run the HP
software.
The switches in the left column support a DB-9 to DB-9 serial cable (5184-1894).
The switches in the right column support a RJ-45 to DB-9 adapter cable (5188-3836).

7 18

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

CLI Privilege Levels


CLI Privilege Levels
The CLI has four operation, or privilege, levels:
Context Configuration:
HP Switch (vlan-10)#
Global Configuration:
HP Switch (config)#

Manager
access

Manager: HP Switch#
Operator: HP Switch>

18

User
privileges
increase with
each level.

Operator
access

Rev. 10.31

HP switches described in this module have four privilege levels: operator, manager,
global configuration, and context configurations. The manager user can access all
the privilege levels; however, the operator user can access only the operator level. To
identify your current privilege level in a switch, check the CLI prompt: it contains the
name of the switch and a notation indicating the privilege level of the current user, as
described below.

Operator
The operator level is identified by the > in the switch prompt:
HP Switch>

The commands available at the operator level are essentially a subset of those
available at the manager level. The operator level enables read-only access and
allows the user to view statistics by using the show command or a menu. Operator
users also can use link-test and ping commands to perform Layer 2 and Layer 3
connectivity tests from the CLI or the menu interface. (You will learn how to access the
menu interface in the next section in this module.)

Rev. 10.31

7 19

Servicing HP Networking Products

Manager
Operator users equipped with the appropriate password can use the enable
command to advance to the manager level. The manager level is identified by the #
in the switch prompt. At the manager level, there is no notation enclosed in
parentheses, as there will be if the user has moved to a higher level in the CLI. There
is only the switch host name and the #, as shown below:
HP Switch#

Users at the manager level have access to all of the same commands as users at the
operator level. In addition, a user at the manager level can clear statistics and make
configuration changes. This includes writing, erasing, and copying configuration files
and software images to and from the switch.

Global Configuration
The global configuration level is identified by the word config enclosed in
parentheses:
HP Switch(config)#

The global configuration level can be accessed by users already at the manager
levels. A manager user can enter the global configuration level without entering an
additional password. The global configuration level is used to manage specific
aspects of switch operation.

Context Configuration
Likewise, specific levels are represented by an associated word enclosed in
parentheses. In the following prompt, for example, the switch CLI is at the VLAN 10
level.
HP Switch(vlan-10)#

The context configuration level allows you to make changes to specific interfaces such
as a VLAN or port interface.

7 20

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Navigate the CLI Privilege Levels

Navigate the CLI Privilege Levels


If you access the switch as operator, you receive access to the operator level.
1.

From the operator level, type enable to gain read-write access.

2.

When prompted, enter the manager password.

3.

Type configure terminal to enter the global configuration context.

4.

Enter the context you want to configure.

5.

Type exit to return to the previous privilege level.


HP Switch> enable 1
Password: ****** 2
HP Switch# configure terminal 3
HP Switch(config)# vlan 10 4
HP Switch(vlan-10)# exit 5
HP Switch(config)#

19

Rev. 10.31

To allow you to access the switch for the initial configuration, the switch does not
have default passwords for the management users. When you connect to a switch
that is using factory default settings, the CLI prompt presents a default switch name
followed by the number sign (#). The default name is based on the switch model. The
# indicates that you are at the manager level, or read-write mode.
To help you understand how to navigate the switch CLI, however, the following steps
are based on entering the switch as an operator user. If you enter the password for
the manager user, skip steps 1 and 2.
1.

From the operator level, enter:


HP Switch> enable

2. When you are prompted, enter the password for the manager level. If you do
not know the manager password, you cannot access this level.
3. To move to the global configuration level, enter
HP Switch# configure terminal

4. Move to a more specific configuration level by entering the appropriate


command. For example, enter the following command to move to the VLAN 10
level:
HP Switch(config)# vlan 10
HP Switch (vlan-10)#

Rev. 10.31

7 21

Servicing HP Networking Products

Enter any command available at the VLAN 10 level or enter exit to return to
the global configuration level.
The exit command is available at any level and takes you to the privilege level
immediately below the current level. If you are in the operator level, the exit
command terminates the management session.

7 22

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

CLI Help

CLI Help
Display the commands available at the current CLI level:
HP Switch# help
HP Switch# ?
Press Tab

If you do not know the entire command, type the first few letters of the
command and press Tab.
HP Switch# co[Tab]
configure
copy
Switch displays a list of commands beginning with
those letters.
20

Rev. 10.31

The CLI offers several help features designed to simplify management and improve
productivity. Some of the most important are as follows:

You can view a list of the available commands by using one of the following
help commands:

Enter help

Type ? at any context

Press the Tab key

You can also use ? to view the options for commands. For example, by typing
show ? you can view a list of all the show command options. (When you use ?
it is not necessary to press Enter.)

You can also use the Tab key to obtain context-sensitive completion of a partial
command. For example, if you enter co<Tab> at the manager level, the CLI will
indicate the available commands that start with co are configure and copy.

The CLI allows you to shorten commands to the minimum number of characters
necessary for uniqueness. For instance, at the manager level, the CLI will execute the
configure command after con is entered because it is the only command that
begins with those characters.

Rev. 10.31

7 23

Servicing HP Networking Products

Frequently Used CLI Commands

Frequently Used CLI Commands*


Command

Explanation

Manager-Level**
clear

Reset system statistics counters

copy
erase

Copy software image or configuration file


Delete software image or configuration file

write memory

Save changes to the startup-config

setup

Access the quick setup in the menu interface

Operator-Level
link-test
ping

Test connectivity between the switch and another device

menu

Access the menu interface

show

Display system information

*Many commands support multiple options. See the switchs CLI reference guide for details.
**Includes all operator-level commands
21

Rev. 10.31

This table lists some of the more frequently used CLI commands in both the manager
and operator level. For example, you can use the copy, erase, and write
commands to manipulate software images and configuration files. The show
command is particularly helpful for monitoring the switch and troubleshooting
problems. (To view a list of options for the show command, type show ? at the
switch prompt.)
Note
Each command has a number of possible options. You can consult the switchs
CLI reference guide for a complete list of command options, or access the switch
CLI and use the ? help key to view a list of the available options.

The next section describes commands that can help gather diagnostic information
about the switch.

7 24

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Diagnostic Information
Diagnostic Information
Overview of Switch Software and Configuration Files
Management Options
CLI
Diagnostic Information
CLI show commands

Software and File Management


Switch Replacement
Menu Interface
Web Browser Interface

22

Rev. 10.31

Oftentimes, you will need to collect information about the switch so that you can
determine exactly what is causing the problem. In Module 6: HP E Series Switch
Hardware, you learned how to use the switchs LEDs to gather information. In this
section, you will learn how to enter show commands to collect information that will
help you evaluate the switch.

Rev. 10.31

7 25

Servicing HP Networking Products

show version Command

show version Command


Display information about the switchs software image:
HP Switch# show version
Management Module 1: Active
Image stamp:
/sw/code/build/btm(feb10_int_t4a)
Mar 22 2010 23:02:09
K.14.47
89
Boot Image:
Primary
Management Module 2: Standby
Image stamp:
/sw/code/build/btm(feb10_int_t4a)
Mar 22 2010 23:02:09
K.14.47
89
Boot Image:
Primary
23

Active or Standby

Switch software
Primary or
Secondary Flash

Rev. 10.31

One of the first things you should do is check which software version the switch is
running. You can then check the HP Networking web site (www.procurve.com) to
determine the latest software image available for that switch model.
If the switch can store two software images, you should copy the software image to
the secondary flash. You can then boot the switch to the secondary software image
and ensure that configuration runs without any issues on the new software image. If
there is a problem, you can boot the switch from the primary software image.
Note
Later in this module you will learn how to update a switchs software image.
Depending on the hardware and software involved, other steps may be required.
You should always read the release notes that accompany the updated software
to make sure you understand the process completely.

This slide shows the output that is displayed when you enter show version on an
E8212 zl switch. From the output shown here, you can see that the switch is booting
to management module 1, the switch is running software version K.14.47, and the
switch has been booted with the software image in its primary flash.

7 26

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

show config and show running-config Commands

show config and show running-config


Commands
HP Switch# show config

Command

Startup configuration:
Vlan 1
name Default_VLAN
untagged 1-24,A1-A4
ip address dhcp-bootp

Configuration stored in nonvolatile memory.

exit
HP Switch# show running-config

Command

Running configuration:
Vlan 1
name Default_VLAN
untagged 1-24,A1-A4
ip address 10.1.1.8
255.255.255.0

Configuration stored in
dynamic memory.
IP address changed
since last boot

exit

24

Rev. 10.31

You can use the show config command to review the switchs startup-config. The
startup-config is saved configuration, which is read into memory when the switch is
booted. (This command corresponds to the display saved-configuration
command on switches that were formerly branded H3C or 3Com.)
Sometimes it is useful to compare the startup-config with the running-config. You may
be able to identify a new configuration change that is related to the problem. Or you
can determine if changes need to be saved or not. (However, you can more easily
see this information by entering show config status command, as shown on
the next page.)
This slide demonstrates the kind of information the switch might display when you
enter these commands. (The slide shows only a portion of the startup-config and the
running-config.) Note the difference in the IP addresses listed for each command. If
the startup-config is not updated, the new IP address contained in the running-config
will be lost once the switch reboots.
Use the show running-config command to display a switchs current runningconfig. (This command corresponds to the display current-configuration
command on switches that were formerly branded H3C or 3Com.)

Rev. 10.31

7 27

Servicing HP Networking Products

show config status and show history Commands

show config status and show history


Commands
Compare the startup-config and the running-config:
HP Switch# show config status

Display the last commands that were entered:


HP Switch# show history
4
exit
3
configure
2
show version
1
enable

25

Recent command history

Rev. 10.31

As explained earlier, a switch stores two configuration files that may or may not be
the same at any given moment: the running-config and the startup-config. It is
important to know when the two files differ and in what way so that you can decide
whether or not to save the changes to the startup-config.
You can use the show config status command to display a report, showing
any differences between the switchs running-config and startup-config. If the two
configurations are different, the results will include a notice telling you that the
running-config needs to be saved.
You can use the show history command to display the recently entered
commands. The HP switches described in this module store up to 25 commands
numbered 1 to 25in their history buffers. To scroll through the list of commands,
press the up or down cursor arrows from the CLI prompt. Enter the show history
command to see a complete list of buffer commands. (The show history
command will be discussed in detail later in the module.)
To repeat a command in the buffer multiple times, enter plus the commands buffer
number plus count and the number of times you want the command to repeat. For
instance, the command repeat 6 count 1 will repeat the sixth command in the
buffer once.

7 28

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

show tech Command

show tech Command


Compile detailed information about the switchs operation
and configuration:
HP Switch# show tech
HP Switch# show tech all

26

Rev. 10.31

When you are troubleshooting complex problems, you may want to collect
information about the switch and its configuration and send it to HP Technical
Support for further analysis. To gather this information, enter the show tech
command. The output for this command includes information such as the following:

Image stamp

Running configuration

Event log

Boot history

Port configuration and status

IP routes

VLAN information

GVRP support

Load balancingstatic and dynamic trunks

To collect comprehensive information, you can use the show tech all command.

Rev. 10.31

7 29

Servicing HP Networking Products

Because the reports generated by both commands are so extensive, you may want to
capture the output and copy it to a text editor or word-processing program such as
Microsoft Notepad, Microsoft Word, or Corel WordPerfect. You can then review
details more easily.
Note
Depending on the switch and the number of features configured on it, the output
of the show tech all command can produce a large file.

7 30

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Software and File Management


Software and File Management
Overview of Switch Software and Configuration Files
Management Options
CLI
Diagnostic Information
Software and File Management
Update the switch software
Boot to primary or secondary image
Save the configuration file

Switch Replacement
Menu Interface
Web Browser Interface
27

Rev. 10.31

This section describes several important management tasks: updating the switch
software, booting the switch to the primary or secondary software image, and saving
the current configuration file.

Rev. 10.31

7 31

Servicing HP Networking Products

Manage Software Images and Configuration Files


Manage Software Images and Configuration
Files
Upgrade a switch image to a new version
Back up a configuration file
Copy a configuration file to the startup-config
Syntax: copy <source> <destination> [options]

Source*

Destination

Options

TFTP
USB**
running-config
startup-config

TFTP
USB
flash
startup-config

TFTP servers IP address


filename

*These are not all of the source and destination options available.
**Supported on the 2910al, 3500yl, 5400zl, 6200yl, and 8200zl switches
28

Rev. 10.31

You use the copy command to manage software images and configuration files. For
example, you can use the copy command to:

Upgrade a software image to a new version

Back up a configuration file

Copy a configuration file to the startup-config

The command syntax is as follows:


HP Switch (config)# copy <source> <destination> [options]

The slide above lists the available commands for the source, destination, and options
portions of the command. The slides that follow show the exact syntax for:

7 32

Updating the software image from a TFTP server or a USB device

Copying configuration files to and from a TFTP server

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Use a TFTP Server to Upgrade to a New Software Image

Use a TFTP Server to Upgrade to a New


Software Image
Download the updated software image to a TFTP server.
In the switch CLI, enter:
Edge_1(config)# copy tftp flash 10.1.1.9 k_14_60.swi secondary
Edge_1(config)# boot system flash secondary

TFTP server

Image update

Primary Flash
Secondary Flash

File: k_14_60.swi
IP Address:
10.1.1.9
29

Rev. 10.31

The latest software images for all HP switches are available from the HP Networking
Web site at www.hp.com/rnd/software/switches.htm. The site also includes a link
for requesting email notification when new software images are released.
You first download the new software image as a compressed archive file and extract
the software image. You then copy the file to a TFTP server or a USB drive for
distribution to the switches.
Note
Several freeware TFTP servers, such as SolarWinds TFTP server or Tftpd32, are
available for download.

Enter the following command to update the software image:


Edge_1 (config)# copy tftp flash <TFTP servers IP address>
<software image file> [primary | secondary]

For example, suppose the IP address of the TFTP server is 10.1.1.9, the software
image is K_14_60.swi, and you want to update the secondary software image. You
would enter:
Edge_1 (config)# copy tftp flash 10.1.1.9 k_14_60.swi secondary

Rev. 10.31

7 33

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switches that have only one software image will automatically reboot after the new
image is copied to the switch. For switches that have two software images, however,
you must reboot the switch to activate the software image; the installation process
does not force a reboot.
To force a warm reboot, use the boot command described later in this module.

7 34

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Use a USB Device to Upgrade to a New Software Image

Use a USB Device to Upgrade to a New


Software Image
On the E2910 al, E3500, E5400 zl, and E8200 zl Switch
Series and the E6200-24G-mGBIC yl switch:
Copy the updated software image to a USB device.
Insert the USB into the auxiliary port on the switch and enter:
Edge_1(config)# copy usb flash k_14_60.swi secondary
Edge_1(config)# boot system flash secondary

30

Rev. 10.31

The E6200-24G-mGBIC yl switch and the E2910 al, E3500, E5400 zl, E6600, and
E8200 zl Switch Series support USB as a source or destination for the copy
command. (The E3500, E5400 zl, and E6200-24G-mGBIC yl switches must be
running software version K.12.01 and above. The E6600 and E8200 zl Switch Series
were introduced after this version was released, so they have always supported USB
with the copy command. The E2910 al Switch Series runs a different version of switch
software and likewise has always supported USB with the copy command.)
To update the switch software using a USB device, copy the updated software image
to the USB device and insert it into the switch as shown here. Then enter the copy
command as shown above.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

Boot from the Primary or Secondary Software Image

Boot from the Primary or Secondary


Software Image
To immediately reboot from the primary or secondary
image:
Edge_1 (config)# boot system flash [<primary | secondary>]

Specify primary or secondary

31

Rev. 10.31

In addition to immediately rebooting a switch to test a new software image, you can
use the boot system flash command to determine which image the switch will
boot from in the future. This command is available from either the manager level or
the global configuration level of the CLI.
Edge_1 (config)# boot system flash [primary | secondary]
Note
You can test a new software version by booting the switch from an image held in
secondary flash memory. After you verify the switchs operation, you can copy
the software image to the primary image and then reboot the switch from the
primary image.

7 36

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Copy the Running-Config to a TFTP Server

Copy the Running-Config to a TFTP Server


Running-config
xx xx xx

copy running-config tftp 10.1.1.20 file_name.cfg

xxxxx
xx xxx
xx

TFTP server
10.1.1.20

xx xx xx
xxx x x

Startup-config
xx x xx
xxx

Recommendation:
a separate folder for each
switch

xxx xxx
xx
xxxxx xx
xxx

Edge_1
32

Rev. 10.31

You should always try to save the customers current configuration to a TFTP server.
That way, if you need to replace the switch or revert to this configuration, you can
simply load the configuration file.
To back up a switchs current configuration, use the copy command as shown in the
slide. Note that the backup copy has been named file_name.cfg. You can name the
file whatever you choose. Just remember to separate multiple words in the name with
the underscore rather than a space.
Also, when you are backing up multiple switches to a single TFTP server, HP
recommends that you create a folder for each switch on the TFTP server, as shown
here by the folders Core_1, Core_2, Edge_1, and Edge_2. Then, if you want to save
a configuration file to a specific folder on the TFTP serversuch as Edge_1you
would enter a command such as the following:
HP Switch# copy running-config tftp 10.1.1.20 edge_1\file_name.cfg

Rev. 10.31

7 37

Servicing HP Networking Products

Copy the Startup-Config to a TFTP Server

Copy the Startup-Config to a TFTP Server


Running-config
xx xx xx
xxxxx
xx xxx
xx

TFTP server
10.1.1.20

xx xx xx
xxx x x

Startup-config
xx x xx
xxx

Recommendation:
a separate folder for each
switch

xxx xxx
xx
xxxxx xx
xxx

Edge_1
33

Rev. 10.31

Copying the startup-config can be a good idea if you have made significant
configuration changes to the running-config and you have not yet entered the write
memory command to save those changes to the startup-config.
The command for copying the startup-config is nearly identical to the command for
copying the running-config. Instead of specifying running-config, you type startupconfig.
Note
In the example shown above, the filename for the backup copy of the startupconfig includes the date of the backup and the initials of the administrator
backing up the configuration. You can use any filename you choose, but it is a
good idea to establish a standard for naming these files so that you can easily
identify and track them.

7 38

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Copy a Configuration File to a USB

Copy a Configuration File to a USB


On the switches that support USB devices:
1. Insert a USB device into the switchs auxiliary port.
2. Enter one of the following commands:
Copy the startup-config.
Edge_1# copy startup-config usb 080808_tms.cfg
Copy the running-config.
Edge_1# copy running-config usb 080808_tms.cfg

34

Rev. 10.31

To copy a configuration file (startup or running) to a USB, insert it into the auxiliary
port on the switch, and execute the appropriate command shown above. Note that
as in previous examples, the command includes the file name and the initials of the
person saving the file. This is to make switch management easier and is merely a
recommendation.

Rev. 10.31

7 39

Servicing HP Networking Products

Copy a Configuration File from a TFTP Server

Copy a Configuration File from a TFTP


Server
Running-config
xx xx xx
xxxxx
xx xxx

TFTP server
10.1.1.20

xx
xx xx xx
xxx x x

Startup-config
xx x xx
xxx

Note: System must be rebooted


after copy

xxx xxx
xx
xxxxx xx
xxx

Edge_1
35

Rev. 10.31

To restore configurations from a TFTP server, use the same copy command you
would use to back up configurations. Only a few parameters are different.
In the example above, the first optiontftpin the copy command indicates that
the configuration should be copied from the TFTP server and the second option
startup-configindicates it should be copied to the switchs startup-config. As
before, the IP address specifies the TFTP server.
You can use this command to restore an earlier configuration to a switch or to install
a configuration on a new switch.
HP Switch# copy tftp start-up 10.1.1.20 <name of file>

The switch must then be rebooted.

7 40

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Copy a Configuration File from a USB

Copy a Configuration File from a USB


To copy a configuration file from a USB drive:
1. Insert a USB device into the switchs USB port.
2. Enter:
Edge_1# copy usb startup-config 080808_tms.cfg

36

Rev. 10.31

The slide above shows the command for copying a configuration file that is stored on
a USB drive to a HP switch. This command differs slightly from the command for
copying a configuration file from a TFTP server to the switch. Again, keep in mind
that the 080808_tms.cfg portion of the command is merely the name of the file in
this example.
Note that you cannot copy the configuration file to the running-config.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

Determine Which Configuration File the Switch Is Using

Determine Which Configuration File the


Switch Is Using
View which configuration file is used when switch is
booted:
HP Switch (config)# show config files
Configuration files:
id | act pri sec | name
---+-------------+------------------1 | *
*
* | config1
2 |
|
3 |
|

37

Rev. 10.31

As mentioned earlier in this module, you can store multiple configuration files on all
the switches described in this module, except the E2810 Switch Series. To display the
startup-config files that are stored on a switch and see how each file is being used,
enter:
HP Switch (config)# show config files

You can interpret the display as follows:

idIdentifies the memory slot for each startup-config file available on the
switch.
actAn asterisk ( * ) in this column indicates that the corresponding startupconfig file is currently active.
priAn asterisk ( * ) in this column indicates that the corresponding startupconfig file is currently assigned to the primary boot path.
secAn asterisk ( * ) in this column indicates that the corresponding startupconfig file is currently assigned to the secondary boot path.

The slide shows the default configuration if the switch was shipped from the factory
with software installed in both the primary and secondary boot paths: one startupconfig file named config1 is used for both boot paths and is stored in memory slot 1.
In this default configuration, memory slots 2 and 3 do not have configuration files.

7 42

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Specify Which Configuration File the Switch Uses

Specify Which Configuration File the Switch


Uses
Specify which configuration file should be used on reboot:
HP Switch (config)# startup-default [primary | secondary]
config <filename>

Specify which configuration file should be used in reboot:


HP Switch (config)# boot system flash <primary |
secondary> config <filename>

Simply reboot the switch


HP Switch (config)# boot

38

Rev. 10.31

To specify the default configuration file, which is used when the switch is booted from
either the primary or secondary software image, enter:
HP Switch (config)# startup-default config <filename>

To have the switch use a particular configuration file when it boots from the primary
or secondary software image, enter the following command:
HP Switch (config)# startup-default [primary | secondary]
<filename>

For example, if you want the switch to use the config4 file only when it boots from the
secondary image, you would enter:
HP Switch (config)# startup-default secondary config4

You can also specify which configuration file the switch should use when you enter
the boot system flash command to boot the switch from the primary or
secondary software image:
HP Switch (config)# boot system flash <primary | secondary> config
<filename>

If you simply want to reboot the switch, enter:


HP Switch (config)# boot

The switch reboots from primary flash by default unless you specify the secondary
flash by entering either the boot system flash [primary | secondary] or
boot set-default flash [primary | secondary] command. The boot
command will reboot based on how these options have been selected.
Rev. 10.31

7 43

Servicing HP Networking Products

erase startup-config Command


erase startup-config Command
Return the switch to factory default settings.*
HP Switch# erase startup-config
Configuration will be deleted and device rebooted, continue [y/n]? y

Passwords are not erased unless the include-credentials


command has been entered.

39

Rev. 10.31

You can use the erase startup-config command to return a switch to factory
default settings. When you enter this command, you are prompted to confirm the
action. If you do not want to erase the startup-config, press N and prevent the reboot.
Otherwise, press Y to erase the startup-config and reboot the switch to factory default
settings.
This command does not erase the management passwords unless you have
previously entered the include-credentials command. When you enter this
command, currently configured manager and operator usernames and passwords
are included in and displayed in the running-config. (Other security settings are
included as well.) For example, a manager username and password may be stored
in the running-config file as follows:
password manager user-name George SHA1 2fd4e1c67a2d28fced849ee1bb76

If you then enter the erase startup-config command, the management user
passwords are erased.

7 44

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Monitor ROM Console


Monitor ROM Console
Use the monitor ROM console to fix problems such as a corrupted
software image.
Switch is booting . . .

You have two seconds to select one of


three Boot Profiles.
40

Rev. 10.31

If you are updating a switch software image and a power failure occurs, it might
corrupt the software image. If this happens and the switch does not boot
automatically boot to the other software image stored on the switch, you may need to
interrupt the boot process and start a Monitor ROM Console session.
You can then reset the switch, reboot the switch, or have the switch boot from the
other software image.

Accessing the Monitor ROM Console


To access the Monitor ROM Console, you must manage the switch out-of-band: you
must connect your workstation to the switch using the switchs console serial port and
cable. When the switch is powered on, you will see a Boot Profiles menu similar to
the one in the slide above.
When this menu appears, you have approximately two seconds to select one of the
following options:

Rev. 10.31

Press 0 to access the Monitor ROM Console

Press 1 to ensure the switch boots from the primary software image

Press 2 to ensure that the switch boots from the secondary software image

7 45

Servicing HP Networking Products

Press 0 to begin a Monitor ROM Console session. You will see the following message
and prompt:
Enter h or ? for help.
=>
When the switch is in a Monitor ROM Console session, all the LEDs (including Port
LEDs) turn on and remain on until you end that session.
If you enter help, it lists the available commands, with a brief description of each.
Below is a partial list of the commands:
do(wnload)

- Download via Xmodem

sp(eed) <baud>

- Set a new baud rate

h(elp)

- Display help screen

- Display help screen

id(entify)

- Print out identification string

jp(jump) <1|2>

- Jump to product code,


optional 1-primary, 2-secondary

q(uit)

- Exit the monitor

boot

- Reboot the system

reset

- Reset the system

v(ersion)

- Display version information

Other commands require a more in-depth knowledge of switch operation and are
beyond the scope of this course. The point to remember is this: if you are working
with a switch that will not boot properly, you can access the switchs Monitor ROM
Console and boot to another software image.

7 46

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Switch Replacement
Switch Replacement

Overview of Switch Software and Configuration Files


Management Options
CLI
Diagnostic Information
Software and File Management

Switch Replacement
Replacing a Switch: Backup Config Available
Replacing a Switch: Back up Config from a Failed Switch
Replacing a Switch: No Backup Config

Menu Interface
Web Browser Interface
1

Rev. 10.31

This section outlines the process for replacing a switch, including the steps you will
take to get the new switch functioning on the customers network.

Rev. 10.31

7 47

Servicing HP Networking Products

Replace a Switch: Backup Config Available

Replace a Switch
Backup Config Available

Does the
customer have a
backup config?

42

Yes

1. Install the new switch.


2. Access the CLI via a
console session.
3. Configure IP settings
(optional).
4. Update software
(optional).
5. Restore the backup
config.

Rev. 10.31

As you learned in Module 4: Basic Configuration of HP A Series Switches, you


should first check if the customer has a good backup copy of the switch
configuration. If there is a backup, you can easily get the switch operating on the
network.
First, remove the old switch and install the new switch.
Next, access the CLI, using a console session.
The next stepconfigure IP settingsis optional, depending on if you will use a USB
or TFTP server to update the software and restore the backup configuration. USB
devices are supported on the E2910 al, E3500, E5400 zl, and E8200 zl Switch
Series and the E6200-24G-mGBIC yl switch. With a USB device, an IP address is not
required because you can simply insert the USB device into the switchs auxiliary
port.

7 48

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Assign an IP Address

Assign an IP Address
Enter the global configuration context to define IP settings:
HP Switch# show running-config
. . .
vlan 1
untagged 1-24,A1-A4
ip address bootp-dhcp
exit
HP Switch# config
HP Switch(config)# vlan 1 ip address 10.1.1.3/24
HP Switch(config)# show running-config

The DHCP server is


supplying VLAN 1s IP
address.
Assign a VLAN an IP
address.

. . .
vlan 1
untagged 1-26
ip address 10.1.1.3 255.255.255.0
exit
43

The new IP address and


subnet mask are in dynamic
memory only for now.

Rev. 10.31

If you are going to use a TFTP server to update the switch software and restore the
backup configuration, you will need to assign the switch an IP address. (If you are
using a USB drive, you can skip this step.)
This slide shows the command you use to configure a static IP address for a VLAN.
Notice that by default the switch will get IP addresses for VLANs from a Dynamic
Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server.
Also notice that you can enter the vlan ip address command from the global
configuration level. You can also configure a static IP address by first entering the
VLAN configuration level and then entering the ip address command, as shown
below.
HP Switch (config)# vlan 1
HP Switch (vlan-1)# ip address 10.1.1.1/24

In the example above, the show running config command is issued first to
review the switchs initial IP address. A second show running config command
reveals the updated IP address.

Rev. 10.31

7 49

Servicing HP Networking Products

Assign a Default Gateway or Default Route

Assign a Default Gateway or Default Route


For Layer 2 switches, configure a default gateway.
For Layer 3, or routing, switches, set up a default IP route.
HP Switch# show running-config
. . .
ip default-gateway 192.168.115.1
Edge_1# config
Edge_1(config)# ip default-gateway 10.1.1.1
Edge_1(config)# show running-config
. . .
ip default-gateway 10.1.1.1

Current default gateway


Configure the default
gateway
New gateway*

*The default gateway should be in the same subnet as the default VLAN.

44

Rev. 10.31

For switches that operate at Layer 2, you must configure an IP default:


HP Switch (config)# ip default-gateway <IP address>

Replace <IP address> with the IP address of the default gateway. In the example, the
default gateway is 10.1.1.1.
If the switch is operating as a routing switch at Layer 3, however, it does not require
a default gateway. To ensure your management workstations traffic can be routed to
and from the switch, you should use the ip route command to configure a default
route.
HP Switch (config)# ip route 0.0.0.0/0 <Next hop>

Replace <Next hop> with the IP address of the nearest router. You will need to ask
the customer for this IP address. For example, you might enter:
HP Switch (config)# ip route 0.0.0.0/0 10.1.2.2

(IP routing and default routes are beyond the scope of this course. For more
information, see the management and configuration guide for the particular switch
you are using.)
It is a good idea to check the running-config (show running-config) after you
configure a default gateway to verify that the information was entered correctly.

7 50

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Save Configuration Changes

Save Configuration Changes


To save configuration changes to the startup-config, enter:
HP Switch(config)# write memory

This command can be executed from within manager,


global configuration, and context configuration levels

45

Rev. 10.31

You should save configuration changes by entering:


HP Switch (config)# write memory

Rev. 10.31

7 51

Servicing HP Networking Products

Update the Software and Restore the Configuration

Update the Software and Restore the


Configuration
Update the switch software
HP Switch# copy tftp flash 10.1.1.9 k_14_60.swi secondary

HP Switch# copy usb flash k_14_60.swi secondary

Restore the saved configuration


HP Switch# copy tftp startup-config 10.1.1.9 backup.cfg

HP Switch# copy usb startup-config backup.cfg

46

Rev. 10.31

Once the switch has an IP address, you can use a TFTP server to update the switch
software and restore the saved configuration.
You can instead use a USB device to copy the saved configuration to the switchs
startup-config.

7 52

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Replace a Switch: Back up Config from Failed


Switch
Replace a Switch

Back up Config from Failed Switch

Does the
customer have
a backup
config?

1.
2.
3.
4.

No

47

Can you
access the
failed switch
at all?

Yes

Access the failed switch.


Back up the config.
Install the new switch.
Access the new switchs CLI
via a console session.
5. Configure IP settings
(optional).
6. Update software (optional).
7. Restore the config.

Rev. 10.31

If the customer does not have a backup configuration, you should try to access the
failed switch and attempt to save the configuration to a TFTP server or a USB drive.
To copy the configuration to a TFTP server, use one of the following commands:
HP Switch# copy running-config tftp <IP address> <file_name>
HP Switch# copy startup-config tftp <IP address> <file_name>

Replace <IP address> with the IP address assigned to the TFTP server.
Replace <file_name> with a name that is meaningful to you.
To copy the configuration to a USB device, use one of the following commands:
HP Switch# copy running-config usb <file_name>
HP Switch# copy startup-config usb <file_name>

Replace <file_name> with a name that is meaningful to you.


You will then complete the steps outlined for replacing a switch with a saved backup
configuration.

Rev. 10.31

7 53

Servicing HP Networking Products

Replace a Switch: No Backup Config


Replace a Switch
No Backup Config

Does the
customer have
a backup
config?

No

Can you
access the
failed switch
at all?
No

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

48

Install the new switch.


Access the new switchs CLI via a console session.
Configure IP settings.
Update software (optional).
Identify the switch.
Configure management passwords (optional).
Save the config.

Rev. 10.31

Sometimes you will not be able to back up the configuration. In such cases, you will
install the switch, access the new switchs CLI through a console session, and
configure the IP settings the customer wants this switch to use. Review the commands
for configuring IP settings, as described earlier in this module.
You may want to help the customer identify the switch by configuring a host name for
it. For best practices, you should recommend that the customer change the default
passwords on the switch as well. These commands are explained on the next few
pages.
Note
Keep in mind that the customer is responsible for the configuration of the switches
you are servicing. For configuration help, the customer should rely on a reseller
or purchase a HP Care Pack. (For information about care packs, see
http://www.procurve.com/customercare/services/
carepacks/care-packs.htm)

Finally, you should save your configuration changes.

7 54

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Identify the Switch

Identify the Switch


You can configure:
A unique host name
Contact information, such as phone extension or email address
Physical location information, such as building and wiring closet
Global configuration context
HP Switch 3500yl-24G(config)# hostname Edge_1
Edge_1(config)# snmp-server location data center
Edge_1(config)# snmp-server contact Admin-555.5555

Prompt reflects new switch name

49

Rev. 10.31

When you are managing multiple switches, you may want to assign a host name to
each switch so that you can easily identify it. You can also specify location and
contact information to help other network administrators or technicians who may not
be familiar with the account.
The slide above outlines the steps for naming a switch and specifying contact
information. Notice that you enter the global configuration context to configure the
host name and the location and contact information.
As mentioned earlier, when you make changes, they are dynamically executed and
stored in the running-config, which is held in volatile memory and does not survive a
reboot.

Rev. 10.31

7 55

Servicing HP Networking Products

Configure an Operator Password

Configure an Operator Password


Protect the switch operators read-only access by assigning
an operator password:
HP Switch# configure terminal 1
HP Switch(config)# password operator
New password: ********
Please retype new password: ********
HP Switch(config)#

50

2
3

Rev. 10.31

You should immediately set a password for both a manager password and an
operator password, as described later in this module.
After you configure these passwords, users receive access privileges based on which
password they enter when they log in. If they enter the operator password as shown
in the slide, they enter the operator level of the CLI and cannot move to the manager
level unless they enter the manager password.
If a user logs in to the switch using the manager password, however, that user
immediately receives access to the manager level (completely bypassing the operator
level).
If you keep the default setting for management usersno passwordsusers will
always receive access to the manager level when they access the CLI.
You should configure a password for the operator management user. Complete the
following steps:
From the manager level in the CLI, enter:
HP Switch# configure terminal

Enter the command to configure the operator password:


HP Switch(config)# password operator

When you are prompted, enter the password and then confirm it.

7 56

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Notice that you must be at the global configuration level to enter the password
command. If you try to enter this command at the manager level, (HP Switch#), the
switch will not recognize the command.

Rev. 10.31

7 57

Servicing HP Networking Products

Configure a Manager Password

Configure a Manager Password


Protect read-write access to the switch by assigning a
manager password:
HP Switch(config)# password manager 1
New password: ********
2
Please retype new password: ********
HP Switch(config)#

51

Rev. 10.31

To assign a manager password from the CLI, complete these steps:


From the global configuration level, enter:
HP Switch(config)# password manager

When you are prompted, enter the password and then confirm it.
To save configuration changes to the startup-config, enter:
HP Switch(config)# write memory

You can enter this command from the manager, global configuration, and context
configuration levels.

7 58

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Menu Interface
Menu Interface
Switch Software and Configuration Files
Management Options
CLI
Diagnostic Information
Software and File Management
Switch Replacement

52

Menu Interface

Accessing the Menu as operator or manager

Navigate the Menu Interface

Getting Help

Using the Full Menu Interface

Web Browser Interface


Rev. 10.31

Although the CLI is the most comprehensive management interface, the menu
interface can be a convenient way to configure switch settings. The next section
examines the menu interface and provides instructions for configuring the switch
through this management interface.

Rev. 10.31

7 59

Servicing HP Networking Products

Access the Menu Interface


Access the Menu Interface
Available either in-band or out-of-band.
From the CLI, enter:
HP Switch# menu

53

Rev. 10.31

As mentioned earlier, the HP switches described in this module offer a menu


interface, which provides you with a subset of switch CLI commands in an easy-to-use
menu format. You can access the menu interface either in-band or out-of-band.
Simply access the CLI and enter the menu command from the manager level.
The menu interface enables you to quickly configure key switch parameters,
including:

7 60

Manager and operator passwords

System parameters

IP settings

Time protocol

Ports

Trunk groups

A network monitoring port

Spanning Tree operation

SNMP community names

IP authorized managers

VLANs (virtual LANs) and GVRP


Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

The menu interface also makes it easy to:

Rev. 10.31

View switch statuses and counters

Examine Event Log information

Update switch software

Reboot the switch

7 61

Servicing HP Networking Products

Operator-Level or Manager-Level Access

Operator-Level or Manager-Level Access

54

Rev. 10.31

This slide shows the E8212 zl switchs Main Menu window when you log in as an
operator and when you log in as a manager. The Main Menu windows for other HP
switches will be similar.
The Main Menu window at the manager level offers considerably more options for
the user than it does for operator level. At the manager level, you can make
configuration changes; at the operator level, however, you cannot. At the operator,
you can view the switchs status and counters and event log.
At the manager level, you can access:

7 62

1.

Status and CountersSelecting this option grants you access to display


windows, showing switch information, port status and counters, port and VLAN
address tables, and spanning tree information.

2.

Switch ConfigurationSelecting this option grants you access to configuration


windows for displaying and changing the current configuration settings.

3.

Console PasswordsSelecting this option grants you access to the window used
to set or change manager-level and operator-level passwords and to delete
manager and operator password protection.

4.

Event LogSelecting this option allows you to monitor switch events and view
error messages, which are useful for checking and troubleshooting switch
operation.

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

5.

Command Line (CLI)Selecting this option returns you to the CLI interface at the
same privilege level (manager or operator) you are operating at within the menu
interface.

6.

Reboot SwitchThis option allows you to perform a warm reboot of the switch
and clear most temporary error conditions. Rebooting the switch also resets the
network activity counters to zero and the system up-time to zero. (A reboot is
required to activate a change in the VLAN Support parameter.)

7.

Download OSThis option allows you to download a new software image to


the switch.

8.

Run SetupSelecting this option grants you access to the Switch Setup window
so that you can quickly configure basic switch options (such as IP addressing,
default gateway, logon default interface, spanning tree, and so on).

9.

StackingSelecting this option allows you to configure stacking options with


supporting switches.

10. LogoutThis option closes the menu interface and console session, and
terminate Telnet access to the switch

Rev. 10.31

7 63

Servicing HP Networking Products

Navigate the Menu Interface

Navigate the Menu Interface


Title identifies menu window
Options settings

Actions
line
Help
55

Navigation instructions

Rev. 10.31

Menu interface windows include these elements:

Option fields or read-only information such as statistics

Navigation and configuration actions, such as Save, Edit, and Cancel

Help line to describe navigation options, individual options, and read-only


data

To navigate the menu interface, you use arrow keys. To make changes, use the arrow
key to move to the Edit action and press Enter. This puts the cursor in the upper half
of the window, where you can type the system name. Continue using the arrow keys
to move to other options on the window.
Some options allow a limited list of settings. For example, in the case of the IP
Config option, the choices are:

DHCP/Bootp

Disabled

Manual

Use the spacebar to cycle through the choices. If you want to configure a static IP
address, you must select Manual.

7 64

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Getting Help

Getting Help
1.

A selected item in the Actions line means the Actions line is active.

2.

The Help line provides a brief description of the highlighted Action item.

3.

Press H or select Help and press Enter to display Help for the options.

3
1

56

Rev. 10.31

In most windows, there is a Help option in the Actions line. Whenever an item in the
Actions line is highlighted, press H, and a separate help window is displayed.
The Help line under the Actions items describes the currently selected action or data
field.

Rev. 10.31

7 65

Servicing HP Networking Products

Select the Switch Configuration Option

Select the Switch Configuration Option

57

Rev. 10.31

To begin configuring the switch from the menu interface, select the Switch
Configuration option from the Main Menu.
Note that some submenus are available to manager-level users only. For example, the
Switch Configuration Menu allows you to modify the IP configuration, port settings,
and other items only if you have manager-level access.

7 66

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Port Configuration

Port Configuration

58

Rev. 10.31

To configure ports on the switch, select Port/Trunk Settings from the Switch
Configuration Menu shown on the previous page. When the Switch Configuration
Port/Trunk Settings window is displayed, note again the navigation instructions
included at the bottom of the window.
You can quickly enable or disable any of the switchs ports. Simply select the Edit
option in the Actions line and press Enter. Then, use the arrow keys to move to the
port you want to edit and press the spacebar to toggle through available settings.

Rev. 10.31

7 67

Servicing HP Networking Products

Switch Setup Window

Switch Setup Window


Manager
password

Default
gateway

IP address for
management
VLAN
59

Rev. 10.31

The Switch Setup window allows you to quickly complete the initial configuration of
the switch. You can define basic options, including IP settings, passwords, a host
name, location, and contact information for the switch. To access this window, enter
the setup command from the CLI or select Run Setup from the Main Menu.
The Switch Setup window provides a convenient method for configuring several
switch features at one time. From this window, you can:

Specify a host name and administrator contact information

Select a default interfaceeither the CLI or the menu interface

Configure an IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway of the


management VLAN

Set user passwords

Enable Spanning Tree

To navigate the Switch Setup window, use the arrow keys to move among the various
options; press the spacebar to toggle through options; and finally, press Enter to
move to the Actions line. These same instructions are listed in the Help lines at the
bottom of the window.
In the slide above, the cursor is placed within the Actions line. You can use the arrow
keys to select the Edit option that is located within the Actions line. After you select
the Edit option, press Enter. You can use the arrow keys to move the cursor from
option to option.
7 68

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Reboot Required

Reboot Required
The Menu interface displays an asterisk (*) next to items
that have been modified and require a reboot

Reminder to reboot the switch to activate


configuration changes
60

Rev. 10.31

If you use the menu interface to make configuration changes that require a reboot,
the switch displays an asterisk (*) next to the menu item in which the change has
been made. For example, if you change and save the setting for the maximum
number of VLANs the switch will support, an asterisk is displayed next to the VLAN
Support option in the VLAN Menu window. An asterisk is also displayed next to the
Switch Configuration option in the Main Menu.
To activate changes that are marked with an asterisk, go to the Main Menu and
select the Reboot Switch option.
Note
Executing the write memory command in the CLI does not affect pending
configuration changes indicated by an asterisk in the menu interface. That is,
only a reboot from the menu interface or entering a boot or reload command
from the CLI will activate a pending configuration change indicated by an
asterisk in the menu interface.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

Updating Software

Updating Software
Select Download OS
from the Main
Menu

Confirm the download

61

Rev. 10.31

You can use the menu interface to upload switch software from a TFTP server. Before
you begin the update process, check the following:

A software version for the switch has been stored on a TFTP server accessible
to the switch. (Again, software files and updates are available at
www.procurve.com.)
The switch is properly connected to your network and has already been
configured with a compatible IP address and subnet mask.
The TFTP server is accessible to the switch via IP.

You should also:

Obtain the IP address of the TFTP server in which the software file has been
stored.
If VLANs are configured on the switch, identify the VLAN in which the TFTP
server is operating.
Determine the name of the software file stored in the TFTP server for the switch
(for example, E0820.swi).

To download the software, complete the following steps:


1. In the console Main Menu, select Download OS to display the window in the
slide above. (The term OS or operating system refers to the switch software.
2. Press E (for Edit).
7 70

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

3. Ensure that the Method field is set to TFTP (the default).


4. In the TFTP Server field, type the IP address of the TFTP server in which the
software file has been stored.
5. In the Remote File Name field, type the name of the software file. If you are
using a UNIX system, remember that the filename is case-sensitive.
6. Press Enter, then X (for eXecute) to begin the software download. A progress
bar indicates the progress of the download. When the entire software file has
been received, all activity on the switch halts and you will see Validating and
writing system software to FLASH . . .
7. After the primary flash memory has been updated with the new software, you
must reboot the switch to implement the newly downloaded software. Return to
the Main Menu and press 6 (for Reboot Switch). You will then see this prompt:
Continue reboot of the system? : No
8. Press the spacebar once to change No to Yes and press Enter to begin the
reboot.
Note
When you use the menu interface to update switch software, the new image is
always stored in primary flash. Also, using the Reboot Switch command in the
Main Menu always reboots the switch from primary flash. Rebooting the switch
from the CLI gives you more options.

After you reboot the switch, confirm that the software updated correctly:
1. From the Main Menu, select Status and Counters; from the Status and Counters
menu, select General System Information.
2. Check the field entitled Software revision to confirm the download.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

Web Browser Interface


Web Browser Interface
Overview of Switch Software and Configuration Files
Management Options
CLI
Diagnostic Information
Software and File Management
Switch Replacement
Menu Interface

62

Web Browser Interface

Access the Web Browser Interface

Switch Status

Management Tasks

Rev. 10.31

The final section of this module examines the Web browser interface. You will learn
how to interpret display presentations and perform fundamental management tasks
using this management interface.

7 72

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Access the Web Browser Interface


Access the Web Browser Interface
Requirements:
The switchs Web agent is enabled by default.
The switch has an IP address.
Java applets are enabled on the Web browser.

Enter the switchs IP address as the URL:

10.1.1.9the switchs IP address

63

Rev. 10.31

Although the Web browser interface provides limited functionality, it can be a good
monitoring tool and simplify basic configuration tasks.
With the K.15.XX switch software release, the Web browser interface on the following
HP switches is updated: E3500, E5400 zl, E6600, and E8200 zl Switch Series and
the E6200-24G-mGBIC yl switch. The Web agent included in K.15.XX and above
improves usability, making this interface even easier to navigate and use.
To enable access to the Web browser interface, the switch must have an IP address.
In addition, you must enable Java applets on your Web browser.
Once these requirements are met, you can open a Web browser window and enter
the switchs IP address as the URL.

Rev. 10.31

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Servicing HP Networking Products

View the Switch Status

View the Switch Status

64

Rev. 10.31

This slide displays the updated Web agent on the HP E3500, E5400 zl, E6600, and
E8200 zl Switch Series and the E6200-24G-mGBIC yl switch. If these switches are
running software version K.14.XX and below, the Web browser interface will have a
different appearance, but it will still be easy to navigate. The Web browser interface
will also differ in appearance if you are providing support for other HP switches.
The Web browser interface has a left navigation bar and tabs on the top of most
windows. Experienced Web users should feel comfortable with this layout, making
the interface easy to use.
As mentioned earlier, one of the advantages of using the Web browser interface is
its graphical display, which allows you to more easily monitor switches. Although this
course cannot show you every graphical display you might encounter when using the
Web browser interface, it can give you an example of the type of displays that are
available and help you interpret it.
For example, the Home > Status window allows you to see at-a-glance information
such as the system uptime, the CPU utilization, the switch software version, the VLANs
configured on the switch, the modules installed in the switch, and the active ports.
You can also quickly access alert logs and scroll down to view in-depth information
about ports.

7 74

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Configure Usernames and Passwords

Configure Usernames and Passwords

65

Rev. 10.31

To configure management user names and passwords, click Security > Device
Passwords.
As you can see, this window allows you to configure both usernames and passwords.
On these switches, the manager and operator passwords are used to control access
to all switch interfaces.
To configure a username and password, click Change on the right side of the
window. The window expands as shown above, allowing you to configure a
username, password, and access level.
After you make your changes, click Save to save them to the startup-config.

Rev. 10.31

7 75

Servicing HP Networking Products

Back Up the Configuration or Update the Switch Software

Back Up the Configuration or Update the


Switch Software

66

Rev. 10.31

To back up the customers current configuration or update the switch software, click
System > Updates/Downloads.
To save out the configuration, click Download under Configuration File.
If you want to update the switch software, download the latest version from the HP
Networking Web site and copy it to your management workstation. Then, click
Update under Software Image and follow the prompts to complete the update.

7 76

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP E Series Switches

Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting

67

Rev. 10.31

The WebAgent provides several troubleshooting options. In the left navigation bar,
expand Troubleshooting to view these options.
If you click Configuration Report, you can view the switchs running-config. You can
then review the list of configured parameters and possibly identify a problem.
You can click Ping/Link Test to verify network connectivity. You can use ping (ICMP
echoes) to test connectivity between the switch and another devicewhether that
device is on the same subnet or a different subnet.
You can use a link test to verify connectivity between the switch and a designated
network device on the same subnet (or VLAN). During the link test, IEEE 802.2 test
packets are sent to the designated network device in the same VLAN or broadcast
domain. The remote device must be able to respond with an 802.2 Test Response
Packet.

Rev. 10.31

7 77

Servicing HP Networking Products

Summary
Summary
Switch software and configuration files
HP management interfaces:
CLI: most comprehensive and powerful
Menu: subset of CLI commands in a menu-driven format
Web browser: user-friendly browser presentation of management

features

HP switch management users:


Operator
Manager

Managing switches
68

Rev. 10.31

In this module you learned how software and configuration files are stored on the
following HP switches:

HP E2510 Switch Series

HP E2520 Switch Series

HP E26XX Switch Series

HP E2810 Switch Series

HP E29XX Switch Series

HP E3500 Switch Series

HP E4200 vl Switch Series

HP E5400 zl Switch Series

HP E6200-24G-mGBIC yl Switch

HP E6600 Switch Series

HP 8200 zl Switch Series

You also learned about the three management interfaces available on these switches
and the two default management users. You then learned how to gather diagnostic
information, perform software updates, manage configuration files, and replace a
switch (including configuring the initial settings).
Finally, you took a quick look at the menu and Web browser interfaces.
7 78

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

Module 8

Objectives
This module introduces you to the HP V, or Value, Series switches. By the time that
you have finished this module, you should be able to:

Rev. 10.31

Identify HP V Series switches


Classify the HP V Series switches according to their ports, functionality, and
management options

8 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V Series Overview
HP V Series Overview
Designed for SMBs
Unmanaged and Web-managed (smart-managed)

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series switches are cost-effective, plug-and-play products for small to medium


businesses (SMBs) with fewer than 100 nodes. Because SMBs do not have the staff to
deploy or managed complicated products, the V Series switches operate with little to
no managementwhile still providing the high performance and basic security
features that more and more even small companies require.
Earlier, you learned that switches can be deployed at the core, edge, or distribution
level. V Series switches, on the other hand, are typically deployed in a flat
architecture with a site having only one or a few switches.

8 2

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

HP V Series Portfolio
HP V Series Portfolio

Unmanaged switches

Smart-Managed switches

HP V1410 Switch Series

HP V1910 Switch Series

HP V1405 Switch Series

HP V1905 Switch Series

HP V1400 Switch Series

HP V1900 Switch Series


HP V1810G Switch Series
HP V1700 Switch Series

Rev. 10.31

The HP V Series portfolio can be divided into two basic groups:

UnmanagedThese switches have no management interface at all and are


completely plug-and-play.
Smart-managedThese switches can be deployed as plug-and-ploy devices but
can also be managed, primarily through a Web browser interface.

As you see, several groups of HP switches fit into both categories.

Rev. 10.31

8 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

Unmanaged HP V Series Switches


Unmanaged HP V Series Switches
Unmanaged HP V Series Switches

V1410 Series

V1405 Series

V1400 Series

Smart-managed HP V Series switches

Rev. 10.31

Unmanaged switches are intended for small businesses with networks that require
basic connectivity and have little or no IT support. Their plug-and-play setup makes
them easy to install, and their fanless design enables open-space deployment.
HP offers several different types of unmanaged Layer 2 switches. Some of the
switches operate at speeds up to 1 Gigabit; others are intended for 10/100 Mbps
environments. Some of these switches are rack mounted, and others are deployed on
the desktop. (For this course, desktop deployment means that you might find the
switch on any horizontal surface or even upside-down under a table or mounted
vertically to a wall.) All of these switches do not have a fan, so they operate quietly
and can be installed in offices (rather than a server closet).
You will now be introduced to each switch, learning to identify its features and to
recognize its physical form factor.

8 4

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

HP V1410 Switch Series

HP V1410 Switch Series


V1410-8G
8

10/100/1000 ports
up to 11.9 mpps
Fanless
Throughput

Front panel
Rear panel

V1410-16G
16

10/100/1000 ports
up to 23.8 mpps
Fanless
Throughput

V1410-24G
22

10/100/1000 ports
up to 35.7 mpps
2 dual-personality ports, either:
10/100/1000-T port
SFP port
Fanless
Throughput

Rev. 10.31

The HP V1410 Switch Series includes unmanaged Layer 2 switches with Gigabit
connectivity.
The V1410-8G switch has eight 10/100/1000 ports. To accommodate deployment
on desktops, the V1410-8G switch has LEDs on the front panel with the eight ports on
the rear panel. It can be mounted on a wall or under a table.
This switch has a compact footprint and is fanless. It includes a Kensington lock slot
for an optional security cable. Its power supply is external, and the switch includes a
power supply tray to keep the mounting area neat.
The V1410-16G and V1410-24G switches are similar but provide more ports. For
these switches, the ports are on the front panel, as shown in the slide. The V141024G also supports fiber-optic connections with its two dual-personality ports, which
can be used as either 10/100/1000 ports for copper cables or open SFP ports.
(Customers can purchase mini-GBICs, which support a variety of connectivity options,
including fiber optic, to insert in the SFP port.)
Note
Throughout this module, unless otherwise noted, a port listed as 10/100/1000
Mbps is understood to be autosensing, to support auto-MDIX, to support Base-T
(copper) cabling, and to comply with IEEE 802.3 Type 10Base-T, IEEE 802.3u
Type 100Base-TX, and IEEE 802.3ab 1000Base-T Gigabit Ethernet.
Similarly, unless otherwise noted, a port listed as 10/100 Mbps is understood to
be autosensing, to support auto-MDIX, to support Base-T (copper) cabling, and
to comply with IEEE 802.3 Type 10Base-T and IEEE 802.3u Type 100Base-TX.
Rev. 10.31

8 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V1405 Switch Series

HP V1405 Switch Series


V1405-16G switch

16 10/100/1000 ports

Throughput up to 23.8 mpps

Fanless

V1405-24G switch

24 10/100/1000 ports

Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

Fanless

Rev. 10.31

The HP V1405 Switch Series consists of unmanaged, fixed-port switches for SMBs.
These easy-to-install, 1U, rack-mounted switches are plug-and-play. Nonetheless, they
provide advanced Layer 2 switching features such as IEEE 802.1p traffic prioritization
to ensure that voice and video traffic receives the quality of service that it needs.
Furthermore, the switches automatically reduce their power consumption based on
the number of connected ports and reduce consumption further still with fanless
operation.
The V1405 switches provide high-speed connectivity and wirespeed performance
with 16 10/100/1000 Mbps ports in the V1405-16G and 24 10/10/1000 Mbps
ports in the V1405-24G.

8 6

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

HP V1405 Switch Series (Cont.)

HP V1405 Switch Series (Cont.)


V1405-16 switch

16 10/100 ports
Fanless

V1405-24 switch

24 10/100 ports
Fanless

V1405-24-2G switch

24 10/100 ports
2 10/100/1000 ports
Throughput up to 6.5 mpps
Fanless
Rev. 10.31

Also members of the V1405 Switch Series, the V1405-16, V1405-24, and V1405-242G switches are rack-mounted, unmanaged switches. They do not have fans and
provide intelligent power consumption. Supporting 10/100 Mbps connectivity, these
non-blocking switches are deployed in lower-speed environments. (In a non-blocking
switch, the backplane speed or internal switching mechanism bandwidth is at least
as large as the sum of the speeds of all of the ports.)
The V1405-16 has 16 10/100 Mbps ports and the V1405-24 has 24. The V1405-24G is distinguished by two 10/100/1000 Mbps ports, for uplink connections to
servers or other switches, in addition to its 24 10/100 Mbps ports.

Rev. 10.31

8 7

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V1405 Switch Series (Cont.)

HP V1405 Switch Series (Cont.)


V1405C-5G, V1405C-8G, or V140516G Desktop switches

5, 8, or 16 10/100/1000 ports

Fanless

V1405C-5, V1405C-8, or V1405-16


Desktop switches

5, 8, or 16 10/100 ports

Fanless

Rev. 10.31

The next members of the V1405 Series have C or Desktop in their names. These
switches are similar to the other members of the series, providing reliable Layer 2
connectivity for SMBs who need either Gigabit or 10/100 Mbps speeds. However,
with a fanless design and unobtrusive fixed-port physical form factor, the switches are
deployed at the desktop.
As you see in the slide, these switches divide into two groups, the Gigabit switches
(with G in the model name) and the 10/100 Mbps switches, each type featuring a 5port, 8-port, or 16-port model. All of these are non-blocking switches, providing
wirespeed throughput for each port.
All of the switches on this slide provide similar power-reduction green technologies to
those on the previous V1405 switches. In addition, the Gigabit switches support
802.1p priority for QoS.

8 8

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

HP V1400 Switch Series

HP V1400 Switch Series


V1400-8G switch

8 10/100/1000 ports

Throughput up to 11.9 mpps

Fanless

V1400-24G switch

22 10/100/1000 ports

2 dual-personality Gigabit ports

Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

Fanless

10

Rev. 10.31

The HP V1400 Series consists of two fixed, unmanaged Layer 2 models suitable for
edge deployment in small networks requiring basic connectivity. It is designed to
meet the needs of companies that have no IT support or a small IT staff. To facilitate
deployment in offices that do not have a network room, the V1400 switch is fanless.
The V1400-8G switch includes the following features:

Eight 10/100/1000 ports

Throughput up to 11.9 millions of packets per second (mpps)

The V1400-24G switch included the following features:

Rev. 10.31

22 10/100/1000 ports
Two dual-personality ports, which can be used as either RF-45 10/100/1000
ports or open SFP ports
Throughput up to 35.7 mpps

8 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

Unmanaged HP V Series Switches Summary

Unmanaged HP V Series Summary

Unmanaged
Connectivity
switches
10/100
Layer 2 only 10/100/1000

12

V1400

V1405

G models

V1410

Deployment
Desk

Rack

C and
Desktop
models

Other
models

Rev. 10.31

Refer to this table for a reference guide to the switches about which you just learned.
You can quickly see which switches provide high-speed connectivity and where each
switch can be deployed. Note that the HP V1410 and V1400 Series switches can be
rack-mounted or deployed at the desktop (however, the 8 port models are desktop
only).

8 10

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches


Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches
Unmanaged HP V Series Switches
Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches

13

V1910

V1905

V1900

V1810G

V1700

OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX

Rev. 10.31

Smart-managed switches are designed for customers whose needs have grown
beyond the one-size-fits all approach of an unmanaged switch, but still have a
limited IT staff. These switches can be deployed as plug-and-play devices, or a
customer can configure them to implement more advanced and specialized functions.
An easy-to-use Web browser interface guides the customer through most
management tasks. In fact, smart-managed switches are sometimes also called Webmanaged switches. However, the term smart-managed is preferred for the HP
products because several of the V Series switches feature a limited command line
interface (CLI) in addition to the Web browser interface.
The smart-managed switches can be divided into several series:

Rev. 10.31

HP V1910 Series Switches

HP V1905 Series Switches

HP V1900 Series Switches

HP V1810G Series Switches

HP V1700 Series Switches

HP OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX

8 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

The switches can be distinguished according to several factors:

Whether they provide 10/100/1000 or 10/100 Mbps connectivity

Whether they operate at Light Layer 3 or Layer 2 only

Whether they provide PoE

Whether they are rack-mounted or desktop-deployed

The following slides cover the smart-managed switches in more detail, teaching you
how to distinguish them according to these factors.

8 12

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

HP V1910 Switch Series

HP V1910 Switch Series


Light Layer 3 smart-managed switches:
V1910-16G switch

16 10/100/1000 ports

4 SFP ports

Throughput up to 29.8 mpps

V1910-24G switch

24 10/100/1000 ports

4 SFP ports

Throughput up to 41.7 mpps

V1910-48G switch

48 10/100/1000 ports

4 SFP ports

Throughput up to 77.4 mpps

14

Rev. 10.31

The HP V1910 Switch Series enhances the functionality with more features and the
ability to manage these features through a Web browser interface.
First, you will look at the Gigabit capable switches in this series, the V1910 switches.
Shown in the slide, are three models in this series, the V1910-16G, V1910-24G, and
V1910-48G, with 16, 24, and 52 10/100/1000 ports respectively. Each switch also
provides four open SFP ports in which customers can install various mini-GBICs for
additional connectivity options.
These V1910 switches are all Light Layer 3 switches; that is, each supports multiple IP
addresses and several static routes. They also provide basic access control lists (ACL),
making them the ideal switch for an SMB that needs to divide users into different
subnets.

Rev. 10.31

8 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V1910 Switch Series (Cont.)

HP V1910 Switch Series (Cont.)


Light Layer 3 smart-managed switches:
V1910-24G-PoE(170W) switch

24 10/100/1000 PoE+ ports

4 SFP ports

Throughput up to 41.7 mpps

V1910-24G-PoE(365W) switch
24
4

10/100/1000 PoE+ ports

SFP ports

Throughput

15

up to 41.7 mpps

Rev. 10.31

Here, you see the two members of the V1910 switches that provide PoE. The V191024G-PoE(170W) and V1910-24G-PoE(365W) switches both provide 24
10/100/1000 PoE+ ports. They are distinguished by the amount of power that they
provide, up to 170W or 365W.

8 14

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

HP V1905 Switch Series

HP V1905 Switch Series


Layer 2 smart-managed switches:
V1905-24 switch
24 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 6.6 mpps

V1905-48 switch
48

10/100 ports
dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 10.1 mpps
2

V1905-24-PoE switch
24 10/100 PoE ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 6.6 mpps

16

Rev. 10.31

The V1905 Series includes several members that operate at 10/100 Mbps: the
V1905-24, V1905-48, and V1905-24-PoE, providing 24, 48, and 24 ports,
respectively. Each of these switches also provides two dual-personality ports, which
can be used to connect to upstream switches or to servers that require more
bandwidth. On all of the former 3Com switches, a dual-personality port is actually a
set of two ports, only one of which can be used at once:

One 10/100/1000 port (for copper cables)


One SFP port into which a variety of mini-GBICs, supporting different types
connections, including fiber-optic ones, can be installed (see Module 3: HP A
Series Switch Hardware for more information on transceivers).

The V1905-24-PoE switch provides PoE (up to 154W).


Unlike the V1910 switches, the V1905 Series switches operate at Layer 2 only.

Rev. 10.31

8 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V1905 Switch Series (Cont.)

HP V1905 Switch Series (Cont.)


Layer 2 smart-managed switches:
V1905-10G-PoE Switch
9 10/100/1000 PoE ports
1 dual-personality port
Throughput up to 14.8 mpps
Fanless

V1905-8-PoE Switch
8 10/100 PoE ports
1 dual-personality port
Throughput up to 2.66 mpps
Fanless

17

Rev. 10.31

The next members of the V1905 Series are also smart-managed switches with
capabilities such as 802.1X port security and advanced QoS. These switches are
ideal for desktop deployments.
The V1905-10G-PoE Switch supports PoE for each of its nine 10/100/1000 Mbps
ports while the V1905-8-PoE Switch provides PoE on eight 10/100 ports.
Each switch also features one dual-personality port. On the V1905-10G-PoE switch,
the 10/100/1000 port component of the dual-personality port is PoE-capable.

8 16

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

HP V1900 Switch Series

HP V1900 Switch Series


Layer 2 smart-managed switches:
V1900-8G Switch

7 10/100/1000 ports

1 dual-personality port

Throughput up to 11.4 mpps

Fanless

18

Rev. 10.31

The HP V1900 Switch Series includes a single member: the V1900-8G Switch,
designed for desktop deployment at a company that nonetheless requires a smartmanaged switch with options for security and QoS. This switch supports Gigabit
connectivity with seven 10/100/1000 ports and one dual-personality port.

Rev. 10.31

8 17

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX

HP OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX


Layer 2 smart-managed switches:
OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX

4 10/100 ports

4 10/100 PoE ports

1 dual-purpose port:
100Base FX uplink
SFP port

Throughput up to 2.69 Mpps

Fanless

19

Rev. 10.31

The OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX provides another option for companies


seeking a smart-managed switch that supports 10/100 Mbps connectivity. The switch
provides eight 10/100 Mbps ports, four of which support PoE. For its uplink
connection, the switch features a dual-purpose port in which customers can install
either a 100Base FX link or an SFP transceiver if they need a different type of fiberoptic link.

8 18

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

HP V1810G Switch Series

HP V1810G Switch Series


Layer 2 smart-managed switches:
V1810G-8
8 10/100/1000 ports
PoE-PD
Throughput up to 11.9 mpps
Fanless

V1810G-24
22 10/100/1000 ports
2 dual-personality ports
Throughput up to 35.7 mpps
Fanless

20

Rev. 10.31

The HP V1810G Switch Series replaced the V1800 Switch Series, providing
enhancements in deployment options, physical security, and energy efficiency. Both
models in this seriesthe V1810G-8 and the V1810G-24can be deployed on the
wall, ceiling, tabletop or under table. The V1810G-24 can also be installed in a rack
mount. Both switches have a Kensington lock slot so they can be physically secured
in open areas.
Like the V1800 switches, the V1810G switches are Layer 2, Web-managed switches.
The V1810G-8 switch has a compact footprint and provides the following:

Eight 10/100/1000 ports

Fanless for quiet operation in open areas

Throughput of up to 11.9 mpps

The V1810G-8 switch can also be powered by an upstream PoE device, making a
good option for places where a power outlet is not available.
The HP V1810G-24 switch provides the following:

Rev. 10.31

24 10/100/1000 ports
Two dual-personality ports, which can be used as either 10/100/1000 ports
or open SFP ports
Throughput of up to 35.7 mpps

8 19

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V1700 Switch Series

HP V1700 Switch Series


Layer 2 smart-managed switches:
V1700-8
7 10/100 ports
1 10/100/1000 port
Throughput up to 2.0 mpps
Fanless

V1700-24
22 10/100 ports
2 dual-personality Gigabit ports
Throughput up to 6.2 mpps
Fanless

21

Rev. 10.31

The HP Series V1700 switch consists of two fixed-port, Layer 2 models: the V1700-8
switch and V1700-24 switch. These switches are ideal for businesses making the
transition from unmanaged to managed networks. They are designed with no fan,
enabling quiet operation for deployment in open spaces and come with the industryleading HP warranty.
The V1700-8 switch includes the following features:

Seven 10/100 ports

One 10/100/1000 port

Throughput up to 2.0 mpps

The V1700-24 switch comes with the following features:

8 20

22 10/100 ports
Two dual-personality ports, which are the same type of dual-personality port as
the V1810Gs
Throughput up to 6.2 mpps

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Overview

Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches Summary

Smart-Managed HP V Series Summary


Smart-Managed
switches

Connectivity
10/100/1000

V1910

V1905

G models

V1900

OfficeConnect
Managed 9 FX
V1810G
V1700

22

Functionality

10/100

Light
Layer 3

Layer
2

Rack

PoE
models

Some
models

Desk

Some
models

Deployment

PoE
models

PoE

Rev. 10.31

Again, use this table as a reference guide for comparing the smart-managed HP V
Series switches according to their capabilities and deployment options.

Rev. 10.31

8 21

Servicing HP Networking Products

Summary
Summary
V Series switches:
Unmanaged versus smart-managed
Connectivity options
Deployment options
Functionality and support for PoE

23

Rev. 10.31

This module has introduced you to the HP V Series switches. You have learned how
to recognize them and how to classify them according to several factors:

8 22

Whether they are unmanaged or smart-managed

Whether they provide Gigabit or 10/100 Mbps connectivity

Whether they are rack or desktop deployed

Whether they provide PoE

Whether they act at Layer 2 or Light Layer 3

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Switch Hardware

Module 9

Objectives
This module familiarizes you with the hardware of the HP V, or Value, Series
switches. You will learn to identify the basic LEDs on these switches and use these
LEDs to troubleshoot common problems. You will also learn about the hardware
accessories that you might encounter with these switches. By the time that you have
finished this module, you should be able to:

Follow the correct procedure to determine whether to replace HP V Series


switches with power problems

Recognize fault conditions on HP V Series switches

Reset HP V Series switches that support hardware resets

Rev. 10.31

Identify LEDs on HP V Series switches

Identify accessories for HP V Series switches, including small form-factor


pluggable (SFP) transceivers and external redundant power supplies (RPSs)

9 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

V Series LEDs
V Series LEDs
V Series LEDs

Power

Port

Diagnosing Power Problems

Diagnosing Self Test Failures and Fault Conditions

Hardware Reboots and Resets


Accessories for HP V Series Switches

Rev. 10.31

First, you will examine the LEDs on V Series switches. These LEDs are quite similar to
those you learned about on A and E Series switches. Therefore, the discussion will be
quite brief. (If you need more help, refer to the earlier modules.)

9 2

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

LED Types

LED Types
V Series switches generally have two types of LEDs:
Power
Port LEDs (status and activity of specific ports):
Port

activity

PoE

compatibility and supply (some models)

Full-duplex

operation

Connection

speed

HP V1910-24G-PoE(365W) switch only:


RPS LED

Rev. 10.31

V Series switches generally have only two types of LEDs:

Power LEDIndicates whether the switch is receiving power and booted up.
Because only one V Series switch has a Fault LED, the Power LED often also
indicates fault conditions by glowing in different way. You will learn more a bit
later.
Port LEDsReport on the status and activity of specific ports. The V Series Port
LEDs resemble those on other HP switches. Some switches have only one LED per
port, which indicates both status and activity (and possibly speed). Other
switches have two LEDs per port, also indicating full-duplex operation or PoE
compatibility and supply (for PoE switches). Some of these switches also have
Mode buttons that toggle a single LED through several functions. (See Module
6: HP E Series Switch Hardware for information about Mode buttons.)

The HP V1910-24G-PoE (365W) also provides an RPS LED; you will learn about the
RPS later in this module.

Rev. 10.31

9 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

Identify LEDs on HP V Series Switches

Identify LEDs on HP V Series Switches


FDx LEDs

Link/Act LEDs

HP 1700-8 Switch

Power LED

Spd LEDs:
Off = 10 Mbps
On = 100 or 1000 Mbps

Rev. 10.31

The slide illustrates the location of these LEDs on an HP V1700-8 switch. The
locations are similar on these switches:

HP V1410 Series switches

HP V1400 Series switches

HP V1810G Series

Remember to view the number for the port LED and match it to the number on the
port because ports are not always assigned IDs in the same order on every switch.
On these switches, each port has three LEDs associated with it. The Link/Act LEDs
show whether the port has a connection (the LED is on) and whether there is activity
on that connection (the LED flashes). The other LEDs report on other characteristics of
the link such as its speed and duplex mode (an illuminated FDx LED indicates full
duplex mode).
You will typically be most interested in the Link/Act LED because this LED signals
possible problems with a connection. If the LED is off but the port has a physical
connection, look for physical problems (a bad cable, connector, and so forth) and
data link problems (on a managed switch, the port is disabled, the duplex mode is
mismatched, and so forth).
Note that the V1410-8G is unique in that its LEDs are on the front panel, but its ports
on the back.

9 4

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

Identify LEDs on HP V1910, V1905, and V1900 Series Switches

Identify LEDs on HP V1910, V1905,


and V1900 Switch Series
HP V1910-24G-PoE(170W)

Mode button

Port LEDs
Speed mode = Link/Activity
PoE mode = State of PoE

HP V1905-10G-PoE

HP V1905-24-PoE

Port LEDs

Link/Activity
Duplex
PoE status
6

Rev. 10.31

On the V1910 switches, look for the port LEDs on the right side of the front panel.
Each 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet port has two LEDs associated with it, which
function much like the Link/Activity LEDs about which you have already learned.
However, one LED, which is green, indicates a 1000 Mbps connection, and the
other, which is yellow, indicates a 10/100 Mbps connection. (The V1910-48G
provides only one LED per port, but since it glows two different colors, you can
interpret it in the same way.)
When you are examining V1910-24G-PoE(170W) and V1910-24G-PoE(365W)
switches, remember that they have a Mode button. If the Mode LED next to the button
is solid green, the port LEDs behave as described for other V1910 switches. But if this
LED is flashing, the port LEDs indicate whether the port is providing PoE (green), is
over-subscribed and cannot provide the power that the connected device needs
(flashing green), or is not providing PoE (yellow). Make sure to press the Mode
button to see the information pertinent to the situation.
The V1905 Series switches provide similar port LEDs to those shown on the previous
slide, indicating status/activity and duplex mode. However, these switches do not
provide Speed LEDs because their ports support only 10/100 Mbps connections. On
the V1905-10G-PoE and V1905-8-PoE switches, one LED per-port reports specifically
on the PoE status; you do not need to click a Mode button.

Rev. 10.31

9 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

Note
On the V1910-48G and V1905-48, look for the port LEDs over the ports
themselves rather than grouped together on the right of the panel. If you need
more information about a specific LED, refer to the latest documentation for the
switch that you are servicing.

9 6

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

Identify LEDs on V1405C and V1405 Desktop Switches

Identify LEDs on HP V1405C and V1405


Desktop Switches

HP V1405C-5G

Port LEDs
Flash = Activity
On Gigabit only:
Green = 1 Gbps
Yellow = 10/100 Mbps
7

Power LED
(illuminated
logo)

Rev. 10.31

Several switches in the HP V1405 Switch Series do not have labeled Power LEDs.
Instead, the logo on the right side of the front panel is illuminated when the switch is
powered on. These switches include:

V1405C-5

V1405C-8

V1405-16 Desktop

V1405C-5G

V1405C-8G

V1405-16G Desktop

(These switches were formerly branded as OfficeConnect Unmanaged switches; you


might see that label on the switch.)
These switches have only one LED per-port, so that LED conveys all information about
the port; a solid glow indicates a connection and blinking, activity on that
connection. On the Gigabit switches, the color of the LED indicates the speed (green
for 1000 Mbps and yellow for 10/100 Mbps).

Rev. 10.31

9 7

Servicing HP Networking Products

Identify Dual-Personality and SFP Port LEDs

Identify Dual-Personality and SFP Port LEDs


You might see:
A numbered LED or an LED next to the SFP or dualpersonality port
Module LED
HP V1810G-24

HP V1900-8G

Rev. 10.31

As you learned in the previous module, some HP V Series switches provide small
form-factor pluggable (SFP) ports, which accept SPF transceivers that in turn provide
interfaces for fiber option connections. Other HP V Series switches have dualpersonality ports, which can accept either a Base-T connection or an SFP transceiver.
On some HP V Series switches, such as the V1810G-24 switch shown in the slide,
each dual-personality port is a single physical port. On others (the HP V Series
switches that were formerly branded as 3Com), the dual-personality port consists of
two physical portsone of which accepts a Base-T connection, one of which accepts
an SFP transceiver, and only one of which can be active at once.
Depending on the switch, you will find the LEDs that report on the SFP or the dualpersonality ports in different locations.

Numbered LED or Port LED


You will find it simple to locate the LEDs for the SFP ports on HP V1910 Series
switches. Just like LEDs for the 10/100/1000 Base-T Ethernet ports, these LEDs are
located either over the SFP port or at the right of the front panel, numbered with the
same numbers as the SFP ports.
Similarly, when the dual-personality port consists of a single physical port, the port
LEDs resemble those for the switchs Base-T Ethernet ports.
If these LEDs indicate problems, check both the cable and the SFP transceiver (or
mini-GBIC). Make sure that the transceiver is installed correctly.
9 8

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

The HP V1905-24, V1905-24-PoE, and V1905-48 switches have two physical ports
for the dual-personality port. Both ports share the same Link/Activity and Duplex/SFP
LEDs. The LEDs behavior depends on which port is in use. (If both ports are
connected, by default, the SFP port takes priority, and other connection does not
come up.) When the 10/100 port is in use, the LEDs behave like other 10/100 port
LEDs on this switch. When the SFP port is in use, the Link/Activity LED indicates the
status of the connection while the Duplex/SFP LED indicates whether a module is
installed (green for installed, even if the connection is down). If the Duplex/SPF LED
indicates that the module is installed, but the other LED is off, check both the cable
and that the SFP transceiver is well-mounted.
The dual-personality port LEDs for the HP V1905-8-PoE are similar; however, the
second LED is called Duplex/Module Active.

Module LED
Other HP V Series switches provide a separate LED for the SPF port within the pair.
Therefore, you must look for that LED when troubleshooting the connection. These
switches include the following:

HP V1905-10G-PoE

HP V1900-8G

The name of this LED begins with Module (Module Present or Module Active,
respectively). Similarly, the OfficeConnect Managed FX9 switch provides a Module
Status LED for its SFP port (which is not part of a dual-personality port pair). These
Module LEDs turn on when an SFP transceiver is installed in the corresponding SFP
port and has established a connection.
If the SFP port has a connected cable, but the LED is not illuminated, then the SPF
transceiver might not be well-mounted or the cable might be faulty.

Rev. 10.31

9 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

Procedure for Power Failures

Procedure for Power Failures


1

Check the power supply at both ends


Problem
solved?

Yes

Power cord
was loose

No

Use a known good outlet

Problem
solved?

Use new
outlet

Yes

No

Use a known good power adapter

Replace switch
9

No

Problem
solved?

Yes

Replace power
adapter
(if covered)

Rev. 10.31

When a switch is connected to a power source, but its Power LED does not
illuminate, then the switch has a problem related to power. When you are called in
to troubleshoot such a problem, follow the procedure indicated in the slide:
1.

Check the power supply at both ends, looking for a loose connection.

2.

If this does not solve the problem, connect the switch to a known good power
outlet (preferably, one that is successfully supplying power to a switch of the
same type).

3.

If this does not solve the problem, try using a different power adapter. Refer to
the products specifications for a list of supported adapters. Preferably, use a
known good power adapter, one that is successfully supply power to a switch of
the same type.

4.

If this solves the problem, tell the customer to use a different power adapter.
Replace the adapter if it is covered by the warranty or service contract.

5.

If the new power adapter does not solve the problem, replace the switch.

For an unmanaged switch, you simply need to install the new switch. For managed
switches, you might need to complete the initial configuration and reload the
customers configuration on the new switch. The next module gives guidelines.

9 10

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

Procedure for Power Failures on PoE-Powered HP V1810G8Switches

Procedure for Power Failures on PoE-Powered


HP V1810G-8 Switches
1

Use known good RJ-45 cable


Problem
solved?

Yes

Use new
cable

No

Check the power on the PoE source


Problem
solved?

Yes

Use new
outlet

No

3
Replace switch
10

Check the port priority


No

Problem
solved?

Yes

Retain new
priority

Rev. 10.31

HP V1810G-8 switches can be powered by PoE instead of by a traditional power


source. When they are, you must use a different procedure to troubleshoot.
First, use a known good RJ-45 cable to connect the V1810G-8 port 1 (the port that
receives PoE) to the PoE power source (which might be an injector or a PoE switch). If
this does not solve the problem, check the PoE source and verify that it has enough
power to supply to the V1810G switch (15W). Finally, if the PoE source is a switch,
have the switch administrator check the PoE priority of the port that connects to the
V1810G-8. The priority must be high enough to ensure that the switch will deliver
power to the V1810G-8.
Once you are certain that the PoE source is delivering the proper amount of power,
check the V1810G-8 Power LED. If it is still not illuminated, the switch has failed.
Replace it.

Rev. 10.31

9 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V1400, V1410, and V1700 Switch Series Fault Condition

HP V1400, V1410, and V1700 Switch


Series Fault Condition
Determine if self-test failed:
If

Port LEDs do not match the picture, self-test has failed

Power cycle the switch twice to confirm failure


HP 1400-24G, 1410-24G, or 1700-24
HP 1400-8G, 1410-8G,
or 1700-8

Unconnected ports

Unconnected
ports

Before Speed
pressing LED on

Link/Act and
Mode LEDs off

FDx LEDs on
Link/Act and
Speed LEDs off
11

Rev. 10.31

You might also need to troubleshoot problems with Port LEDs that are not illuminated
when the port is connected. However, the procedure for troubleshooting these
problems (checking the Ethernet cable and so forth) is the same as that on HP A and
E Series switches. Therefore, this module will not cover this procedure.
Instead, you will focus on recognizing and dealing with fault conditions on various V
Series switches, beginning with the V1400, V1410, and V1700 Series.
You might be called in to look at a switch for which the Power LED is illuminated (so
it does not have a power problem), but seems to be experiencing problems. Perhaps
the switch is not forwarding traffic. Additionally, in the case of a V1700 Series
switch, you might not be able to access its Web browser interface.
You can verify that the switchs self-test has failed by power cycling the switch,
waiting a moment, and then checking the LEDs for the unconnected ports. All port
LEDs temporarily illuminate while the switch completes its self test, but most of the
LEDs for the unconnected ports should then turn off.
On a V1400-8G, V1410-8G, or V1700-8 switch, only the FDx LEDs for unconnected
ports should be illuminated. On a V1400-24G or V1410-24G, before you press the
Mode button, all of the port LEDs should be off and the Speed LED should be on.
If the switchs unconnected port LEDs do not match this description and remain lit, the
self test has failed. Power cycle the switch again to confirm the failure. Then, if the
problem is not solved, replace the unmanaged switch. For the V1700 switches, you
should first attempt to return the switch to its factory default settings and see whether
that repairs the problem. You will learn how a bit later in this module.
9 12

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

HP V1910 Series Fault Condition

HP V1910 Switch Series Fault Condition


Symptom:
Power
Port

LED blinking slowly (3Hz)

LED blinking slowly yellow*

Problem: Self-test failed

HP V1910-24G-PoE(170W)

Solution:
Access

Boot ROM Menu and


bypass the configuration or
reinstall software

If

necessary, replace switch

*On the V1910-48G, the port LEDs are off.


12

Port LED
blinking?

Power LED
blinking?

Rev. 10.31

On V1910 Series switches, you can recognize a POST failure by examining the Power
LED. This LED blinks at 1 Hz while the switch boots up. If the LED continues to blink
slightly more rapidly (at 3 Hz), the POST has failed. Wait several minutes to confirm.
The Port LEDs that failed the POST will also blink slowly yellow at 3Hz (however, they
will be off on a V1910-48G). You should power-cycle the switch to verify the failure.
Next, you should power cycle the switch again and press [Ctrl+B] when prompted
during the boot process. Then attempt to load known good software on the switch or
to bypass a bad configuration. The V1910s Boot ROM menu is just like the one that
you learned how to use in Module 4: Basic Management of HP A Series Switches.
(Of course, if your attempts at fixing the switch do not succeed, you should escalate
the problem or replace the switch as appropriate.)

Rev. 10.31

9 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V1905 Series Fault Condition

HP V1905 Switch Series Fault Conditions


Symptom: Power LED yellow
Problem: Self-test failed
Solution:
Access
If

failsafe mode (covered in next module)

necessary, replace
Power LED

HP V1905-10G-PoE
13

Rev. 10.31

On the V1905 Series switches, you can recognize a self-test failure by the Power LED
glowing yellow. (This might occur when one or more ports have failed.) Again,
confirm the failure with a power cycle. If the problem persists, you must access
failsafe mode and attempt to reset the configuration or load good software on the
switch. You will learn how in the next module.
Note
The V1905-10G-PoE switch does not support fail-safe mode.

9 14

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

HP V1900-8G and OfficeConnect Managed FX Switch Fault


Conditions

HP V1905-8G and HP OfficeConnect


Managed 9 FX Switch Fault Conditions
Symptoms
Status

LED is yellow
(V1900-8G)

Alert

LED is solid orange


(OfficeConnect Managed 9 FX)

Problem = Self-test failed


Solution = Access CLI and
collect information or reinstall
software
HP V1900-8G

Status LED

HP OfficeConnect
Managed Switch 9 FX
FX

Alert LED
14

Rev. 10.31

The V1900-8G and Office Connect Managed 9FX switches have special LEDs that
indicate problems, the Status LED or Alert LED, respectively. When this LED is on, the
switch is experiencing a problem of some sortfor example, the software might have
become corrupted. If possible, you should access the CLI, as you will learn how to do
in the next module, and collect diagnostic information. You can reinstall software
from the CLI as well.
On the V1900-8G switch, you can also access the fail-safe menu and attempt to fix
the switch from there (the next module explains how). If you cannot reach the CLI or
solve the problem in the failsafe menu, you might need to escalate the problem or
replace the switch as appropriate.

Rev. 10.31

9 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V1810G Switch Series Fault Condition

HP V1810G Switch Series Fault Condition


Blinking Fault LED
Self

test failed; power-cycle twice to confirm

Blinking Fault LED and Port LED


Port

failed; power-cycle twice to confirm


Blinking?

Blinking?
15

Rev. 10.31

The HP V1810G Switch Series also has a specific Fault LED. This LED blinks to
indicate a problem. If it is blinking, but none of the Port LEDs is blinking, the switch
system itself has failed its self test or experienced another fatal error. Power up the
switch two times to confirm the problem. You can try resetting the switch to its factory
default settings to fix the problem; you will learn how to do this later in this module.
You might also need to reinstall its software.
If both the Fault and a Port LED are blinking, that port has failed. You might need to
replace the switch.

9 16

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

Hardware Reboots and Resets


Hardware Reboots and Resets
V Series LEDs
Hardware Reboots and Resets

Reboot Switches

Execute a Hardware Reset to Factory Default Settings

Accessories for HP V Series Switches

16

Rev. 10.31

You will now learn about tasks that you can perform using the switch hardware itself
(no need to access the switchs management interface): rebooting the switch and
resetting the switch to factory default settings.

Rev. 10.31

9 17

Servicing HP Networking Products

Reboot HP V Series Switches

Reboot HP V Series Switches


Switches with no Reset button

Power cycle (remove and restore the power adapter)

HP V1810G Switch Series

Press the Reset button for a warm reboot and self-test

Power cycle for a hard reboot and self-test

Reset button
17

Rev. 10.31

Rebooting al HP V Series switch is as simple as power cycling the switch; that is,
removing the power adapter and then replacing it.
On the HP V1810G Series only, you have the option of executing a warm reboot
(also called a soft reboot), in which the switch gracefully shuts down and then
restarts. For a warm reboot, press the Reset button on the front panel. A hard reboot
might be necessary to deal with some problems; in this case, power cycle the switch.

9 18

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

Reset HP V1810G Series Switches to Factory Default Settings

Reset HP V1810G Series Switches to Factory


Default Settings
HP V1810G Switch Series
1.

Press the Reset and Clear buttons

2.

Release the Reset button

3.

When all three Mode buttons blink, release the Clear button

Reset button
Clear button

18

Rev. 10.31

With the V1810G Series switches front panel buttons, you can also reset the switch to
factory default settings. In this way, you can reset a faulting switch to known-good
settings even though you cannot gain management access to it. Use a similar
procedure as that for many E Series switches:
1.

Press the Reset and Clear buttons.

2.

Release the Reset button while holding the Clear button.

3.

When all three Mode buttons (circled in the figure in the slide) begin to blink,
release the Clear button.

When the switch reboots, it runs the factory default settings including its IP address
and password.
(You can press and hold the Clear button on its own to reset only the password.)

Rev. 10.31

9 19

Servicing HP Networking Products

Reset HP V1700 Series Switches to Factory Default Settings

Reset HP V1700 Switch Series to Factory


Default Settings
1. Remove the switchs power adapter.
2. Remove all cables.
3. Connect port 1 to port 2.
4. Reconnect the power adapter.
5. Wait at least 40 seconds before disconnecting port 1 from
port 2.
No Reset or Clear button

Cable
ProCurve 1700-8 Switch
19

Rev. 10.31

You can also initiate a hardware reset to factory defaults on the HP V1700 Series
switches although these switches have no Reset button. Follow these steps:

9 20

1.

Remove the switchs power adapter.

2.

Remove all cables.

3.

Connect port 1 to port 2.

4.

Reconnect the power adapter.

5.

Wait at least 40 seconds before disconnecting port 1 from port 2.

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

Accessories for V Series Switches


Accessories for HP V Series Switches
V Series LEDs
Hardware Reboots and Resets
Accessories for HP V Series Switches

20

Mini-GBICs

SFP Transceivers

External RPS

Rev. 10.31

You will now learn about the HP V Series accessories that you might need to
recognize and install, including:

Rev. 10.31

Mini-GBICs, which are installed in SFP ports or dual-personality ports

External Redundant Power Supplies (RPSs)

9 21

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V Series Mini-GBICs

HP V Series Mini-GBICs
Mini-GBIC

V1400

V1410

V1810G

V1700

Gigabit-SX-LC

Gigabit-LX-LC

Gigabit-LH-LC

1000BX-D SFP-LC

1000BX-U SFP-LC

100-FX SFP-LC

100BX-D SFP-LC

100BX-U SFP-LC

21

Rev. 10.31

You will need to know which transceivers a particular switch supports so that you can
install the correct ones and so that you can recognize when a non-compatible
transceiver is causing a fault condition. The table displays the wide variety of SFP
transceivers, called mini-GBICs, available for HP V1400, V1410, V1700, and
V1810G Series switches. You might recognize these mini-GBICs from the HP E Series
Hardware module, as these mini-GBICs are also supported by many switches in that
series.
Note
Installing these mini-GBICs is simple. You simply plug them into the SFP or dualpersonality port and then connect the correct cable to the interface in the miniGBIC. For more information, see Module 6: HP E Series Hardware.

9 22

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

HP V Series SFP Transceivers

HP V Series SFP Transceivers


V1910

V1905

V1900

OfficeConnect
Managed 9FX

1000Base-SX

1000Base-LX

1000Base-LH70

1000Base-T

Mini-GBIC

1G SFP

22

Rev. 10.31

As you recall from the previous module, the V1910, V1905, V1900 Series switches
support dual-personality port pairs, which include an SFP port. Similarly, the
OfficeConnect Managed 9FX Switch provides a port that can act as an FX port or an
SFP port. Refer to the table to see which SPF transceivers you can install in various
switchs SFP ports.
Note
Installing these transceivers is simple. You simply plug the (empty) transceiver into
the SFP port. If it provides a clasp, pivot the clasp until it catches the knob. Then
connect the correct cable to the interface in the transceiver. For more information,
see Module 3: HP A Series Hardware.

Rev. 10.31

9 23

Servicing HP Networking Products

HP V Series External RPS


HP V Series External RPS
HP RPS 1000 A3 Redundant Power Supply
Power supply for the HP V1910-24G-PoE(365W) switch

25 Amps
-52 to -55 VDC

RPS 1000 A3
Cable A, JD5
Connector

V1910-24G-PoE(365W)

23

Rev. 10.31

The HP V1910-24G-PoE(365W) switch can receive power from a HP RPS 1000 A3


Redundant Power Supply, one of the RPSs that you already learned about with the A
Series switches. The RPS 1000 A3 is the only RPS supported for this switch. You must
also use the correct cable to connect the switch to the RPS; the slide displays the
specifications.
The switch has both an AC and DC power input. You can connect one or both, for
redundancy. When operating at is capacity, the V1910-24G-PoE(365W) switch
draws:

AC power:

523 W for system power

365 W for PoE

DC power

92 W for system power

740 W for PoE

The V1910-24G-PoE(365W)switch provides an RPS Status LED directly above the


Mode button and Mode Status LED. Look at this LED to discover whether the switch is
successfully receiving power from the RPS (LED glows solid green) or whether the
switch is not receiving power or the DC input is abnormal (LED is off).

9 24

Rev. 10.31

HP V Series Hardware

Summary
Summary
HP V Series LEDs
V Series power failures
V Series fault conditions
Hardware reboots and resets
Mini-GBICs
RPSs

24

Rev. 10.31

In this module, you have been introduced to features of the HP V Series switches
hardware and taught how you can use those features to provide support for
customers. You learned how to use LEDs to recognize power failures and fault
conditions on V Series switches, and you learned how to execute reboots and resets
to factory defaults using the hardware.
You also learned about supported hardware accessories for the V Series switches:

Rev. 10.31

SFP transceivers (or mini-GBICs), which can be installed in SFP and dualpersonality ports
The HP RPS 1000 A3 for V1910-24G-PoE(365W)switches

9 25

Servicing HP Networking Products

9 26

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Module 10

Objectives
In the previous module, you learned how to recognize problems with HP V Series
switches. This module will give you the skills that you need to address some of these
problems. Andwhen you must replace a switchyou will use the same skills to get
the new switch up and running.
By the time that you have completed this module, you will be able to:

Rev. 10.31

Identify management options for V Series switches

Access and navigate a smart-managed switchs CLI or Web browser interface

Complete basic management tasks in either interface

Use fail-safe mode for troubleshooting

10 1

Servicing HP Networking Products

Management Overview of HP V Series


Management Overview of HP V Series
Management Overview of HP V Series
Software Capacity
Configuration File Capacity
Management Users
Management Options

CLI
Fail-Safe Mode
Web Browser Interface
3

Rev. 10.31

From previous modules, you are familiar with the basics of switch management
switch software, configuration files, the roles of different management users, the
various types of management interfaces, and so forth. In terms of concepts, this
module does not introduce much that will surprise you; as you would expect, the
management of HP V Series switches is somewhat simpler than that of the switches
intended for enterprises with larger IT staff.
This section, therefore, will simply lay out the options for management the HP V
Series switches with the assumption that you will understand what these options
mean.

10 2

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

V Series Software Image Capacity

V Series Software Image Capacity

Single Software
Image

Dual Software Image

Unmanaged switches* HP V1905-24


HP V1900-8G
HP V1905-48
HP V1700 Series
HP V1905-24-PoE
HP OfficeConnect
Managed Switch 9 FX
HP V1810G Series

Multiple Software Images


One backup
One active
HP V1910 Series
HP V1905-10G-PoE
HP V1905-8-PoE

*No updates for these switches


4

Rev. 10.31

As you have learned, although only one software image runs at a time, a switch can
have one, two, or multiple software images, those switches with more than one
image having greater resiliency in case of the corruption of one image.
The table shows the number of software images supported by each switch in the HP
V Series. Note that all of the unmanaged switches, even though they cannot be
configured, do run a software image; however, this software cannot be updated.

Rev. 10.31

10 3

Servicing HP Networking Products

V Series Configuration File Capacity

V Series Configuration File Capacity


No
config file
Unmanaged
switches

Changes to runningconfig immediately


applied to startup
HP V1905-24
HP V1905-48
HP V1905-24-PoE
HP V1900-8G
HP OfficeConnect
Managed Switch 9 FX
HP V1700 Series

Running and
startup-config
HP V1810G Series
HP V1905-10G-PoE

Multiple configuration files


One running-config
One startup-config
HP V1910 Series
HP V1905-8-PoE

Rev. 10.31

The unmanaged switches, of course, do not contain any configuration file that you
can alter. And, as this module concerns switch management, this will be the last
mention of this segment of the HP V Series. But the smart-managed switches run
configuration files much like the other switches that you have learned about in this
course.
However, several of the V Series switches do not have a truly separate concept of a
running-config and startup-config. In other words, all changes made to the
configuration are immediately applied and immediately saved to the startup
configuration (which is reapplied whenever the switch reboots). Switches of this type
include:

V1905-24, V1905-48, V1905-24-PoE switches

V1900-8G switches

OfficeConnect Switch Managed Switch 9 FX

V1700 Series switches

On other V Series switches, changes applied to the currently running configuration


must be saved to the startup-config to be made permanent. These switches include:

10 4

V1905-10G-PoE switches

V1810G Series switches

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Finally, the V1910 Series switches and V1905-8-PoE switches can store multiple
configuration filesjust as they do multiple software images. One of the files
functions as the startup-config. And, of course, these switches have a running-config
with the currently applied settings.

Rev. 10.31

10 5

Servicing HP Networking Products

Privilege Levels for Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches

Privilege Levels for Smart-Managed HP V


Series Switches
4 Levels (like A Series)
Visitor
Monitor
Config
Ping and
Read
Read and
traceroute access configure

HP V1910 Series

Manage
Complete
access

2 Levels
(like E Series)
Monitor
Read
access

Manage
Complete
read-write
access

1 Level
Administrator
Complete access

HP V1905-24
HP V1900-8G
HP V1905-48
HP V1810G Series
HP V1905-24-PoE
HP V1700 Series
HP V1905-10G-PoE
HP V1905-8-PoE
HP OfficeConnect
Managed Switch 9 FX

Rev. 10.31

The A Series switches, as you learned in Module 4: Basic Configuration of HP A


Series Switches, have four access levels. Management of the V1910 Series switches
follows the same strategy. You will need to obtain the credentials for the access level
required for the task that you must complete. For simple connectivity checks, you can
log in as a visitor; to view configurations, you must log in as a monitor; to make any
configuration changes, such as to the IP address, you must log in at the config level
(equivalent to the A Series system level); and the update the software or reset the
switch to factory defaults, you must log in as a manager. As with the A Series
switches, each level contains the rights for lower levels; therefore, it is a good idea to
log in as a manager whenever possible.
Most other V Series switches follow the slightly simpler pattern of the E Series
switches: a monitor level with read-only access and a manager level with complete
access. These switches are:

V1905 Series switches

OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX switches

The following V Series switches provide a single level of access, so you only need to
worry about obtaining the correct credentials:

10 6

V1900-8G switches

V1810G Series switches

V1700 Series switches


Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Note
Simplifying matters is that most of these switches have only one management
user for access to the limited CLI through a console connection. For example, the
V1910 Series switches divide the Web browser interface, which offers full
management features, into four access levels. But a single password provides
access to the limited CLI.

Rev. 10.31

10 7

Servicing HP Networking Products

Management Options for Smart-Managed HP V Series Switches

Management Options for Smart-Managed


HP V Series Switches
Web browser
interface

CLI

SNMP

HP V1910 Series

HP V1900 Series

HP V1905 Series

HP OfficeConnect Managed
Switch 9 FX

HP V1810G Series

HP V1700 Series

Switch

Rev. 10.31

All of the smart-managed V Series switches support a Web browser interface, which
is typically the primary management tool for switches in this series.
As hinted in the previous slide, the V1900 Series, V1905 Series, V1910 Series and
OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX switches also have a CLI, which, depending on
the switch, might provide only a few commands or almost any command that you
need to configure any setting. You will learn more about each CLI in a little while.
These switches can also be managed by a Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) server; however, this option will not be covered in this course.

10 8

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

CLI
CLI
Management Overview of HP V Series
CLI
Access the CLI
Navigate the CLI
Complete Basic Tasks in the CLI

Fail-Safe Mode
Web Browser Interface

Rev. 10.31

You might need to access a switchs CLI when the switch has lost network connectivity
or when you do not know its IP address. From the CLI, you can complete most of the
tasks that you may be called on to do. In this section, you will learn how to access
and navigate the CLI on each switch in the HP V Series that supports this option. A
reference of commands for several basic tasks will then be provided.
Note
You can access the CLI in-band (with a Telnet or SSH session) or out-of-band with
a console session. This section will focus on out-of-band access because this is
the type that is required when you cannot reach the switch at its IP address.

Rev. 10.31

10 9

Servicing HP Networking Products

Access the CLI: Serial Cables for HP V Series Switches

Access the CLI

Serial Cables for HP V Series Switches

RJ-45 to RS-232 Cable


HP OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX

RJ-45 to DB-9 Cable


HP V1910 Series
HP V1905 Series

Rev. 10.31

The first step to accessing the CLI through a console session is obtaining the correct
serial cable to connect your management station to the switch. The V Series switches
have a console port that accepts an RJ-45 connector (the same type as Ethernet
cable). The other side of the cable is a traditional serial connector. Refer to the table
for the exact specification.

10 10

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Access the CLI

Access the CLI


Terminal software settings:
Baud rate = 38,400
Data rate = 8
Parity = None
Stop bits = 1
Flow control = None

Log in:
Default username = admin
No default password
If passwords have been changed, log in with the credentials

you are given


10

Rev. 10.31

The table shows the correct settings for your terminal software, which you learned
about in earlier modules. When prompted to log in, use the credentials that you were
given. Only the V1905-8-PoE and OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX switches
have multiple types of console users; for these switches, try to obtain the manager
credentials.
If you do not know the login credentials, you can try the default username, admin,
and default password, none (press [Enter]).

Rev. 10.31

10 11

Servicing HP Networking Products

V1910 and V1905 Switch Series CLI

V1910 and V1905 Switch Series CLI


The V1910 and V1905 Series* CLI provides a basic set of
commands.
V1910 Series and V1905-10G-PoE
<Sysname> command <options>

HP V1905-24, HP V1905-48, and HP V1905-24-PoE


Select menu option: command
<Prompts for options>

*With the exception of the V1905-8-PoE switches


11

Rev. 10.31

The V1910 Series and V1905-10G-PoE switches have nearly identical CLIs. These CLIs
consist of only a few commands, mostly related to basic management and support
tasks.
The V1905-24, V1905-48, and V1905-24-PoE switches also have a similar CLI.
However, in this CLI, you simply enter what would be the first part of a command in
the other switches CLI. You are then prompted for the options. For example, to set the
IP address on a V1910 Series switch, you might enter:
ipsetup address 10.1.4.12 24 default-gateway 10.1.4.1

On a V1905-24-PoE switch, on the other hand, you would simply enter:


ipsetup

Then you would be prompted for the IP address, mask, and default gateway.

10 12

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

V1900-8G Switch CLI

V1900-8G Switch CLI


Basic set of commands
Three top level commands
System

IP

Console

Subcommands

Subcommands

Subcommands

Select menu option: toplevelCommand subcommand

Select menu option: toplevelCommand


Select menu option(toplevelCommand): subcommand

13

Rev. 10.31

The V1900-8G switch also features a CLI with a limited set of commands. These
commands are organized into menus. In the top-level menu, you can enter three
commands, System, IP, and Console, each of which takes you to a new menu, where
you can enter more commands.
You have the option of entering an entire command, both the top level command and
the subcommand, in the top level menu. Or you can enter one command at a time
until you have completed a task. You can use the help (?) to see the commands in the
current menu, so the second option works best when you cannot remember the
complete command.
Note
You must enter the full word for each command; this switch does not autocomplete entries.

Rev. 10.31

10 13

Servicing HP Networking Products

V1905-8-PoE CLI

V1905-8-PoE Switch CLI


More comprehensive command set
Organized into modes
Save with this command: copy
enable

running-config startup-config

Normal EXEC mode: Switch>


Privileged EXEC mode: Switch#

config

Global Configuration:
Switch(config)#
Other modesfor example, interface
Switch (config-if)#

12

Rev. 10.31

The V1905-8-PoE CLI switch features a CLI that is closer to those to which you were
introduced when you learned about the E Series switches. You can move from a
basic command set (normal EXEC mode) to a privileged one, using the enable
command and perhaps a password. Then with the config command, you can
access the global configuration mode and other modes.
Examining the complete structure of this CLI exceeds the scope of this course (refer to
the switch documentation). You will simply need to learn a few commands. Keep in
mind that, on this switch, you need to save configurations that you make in the CLI.
Use the command shown in the slide.

10 14

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

HP OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX CLI

HP OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX CLI


More comprehensive command set
Organized into menus (like mode contexts)

Select menu option: toplevelCommand subcommand subcommand

Select menu option: toplevelCommand


Select menu option(menu): subcommand
Select menu option(submenu): subcommand

14

Rev. 10.31

The CLI of the HP OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX also features a more


comprehensive command set. Similar to the V1900-8G CLI, you have the option of
entering a complete command, or entering one part of the command at a time in
successive menus.
Again, we will not examine the complete structure of the CLI. You can refer to the
switch documentation for this information. You can also enter ? to obtain help as you
configure the switch.

Rev. 10.31

10 15

Servicing HP Networking Products

Basic CLI Tasks

Basic CLI Tasks


Tasks
View system information
Assign IP address
Ping
Reset to factory defaults
Install software
Change console password

15

Rev. 10.31

From a console session to the CLI, you can complete several tasks, including:

Viewing system information

Assigning the switch an IP address

Pinging

Resetting to factory defaults

Installing software

Changing passwords

The following slides present the CLI commands for completing these tasks on each
type of V Series switch with a CLI.

10 16

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

View System Information

View System Information


V1910
Series

V1905-24
V1905-48
V1905-24-PoE

V1905-10GPoE

V1905-8-PoE

V1900-8G

9 FX

summary

summary

summary

show
version
show
system

IP
status

system
summary

16

Rev. 10.31

Use the commands shown in the slide to learn information about the switch, including
(but not limited to) the switchs:

IP address

Software version

Hostname

Uptime

Below is a sample output when the summary command is entered on an HP V191024G-PoE switch:
IP Method: DHCP
IP address: 10.153.96.86
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Default gateway: 0.0.0.0
Current boot app is: flash:/2900_release.bin
Next main boot app is: NULL
Next backup boot app is: NULL
3Com Corporation
3Com Baseline Switch 2928-PWR Plus Software Version 5.20 ESS 1101
3-11
Copyright (c) 2004-2009 3Com Corp. and its licensors. All rights reserved.
Rev. 10.31

10 17

Servicing HP Networking Products

3Com Baseline Switch 2928-PWR Plus uptime is 0 week, 0 day, 3 hours, 11


minutes
3Com Baseline Switch 2928-PWR Plus
128M bytes DRAM
128M bytes Nand Flash Memory
Config Register points to Nand Flash
Hardware Version is REV.B
CPLD Version is 001
Bootrom Version is 112
[SubSlot 0] 24GE+4SFP+POE Hardware Version is REV.B

10 18

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Assign a Static IP Address

Assign a Static IP Address


V1910
Series

ipsetup
address
<address>
[mask |
length]
[defaultgateway
<address>]

V1905-24
V1905-48
V1905-24PoE
1.

ipsetup
2.

manual
3.

Follow prompts.

V190510G-PoE

ipsetup
address
<address>
<mask>
[defaultgateway
<address>]

V1905-8PoE

9 FX

1.

1.

1.

interface
<VLAN ID>

ip dhcp
disable

protocol ip
basicconfig

2.

2.

ip address
<address>
<mask>

ip setup
<address>
<mask>
<defaultgateway
address>
<VLAN ID>

3.

ip defaultgateway
<address>

17

V1900-8G

OR

gettingstarted
2.

manual
3.

Follow prompts.

Rev. 10.31

You will need to assign a replacement switch an IP address when you first set it up.
You might also assign an IP address to a recovered switch. Enter the commands
shown in the slide, depending on the switch. Follow prompts is not a command,
but simply indicates that you will be presented with prompts for the IP address, mask,
and so forth and you should fill them in.
Note that these commands are for static IP addresses. For example, on the V190524, V1905-48, and V1905-24-PoE switches and the OfficeConnect Managed Switch
9 FX, you enter manual to indicate that you are entering a static address (you would
use auto to obtain an address with DHCP). Also note that on the V1900-8G switch,
you must disable DHCP before you can set a manual IP address.
Only on the V1905-8-PoE switch must you access a VLAN interface to assign the IP
address (on other switches the IP address is automatically assigned to VLAN 1).

Rev. 10.31

10 19

Servicing HP Networking Products

Test Connectivity with a Ping

Test Connectivity with a Ping

V1910
Series

V1905-24
V1905-48
V1905-24-PoE

ping
ping
<address> <address>

18

V190510G-PoE

V1905-8PoE

V1900-8G

9 FX

ping
<address>

ping
<address>

ip ping
<address>

protocol
ip ping
<address>

Rev. 10.31

After you configure the IP settings, you must test them by pinging other devices in the
LAN. The table displays the correct ping command for each switch.

10 20

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Reset to Factory Default Settings

Reset to Factory Default Settings


V1910 Series

V1905-24
V1905-48
V1905-24PoE

V1905-10GPoE

V1905-8-PoE

V1900-8G

initialize

initialize

initialize

initialize

system
restore
[keep
ip]

19

9 FX

system
control
initialize

Rev. 10.31

Sometimes a switch configuration might cause the switch to fail or other problems in
the network. If you have determined that you need to reset the switch to its factory
default settings, enter the commands shown on the slide. Note that on a V1900-8G
switch, you can use the keep ip option to reset all settings to factory defaults except
the switchs IP settings.

Rev. 10.31

10 21

Servicing HP Networking Products

Install Software

Install Software
V1910
Series
1.
upgrade
<serveraddress>
<sourcefilename>
{bootrom |
runtime}
2.
reboot

20

V1905-24
V1905-48
V1905-24-PoE
1.
upgrade
2.
Follow prompts.
3.
reboot

V1905-10GPoE
1.
upgrade
<serveraddress>
<sourcefilename>
{bootcode |
runtime}
2.
reboot

V1905-8-PoE

1.
copy tftp
file
2.
Follow prompts.
3.
boot system
opcode
<filename>

V1900-8G

9 FX

ip tftpget
<serveraddress>
<sourcefilename>

1.
system
control
software
Upgrade
2.
system
control
reboot

Rev. 10.31

A corrupt software image file can also cause a switch to fault. When a switch fails its
self test, you can attempt to reinstall the software image, which you will need to
obtain and place on a TFTP server that the switch can reach. Note that the V1910
Series and V1905-10G-PoE switches have boot code that might also need to be
updated. The release notes for the software image should indicate the correct boot
code version.

10 22

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Set the Console Password

Set the Console Password


V1910
Series

V1905-24
V1905-48
V1905-24-PoE

V190510G-PoE

V1905-8-PoE V1900-8G

9 FX

1.

1.

1.

1.

1.

1.

password

password

password

line
console

console
password

2.

2.

2.

system
management
password

2.

2.

Follow
prompts.

Follow prompts.

Follow
prompts.

login
local
3.

Follow
prompts.

2.

Follow
prompts.

password
[0 | 7]
<password>

21

Rev. 10.31

Before you finish setting up a replacement switch, you should change the console
password to protect this type of access. The table indicates the correct procedure on
each switch.

Rev. 10.31

10 23

Servicing HP Networking Products

Fail-Safe Mode
Fail-Safe Mode
Management Overview of HP V Series
CLI
Fail-Safe Mode
Access Fail-Safe Mode
Complete Troubleshooting Tasks

Web Browser Interface

22

Rev. 10.31

Fail-safe mode is a special mode that you can access on several HP V Series switch
by interrupting the boot process. In some ways, it is similar to the Boot ROM menu
on HP A Series and V1910 Series switches. This section teaches you how to access
fail-safe mode and use it for troubleshooting.

10 24

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Fail-Safe Mode Overview

Fail-Safe Mode Overview


These V Series switches support fail-safe mode:
HP V1905 Switch Series*
HP V1900-8G Switch

Access a switchs fail-safe mode to troubleshoot problems


such as:
The switch is faulting (corrupt software or other problem).
The password is lost.

*Except the V1905-10G-PoE switches


23

Rev. 10.31

The slide displays the V Series switches that support a fail-safe mode. You should
access this mode to troubleshoot problems such as:

Rev. 10.31

A switch that is unresponsive or will not boot completely. Such a switch will
exhibit one of the fault conditions that you learned how to recognize in the
previous module.
The password is lost. You can use the fail-safe mode to reset passwords.

10 25

Servicing HP Networking Products

Access Fail-Safe Mode on V1905 Series Switches

Access Fail-Safe Mode


V1905 Switch Series

2 Boot the switch

Open a console session

3 Boot ROM runs

Boot ROM
When prompted, 4
press [Ctrl+C]

FailSafe mode

24

You enter 5
Fail-safe mode

Rev. 10.31

The slide illustrates the process for accessing fail-safe mode on V1905 Series
switches:
1.

Open a console session with the switch.

2.

Reboot the switch.

3.

The boot ROM runs.

4.

When the boot ROM finishes loading and gets ready to boot the system
software, you will see a prompt to press [Ctrl+C]. You have five seconds to
do so.
Note
When a switch cannot boot completely (you would see a Yellow Power LED), it
will stay at fail-safe mode.

5.

10 26

You enter fail-safe mode and are presented with several options.

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Use Fail-Safe Mode: V1905 Series Switches

Use Fail-Safe Mode


V1905 Switch Series

Initialize
Password
Reboot*
Upgrade

Reset to factory default settings when


the current configuration is faulty
Reset all passwords to default
(username = admin; password empty)
Install new image when the current is
corrupted

*Not an option on V1905-8-PoE switch


25

Rev. 10.31

The slide displays four options.


Use Initialize to reset the switch to its factory default settings. Use Upgrade to install a
new software image on the switch. You might select one of these options when the
switch is experiencing a fault condition in an attempt to return the switch to known
good settings and software.
Use Password when you have been locked out of a management interface. This
command resets all passwords that are stored locally on the switch. You can then log
in to the CLI or to the Web browser interface using the admin username (and no
password).
On the V1905-24, V1905-48, and V1905-24-PoE switches, you can reboot the switch
directly from fail-safe mode.

Rev. 10.31

10 27

Servicing HP Networking Products

Access Fail-Safe Mode: V1900-8G Switches

Access Fail-Safe Mode


V1900-8G Switch

2 Boot the switch

1 Open a console session


3 Boot ROM runs

Booting image 0

Boot ROM
Press [Ctrl+Shift+ -] 4

Booting image 0
Entering safe mode
SRAM testing: Passed
S/W Version: V1.0.0
H/W Version: R01
serial number0001
Default IP address:
169.254.0.1
**Bootup finish**
Entered safe mode
26

You enter 5
Fail-safe mode

Rev. 10.31

The process for accessing fail-safe mode on V1900-8G switches is quite similar to the
process for the other switches. Note, however, that you will not be prompted to press
the keys that take you into fail-safe mode. Instead, watch carefully for this message:
Booting image 0

Press [Ctrl+Shift+ -]. You will see the messages shown in the slide, indicating that you
have entered safe mode.

10 28

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Use Fail-Safe Mode: V1900-8G Switches

Use Fail-Safe Mode


V1900-8G Switch

Reset to factory default settings:


>system restore default
*** Restoring to default configuration...
*** Restored to default configuration...
*** Activating new configuration...
>exit

27

Rev. 10.31

Use the system restore default command to reset the switch to factory default
settings. After the prompt returns, enter exit, and the switch will continue the boot
process.

Rev. 10.31

10 29

Servicing HP Networking Products

Web Browser Interface


Web Browser Interface
Management Overview of HP V Series
CLI
Fail-Safe Mode
Web Browser Interface
Access the Interface
Complete Basic Tasks

28

Rev. 10.31

You will now be introduced to the Web browser interfaces of HP V Series switches.
This interface is particularly important for these switches as it is the only management
interface for the HP V1700 and V1810G Series switches and the main interface for
most smart-managed switches.
You will learn how to access the interface with guidelines for discovering a switchs IP
address when you do not know it. You will be introduced to the windows in which
you complete the same basic tasks that you just learned about completing in the CLI.
The intent of this section is for you to become familiar with the process of Web
management; an illustration of every window on every switchs Web browser
interface will not be provided.

10 30

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Access the Web Browser Interface

Access the Web Browser Interface


1. If you know the IP address, enter it as the URL.

10.1.1.9the switchs IP address

2. Log in as a user with the appropriate privilege level.

29

Rev. 10.31

You access a V Series switchs Web browser interface in the same way that you
would any other HP switchs. You do need to know the IP address, but the HP V
Series switches are configured with default IP addresses, meaning that you can often
access the Web browser interface when you first install the switch. Of course, your
management station and the switch must have connectivity.
After you navigate to the switchs IP address in your Web browser (use HTTP), you
will be prompted to login. You learned about the various privilege levels earlier in
this module. Be sure to obtain the correct credentials for the tasks that you must
perform.
If you are setting up a new switch, the default credentials are:

HP V1910 Series, V1905 Series, V1900-8, and OfficeConnect Managed Switch


9 FX switches:

Username = admin

Password = [empty]

HP V1700 Series and V1810G Series switches:

Password = [empty]

For a V1910 Series switch, you must also input the verify code shown in the Login
window.

Rev. 10.31

10 31

Servicing HP Networking Products

Obtain an Unknown IP Address

Obtain an Unknown IP Address


1. Try the default IP address.
2. V1900, V1905, V1910 Switch
Series and HP OfficeConnect
Managed Switch 9 FX:
Use the 3Com Switch Detect Application.
Access the CLI on the console port (when

available).

V1810G and V1700 Switch Series:


Execute a hardware reset to factory

default settings.

30

Rev. 10.31

If you do not know the IP address, you will need to obtain it before you can access
the device. For a replacement switch, at factory default settings, you can access the
switch at its default address (the next slide shows what these are for each switch).
For a V1910 Series, V1905 Series, V1900-8, or OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9
FX switch that is not operating at factory defaults, you can use the 3Com Switch
Detect Application to discover the device IP address. (See Module 4: Basic
Configuration of HP A Series Switches for more information.) You can also access the
CLI and view the IP address as you learned how to do in the previous section.
The HP V1810G and V1700 Series switches do not support a CLI. Therefore, when
you cannot discover the IP address of one of these switches, you must reset the switch
to factory default settings using the procedure demonstrated in Module 9: HP V
Series Switch Hardware.

10 32

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Default V Series Switch IP Addresses

Default V Series Switch IP Addresses


V1900 and V1905 Switch Series:
DHCP first

HP V1810G and V1700 Switch


Series: 192.168.2.10 /24

No DHCP, switch default

Label on right of rear panel, top


cover, or underside
*Note: The 9 FX does not have a default IP address
31

Rev. 10.31

By default, V1910 Series, V1905 Series, V1900-8, and OfficeConnect Managed


Switch 9 FX switches receive DHCP addresses if DHCP services are enabled for the
VLAN on which they are installed. If you have access to the DHCP server, you can
look on it for new switches IP addresses. Otherwise, you might need to use the
3Com Switch Detect Application.
If the switch cannot receive an IP address, it takes a default address. Each switch has
its own default address in the 169.254.0.0/16 subnet. You can find the unique IP
address on the switchs label, which is on the right of the rear panel, the top cover,
or the underside of the switch, depending on the model.
Note
The OfficeConnect Managed Switch 9 FX does not have a default IP address.
Before you can access the Web browser interface, you must connect to the
device on its console port and assign it an IP address using the CLI.

The default IP address of an HP V1810G and V1700 Series switch is


192.168.2.10/24.
To connect to a switch using its default address, you should generally connect your
management station directly to an Ethernet port on the switch. You must configure
your management station with an IP address on the same subnet.

Rev. 10.31

10 33

Servicing HP Networking Products

View System Information

View System Information

1.
2.
32

Click System > Information to view switch information.


Click System > Name to record the switchs name and administrative
information.

Rev. 10.31

You will now be guided through the process of completing basic management tasks
on an HP V1700 Series switch. Using the Web browser interface to manage other
smart-managed HP V Series switches is a similar process although the location of
particular windows and names of particular settings vary on different types of
switches.
To view system information on an HP V1700 Series switch, click System and the
Information. You can then see the switchs name, its hardware and software version,
and its IP address among other information. To change the switchs name and other
administration, you would click Name under System.

10 34

Task

V1910 Series

V1905 Series

V1900-8G Switch

View system
information

Summary >
System Information
Device Information

Device Summary >


Device View

Status

Task

OfficeConnect
Managed Switch
9 FX

V1810G Series

V1700 Series

View system
information

Physical Interface >


Ethernet > Port
Setup Summary

Status > System


Description

System > Information

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Reset to Factory Default Settings

Reset to Factory Default Settings


Diagnostics > Factory Defaults

33

Rev. 10.31

Resetting a switch to factory default settings is not a typical part of a switchs initial
setup. However, you might need to do so when the switch has a configuration that is
causing problems.
The slide shows an example of a window for resetting the configurationthe
Diagnostics > Factory Defaults window on an HP V1700 Series switch. Note that on
this switch, you can keep the current IP address if you want. This allows you to revert
to the factory default setting but still manage the switch on its current address. Some
of the other switches also support this option, so look for it before you reset.

Rev. 10.31

Task

V1910 Series

V1905 Series

V1900-8G Switch

Reset to
factory
defaults

Device >
Configuration >
Initialize

Administration >
Reset

System > Tools

Task

OfficeConnect
Managed Switch
9 FX

V1810G Series

V1700 Series

Reset to
factory
defaults

System > Control >


Initialize

Diagnostics >
Factory Defaults

Diagnostics > Factory


Defaults

10 35

Servicing HP Networking Products

Save Current Configurations

Save Current Configurations


Some V Series switches require changes to be saved to the startup-config:
V1910 Switch Series
V1905-10G-PoE and V1905-8-PoE switches
V1810G Switch Series
V1910s

34

Rev. 10.31

Some HP V Series switches immediately save changes to the startup-config when you
apply them to the running-config. Others require you to save the changes manually. It
is important to remember which switches these are so that you do not lose your
configurations. The table shows which switches these are, and the window in which
you save the current configuration.

10 36

Task

V1910 Series

V1905-10G-PoE
Switch

V1905-8-PoE
Switch

V1810G Series

Save
configurations

Configuration >
Save

Save Configuration
(at the top of the
navigation bar)

Save Configuration
(at the top of the
navigation bar)

Maintenance >
Save
Configuration

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Set the IP Address

Set the IP Address

1. Click System > IP Address to configure the switchs IP address and


password.
2. Click System > Rate Limits to determine rate limits for broadcasts and
multicasts.

35

Rev. 10.31

If you have accessed a new switch at its default IP address, you must now set the
switchs permanent IP address. Here you see the window for IP settings on an HP
V1700 Series switch, which is accessed at System > IP Address. Set the switchs IP
address and subnet mask. Also remember to set the default gateway address.
Many of the HP V Series switches support multiple VLANs. When you configure IP
settings, make sure that the VLAN ID is set correctly. For example, a customers LAN
might use VLAN 2 and subnet 10.1.2.0/24 for infrastructure devices IP addresses.
You would need to select the correct VLAN ID when you configure the address on the
10.1.2.0/24 subnet.
After you set the switch to its permanent IP address, you will lose your management
session. Reconfigure your management station to use an IP address on the same
subnet and access the Web browser interface again.
At this point, you can also reestablish on the new switch the connections that used to
be supported by the switch that failed.

Rev. 10.31

10 37

Servicing HP Networking Products

The tables display the location for the simplest setup for a management IP address;
some of the switches support multiple IP addresses and other ways to define them.

10 38

Task

V1910 Series

V1905 Series

V1900-8G Switch

Set an IP
address

Wizard >
IP Setup

Administration >
IP Setup

System > LAN Settings

Task

OfficeConnect
Managed Switch
9 FX

V1810G Series

V1700 Series

Set an IP
address

System > Getting


Started

Network > Get


Connected

System > IP Address

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Test Connectivity

Test Connectivity
Diagnostics > Ping Test

36

Rev. 10.31

After you configure the IP settings, you should verify that they are correct by testing
connectivity. For example, on an HP V1700 Series switch, click Diagnostics > Ping
Test. Then type in the IP address that you want to ping and click Apply.
Although all of the smart-managed HP V Series switches support pings, several only
do so from the CLI, as indicated by Not applicable in the table.

Rev. 10.31

Task

V1910 Series

V1905 Series

V1900-8G Switch

Initiate a
ping

Network >
Diagnostic tools >
Ping

Not applicable

Not applicable

Task

OfficeConnect
Managed Switch
9 FX

V1810G Series

V1700 Series

Initiate a
ping

Diagnostics > Ping


Test

Network > Get


Connected

Diagnostics > Ping Test

10 39

Servicing HP Networking Products

Restore and Backup Configurations

Restore and Backup Configurations


3 Download = Backup
Upload = Restore
4
1

1. Click Support from the left menu column.


2. Click Configuration File.
3. Select Upload to restore a configuration.
4. Click Browse to select the configuration file on your management station.
5. Click Apply.
37

Rev. 10.31

If the customer has backed up the switchs configuration, then you can now load it on
the replacement switch. In the Web browser interface of some of the HP V Series
switches, this process is called restoring the configuration. In other interfaces, it is
called uploading a configuration, or copying a configuration to the startup-config.
On an HP V1700 Series switch, click Support > Configuration File. Then select
Upload to restore a configuration. The configuration file should be saved on your
management station, click Browse to navigate to it. When you click Apply, the
configuration is copied to the switch.
Whenever you configure a customers switch, you should back up the configuration
in case the customer needs to restore it later. You might also back up the
configuration of a failed switch to load it on a new switch.
On the HP V1700, you can back up the current configuration from the Support >
Configuration File window. Simply select Download instead of Upload and follow a
similar process to restoring the configuration. On other switches, you might need to
access a different window to backup the configuration. You might also have the
option to backup and restore from either the local management station (using HTTP)
or from a TFTP server.

10 40

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Task

V1910 Series

V1905 Series

V1900-8G Switch

Restore a
configuration

Device >
Configuration >
Restore

Administration >
Backup & Restore >
Restore or Restore
Configuration

System > Tools

Backup a
configuration

Device >
Configuration >
Backup

Administration >
Backup & Restore >
Backup or Backup
Configuration

System > Tools

Task

OfficeConnect
Managed Switch
9 FX

V1810G Series

V1700 Series

Restore a
configuration

System > Backup


Configuration >
Restore
System > Backup
Configuration >
Save

Maintenance >
Update Manager

Support >
Configuration File

Maintenance >
Backup Manager

Support >
Configuration File

Backup a
configuration

Rev. 10.31

10 41

Servicing HP Networking Products

Set a Password

Set a Password
HP V1700sSystem > Password
HP V1910s
Authentication > Users > Add Local User
1
1

1. Password and username

2
3

2. Methods of access
3. Privilege level

38

Rev. 10.31

The customer might want you to set or change the password to the Web browser
interface in order to protect the switch (or the customer might prefer to do so him or
herself).
On the left, the slide displays the System > Password window an HP V1700 Series
switch. This switch and the HP V1810G Series switch do not specify a username for
the manager, so you only need to configure the password.
On HP V Series switches that support multiple management users, you should modify
the default admin user to change the default password. You can also set up a new
user. In the latter case, you might also need to indicate the ways that the user can
manage the device, whether with Telnet (which also permits Web access), with SSH,
and so forth. (Remember, for these switches, the console password is separate; you
set that password in the CLI). The figure on the right illustrates the window for
creating a user on a V1910 series switch.

10 42

Task

V1910 Series

V1905 Series

V1900-8G

Set a
password for
management
access

Authentication >
Users

Administration >
System Access >
Setup and Modify
tabs

System > Password

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Rev. 10.31

Task

OfficeConnect
Managed Switch
9 FX

V1810G Series

V1700 Series

Set a
password for
management
access

Security > Device >


User > Create and
Modify tabs

Maintenance >
Password Manager

System > Password

10 43

Servicing HP Networking Products

Update Software

Update Software

1
2
4
1. Click Support from the left menu column.
2. Click Update Software.
3. Click Browse and select the appropriate file.
4. Click Apply.
39

Rev. 10.31

You might need to update a switchs software. First obtain the software. Then save
the file to your management station. (On some switches, you can alternatively upload
the software file from an FTP or TFTP server on your station or another device).
Note
For some switches, you might need to obtain a boot ROM image as well; the
software release notes should indicate whether this is the case. Typically, you
install the boot ROM through the CLI.

The slide displays the process for an HP V1700 Series switch:

10 44

1.

Click Support from the left menu column.

2.

Click Update Software.

3.

Click Browse and select the appropriate file.

4.

Click Apply.

Rev. 10.31

Basic Configuration of HP V Series Switches

Rev. 10.31

Task

V1910 Series

V1905-24
V1905-48
V1905-24-PoE

V1905-10G-PoE
and V1905-8PoE Switches

V1900-8G
Switch

Install
software

Device > Device


Maintenance >
Software Upgrade

Administration >
Firmware Upgrade

Administration >
Firmware Upgrade
> Restore Image
*You must also set
the new image as
the active image in
Administration >
Firmware Upgrade
> Active Image

System > Tools

Task

OfficeConnect
Managed Switch
9 FX

V1810G Series

V1700 Series

Install
software

System > Control >


Software Upgrade

Maintenance >
Update Manager
*Update type is
Code
*You can choose
whether to update
the active or backup
software. To later
change which
software image is
active, select
Maintenance > Dual
Image Configuration

Support > Update


Software

10 45

Servicing HP Networking Products

Summary
Summary
V Series management options
CLI management
Troubleshooting with fail-safe mode
Web browser interface management

40

Rev. 10.31

You have learned the basics of managing V Series switches. You can access the
switches that have CLIs on their console port or over Telnet or SSH. You can access
all of the V Series switches Web browser interfacesand you know how to find the
IP address at which to access the switch. You can complete basic management tasks
in both interfaces. You have also learned how to access fail-safe mode on several HP
V Series switches, and use the commands to reset a forgotten password, install good
software, or reset to factory default settings.

10 46

Rev. 10.31

To learn more about HP Networking, visit


www.hp.com/go/procurve
2010 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is
subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth
in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein
should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical
or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.