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MY RESOURCE PACKAGE

CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM

www.newcomersuccess.ca

JUNE 2014

CONTENTS
Map Of Canada .......................................................................................................................... 1
My CIIP Online Resource Worksheet:......................................................................................... 2
What Factors Influence Your Destination Choice? .................................................................... 18
What Do You Know About Canada? ......................................................................................... 19
What Factors Influence Your Occupation Choice? .................................................................... 21
My Readiness for a Job ............................................................................................................ 22
My Essential Skills .................................................................................................................... 23
Communication Skill Exercise Option 1 .................................................................................... 24
Communication Skill Exercise Option 2 .................................................................................... 25
Settlement Document Checklist ................................................................................................ 26
Leveraging Social Media for Networking and Job Search ......................................................... 27
My Skills Inventory .................................................................................................................... 28
Cover Letter .............................................................................................................................. 29
Types of Resumes .................................................................................................................... 30
Chronological Resume Example ............................................................................................... 31
Functional Resume Example ................................................................................................... 33
Combination Resume Example................................................................................................. 34
Interviews ................................................................................................................................. 35
One-Minute Commercial Exercise ............................................................................................ 36
Interview Tips ........................................................................................................................... 37
My Cultural Adapatation............................................................................................................ 38
Canadian Workplace Norms and Soft Skills .............................................................................. 40
GO Key Actions ........................................................................................................................ 42
My Action Slides ....................................................................................................................... 43
Start Preparing Ahead .............................................................................................................. 45
The Job Hunt ............................................................................................................................ 46
Networking Leads to Job Success ............................................................................................ 47
Soft Skills are highly Valued in Canada .................................................................................... 48
My Path After CIIP .................................................................................................................... 49

MAP OF CANADA

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_and_territories_of_Canada

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CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

MY ONLINE RESOURCES WORKSHEET


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Sources of Information and Support

My Job Prospects

National Perspective

Pan Canadian
Federal Government:
www.canada.gc.ca

Citizenship and Immigration:


www.cic.gc.ca

Service Canada:
www.servicecanada.gc.ca

Welcome to Canada What You Should Know:


www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/publications/welcome/index.asp

Get to Know Canada:


www.cic.gc.ca/english/newcomers/before-canada.asp

Provinces and Territories:


www.cic.gc.ca/english/newcomers/pt/index.asp

Canada at a Glance 2013:


www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/12-581-x/12-581-x2013000-eng.htm

Building Futures in Canada:


www.buildingfuturesincanada.ca

Population Statistics (Census 2011):


www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/dp-pd/hlt-fst/pd-pl/TableTableau.cfm?LANG=Eng&T=101&S=50&O=A

Permanent and Temporary Residents (2012):


www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/statistics/facts2012/permanent/02.asp

Immigration and Ethnocultural Diversity in Canada:


www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/as-sa/99-010-x/99-010-x2011001-eng.cfm

Labour force Characteristics, Seasonally Adjusted, By Province:


www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/lfss01c-eng.htm

Average Wages by Province:


www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/labr69k-eng.htm

Canadian Trade Commission Service Information about Canadian Economy and Industries:
http://www.tradecommissioner.gc.ca/eng/home.jsp

Tables by Province of Average Household Expenditures:


www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/z01/cs0003-eng.htm

Proof of Funds (Federal Skilled Workers):


www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/skilled/funds.asp

Labour Market Trends: www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/lmi/publications/index.shtml

Newfoundland and Labrador

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Provincial Government:
www.gov.nl.ca

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Sources of Information and Support

Immigration Portal:
www.nlimmigration.ca/

Labrador Towns Listed by Name:


www.ourlabrador.ca/member.php?show=communities&sortby=name

Association of New Canadians Newcomers Guide to Services and Resources:


www.ancnl.ca/?Content=Publications__Resources

Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism:


www.newfoundlandlabrador.com/

Newfoundland and Labrador Economic Indicators:


www.economics.gov.nl.ca/ and www.stats.gov.nl.ca/

Prince Edward Island


Provincial Government:
www.gov.pe.ca/

Immigration Portal:
www.opportunitiespei.ca/#2

Place Finder - Cities and Towns:


www.gov.pe.ca/placefinder/index.php3

Newcomers Guide:
www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/popsec_welcom_e.pdf

Island Life:
www.gov.pe.ca/islandlife/

Tourism PEI:
www.tourismpei.com/index.php3

Summary of Selected Economic Indicators:


www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/pt_summary_sele.pdf

Nova Scotia
Provincial Government:
www.gov.ns.ca

Immigration Portal:
novascotiaimmigration.ca/immigrants/

Nova Scotia Start:


www.novascotiastart.ca

Nova Scotia Cities and Towns:


www.novascotia.com/en/home/discovernovascotia/citiesandtowns/default.aspx

Newcomers Guide to Halifax Municipality:


www.halifax.ca/newcomers/

Living in Nova Scotia:


www.immigratetoruralnovascotia.ca/default.asp?mn=1.19.173

Living in Rural Nova Scotia:


www.immigratetoruralnovascotia.ca/default.asp?mn=1.19.173

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Sources of Information and Support

Travel to Nova Scotia:


www.novascotia.com/en/home/default.aspx

Nova Scotia Economics and Statistics:


www.gov.ns.ca/finance/statistics/agency/default.asp

New Brunswick
Provincial Government:
www.gov.nb.ca

Immigration Portal:
www.gnb.ca/Immigration

New Brunswick Cities, Towns and Villages:


www.tourismnewbrunswick.ca/See/CitiesTownsVillages.aspx

Newcomers Guide:
http://www.welcomenb.ca/content/wel-bien/en/immigrating_and_settling/publications.html

Travel New Brunswick:


www.tourismnewbrunswick.ca

New Brunswick Economic Indicators:


www.gnb.ca/0160/economics/monthlyeconomicindicatorse.pdf

Nunavut
Nunavut Territory Government:
www.gov.nu.ca

Nunavut Tourism:
http://www.nunavuttourism.com

Qubec

Provincial Government:
http://www.gouv.qc.ca/portail/quebec/pgs/commun/?lang=en

Immigration Portal:
www.immigration-quebec.gouv.qc.ca/en/index.html

Ontario
Provincial Government:
www.gov.on.ca

Immigration Portal:
www.ontarioimmigration.ca

Ontario Cities and Towns:


www.ontarioimmigration.ca/en/living/OI_HOW_LIVE_CITIES.html

Orientation to Ontario:
www.orientationontario.ca/

Welcome to Ontario:
www.citizenship.gov.on.ca/english/publications/docs/welcometoontario/Welcome-toOntario.eng.pdf

Settlement.Org Welcome to Ontario:

CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

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Sources of Information and Support


www.settlement.org
Ontario Tourism:
www.ontariotourism.com

Ontario Economic Indicators:


www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/

Northwest Territories

Territory Government:
www.gov.nt.ca

Northwest Territories Tourism Information:


www.gov.nt.ca/research/tourism/

Manitoba

Provincial Government:
www.gov.mb.ca/

Immigration Portal:
www.immigratemanitoba.com

Neighbourhoods Of Winnipeg:
now.winnipeg.ca

Living in Manitoba Resource Guide:


www.gov.mb.ca/msw/publications/immigrant_guide.pdf

Manitoba Economic Indicators:


www.gov.mb.ca/tce/lmi/indicators.html

Quick Facts: Overview of Manitoba:


http://www.gov.mb.ca/trade/export/qfacts/

Travel Manitoba:
www.travelmanitoba.com

Saskatchewan

Provincial Government:
www.gov.sk.ca/

Immigration Portal:
www.saskimmigrationcanada.ca

Cities and Towns:


www.saskimmigrationcanada.ca/cities

Welcome to Saskatoon Guide:


krsp.wordpress.com/

Saskatchewan Communities:
www.saskbiz.ca/communityprofiles/SELECT_a_Region.asp

Saskatchewan Economy:
www.enterprisesaskatchewan.ca/economy

Alberta

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Sources of Information and Support

Provincial Government:
www.gov.ab.ca

Immigration Portal:
www.albertacanada.com/immigration

Urban Communities:
www.albertacanada.com/immigration/choosing/province-urban-communities.aspx

Rural Communities:
www.albertacanada.com/apps/map/

Welcome to Alberta Information for Newcomers:


alis.alberta.ca/ep/careershop/showproduct.html?DisplayCode=PRODUCT&EntityKey=3532

Edmonton Newcomers Guide:


www.edmonton.ca/for_residents/programs/newcomers-guide.aspx

Alberta Economic Indicators:


www.finance.alberta.ca/aboutalberta/

Alberta Tourism, Parks and Recreation:


www.tpr.alberta.ca

Yukon

Territory Government:
www.gov.yk.ca

Immigration Portal:
www.immigration.gov.yk.ca

Yukon Communities:
http://travelyukon.com/About/Yukon-Communities

Yukon Newcomers Guide:


www.afy.yk.ca/secteurs/documents/en/d61-newcomers-guide-2008.pdf

Travel Yukon:
http://travelyukon.com/

British Columbia

Provincial Government:
www2.gov.bc.ca/

Immigration Portal:
www.welcomebc.ca

The Regions of B.C.:


www.welcomebc.ca/Live/about-bc/regions.aspx

British Columbia Newcomers Guide:


www.welcomebc.ca/newcomers_guide/newcomerguide.aspx

Travel British Columbia:


www.travel.bc.ca

Vancouver Newcomers Guide:


http://vancouver.ca/green-vancouver/moving-to-vancouver.aspx

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Sources of Information and Support

Career Planning

Pan Canadian
An Essential Workbook for Newcomers:
www.cic.gc.ca/english/pdf/pub/workbook-national.pdf

Job Bank: www.jobbank.gc.ca/home-eng.do?lang=eng

Working in New Brunswick, Canada Tool:


www.workingincanada.gc.ca/newbrunswick-nouveaubrunswick/welcome-eng.do?lang=eng

Working in Alberta Tool:


www.albertacanada.com/immigration/working/jobs-in-alberta.aspx?icn=rightnav&ici=resources_job-seekers

Work BC: (when log in box appears press cancel and website will take you to the page)
www.workbc.ca/Pages/Home.aspx

Occupational Fact Sheets:


www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/publications/index.asp#credential

National Occupation Classification: www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/lmi/noc/index.shtml

Information and Communications Technology Council:


www.ictc-ctic.ca

Career Cruising:
www.careercruising.com

My Job Readiness

Skills

Pan-Canadian
Colleges and Institutes Canada: www.collegesinstitutes.ca/

Association of University and Colleges of Canada:


www.aucc.ca/

Education in Canada:
www.cicic.ca/382/education-in-canada.canada

Discover Tourism Is Tourism Right for Me


Quiz (free assessment to determine your transferable skills
:discovertourism.ca/en/interactive_zone/take_tourism_career_quiz/is_tourism_for_me#.UmV6gRbv
yCc

Discover Tourism Thinking about Management Quiz (free assessment of your management
skills):
discovertourism.ca/en/interactive_zone/take_tourism_career_quiz/thinking_about_management#.U
mV62BbvyCc

Get working in IT/ICT:


www.newcomersictcareers.ca

Newfoundland and Labrador

Association for New Canadians Bridge-to-Work Program:


www.ancnl.ca/?Content=Employment_Services/Bridge-to-Work

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Sources of Information and Support


Prince Edward Island
Internationally Educated Health Professionals Program:
www.peianc.com/content/lang/en/page/employment_iehp

Nova Scotia
ISIS Work Placement Program:
www.isisns.ca/employment/for-immigrants/work-placement-program/

Halifax Connector Program:


www.greaterhalifax.com/en/home/ourprograms/connectorprogram/default.aspx

New Brunswick
New Brunswick Bridging Program for Internationally Educated Medical Laboratory Technologists
(IEMLTs): http://bridging.nbsmlt.nb.ca/index.html

Ontario
Ontario Work in Your Profession Bridge Programs:
www.ontarioimmigration.ca/en/working/OI_BRIDGE.html

Manitoba
Manitoba Job Preparation Toolkit: www.gov.mb.ca/tce/jobseek/jobprep.html

Saskatchewan
Your Occupation in Saskatchewan:
www.saskimmigrationcanada.ca/your-occupation-in-saskatchewan/

Alberta
Immigrant Bridging Programs:
http://humanservices.alberta.ca/documents/Calgary-etcs-immigrant-bridging-excerpt.pdf

British Columbia
Skills Connect for Immigrants:
www.welcomebc.ca/skillsconnect

Credential Recognition

Pan Canadian
Getting your credentials assessed:
www.cic.gc.ca/english/newcomers/credentials/index.asp

Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials: www.cicic.ca

Alliance of Credential Evaluation Services: www.canalliance.org

World Education Services (WES) Ontario and Atlantic provinces: www.wes.org/ca/

WES Credential Services - Free preliminary credential assessment:


www.wes.org/ca/evaluations/preliminary.asp

WES International Credential Advantage Package - Electronic document storage:


www.wes.org/students/icap.asp

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Sources of Information and Support


Pan Canadian
Canadian Network of National Associations of Regulators: www.cnnar.ca

Red Seal Trades: www.red-seal.ca

Self Assessment Readiness Tools (SART) - For Internationally Educated Healthcare Professionals:
www.atlanticcanadahealthcare.com/default.asp?mn=1.20.326

Canadian Architectural Certification Board Broadly Experienced Foreign Architects Program:


www.cacb-ccca.ca/index.cfm?Voir=sections&Id=16731&M=3943&Repertoire_No=660386109

Canadian Technology Immigrant Network (CTIN): ctin.ca/

Roadmap to Engineering in Canada:


www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0tpa-UUwlU and newcomers.engineerscanada.ca/

Canadian Resident Matching Program: www.carms.ca

Internationally Educated Medical Radiation Technologists: www.camrt.ca/certification/international/

Licensure

Newfoundland and Labrador


Getting Your Credentials Assessed:
http://www.nlimmigration.ca/en/work/getting-your-credentials-recognized.aspx

Atlantic Connection for Internationally Educated Health Professionals:


www.atlanticcanadahealthcare.com

Practice NL for Physicians and Allied Health Professionals:


www.practicenl.ca

Prince Edward Island


Qualifications Recognition:
www.peianc.com/content/lang/en/page/guide_employment_qualifications

Atlantic Connection for Internationally Educated Health Professionals:


www.atlanticcanadahealthcare.com

Nova Scotia
Working in Your Field Pathways to Licensure & Profession-Specific Programs:
www.isisns.ca/employment/for-immigrants/professionals/

Atlantic Connection for Internationally Educated Health Professionals:


www.atlanticcanadahealthcare.com

New Brunswick
Foreign Qualification Recognition and Regulated Occupations in New Brunswick:
www.welcomenb.ca/content/welbien/en/immigrating_and_settling/working/foreign_qualification_recognition.html
Atlantic Connection for Internationally Educated Health Professionals:
www.atlanticcanadahealthcare.com

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Sources of Information and Support


Ontario
Global Experience Ontario:
www.ontarioimmigration.ca/en/geo/index.htm

Health Force Ontario:


www.healthforceontario.ca/en/Home

Ontario Regulators for Access Consortium (ORAC) Orientation to Regulated Professions in


Ontario: www.regulatorsforaccess.ca/online_orientation/

Ontario Career Maps:


www.ontarioimmigration.ca/en/working/OI_HOW_WORK_CAREER_MAPS.html

Northwest Territories
Getting Your Credentials Recognized:
http://immigratenwt.ca/en/working-northwest-territories/getting-your-credentials-recognized

Manitoba
Regulated Professions: www.manitobafairnesscommissioner.ca/for-internationally-educatedprofessionals/ and www.manitobafairnesscommissioner.ca/regulators-2/

Winnipeg Regional Health Professional Licensing Information:


www.winnipeghealthregion.ca/careers/resources/international_licensing.html

Medical Licensure Program for International Medicate Graduates:


www.gov.mb.ca/health/mlpimg/ and
umanitoba.ca/faculties/medicine/education/imgp/ and www.cpsm.mb.ca

Information for Skilled Trades: www.gov.mb.ca/tce/apprent/mb_trades/

Saskatchewan
Regulated Occupations and Trades in Saskatchewan:
www.saskimmigrationcanada.ca/is-my-occupation-regulated/

A Guide for Researching the Licensing Process:


www.saskimmigrationcanada.ca/guide_researching_licensing_process/

Internationally Educated Health Professionals in Saskatchewan:


www.saskimmigrationcanada.ca/iehp-information

Family Physician - International Medical Graduate (IMG):


www.saskdocs.ca/work/family-physician---international-medical-graduate-img/

Alberta
International Medical Graduate Program:
www.cpsa.ab.ca/services/Registration_Department/IMGs.aspx and www.aimg.ca/ and
www.med.ualberta.ca/programs/residency/postgraduateprograms/aimg
Alberta International Medical Graduates Association:
http://aimga.ca/

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Sources of Information and Support


Yukon
Professional Licensing:
http://www.community.gov.yk.ca/consumer/pl.html

British Columbia
Regulated Occupations in B.C.:
www.jtst.gov.bc.ca/labourmobility/docs/AIT_OccupationsRegulators.pdf

B.C. Work Futures:


www.workbc.ca/Careers/Pages/Careers.aspx

Canadian Medical Residency:


imgbc.med.ubc.ca

Pan Canadian

Centre for Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB):


www.language.ca

Assess Your Canadian English Online:


www.clb-osa.ca

Language Instruction for Newcomers (LINC) Program:


www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/goc/linc.shtml

Newfoundland and Labrador


Newfoundland and Labrador English as a Second Language:
www.nlimmigration.ca/en/study/english-as-a-second-language.aspx

AXIS Career Services Occupation - Specific Language Training:


www.axiscareers.net/services/oslt/

Language

Prince Edward Island


Opportunities PEI Learning Language:
www.opportunitiespeo.ca/living-language

English Language Training:


www.peianc.com/content/lang/en/page/guide_education_esl

PEI Association for Newcomers English Language Training for Newcomers:


www.peianc.com/content/lang/en/page/language_linc

Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia Language Training:
http://novascotiaimmigration.com/live-here/language-training/

ISIS English for Work and Business:


www.isisns.ca/english/english-for-work/

New Brunswick

NB Employment Language Training (NBELT):


http://nb-mc.ca/index.php/english/nb-employment-language-training-nbelt

Learn English or French:


www.welcomenb.ca/content/wel-bien/en/immigrating_and_settling/settling/language_classes.html

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Sources of Information and Support


Ontario
Occupation-specific Language Training for Newcomers:
www.co-oslt.org/en/

Learn English or French:


www.citizenship.gov.on.ca/english/keyinitiatives/language.shtml

Improve your English with CBC:


http://www.cbc.ca/ottawa/esl/

Canadian Workplace Communication for Internationally Trained Individuals:


www.jvstoronto.org/index.php?page=canadian-workplace-communication-for-internationallytrained-individuals

Manitoba
English Language Classes in Winnipeg: www.welarc.net/eal-classes-in-winnipeg/index.html

Occupation-specific Language Training - Red River College:


http://me.rrc.mb.ca/Catalogue/Programs.aspx?DeliveryCode=F

English Online:
http://www.myenglishonline.ca/for-learners/

Improve your English with CBC On-line:


www.cbc.ca/manitoba/eal/

Saskatchewan

Learning English:
www.saskimmigrationcanada.ca/enhanced-language-training and
www.saskimmigrationcanada.ca/learning-english

Alberta
Improving Your English:
albertacanada.com/immigration/living/education-improving-english.aspx and
www.norquest.ca/programs/Programs_Descriptions/English_Language_Training.htm and
bowvalleycollege.ca/programs-and-courses/esl.html

Learning English with CBC Edmonton/Calgary:


www.cbc.ca/edmonton/learning-english/ and
www.cbc.ca/calgary/learning-english/

Yukon

Learning English:
www.immigration.gov.yk.ca/learning_english.aspx

British Columbia
Study English as a Second Language in BC:
www.welcomebc.ca/Immigrate/study-in-bc/study-english.aspx and
www.vcc.ca/programs-courses/college-programs-area.cfm?DIV_ID=5

Pan Canadian

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Sources of Information and Support

How Do I Get Canadian Work Experience: www.jobbank.gc.ca/content_pieces-eng.do?cid=221

Volunteering:
www.volunteer.ca/
www.boardmatch.org

www.getvolunteering.ca
www.charityvillage.ca

Canadian Newcomer Magazine Top 10 Ways to Get Canadian Experience article:


www.cnmag.ca/issue-2/730-jobs-top-10-ways-to-get-canadian-experience-n00

Career Bridge Paid Internship Program:


www.careeredge.ca/en/job-seekers/career-bridge

Canada Infonet Mentoring:


www.canadainfonet.org/

Professional Immigrant Networks:


www.networksforimmigrants.ca

Hire Immigrants:
www.hireimmigrants.ca

Newfoundland and Labrador

Canadian Experience

AXIS Career Services Mentoring Link: www.axiscareers.net/services/mentoring/

Prince Edward Island


PEI Connectors Program: www.charlottetownchamber.com/pei-connectors/peiconnectors/

Nova Scotia
Professional Mentorship: www.isisns.ca/employment/for-immigrants/professional-mentors/

New Brunswick
Business Immigrant Mentorship Programs:
www.welcomenb.ca/content/welbien/en/immigrating_and_settling/business/business_supportprograms.html

Ontario
Mentoring Programs:
www.ontarioimmigration.ca/en/working/OI_EMPLOYERS_MENTORING.html

Find a Mentor:
www.ontarioimmigration.ca/en/working/OI_HOW_WORK_MENTOR.html

JVS Mentoring Services - Toronto:


www.jvstoronto.org/index.php?page=mentoring-services

Niagara Immigrant Mentorship Program:


niagaramentoring.wordpress.com/

Manitoba

Success Skills Mentorship Program:


www.successskills.mb.ca/mentorship.html

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Sources of Information and Support

Manitoba Start StrongStart and JobStart Programs:


http://manitobastart.com/employment-programs.html

Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan Intercultural Association Mentorship Project:
saskintercultural.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=10&Itemid=12

Alberta
CRIEC Connects - Calgary:
www.criec.ca/

Integrated Mentorship Program Calgary:


www.immigrantservicescalgary.ca/how-can-we-help/career-education-planning

ERIEC Career Mentorship Program Edmonton:


www.eriec.ca/career-mentorship-program/

Mentorship and Host Services - Edmonton:


www.eisa-edmonton.org/programs-services/mentorship-and-host-services/

British Columbia
Workplace Connections Mentoring Program:
www.mosaicbc.com/looking-work/workplace-connections-mentoring-program

S.U.C.C.E.S.S. Employment Mentoring Program:


www.successbc.ca/eng/component/option,com_mtree/task,viewlink/link_id,1203/

Internationally Trained Technology Professionals Mentorship Program:


www.itpbc.com/working-in-bc/mentoring

Settlement & Integration

Pan Canadian
Your First Two Weeks in Canada Video:
www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/multimedia/video/settlement/twoweeks.asp

Culture Shock:
integration-net.ca/coa-oce/english/pdf/03culture.pdf

Coping with Culture Shock:


http://travel.gc.ca/travelling/health-safety/culture-shock

Service Canada Fact Sheets:


www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/about/publication/index.shtml

Canada Benefits:
www.canadabenefits.gc.ca

The Newcomers Guide to Canadian Housing:


www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/co/buho/upload/TheNewcomersGuide_E.pdf

Apartment Rentals:
www.kijiji.ca and www.padmapper.com/

Boardwalk rental communities (Apartments for rent in AB, BC, ON and SK):
www.bwalk.com/

Homes for Sale:


www.realtor.ca/splash.aspx and comfree.com/

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Sources of Information and Support

Scams and Fraud:


www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/scams-fraudes/index-eng.htm

Canadian Bankers Association Newcomers to Canada:


www.cba.ca/en/consumer-information/40-banking-basics/479-newcomers-to-canada

Canada Border Services Agency:


www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/cpr-crp-eng.html

Settlement Agencies:
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/newcomers/map/services.asp

My Job Search

Where To Find A Job

Pan Canadian
Finding a Job in Canada:
www.cic.gc.ca/english/pdf/pub/workbook-national.pdf

Job Bank:
www.jobbank.gc.ca/prov-eng.aspx?OpPage=50&Stdnt=No

Canada Business Network:


www.canadabusiness.ca/eng/

Recruitment Agencies:
www.recruitmentagencies.ca/

Skills International connects internationally educated professionals with employers who need
their skills:
www.skillsinternational.ca

Job Search Engines


www.workopolis.ca

www.monster.ca

www.careerbuilder.ca/

www.eluta.ca/

www.careeraim.com

www.careerbeacon.com/

www.wowjobs.ca/

www.simplyhired.ca/

www.jobbus.com

www.jobshark.ca

www.indeed.ca

www.educationcanada.com/ (Education only)

Job Search Tools

Pan Canadian
How Do I Search for Jobs: http://www.jobbank.gc.ca/content_pieces-eng.do?lang=eng&cid=203

Service Canada Rsums:


www.jobsetc.gc.ca/categories.jsp?category_id=201

How Do I Create a Canadian-style Rsum:


www.settlement.org/sys/faqs_detail.asp?faq_id=4001064

Applying for a Job:


www.peianc.com/content/lang/en/page/guide_employment_apply

15
CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

To
pic

Sources of Information and Support

Winning Rsums:
www.bcjobs.ca/career-advice/winning-resumes/

Rsums:
www.employeeservices.gov.sk.ca/resume

Career Advice and Samples:


www.cvtips.com/

The Action Verb Checklist:


www.jobsetc.gc.ca/toolbox/checklists/actionverb.jsp

Job Search Guide:


http://umanitoba.ca/student/employment/media/job_search_workbook.pdf

Job Search Strategies:


www.sasknetwork.ca/html/JobSeekers/lookingforwork/searchstrategies.htm

What are Some Career Strategies for New Immigrants:


www.settlement.org/sys/faqs_detail.asp?faq_id=4001175

How Do I Prepare for an Interview: hwww.jobbank.gc.ca/content_pieceseng.do?lang=eng&cid=208&lang=en

Prepare for the Interview:


www.jobsetc.gc.ca/pieces.jsp?category_id=303

Use The STAR Technique to Ace Your Interview (Behavioural Interview):


www.rightattitudes.com/2008/07/15/star-technique-answer-interview-questions/

Interview Questions:
www.douglas.bc.ca/services/co-op/job-search-tips/interview-questions.html

100 Potential Interview Questions:


http://career-advice.monster.ca/job-interview/interview-questions/100-potential-interview-questionscanada/article.aspx

Interviewing:
www.workopolis.com/work.aspx?action=Transfer&View=Content/Common/ResourceCentre/career
911/interviewing/InterviewIntroView&lang=EN

Salary Wizard Canada:


http://swz.salary.com/CanadaSalaryWizard/layoutscripts/cswzl_newsearch.aspx

My Job Retention

Canadian Workplace Culture

Pan Canadian
Canadian Workplace Culture:
discovertourism.ca/en/come_work_in_canada/canadian_workplace_culture

Workplace Culture in Canada:


www.peianc.com/content/lang/e/page/guide_employment_culture

Adapting to Canada:
www.cnmag.ca/adapting-to-canada/1528-how-canadian-is-your-way

Canadian Work Culture:


http://immigration.simcoe.ca/work/culture

Workplace Culture:
www.skillsconnect.ca/seeking-employment/workplace-culture

16

CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

To
pic

Sources of Information and Support

Working Canadian Style:


http://settlement.org/sys/faqs_detail.asp?faq_id=4001129

Canadian Workplace Essentials:


http://cthrc.ca/~/media/Files/CTHRC/Home/research_publications/credential_recognition/newcome
r_integration/FCR%20Can%20Workplace%20Experience%20Essentials%20en.ashx

9 Soft Sills No Immigrant Should be Without:


www.prepareforcanada.com/wp-content/uploads/9SoftSkills_PrepareforCanada.pdf

Cross-Cultural Teamwork:
http://triec.ca/find-solutions/for-employers/learning/training-videos/cross-culturalteamwork/?utm_source=triec&utm_medium=rightSidebar&utm_campaign=relatedContent

The Hofstede Centre Cultural Dimensions:


http://geert-hofstede.com/countries.html

Canadian Newcomer Magazine:


www.cnmag.ca/

Canadian Immigrant Magazine:


canadianimmigrant.ca/

Rights

Pan Canadian
Your Guide to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms:
www.pch.gc.ca/eng/1356631760121/1356631904950

Labour Program Employment Equity:


www.labour.gc.ca/eng/standards_equity/eq/emp/index.shtml

Canadian Human Rights Commission:


www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/index.html

Workers Rights in Canada:


www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/about/publication/workers_rights.shtml

Understand Permanent Resident Status:


www.cic.gc.ca/english/newcomers/about-pr.asp#pr_can

17
CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

WHAT FACTORS INFLUENCE YOUR DESTINATION CHOICE?

Directions: Please take a few moments to consider what factors you would like to influence
your choice of destination in Canada. List your influences and decide their level of importance.
Use this list to assess options and make decisions.
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________

18
CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT CANADA?


1. What province is the largest producer of oil and gas and the oil sands in the north are
being developed as a major energy source?
a)
b)
c)
d)

Alberta
Saskatchewan.
Newfoundland and Labrador
Manitoba

2. What is Canadas westernmost province where Chinese and Punjabi are the most
spoken languages after English?
a) Quebec
b) Alberta
c) Ontario
d) British Columbia
3. What province has Canadas largest Aboriginal population and whose capital city,
Winnipeg is known as the Gateway to the West and the Heart of the Continent?
a)
b)
c)
d)

Ontario
Manitoba
Quebec
British Columbia

4. What province is the only officially bilingual province where about one-third of the
population lives and works in French?
a)
b)
c)
d)

New Brunswick
Quebec
Manitoba
Prince Edward Island

5. What province is the most easterly point in North America, geographically the closest to
Europe and is on the same latitude as Paris?
a)
b)
c)
d)

British Columbia
Nova Scotia
Newfoundland and Labrador
Qubec

6. What territorys capital, Yellowknife, is called the diamond capital of North America?
a)
b)
c)
d)

Yukon
Newfoundland and Labrador
Northwest Territories
Nunavut

7. What territory means our land in the Inuit language of Inuktitut and is Canadas newest
territory?
a)
b)
c)
d)

Northwest Territories
Manitoba
Yukon
Nunavut

19
CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

8. Which Canadian province, with a diverse population of more than 12 million, is home to
both Canada's capital and its largest city?
a)
b)
c)
d)

British Columbia
Manitoba
Ontario
Prince Edward Island

9. What is Canadas smallest province known for its beaches, red soil and agriculture,
especially potatoes?
a)
b)
c)
d)

Saskatchewan
Ontario
Manitoba
Prince Edward Island

10. What province is Canada`s largest producer of pulp and paper and Canadas largest
producer of hydroelectricity?
a)
b)
c)
d)

Newfoundland and Labrador


Quebec
New Brunswick
Alberta

11. What province, once known as the breadbasket of the world and the wheat province,
has 40% of the arable land in Canada and is the countrys largest producer of grains and
oilseeds?
a)
b)
c)
d)

Manitoba
Nova Scotia
Alberta
Saskatchewan

12. What territory is often referred to as the Land of the Midnight Sun because at the height
of summer, daylight can last up to 24 hours and in winter, the sun disappears and
darkness sets in for three months?
a)
b)
c)
d)

Yukon
Nova Scotia
Nunavut
Northwest Territories

13. What province is Canada`s largest east coast port and whose capital, Halifax, has
played an important role in Atlantic trade and defence and is home to Canada`s largest
naval base?
a)
b)
c)
d)

British Columbia
Nova Scotia
Ontario
Manitoba

20
CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

WHAT FACTORS INFLUENCE YOUR OCCUPATION CHOICE?


Directions: Please take a few moments to consider what factors you would like to influence
your choice of occupation in Canada. List your influences and decide their level of importance.
Use this list to assess options and make decisions.
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________

21
CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

MY READINESS FOR A JOB

Am I job-ready?

I will enhance my competitiveness by:

I know if I am in a regulated occupation.


Yes, I do

No, I do not

I have a license to practice this regulated


occupation or know how to get a license.
Yes, I do
No, I do not
I can prove the Canadian equivalency of my
credentials.
Yes, I can
No, I cannot
I know the skills requirements for my
occupation.
Yes, I do

No, I do not

I can meet the hard and soft skill requirements


for my occupation
Yes, I can
No, I cannot
I can meet Canadian employment language
requirements.
Yes, I can
No, I cannot
I can offer or approximate Canadian
experience to a Canadian employer.
Yes, I can
No, I cannot
I know what is required on landing and how to
settle myself and my family in Canada
Yes, I do
No, I do not
I know where and how to find jobs in my
occupation.
Yes, I do

No, I do not

22
CANADIAN IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION PROGRAM (CIIP) www.newcomersuccess.ca

MY ESSENTIAL SKILLS1

Pick one of the most important Essential Skills for your occupation:

Reading

Document Use

Numeracy

Writing

Oral Communication

Working with Others

Continuous Learning

Thinking Skills

Computer Skills

1. Think about how you would describe your competency level (scope, complexity etc.) to an employer
using examples.

2. Share your description in pairs.

3. Volunteer to share with the larger group.

Occupational Profiles: http://www.edsc.gc.ca/eng/jobs/les/profiles/index.shtml

23

COMMUNICATION SKILLS EXERCISE OPTION 1:


Listen for details and inference. Answer the statements below by stating if they are
true or false.

Statement

T or F

1. Tan Trinh works at Loewen Windows in Steinbach.


2. The Statistics Canada study says that second generation daughters of
immigrant parents earn more than daughters of Canadian-born parents.
3. The Trinhs are from Indonesia.
4. Mrs. Trinh made certain her daughters went to school and studied hard.
5. Mr. Trinh dreamed of being a doctor.
6. The Trinhs persuaded their daughters that in order to get ahead they had to get
a good education.
7. The statistics show that daughters of immigrant parents marry and have
children earlier than daughters of Canadian-born parents.
8. None of the Trinh daughters were allowed to have serious relationships in high
school.
9. Their parents experience as refugees and immigrant strongly motivated the
Trinh daughters to succeed.
Exercise from: Learning English with CBC, CBC Manitoba Radio Broadcasts, October 9, 2008

CANADIAN IDIOMS AND SLANG


Canadian Idioms: www.settlement.org/site/ed/esl/idioms.asp
Understand Canadian Slang: www.wikihow.com/Understand-Canadian-Slang
Canadian Slang: www.canadaka.net/content/page/124-canadian-slang--english-words

24

COMMUNICATION SKILLS EXERCISE OPTION 2

Translate the following from Canadian Regional English


As the hydro flickered, Jens listened to the forecast to check the wind chill, and then pulled on his
toque. Once outside, he lifted the hood to unplug the engine before starting the car. He hadnt
gone far on the highway, when first signs of a white-out made him turn back. It had been years
since he went to a Sugar Bush and he didnt want to miss this one, so he hopped on his skidoo and
braved the elements.

Hydro =

_______________________________

Wind chill =

_______________________________

Toque =

_______________________________

Hood =

_______________________________

Highway =

_______________________________

White-out =

_______________________________

Sugar bush = _______________________________


Skidoo =

_______________________________

CANADIAN IDIOMS AND SLANG


Canadian Idioms: www.settlement.org/site/ed/esl/idioms.asp
Understand Canadian Slang: www.wikihow.com/Understand-Canadian-Slang
Canadian Slang: www.canadaka.net/content/page/124-canadian-slang--english-words

25

SETTLEMENT DOCUMENT CHECKLIST

Documents to collect and bring with you to Canada

Canadian visa, valid passport, travel documents for each family member

2 copies of a list of all personal/household items you are bringing with you

2 copies of list of items that are arriving later (plus value)

Money to cover living expenses for 6 months

Birth/adoption and marriage/divorce papers

High school, College and University records, diplomas, degrees

Trade or professional certificates/licenses

Translated letters of reference from employers

Canadian style rsum

Health records

Drivers license and reference from your insurance company

Photocopies of all essential and important documents

CIIP TIPS:
Dont pack your documents in a suitcase. You will need to show them to customs and
immigration.
Get your documents translated into English.

26

LEVERAGING SOCIAL MEDIA FOR NETWORKING AND JOB SEARCH


Most people know that the best way to find a job is through networking. You can go to networking meetings,
tap into your own personal network, or ask friends who they know. There are similarly many ways to use social
media in order to network and find a job.
LinkedIn is currently considered to be the top professional networking site. The online networking site allows
you to upload your resume and connect with people in your chosen field. LinkedIn allows you to connect to
people you know and to see profiles of anyone else on LinkedIn and to connect to them. Everyone who is job
hunting should have a LinkedIn profile and should be actively using LinkedIn to job search and network.

Your Profile: Ensure that you have a complete profile. Your profile should be employer friendly and
reflect the type of job that you want.

Highlight your Skills: By adding relevant skills to your profile, youll come up in search results when
employers need someone like you for a project or job. Skills pages will also tell you which groups on
LinkedIn you can join to learn more about that skill and jobs.

Build your network: Having a strong network of people you know and trust is essential. You may be
able to use those connections for recommendations, references and job leads now and into the future.
You can send an email to everyone in your LinkedIn network, letting them know of your situation, and
asking for help or people they could put you in touch with.

Focus your Job Search: LinkedIns job-search engine allows you to hone your search by specific
companies, locations, experience levels and job functions. It also lets you see the individuals doing the
hiring, as well as anyone in your network who can refer you to those people or to someone else who
works at the company.

Company Search: If you have a very specific company you are interested in, you can search that
company and hopefully find people who are connected to other people you know. Then, ask your
personal contact to connect you.

Apply for jobs: You can submit your LinkedIn profile and cover letter for job postings that employers
post on this site. It will also display your professional connections who work at that company, or who
can introduce you to someone there, to increase your chances of being hired through a referral.

Update Your Status: Use your status update to let your network know that you are a skilled
professional looking to establish your career in your destination province. Update your status regularly
to better inform your connections.
a. Some tips on using LinkedIn for your Job Search: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-onbusiness/careers/career-advice/using-linkedin-to-track-down-your-dream-job/article4249078/

Facebook: Use your Facebook profile to your advantage for networking and job search. First, edit your
photos and de-tag any that cast you in a negative way. Delete any posts that you do not want a potential
employer to see. Make sure that your statuses are appropriate and reflect your goals. Frequently post
status updates relating to your job search to keep it top of the mind of others in your network that you are
still looking for a job. Remember Facebook is primarily used by companies to research their interviewees
so ensure your profile is appropriate.
Twitter: Use Twitter to make that first contact. Twitter allows you to connect with people you do not know,
based on common interests. Your Twitter name should be your name, as it will help in your search engine
results. Many of career sites and companies will have their own Twitter streams and will have regular
updates on job opportunities.

27

MY SKILLS INVENTORY

An important aspect of knowing what you can offer a Canadian employer is to make an inventory or
list of your skills.
A skills inventory will help you build your resume and cover letter. It will help you know how to sell
yourself in your job search, act as a reminder to include significant elements of your knowledge,
abilities and experience, and act as a guide to determine which jobs fit best with who you are.
In addition to experience and education, a Canadian employer will also have a ranked list of
required and preferred skills. Consider how your range of skills can meet the employers skills
needs.
Two key points as you look for a job:
You must demonstrate how your skills will be an asset to the company (How will the
company improve its position by hiring you?)
How are you and your skills different (i.e. better) than other applicants? Many people
will be applying for and interviewing for a position, so you must set yourself apart.
What skills are employers looking for?
Professional and technical skills

What are the building block skills of your art, craft, occupation, trade or profession?

What additional added value skills have you acquired throughout your career?
Equipment operating or tool use skills

What special tools and equipment do you have skills in using and operating?
Software and data/information skills

What computer skills do you have (word processing, spreadsheet, database,


inventory, accounting, tracking and logistics systems)?
Administration and people skills

What skills do you have in the area of human relations, organization and office
administration?
Project management skills

Can you be trusted to lead a team and complete a project?


Other skills

What other skills do you have that make you unique?

28

COVER LETTER

Your Street Address


City, Province, Postal Code
Date
Mr. William Jackson
Recruitment Manager
Company Name
Dear Mr. Jackson:
From your company's website I learned about your need for a Sales Representative. I am very
interested in this opportunity, and believe that my education and employment background are
appropriate for the position. Please find enclosed a copy of my resume.
While working toward my masters degree in marketing, I was employed as a sales representative with
a small dairy foods firm. I increased my sales volume and profit margin appreciably while at Farmers
Foods, and I am confident I could repeat that success in the pharmaceutical industry. I think that you
would find my strengths in relationship building together with other international experience to be a real
asset to your company.
I look forward to talking with you regarding sales opportunities. Thank you for your consideration.
Sincerely,
(Signature)
Your Name
Enclosure

29

TYPES OF RESUMES
CHRONOLOGICAL RESUME
Style shows a progressive path
Organized by dates of employment (recent first)
Major emphasis is on Job Title and Company where you worked
Use if you have:
A clear job target
logical progression to your next job
Impressive job titles
Do not use if you have:
Work gaps or are changing career paths

FUNCTIONAL RESUME

Highlights what you did, not where you did it


Offers flexibility to highlight specific skills, ability and experiences
Eliminates need to categorize repetitive work history
Focuses on transferable skills
Use if you have:
Work gaps
Changing career paths
Job Titles that do not reflect all that you did
No recent experience Re-entering the workforce

COMBINATION RESUME
Combines employer information and candidates skills
Focuses on skills, abilities and experiences that are transferable
Use if you have:
A lot of experience
One employer for many years
Many accomplishments
Senior management experience

30

CHRONOLOGICAL RESUME EXAMPLE

YOUR NAME
Apt number and Street, City, Province, Postal Code Dialling code and number Email address

SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS

Over 10 years experience in


Strong background in
Proven skills in
Demonstrated ability to
Communication skills include fluency in English and
Computer skills include: MS Office, ABC Specialized Software Program

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
Electrical Engineer

20052013

Company Name, City, Province or Country (if not Canada)

Conducted research into feasibility, design, operation and performance of electrical generation
and distribution networks
Designed electrical and electronic circuits, components, systems and equipment
Supervised and inspected installation, modification, testing and operation of electrical and
electronic systems and equipment
Developed maintenance and operating standards for electrical and electronic systems and
equipment

Computer Programmer

20012005

Company Name, City, Province or Country (if not Canada)

Created, tested, debugged, documented and implemented client-tracking software utilizing skills
in C# and VB.net
Worked directly with end-users to maximize efficiencies and user-friendliness
Employed strong communication skills to Train the Trainers
Maintained existing computer programs by making minor modifications as required

31

Your Name

Page 2 of 2

Customer Service Representative

19982001

Company Name, City, Province or Country (if not Canada)

Answered inquiries from customers in person and on the phone


Investigated and solved any customer concerns
Accurately processed financial transactions using computerized cash registers in a fast-paced
environment
Earned Quality Service award twice

VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE
Library Assistant
2008Present
Library Name, City, Province
Organize library shelves and restock returned books
Assist library patrons with online catalogue system

EDUCATION
Project Management Certificate

2008

College Name, City, Province


Bachelor of Computer Science

1998

University Name, Location


(Equivalent to a Bachelor of Computer Science degree from an Ontario University, as determined
by World Education Services in Toronto, ON)

Adapted from: http://settlement.org/sys/faqs_detail.asp?faq_id=4001064

32

FUNCTIONAL RESUME EXAMPLE

YOUR NAME
Apt number and Street, City, Province, Postal Code Dialling code and number Email address
HIGHLIGHTS OF QUALIFICATIONS

5+ years manufacturing industry experience


Solid background in process development, product quality control and equipment design
Boosted company sales by 30% in 2-year period by establishing new products and clients
Proficient in MS Office, Flash, HTML and Adobe Photoshop
Multilingual: Fluent in English, and
SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE

Manufacturing
Set-up and qualified new equipment for wafer etching and packaging
Utilized statistical process control (SPC) in ISO 9001 2008 manufacturing environment
Analyzed failure mechanism (FMEA) to improve MTBF and yield improvement
Identified and troubleshot process, equipment and operation-related issues
Management
Managed construction project team of 2 engineers and 5 draftspersons
Supervised drafting of structural drawings, construction specifications and project schedules
Verified shop drawings, structural calculations and produced concrete precast element types
Reported project progress to customers according to their requirements
Estimating
Estimated quantities and costs of pre-cast concrete structures
Prepared contract documents and payment claims; negotiated cost variation with customers
EMPLOYMENT
Project Chief
Company Name, City, Province or Country (if not Canada)

20052014

Structural Engineer
Company Name, City, Province or Country (if not Canada)

20022005

EDUCATION
MSc in Construction Engineering
2001
University Name, Country
(Equivalent to Master in Civil Engineering, as determined by World Education Services, Toronto,
ON)
BSc in Civil Engineering
University Name, Country

1999

Adapted from: http://settlement.org/sys/faqs_detail.asp?faq_id=4001064

33

COMBINATION RESUME EXAMPLE

YOUR NAME
Apt number and Street, City, Province, Postal Code Dialling code and number Email address

MARKET RESEARCH ANALYST


SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS
Market Research
Developed target market profiles for the software industry
Wrote software market research reports, ranging from analysis of market for financial services
business instant messaging tools to demand for systems software in healthcare sector.
Analyzed contact management databases
Sized markets, identifying demand and profiling profitable target customers
Interviewed potential systems software customers, identified likely buyers and helped to increase the
company's qualified leads by 23%
Created software market penetration plan for product that now earns revenues of over $8 M/yr
Developed market penetration plan for launch of new systems software in Asia
Analyzed market data, summarized findings through charts and written reports
Writing
Researched, wrote and published more than 25 success stories on high tech companies, resulting in
increased recognition of those firms among target market
Wrote, edited and published a monthly newsletter, alerting target market to the successes of 18 local
high tech companies

EXPERIENCE
Director, Market Research. ABC Market Research. Vancouver. 19992006
Senior Software Market Research Analyst. ABC Market Research. Vancouver. 19941999
Software Market Research Analyst. ABC Market Research. Vancouver. 19931994
Market Research Analyst. Hitech Systems Inc. Burnaby. 19881993
Conducted 75 telephone interviews to develop database of Asian firms looking to upgrade
systems software in the next 6 months
Examined Maximizer database profiles; recommended further follow up, helping company identify
10 leads likely to upgrade their software in the next 6 months
Developed market penetration plan for launch of new systems software in Asia.
Analyzed market data, summarized findings through charts and written reports
Marketing Assistant. Western Economic Diversification Canada. Vancouver. 19861988
Secretary. Western Economic Diversification Canada. Vancouver. 19821986

EDUCATION
Diploma of Technology. Marketing Management. BCIT. 1982

AWARDS AND RECOGNITION


Named Employee of the Month three times at Hitech Systems Inc.
Adapted from: http://www.bcjobs.ca/content/index.cfm?objectid=D4FC752B-1372-5900-AD64613B1879C436

34

INTERVIEWS
Preparing for a Job Interview

Ask who will be interviewing you, the interview format, and time frame.

Do your research on the organization and position.

Think about possible interview questions.

Prepare your responses to potential interview questions


Tell me about yourself
A version of your one minute commercial
Briefly summarize your employment background and education, if recent or particularly
relevant. You can also say something unique about yourself.
There is no need to try to address all the skills required for the job at this time, the
interviewer will be asking those in the main body of the interview.
Why should we hire you?
Show that you know what skills the organization wants (from a job advertisement, job
description or information you've gathered) and that your experience and knowledge make
you the best fit for the organization. Set yourself apart from other candidates by telling the
interviewers about qualities that are unique to you. Be positive. Focus on what you can do to
add value to the employer. What would you bring that other candidates would not?
Job specific questions
What skills and experience were mentioned in the job posting?
What other qualities will they be looking for in a candidate?
What do you have that matches?
Prepare your answers using the STAR approach to highlight your accomplishments
State the Situation; the Task; your Actions; the Results

Be prepared to explain reasons for leaving previous jobs.

Practise promoting yourself.

Plan what you will wear to the interview.

Prepare questions you will ask during the interview - impress the interviewers with your knowledge
of their company or industry.

35

ONE - MINUTE COMMERCIAL EXERCISE


A one minute commercial, sometimes called an elevator speech or pitch, is a clear, brief, authentic and
compelling message or "commercial" about you. It communicates who you are, what you do, what you
want, what you can deliver, how you can benefit a company and why someone should hire you. A oneminute commercial is a tool to spark a persons and/or an employers interest.
You will use versions of this for networking; in a summary section on your resume; in your cover letters;
and in an interview to answer questions such as: Tell me about yourself, or Why should we hire you?
To prepare your commercial, identify your:

Strengths and abilities


Skills and accomplishments in past jobs
Unique qualities

Write a brief paragraph to pull these together, make sure it is no more than one minute in length
My name is ..., I have a background in ..., I have specific experience in ., my
strengths include , and Im looking for a job as a ..
Practice, practice, practice so that your commercial comes out smoothly, and without having to think too
much when you are talking to people.
Examples:

You should hire me because I am a determined, energetic, motivated, optimistic individual. I'm a
quick learner and also a good team player. I have the ability to stay focused in stressful situations
and can be counted on when the going gets tough.

I am the person for this job because I have the drive and motivation to do my very best every day,
because I'm a good initiator, as well as a good implementer. I'm always ready to run that extra
mile, and I already have experience. I have learned how to work in a corporate culture and how to
adapt myself to the environment! I am always eager to learn new things, which is very important
for this position. I have the required skill for the position and I am qualified, capable and have the
desire to excel beyond my capabilities, which means I always aim high. I have good qualifications
and I am able to do this job. I will make a great effort because I want to be a successful part of
successful organization. I am passionate about working in this field, and very hardworking. Due to
my global exposure during my studies and in conferences, meetings and round tables, I have
experience interacting with different experts.
(From: http://jobsearch.about.com/u/ua/topinterviewanswers/whyshouldwehireyou.htm)

Why should we hire you videos:

2.11 minutes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZjN6EMO55U


3.37 minutes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8USd4EhP_o0
4.17 minutes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcoat4ifHoY

36

INTERVIEW TIPS

Arrive On Time. In Canada, this means you should be at the interview approximately 10 minutes
prior to the interviews scheduled start time.

Introduce yourself, smile and shake hands firmly.

Address interviewer(s) by title (Ms. Mr. Dr.) and last name until you are invited to do otherwise.

Stay calm and maintain eye contact with the interviewers.

Listen to the entire question before you answer.

Ask for clarification if you do not understand a question.

Be honest about yourself.

Do not criticise previous employers.

Keep your responses concise and to the point.

Support your responses with concrete examples.

Use the STAR approach State the Situation; the Task; your Actions; the Results when answering
behavioural questions.

Try to relate what you know about the company when answering questions.

When discussing your career accomplishments match them to what the company is looking for.

37

MY CULTURAL ADAPTATION

Stages of Cultural Adaptation


All immigrants go through the different stages of cultural adaptation. Some will experience the different
stages faster than others. You may experience it differently than your family and friends and this can
cause conflict within the family. With increased awareness and knowledge of the different stages of
adaptation, you can effectively plan and prepare for the anticipated changes that will occur. Knowing that
it is normal, and a part of the process in transitioning and integrating into a new culture is important. You
can minimize cultural shock by preparing for problems and using the CIIP resources and tools that will
help you cope and adjust to your new life.
1. Pre-Arrival Stage
Typically individuals are nervous, excited and scared.
2. Honeymoon Stage
Usually lasts a few days to a few weeks. During this stage, you may feel like a tourist. However, at the
same time, you will be busy taking care of business such as finding housing, setting up a bank
account and registering your children in school, etc.
While you are familiarizing yourself with the new environment, try to observe your new culture. Watch
how people greet one another and how they communicate non-verbally. This is also the stage where
you will be meeting with an immigrant-serving agency to assist you with continuing the process of
adapting to life in Canada.

38

3. Culture Shock Stage


This is the most difficult and challenging phase of the Cultural Adaptation process. Depending on the
individual, this stage can last several weeks to several months.
Within your family, different people may be at different stages of adjustment. Sometimes, this can
cause family conflicts. However, the more you know about the cultural values and social relations in
Canada prior to your departure, the easier this stage will be for you.
As you move through culture shock, you will find that things seem like they are going wrong where
minor issues become major problems. You will begin to have a growing awareness that your cultural
behaviours may not be accepted in Canada. You may feel like you want to give up and go home. You
may start to blame Canada for your problems.
When you are in Canada, the best resolution to culture shock is to be self-aware of when you are in
this stage, and then be proactive. Recognize what is happening to you and know that you are normal
and simply going through the steps of adaptation. You need to take an analytical approach and reframe the problems. Learning culturally appropriate behaviours and implementing problem-resolution
procedures provides the basis for effective adaptation.
Successful adjustment also means seeking help from others. Visit a settlement agency that will help
orientate you to Canada and will provide information on support services. Do not be afraid to use the
support services as they were established to help new immigrants like you.
Enjoying oneself in the new culture also eases adjustment and helps to maintain a positive sense of
well-being. Go out with your family. Meet new people and have fun.
4. Adjustment Stage
You will gradually recover from culture shock. Your focus will turn to learning how to effectively adjust.
Your attitude about the new culture and your willingness to change are vital for adjustment. It is
essential that you recognize and acknowledge the benefits of living in Canada.
Keep a positive attitude at all times. Try not to compare Canada to your culture. Try to think about the
situation as an opportunity to learn about a new culture. Avoid just socializing with people from your
own culture. If you want to function effectively in Canada, then you have to reach out beyond your
comfort zone to adjust and adapt.
You will begin to make a variety of adjustments. The new culture will begin to make sense. You will
begin to accept the new cultures ways more positively. Learning about the new culture will become
enjoyable again similar to what it was like during the Honeymoon Stage.
During the Adjustment Stage, the problems do not end. However, having more positive attitude toward
meeting challenges will help you adjust and function in Canada.
5. Adaptation Stage
This is the final stage of the adaptation process. You will now be able to successfully resolve
problems and manage in the new culture. This is where you will be a changed person. You will now
be bicultural. Canadian cultural values and behaviours will now be integrated into your identity and
self-concept.
You will have gone through personal and emotional changes and made the adjustment to your new
home country. You will participate in the local culture, work in a successful career, learn the subtleties
of the language, make friends, enjoy life and become an active citizen.
Once you have reached this stage, rather than thinking of yourself as a _________ (Chinese, Indian,
Filipino, etc.) person living in Canada, you will think of yourself as a Canadian from __________
(China, India, Philippines, etc.) Canada will be your home.

39

CANADIAN WORKPLACE NORMS AND SOFT SKILLS


You have heard that employees are hired for their technical skills but fired for their lack of soft skills, which
are highly valued by Canadian employers. You may have high soft skills by your home countrys
standards, but when you arrive in Canada your soft skills will be measured according to Canadian cultural
standards. Soft skills include such things as your ability to communicate, to work collaboratively with
people and build teams, to manage yourself, your workload and your time, to solve problems and make
decisions and to resolve conflicts effectively.
Workplace Norm #1: Canadians believe in equality
People do not have authority just because of their name, status, social class or gender
Employees are judged on merit and earn their positions based on merit
Self-promotion is expected
Employees are able to communicate with all people at all levels if required
Employees are expected to speak, share ideas and participate in making group decisions
Employers may be suspicious about the sincerity of employees who are too pleasing
Learn Canadian business etiquette and understand the cultural rules. For example,
Canadian workplaces are generally very casual. Even bosses are generally addressed by
their first name. Generally, people do not address others by their job title.
Workplace Norm #2: Canadian employees are expected to show initiative
Say when they do not understand directions from supervisors and ask for help and/or advice from
co-workers or supervisors when needed
View constructive criticism as part of professional growth
Ask for help and/or advice from co-workers or supervisors when needed
Manage their own time
Keep busy and not wait for the boss to give them their next task
Be flexible
Look at failure as just a mistake and a learning opportunity, not something shameful
In the Canadian workplace, constructive criticism is seen as part of professional growth:

Be open to new ways of doing things


Listen to negative feedback
Ask questions to clarify
Respond positively and provide input
Implement required changes
Employees are not ashamed, embarrassed or hurt when co-workers or bosses give
critical feedback

Workplace Norm #3: Working effectively with others


In Canada, business relationships are not necessarily personal relationships
Teamwork is highly valued
Positive attitudes build stronger working relationships
Small talk (exchanging pleasantries) is expected read the local newspaper and watch Canadian
news stations, keep up to date with what is happening in your community for local sports events or

40

new restaurant openings, listen and observe what people are talking about and join in by asking
questions
Avoid discussions about religion, politics and sex
Failure is not considered to be shameful
Colleagues do not commonly touch at work with the exception of handshakes when greeting
someone new or in French-speaking areas with a quick kiss on each cheek
Canadians value their physical space and the general rule is to maintain an arms length between
people

Step outside your comfort zone. Avoid huddling together in your own cultural group. Mix with
mainstream Canadians and those outside your cultural group. Your everyday life in Canada is an
opportunity to learn about Canadian workplace culture, practice your language skills, learn how
to communicate better and learn how to work effectively with others in the Canadian work
environment.

Workplace Norm #4: Honesty and integrity are highly valued and bosses want the truth
If you do not understand, bosses expect you to tell them
If you reply yes to a question or direction, Canadians interpret this to mean you understand and will
do what you are asked
Canadian bosses do not want to hear excuses or be told that you understand an assignment when
you do not
It is considered respectful and honest to express no, if something is not available or you cannot do
something as scheduled
In Canada, supervisors want to know if you do not understand. Nod your head only if you
understand.
Additional Workplace Norms:
Canadians do not define relationships according to status or hierarchy

Employees interact with different levels within the organization and are expected to openly and
directly express their views and opinions, and provide input and suggestions towards the final product
Bosses make the final decision after consultation, feedback and recommendations from employees
In Canada, sharing your ideas is a sign of interest.

In the Canadian workplace, problem solving and conflict resolution are essential skills

If you have a problem with a co-worker, you are expected to discuss it


If the problem cannot be resolved, most workplaces have policies and procedures for resolving
conflicts between employees

In the Canadian workplace, employers value time

Employees are punctual


Employees are expected to call their bosses if they will be late or absent

For more information on soft skills, see Nick Nooranis Soft Skills No immigrants Should Be Without
www.prepareforcanada.com/wp-content/uploads/9SoftSkills_PrepareforCanada.pdf

41

GO KEY MESSAGES
Opening
With an aging population and declining birthrate, Canada needs skilled immigrants.
Immigration is risky. CIIP will help you minimize the risks and maximize your chances of success.
CIIP will help you make a successful transition to Canada if you apply what you learn in the GO and use the
MAP and take advantage of on-line advice from Canadian partners prior to departure.

Job Prospects
Canada is a huge country with 10 provinces and territories all with jobs in demand and much to offer
newcomers. It is important to identify and understand opportunities wherever they are
Newcomers can be successful more quickly in less known provinces and in smaller cities
Canadas economy is diversified and stable with job shortages in certain careers.
Career planning will help you understand job requirements in Canada and explore options
Transferable skills can enable you to re-invent yourself in a related or alternative occupation.

Job Readiness
A licence is required to practice as a professional in regulated occupations. Licenses are issued by provincial
regulatory authorities.
Credential assessment shows how your qualifications compare with Canadian ones. Credential recognition
can be added to your rsum to reassure employers.
Canadian employers value Essential (soft) Skills as well as technical skills. Bridging programs are designed to
help newcomers fill skill gaps. College partners can provide online pre-arrival advice
Language competency is key for newcomer integration, including occupationally-specific and socio-cultural
communication. Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) levels are used.
Canadian work experience is a code for assessing if you understand and comply with Canadian norms. In
Ontario, it is now an illegal requirement. Canadian experience can be gained through volunteering, internships,
temporary work and even mentoring and job shadowing.
CIC provides extensive information about settlement issues through the Welcome to Canada guide and the
Living in Canada Tool. Immigrant-serving partners can provide online pre-arrival advice

Job Search
Most jobs in Canada are in the internal job market and require networking to uncover
Job search tools include a 1-2 page Canadian-style rsum and a tailored cover letter.
Prepare for Canadian-style job interviews and practice responding to questions, such as Why should we hire
you?
Plan and start your job search before arrival, using Skills International and other forms of support

Job Retention
It is important to recognize culture shock and to move towards cultural adaptation
Permanent Residents enjoy the same employment rights and protection as Canadian citizens
Understanding and complying with Canadian workplace norms is key to job retention

Closing
Integration into the Canadian economy takes preparation and planning that starts in the home country and
continues upon arrival in Canada.
Remember that success is your hands and you can reach for the stars!

42

MY ACTION SLIDES

43

44

START PREPARING AHEAD


Newcomer and CIIP client, Peng Cai, shares his story.
Peng participated in the CIIP GO and MAP sessions in China in September 2012, half a year before
his family made a short landing in Toronto in February 2013 during Chinese New Year.
After the CIIP sessions, Peng was been very active in participating in other services which may be
helpful. He attended the Essential Skills Assessment and workshop, as well as the ES evaluation
session.
Peng proactively maintained contact with the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB). He
carefully polished his resume and applied for potential jobs referred by CACB and other resources.
He has gained experience in job hunt before he permanently moved to Canada in June 2013.
Soon after his arrival, he got two job offers in the architectural field. After careful consideration, he
started working for a small company as a senior designer in mid-June. At this company, he has lots
of opportunities to learn and practice.
I am well informed about the differences in working as an architectural professional here from in
China. It is more difficult and less profitable here to work in the architectural design field. I am
thinking to expand my professional scope in order to make more money. Life might be hard in the
coming two or three years, but I am quite confident about our future.

45

THE JOB HUNT

Newcomer and CIIP client, Abhijit Medhi, shares his story.


Abhijit participated in the CIIP Go and MAP sessions in India and landed in Toronto in October 2013
with his wife and son.
It was pretty cold for us during the initial days. Unfortunately, it happened to be one of the worst
winters in quite a while, however we got used to it gradually. We obtained all the legal documents
(SIN/PR Card/drivers license and child care benefits, etc.) in the first week. Thereafter, I launched
that massive job hunt as per the CIIP plan, and in seven months I got a job as an Intake Worker with
the Salvation Armys Maxwell Meighen Centre in Toronto. Importantly, the opportunity is in the field
of homelessness and addiction, which is the area of my expertise and interest.
My wife got a permanent, full-time position as a Legal Assistant in a law firm within 20 days of our
landing. She didnt attend the CIIP orientation, but I ensured that she go through the CIIP online
workshops. We enrolled our son in a preschool, and he's adapting well to the Canadian way of life.
Honestly speaking, I truly believe that CIIP played a very critical role in our humble achievements to
date. CIIP's job search strategies were really practical and I did everything they asked me to do,
including on-line workshops/bridging programs, targeting the hidden job market, networking, job
seekers card and keeping cool. Probably, these were the reasons for not only getting into my field
in a reasonable time, but also fulfilling the opportunity to work my specific area of social work.
I also acknowledge Skills International, for their assistance and constant encouragement. Currently,
Im enjoying my new work schedules and even taking up the evening shifts to gain optimum
experience in the homelessness sector. My next objective is obtaining a government position.
Lastly, thanks to the CIIP team, Delhi office, for developing an excellent immigration plan/MAP
which I showed me I could live up to my dream of working in social services and not end up in
survival jobs. Although there are many bridging programs for internationally trained professionals in
Canada, I found CIIP to be the most compelling and cost-effective bridge whilst integrating into
the mainstream Canadian culture and employment.
I also wish to share with you that I, along with a friend have initiated a network of immigrant social
workers, which is registered with the Professional Immigrant Networks.
Check this link: http://www.networksforimmigrants.ca/directory/i-cansow and https://www.facebook.com/pages/I-CAN-SOW-International-Canadian-Network-of-SocialWorkers/525715327470152?ref=hl
See also Abhijits page on the TRIEC website: http://triec.ca/2013/i-can-sow%E2%80%A6in-indiacanada-or-anywhere-else/

46

NETWORKING LEADS TO JOB SUCCESS

Newcomer and CIIP client, Richmond H. Manalili, shares his story.


Richman Manalili arrived in Vancouver from the Philippines in October 2011.
It took me three months to find my first job in Canada. I learned about the opening through a coparticipant in an industry meet-up event (IT QA specialists in Vancouver). I did some internet
searches for professional organizations within Vancouver in my field. My counsellor from Skills
Connect advised me to look into this, and if there would be membership fees, I could be reimbursed
through that program. This particular industry group was free and so I just emailed the coordinator
to see if I could participate in the event. The organization did monthly meetups to discuss the latest
trends in the IT QA field. It is through these meetings that I got to meet my current colleague who
referred me to the opening they had with my current company.
The hiring process was pretty fast. I got a call a few days after submitting online my resume. Within
one week, I was called for an interview onsite. For the interview, I prepared my resume and decided
to wear a suit for the occasion as I don't know what to expect from the company's culture. I also
researched the company profile and their business as well as looked into the details of the
requirements of the position I was applying for. I made sure my resume addressed most, if not all
the required items, based on my work experience and credentials.
If there is one thing that surprised me in my job search is that I would find an exact match of the job
that I had previously from the Philippines. I've always considered that job as to be in a niche market
and did not expect the same opportunities to exist here in Canada, particulary in Vancouver.
Attending CIIP enabled me with the building blocks and essentials that helped me prepare for the
job search activities when I arrived in Canada. The plans that we created in the CIIP program
helped me give direction to the actions I would be taking. The referrals to the different agencies
here in Canada also helped me to engage with institutions that further equipped me with skills to
easily adapt to the new environment. Specifically, the steps I took included preparation of my
template resume that would be the basis of my targeted resume; connecting with personal
acquaintances within my area; engaging with the different agencies that CIIP provided to leverage
on guidance provided; expanding my network via different channels - school, friends, former
classmates, church, organizations within my field, community, etc.; creating a Monster account for
my job search; conducting a daily collection of potential job placements, making a shortlist, targeting
resumes for each and sending resumes; and, engaging with IT agencies for potential job
placements.
Attending the IPSO program via the CIIP referral was really instrumental in preparing me for the
move. From this online training course, I got first-hand experience on what to expect when I landed.
Contacting IIS (one of the referrals from CIIP) was also a major help for me, as it was instrumental
in preparing me for the job search activities. Engaging with the Skills Connect program was
beneficial, as I found a venue to learn the working culture of Canada via the Soft Skills training
course, as well as gained insights from my counsellor on how to approach applications for job
postings and connect with the right network. Since my field doesnt require much regulation, I had
fairly a good range of opportunities to explore.
My advice to newcomers is to be diligent in coming up with targeted resumes. Have a mindset that
your job at the moment is to land a job in your field and work out a plan to make this happen.
Execute the plan. Network all you can. Make sure you expand your reach to people who can help.
Take advantage of industry organizations and clubs.
47

SOFT SKILLS ARE HIGHLY VALUED IN CANADA


Newcomer and CIIP client, David Asekomhe, shares his story.
My name is David Asekomhe and I am a graduate of the June 2013 CIIP program in London. I
landed permanently in Calgary in July 2013 with my family. Prior to moving to Canada, I worked as
a senior process engineer / project manager in the UK. After attending the CIIP program in London,
I felt more motivated to make the move to Canada. It definitely was informative and played a major
role in my preparedness for the journey ahead of me. After attending the program, I started applying
for jobs in Calgary and I was able to secure a couple of interviews before I moved.
When I arrived in Calgary, I discovered that one of the jobs I was supposed to interview for was
already filled. The second prospective employer never got back to me. This did not deter me. It only
made me more determined as I had my family with me and I knew there was no going back now.
During my first week in Canada, I visited most of the CIIP partners in Calgary and the help they
rendered was one of the reasons I was able to settle in so quickly. I attended a three-day program
with CCIS in Calgary and through this program I was able to network with other immigrants who
shared their survival experience in Calgary with me.
Within the first two weeks of arriving in Canada, I secured four interviews with prospective
employers in my field of engineering. In order to prepare for the interviews, I would go to the
company's website to research about the company, read interview tips from different Canadian
books and also talk to my CCIS contact. I recognized that it was important to understand how
interviews are conducted in Canada, as every country is different. I had a four-stage interview with
ACM and, right from the first interview, I knew I wanted to work for this employer. The first interview
was with the agency that put my resume forward to ACM, the second was with HR and the hiring
manager, the third interview was with their senior technical specialist and the final interview was
with the president of ACM.
At the end of the third week, I received an offer from ACM Facility Safety for the position of senior
process safety specialist. I couldn't believe my luck, as most people I met in Calgary told me I
needed Canadian experience to secure any job in my field. They also estimated it could take up to
four months before I could be offered a job so they advised that I should not be too hopeful so that I
did not get disappointed. I took all their advice on board but remained optimistic. I was determined
to get a senior role and so I only applied for senior positions in my area of engineering. I also
ensured that I highlighted my transferable skills in my resume. Although my technical skills were
important in helping me land my job, I also discovered that soft skills are highly valued over here in
Canada.
I started work in the first week of September and I can say that my family has settled in quite nicely
already.
Looking back, I am very grateful I made the bold move to relocate myself and family permanently to
Canada rather than making a temporary landing. I am indebted to CIIP for the information they
provided and also for the help their partners provided me when I landed in Canada, as this made my
integration into Calgary Canada very smooth. With this information, I knew I already had a head
start over other immigrants who were not fortunate enough to attend the CIIP program.

48

MY PATH AFTER CIIP

END: GOAL!
I have integrated into Canada
and have a new job!
MY TASK 5

ROADBLOCK 5

Contact Immigrant Serving agency


to participate in a job search
workshop, volunteer opportunities
or mentorship program

I try, but Im having difficulty finding work in my


field: there is no response to my resume, my
interviews are not going well, or employers are
saying I dont have Canadian experience

ROADBLOCK 4

MY TASK 4

I dont know where to look or


how to apply for a job

MY TASK 2
I will email the College
referral given on My
Action Plan

I will search CIIP employer partners websites, email


Canadian-style resume to specific jobs and email
Orientation Officers with the jobs applied for

MY TASK 3

ROADBLOCK 3

I will contact the regulatory body


listed on My Action Plan and use
the Working in Canada Tool

I am in a regulated
profession, I dont know
about the licensing
requirements

ROADBLOCK 2
I dont know about education
upgrading programs, skills
enhancement, alternative career
options, or language training

MY TASK 1
I will email the Immigrant Serving agency
referral given on My Action Plan

Adapted from Starting Points

ROADBLOCK 1
My questions werent all answered at
CIIP; I need more basic information
about settling in Canada

START: CIIP
I participated in the
Group Orientation &
Personal Planning
Sessions

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