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Dr. S.Y.

Kulkarni
Principal
Dr. NVR Naidu
Vice-Principal

M. S. RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY


BANGALORE

Dr. T.V. Suresh Kumar


Registrar (Academics)

(Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)


Faculty Name
Dr. Channarayappa

Dr. Bindu S

FACULTY
Qualification
Designation
MSc (Agri),
Professor &
Head of the
Ph.D.(India),
Ph.D. (USA), PDF Department
(USA), PGDBA
MSc, Ph.D., PDF
(USA)
MSc (Engg.),
Ph.D. (Engg.)
M.Sc, M.Phil.,
Ph.D.
M. Pharm
(Ph.D.)
MSc, M.Phil,
Ph.D., PDF

Associate
Professor
Associate
Professor
Assistant
Professor
Assistant
Professor
Assistant
Professor

Dr. Sharath R

MSc, Ph.D.,

Assistant
Professor

Dr. Ravi Kumar YS

MSc, Ph.D., PDF

Dr. Harish BG
Dr. Prabha M

MCA, MSc,
Ph.D.,
MSc, Ph.D., PDF

Dr. Sravanti V

M.Sc., Ph.D.

Mrs. Samrat K

M. Tech

Mr. Gokulakrishna M

M. Tech

Ms. Bhavya SG

M. Tech

Assistant
Professor
Assistant
Professor
Assistant
Professor
Assistant
Professor
Assistant
Professor
Assistant
Professor
Assistant

Dr. Chandraprabha
MN
Dr. Dhamodhar P
Mr. Lokesh KN
Dr. Ahalya N
SYLLABUS

Sri. Ramesh Naik


Registrar (Administration)

(For the Academic year 2013 2014)

III & IV Semester B.E.

BIOTECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING

Specialization
Biotechnology,
Molecular biology
interdisciplinary
approach,
Agriculture
Food Biotechnology
Toxicology
Biochemical Engg.
Environmental BT
Immunotechnology
Biochemistry
Pharmaceutical
Biotechnology
Microbiology
Environmental
Biotechnology
Plant & Animal BT
Phytochemistry &
Pharmacology
Cancer Biology
Virology
Bioinformatics
Plant Biotechnology
Medical biotechnology
and rDNA Technology
Genomics & Proteomics,
Structural Biology
Nano-Biotechnology,
Microbial Biotechnology
Bio process Engineering
Enzyme Technology

Professor

Downstream processing

PROGRAM OUTCOMES

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OUTCOME (PEO) ASSESSMENT

By the time of graduation a Biotechnology Engineering graduate should be able to:

The matrix given below describes assessment of PEO defined above against the
outcome a k as described by ABET (Appendix I)

Technical Outcomes
a.

Imbibe the essential concepts of both engineering and life sciences & apply it
to a wide range of interdisciplinary work.
b. Understand the engineering design, conduct experiments in biotechnology
and apply in the field by generating innovative, economical and feasible
solutions.
c. Design and automate the processes and programs to accelerate the output
for wide applications
d. Perform and formulate both concept and empirical based equations and
formulas in biotechnology to solve the problems and to draw meaningful
conclusions.
e. Update the modern techniques, skills and advanced engineering tools
essential for applications in biotechnology.

No
1

3
Professional Outcomes
f.

Mould the students behavior, attitude and interpersonal skills to function in


multi-disciplinary teams and setups.
g. Become a responsible citizen by being aware of his/her roles, duties,
professional and ethical responsibilities and rights.
h. Develop soft-skills through classroom seminars, institutional & industry
interactions, use of modern research and teaching aids
i. Encourage students to take courses from other branches of engineering to
have broad-based education and multidisciplinary approach in a global and
societal context
j. Create enthusiasm in the candidate for life-long learning and urge to
contribute to technology and society by working in a need-based and
problem solving projects.
k. Possess knowledge of contemporary issues for sharpening managerial and
entrepreneurial skills to commercialize the technology & capture the markets
for innovations.

BIOTECHNOLOGY
ENGINEERING PEOs
Ready to serve a wide
variety of fields that
encompass both
engineering and life
sciences
Motivated to pursuing
advanced research in
Biotechnology, Engineering
and related interdisciplinary
fields.
Will be capable of
developing highly innovative
research projects that can
help to solve the problems
related to health, food,
environment and
community based.
Continue to learn, discover,
develop product and
address the challenges of
national and international.
Become a very productive
entrepreneur to create jobopportunities for him-/herself and for others.

Program Outcomes (A K)
c
d e
f
g h i

CURRICULUM MODEL

Flowchart of core competencies those are pertinent in various fields:


BASIC SCIENCES

This model is developed to encompass the curriculum development processes as given


in Figure 1. It includes periodic curriculum revision. Major steps included in curriculum
revision:
Students will be assessed periodically for their progress both in academic and
research.
Research will be oriented towards both Academic and industrial
requirements
Design of curriculum according to outcome based and end users requirement
Validation of curriculum effectiveness with feedback from all stakeholders
and observation
Faculty training and up gradation
STUDENT
ASSESSMENT

DETERMINE
COURSE AREAS
Introduction of
Audit courses
based on students
background

Review regular
entry students
Review lateral
entry students

Foundation courses
Industry, academia,
research driven
professional
electives
Interdisciplinary
open electives

SET GOALS AND


OBJECTIVES OF
COURSES

Develop
courses to
match the
set objectives
Students
performance
indicates are
also set

EVOLVE
CURRICULUM

As the needs
of the industry
changes and
as the field
develops
unique
solutions need
to be provided
and curriculum
developed
accordingly

VALIDATE AND
IMPLEMENT
Feedback from
industry experts,
alumni
Periodic review
by BOS
Adhering to
guidelines and
regulations by
statutory bodies

-Engineering Physics
-Engineering Chemistry
-Engineering Mathematics
-Biochemistry
-Microbiology

PROFESSIONAL CORE
-Unit Operations
-Bioprocess principles
& Calculations
-Cell Biology &
Genetics
-Molecular Biology
-Human Physiology
-Immunology
-Bio reaction
Engineering
-Structural Biology
-Genetic Engineering
-Enzyme Technology
-Upstream Process
Technology
-Bioinformatics
-Bioprocess control
and Automation
-Downstream process
technology and
bioseparation
techniques
-Genomics and
Proteomics

ENGINEERING SCIENCES

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES

-Heat & Mass Transfer


-Fundamentals of Computing
-Basics of Civil Engineering
-Elements of Electronics
-Elements of Mechanical Engg.
-Basic Electrical Engg.
-Engineering Design and Drawing

-Professional communication
-English/Kannada
-Constitution of India
-IPR
-Economics & Enterpreneurship
-Environmental Studies
-Biosafety and Bioethicks

PROFESSIONAL
ELECTIVES
-Food Biotechnology
-Programming in JAVA &C++
-Environmental
Biotechnology
-Process Equipment Design
-Fundamentals of OS & SQL
-Animal Biotechnology
-Microbial Biotechnology
-Transport Phenomena
-BioPerl & HTML
-Fermentation Technology &
Design
-Agricultural Biotechnology
-Biomaterials
-Advance Programming
using CAD & MAT Lab
-Tissue Engineering
-Medical Biotechnology
-Insilico Drug Design
-Nano Biotechnology
-Operation Research &
Management
-Other Institutional Open
Elective

TECHNOLOGY

CURRICULUM
OBJECTIVES

JOB PROFILE

-Academics /
Teaching
-Project work

-Basic
knowldege

-Maintenence of
biotechnology
laboratory
equipments

-Core
competence

-Bio-Separation
equipments
-Genetic
engineering:
specimens &
equipments
-Bioinformatics

-Interdisciplinary
learning
-Practical
experience
-Research
opportunities

-Research
-Healthcare
-Ennvironmental
information
systems
engineer
-Biomedical
engineer
-Product
development

-Management
-Enterpreneure
-Consultant

SALIENT FEATURES
Lower semesters will mainly focus more on basic and fundamentals of basic,
engineering courses, to understand the basics necessary for studying applied
sciences.
Compulsory seminar component has been introduced to prepare students for
scientific data acquisition, interpretation and presentation to develop
professional skills.
Students will be assessed periodically based on the internal tests,
assignments, practicals, and final examination and project work
presentations.
Students will be allowed to select their research project with the approval of
their guide(s) and hosting institution.

Compulsory for UG students to write standard research project report,


publication of paper and presentation of research papers in the national and
international conferences will be highly encouraged.

Good
Governance

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

Curriculum Development

FOCUSED
EDUCATION

Expert Opinion
Approved by Board of Studies
Semester start and end Review with Faculty & Students
Periodic review by BOS and Subject Experts
Feedback from all the stakeholders
CONTINUAL QUALITY IMPROVEMENT
Program outcomes and course learning outcomes will be continuously assessed and
evaluated
by faculty, subject experts, and students
giving pertinent information to faculty (lecturers) and Board of
studies/examiners
on the effectiveness of the design, delivery, and direction of an educational
program.
Improvements base d on periodic re view meeting outcomes and deliberations during
BOS/BOE will close the system loop and the process will continue towards quality
improvement

Learning
outcomes

Different stakeholders and their interactions contributed for establishment of


outcome based education.

M S RAMAIAH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BANGALORE


(Autonomous Institute, Affiliated to VTU)
SCHEME OF TEACHING FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2013 2014

Sl.
No

Subject
Code

BTMAT
301

BT302

BT303

4
5

BT304
BT305

BT306

BT307L

BT308L

BT309L

*L Lecture,

III SEMESTER BE BIOTECHNOLOGY


Credits*
Teaching
Subject Title
Dept.
L T P Total
Numerical &
Mathematical Mathematics
Biology
Unit
BT
Operations
Bioprocess
Principles &
BT
Calculations
Biochemistry
BT
Microbiology
BT
Cell Biology &
BT
Genetics
Unit
Operations
BT
Lab
Biochemistry
BT
Lab
Microbiology
BT
Lab
Total
T Tutorial,

Contact
hours
4

4
4

0
0

0
0

4
4

21

2 3
26
P- Practicals

Classifi
cation
BS

PSC

PSC

4
4
5

BS
BS
PSC

PSC

PSC

PSC

Sl.
No
1

Subject
Code
BTMAT
401

BT402

BT403

BT404

BT405

BT406

BT407L

BT408L

BT409L

31
*L Lecture,

IV SEMESTER BE BIOTECHNOLOGY
Credits*
Teaching
Subject Title
Dept.
L T P Total
Biostatistics & Mathemat
4 0 0
4
Biomodeling
ics
Heat & Mass
BT
3 1 0
4
Transfer
Bioanalytical
BT
4 0 0
4
Techniques
Biochemical
Thermodynam
BT
3 1 0
4
ics
Molecular
BT
3 1 0
4
Biology
Human
BT
3 0 0
3
Physiology
Heat & Mass
BT
0 0 1
1
Transfer Lab
Bioanalytical
Techniques
BT
0 0 1
1
Lab
Molecular
BT
0 0 1
1
Biology Lab
Total
20 3 3
26
T Tutorial,
P- Practicals

Contac
t hours

Classification

BS

PSC

ES

ES

PSC

PSC

PSC

PSC

PSC

32

Prerequisite: Engineering Mathematics I and II


Course coordinators: Dr. G. Neeraja and Dr. Monika Anand
Objectives:
1. Learn to solve algebraic and transcendental equations numerically.
2. Understand the concept of partial differential equations and it applications to
engineering.
3. Learn the concept of finite differences and its applications.
4. Learn the concepts of fluid dynamics.
Unit I
Numerical solution of Algebraic and Transcendental equations: Method of false
position, Newton - Raphson method.
Partial Differential Equations I: Formation of PDES by elimination of arbitrary constants
and arbitrary functions, Solution of PDE - Lagranges linear form, Method of separation
of variables.
Unit-II
Partial Differential Equations-II: Derivation of one dimensional heat and wave
equations, Numerical solution of one dimensional heat and wave equations, Two
dimensional Laplace equation, Poisson equation.
Unit III
Finite Differences and Interpolation: Forward and backward differences, Interpolation,
Newton-Gregory forward and backward Interpolation formulae, Lagranges
interpolation formula, Newtons divided difference interpolation formula (no proof).
Numerical Differentiation and Numerical Integration: Derivatives using NewtonGregory forward and backward interpolation formulae, Newton-Cotes quadrature
rd
th
formula, Trapezoidal Rule, Simpsons (1/3) rule, Simpsons(3/8) rule.
Unit IV

Models for Blood Flows: Basic concepts of fluid dynamics, Hagen Poiseuille flow,
Basic concepts about blood, Cardiovascular system and blood flows, Blood flow through
artery with mild stenosis.
Unit V
Models of flows for other Bio-fluids: Peristaltic flows in Bio mechanics, Peristaltic
motion in channels, Characteristic dimensionless parameters. Models for Gas exchange
and air flow in lungs, Alveolar sacs, pulmonary capillaries, Weibels model for flows in
lung air ways. Two dimensional flow in renal tubule Function of Renal tube- Basic
equations and boundary conditions.
MATLAB or Mathematica: Tool kits 2D & 3D Graph Plotting, Data Analysis.
Text Books:
th
1. B.S. Grewal Higher Engineering Mathematics Khanna Publishers 40
edition 2007.
2. J.N. Kapur Mathematical Models in Biology and Medicine East-west press
private ltd. New Delhi 2000.
Reference Books
1. Dennis G. Zill, Michael R. Cullen Advanced Engineering mathematic
rd
Jones and Barlett Publishers Inc. 3 edition 2009.
2. S.S. Sastry Introductory methods of Numerical Analysis Prentice Hall of
th
India 4 edition 2007.
3. B.V. Ramana-Engineering Mathematics-Tata McGrawHill publishing co ltd, New
Delhi 2008.
Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial
class
Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome
What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency in
the course)
Direct
Assessment
Methods
CIE

Sub Code
Credit

Numerical and Mathematical Biology


: BT MAT 301
CIE
: 50 Marks
: 4:0:0
SEE
: 50 Marks

Internal
assessme
nt tests
Class-

Student
s

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Twice(

10

Assignmen

1,2,3&4

Average of
the two will
be computed)

t reports

Surprise
Test

Once

Standard
examinati
on

End of course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

100

End of course

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

SEE

room
open
book
assignme
nt

End of course
survey

Student
s

10

To solve problems
of
algebraic
transcendental
equations
numerically.

Quiz
answers

1,2,3&4

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

Questionnaire

1,2,3&4,
assessment
methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL NO.
Blooms Category
CIE/SEE
1
2
3
4
5
6

Remember
Understand
Apply
Analyze
Evaluate
Create

20
20
30
25
5

Outcome: On completion of this course students are expected to do the following:


1. To solve problems of algebraic transcendental equations numerically.
2. Solve linear partial differential equations.
3. Will be able to use a given data for equal and unequal intervals to find
polynomial function for estimation.
4. Computing maxima, minima, curvature, the radius of curvature using numerical
differentiation.
Mapping of course outcome with program outcomes
Course Outcomes

Program Outcome

a
X

Solve linear partial


differential
equations.
Will be able to use
a given data for
equal and unequal
intervals to find
polynomial
function
for
estimation.
Computing
maxima, minima,
curvature,
the
radius
of
curvature
using
numerical
differentiation.

Sub Code
Credit

e
X

UNIT OPERATIONS
: BT 302
: 3:0:0

CIE
SEE

Prerequisite: Engineering Mathematics I and II


Course coordinators: Mr. M.Gokulakrishnan and Dr.Chandraprabha M N
Objectives: The course will provide:

j
X

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

UNIT-1
Introduction to Fluid Mechanics: Units, Dimensions, Basic and Derived units,
Dimensional homogeneity, Dimensionless numbers, Rayleigh method, Buckinghams pi
theorem, Similitude. Fluid definition and classification (Types of fluids Newtonian and
Non Newtonian); Pressure measurement - Manometers.
UNIT- 2
Flow Past Immersed Bodies: Types of flow - laminar and Turbulent; Reynolds number;
Basic equations of fluid flow - Continuity equation and Bernoulli equation; Flow through
circular and non circular conduits Hagen Poiseuille equation; Flow past immersed
bodies Kozney-Carmen equation.
UNIT-3
Flow measurements: Flow measurements Orifice meter, Venturimeter, Rotameter.
Pumps, Centrifugal & Reciprocating pumps, Characteristics of centrifugal pumps.
UNIT-4
Filtration & Agitation and Mixing: Filtration, Types of filtration, Calculation of
resistances and rate of filtration, equipments- plate and frame, Rotary Drum filter
Theory of mixing, Power number calculations, Mixing equipments.

UNIT-5
Flow of Solids through Stagnant Fluids: Settling, Free and Hindered, Stokes law,
Newtons law, Terminal settling velocity, Batch sedimentation theory (Kynch), Thickner
design.
Size Separation & Reduction: Particle shape, size, screen analysis, Size reduction
equipment (Qualitative treatment), Ball mill
Material Handling Equipment: Material handling equipments, Transportation of
materials and storage

Reference Books
rd
1. Badger, Banchero and Walter (1955) Introduction to Chemical Engineering, 3
Edn., McGraw-Hill Publications, USA
2. Alan S Foust, Wenzel LA, Clump CW, Maus L, and Anderson LB (2008) Principles of
Unit Operations. 2nd Edn., John Wiley & Sons, USA.
th
3. Coulson and Richardsons (2006); Chemical Engineering, Vols I & II., 5 Edn., Reed
Educational and Professional Publishing Ltd., USA
th
4. Perry R.H, Green D.W. (2008); Perrys Chemical Engineering Hand Book, 8 Edn.,
McGraw-Hill Publications, USA

Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class
Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome
What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency in
the course)
Thrice(Averag
Internal
e of the best
30
assessment
two will be
tests
computed)
Assignmen
Twice
10
t
CIE

3.
4.

Textbooks:
1. McCabe WL, Smith JC and Harriott (2005) Unit operations in Chemical Engineering,
th
7 Edn., McGraw-Hill Publications, USA.
nd
2. Gavhane KA (2012) Unit Operations I & II, 22 Edn., Nirali Prakashan, India.

Surprise
Test/Quiz

SEE

2.

To study dimensional analysis and empirical methods governing the transport


of momentum (fluid flow) in chemical engineering systems.
To analyze the application of momentum and energy balances to simple steady
state fluid flow systems and flow through packed beds.
To predict the flow measurements and analyze transportation of fluids.
To become familiar with techniques to apply these subjects to areas such as
sedimentation, filtration, mixing and size reduction

Direct Assessment Methods

1.

Standard
examinatio
n

Student
s

Once

10

End of course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

100

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Blue books

1,2,3&4

Assignmen
t reports
Blue
books/
Quiz
answer
sheets
Answer
scripts

2&3

1,2&3

1,2,3&4

Indirect
Assessm
ent
Methods

End of course
survey

Student
s

End of course

problems.

Questionnaire

---

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL
NO.

Blooms
Category

Test 1

1
2
3
4
5
6

Remember
Understand
Apply
Analyze
Evaluate
Create

20
25
25
20
10
0

Test 2
20
20
20
25
15
0

Test 3

Semester-End Exam

20
15
15
30
20
0

10
20
20
30
20
0

Outcome: On completion of this course students will


1. Predict the dimensional analysis and solution for fluid flow problems.
2. Predict the pressure drop in fluid flow and flow through packed beds.
3. Estimate the flow rate of fluids and design the pumps for transportation of
fluids.
4. Analyze and solve the problems on filtration, sedimentation, size reduction and
mixing.

Mapping of course outcome with program outcomes


Course
Program Outcome
Outcomes
PO PO PO
PO PO PO PO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Predict the
dimensional
analysis and
solution for
fluid flow

PO
8

PO
9

P
O
10

PO
11

PO
12

Predict the
pressure
drop in fluid
flow
and
flow
through
packed
beds.
Estimate
the
flow
rate
of
fluids and
design the
pumps for
transportati
on of fluids.
Analyze and
solve the
problems
on
filtration,
sedimentati
on,
size
reduction
and mixing.

Sub Code
Credit

BIOPROCESS PRINCIPLES AND CALCULATIONS


: BT 303
CIE
: 50 Marks
: 3:1:0
SEE
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Engineering Mathematics I and II


Course coordinator: Dr.Chandraprabha MN and Mr. M. Gokulakrishnan
Objectives of the course: The course will provide:

1.
2.
3.
4.

To correctly implement unit conversions (an ability to apply knowledge of


mathematics, science, and engineering),
To analyze and solve elementary material balances on single and multi-unit
process, for both nonreactive and reactive processes
To analyze and solve elementary energy balances.
To analyze and solve elementary balances for biochemical reactions.

UNIT-1
Introduction & Basic Chemical Calculations: Historical development and overview of
traditional and modern applications of biotechnological processes. Process flow sheet
and unit operations in chemical and bioprocess industries. Fundamental and derived
quantities, Inter-conversion of units from one system to another (FPS, CGS, MKS, SI).
Concept of mole and molecule, Composition of mixtures and solutions- Percentage by
weight, mole and volume; Normality, Molarity, Molality; average molecular weight; ppm,
pH and pK Buffer calculations.
UNIT-2
Material balance without chemical reactions: General material balance equation for
steady and unsteady states. Material balances in Distillation, Absorption, Extraction,
Crystallization, Psychrometry, Drying, Mixing, Evaporation Operations.

Stoichiometry of Microbial Growth and Product Formation: Introduction, Definitions of


specific growth rate and yield. Elemental balances and degrees of reduction. Problems
on specific rate and yield.

Textbooks:
1. Hougen OA, Watson KM and Ragatz RA (1996) Chemical Process Principles: Part I,
nd
2 Edn., John Wiley, USA.
nd
2. Gavhane KA (2009) Process Calculations Stoichiometry, 22 Edn., Nirali Prakashan,
India.
nd
3. Shuler ML and Kargi F (2001) Bioprocess Engineering, 2 Edn., Prentice Hall
International, NJ, USA.

Reference Books:
1. David Himmelblau (2003) Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical Engineering,
th
7 Edn., Prentice Hall Inc., USA.
st
2. Segel IH (1995) Biochemical Calculations 1 Edn., John Wiley & Sons, NewYork.
3. Bailey JE and Ollis DF (1993) Biochemical Engg. Fundamentals, McGraw Hill,
Newyork, USA.
Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class

UNIT-4
Energy Balance: General energy balance equation for steady state. Thermo physics and
Thermo chemistry: Heat capacity, estimation of heat capacity for solids, liquids, gases
and their mixtures. Enthalpy, Standard Heat of formation, standard heat of reaction,
Standard heat of combustion and calorific value, Calculation of (HR) at elevated
temperature. Biochemical equilibrium constants and conversions.

UNIT-5

Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome


What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency
in the
course)
Direct Assessment Methods

UNIT-3
Material balance involving chemical reactions: Principles of Stoichiometry. Definitions
of limiting and excess reactants, fractions and percentage conversion, yield and
percentage yield, selectivity and related problems. Material balances involving bypass,
recycle & purge; Fuels and Combustion: calculations involving Excess air and Air-fuel
ratio.

C
I
E

Internal
assessme
nt tests
Assignme
nt
Surprise
Test/
Tutorial

Student
s

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Thrice
(Average of
the best
two will be
computed)

30

Blue books

1,2,3&4

Once

10

Assignmen
t reports

2,3&4

Once

10

Blue books

3&4

Test

Asse
ssme
nt

S
EE

Standard
examinat
ion

End of course
survey

End of
course
(Answering
5 of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

End of
course

Questionnaire

----

Student
s

CIE and SEE evaluation


S.No

Blooms Category

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Semester-End
Examination

Remember

10

10

10

Understand

30

10

Apply

60

10

20

20

Analyze

Evaluate

90

70

60

Create

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to:1. Acquire knowledge on basic chemical calculations and conduct material
balances around steady- state multi-unit processes without chemical reactions.
2. Conduct material balances around steady- state multi-unit processes with
chemical reactions.
3. Conduct energy balances around multi-unit processes with and without
chemical reactions.
4. Predict stoichiometric requirements of reactants and products in biochemical
reactions.
Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes
Program Outcome

Course outcome
Conduct material
balances
around
steady- state multiunit
processes
without chemical
reactions.
Conduct material
balances
around
steady- state multiunit processes with
chemical reactions.
Conduct
energy
balances
around
multi-unit
processes with and
without chemical
reactions.
Predict
stoichiometric
requirements
of
reactants
and
products
in
biochemical
reactions.

a
X

d
X

b
X

i
X

BIOCHEMISTRY
Sub Code
Credit

: BT 304
: 4:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Engineering Chemistry


Course coordinator: Dr. P.Dhamodhar & Dr.Ahalya N
Objectives of the course: The course will provide
1. To learn the basic chemical and structural features of important classes of
biomolecules, including peptides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids.

2.
3.

To develop hands-on laboratory skills in modern biochemical techniques.


To develop a sufficient background for those students who wish to study more
advanced biotechnology topics
4. To develop a general foundation for understanding the molecular basis of
human growth, metabolism and disease.
UNIT-1
Introduction to Biomolecules: Carbohydrates, Fats and lipids, Amino acids and Proteins.
Structure, Properties and Classification. Biologically important peptides, Purines,
pyrimidines, nucleotides, Nucleic Acids- DNA and RNA.

Reference Books
1. Donal J. Voet, Judith G. Voet, Charlotte W. Pratt (2005) Fundamentals of
Biochemistry, Upgrade Edn. Wiley Publishers, New York, USA.
2. Robert K Murray, Daryl K Granner, Peter A Mayes (2006) Harpers Illustrated
th
Biochemistry 27 Edn. McGraw Hill Book Company, USA.

Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class

UNIT-5
Amino Acid & Nucleotide Metabolism: Biosynthesis of amino acids starting from acetyl
CoA (with reference to oxaloacetate family). Biodegradation of amino acids,
deamination, transamination and urea cycle. Biosynthesis, and biodegradation of Purine
& pyrimidine nucleotides: Denova pathway, salvage pathway. Regulation of nucleotide
metabolism.
Textbooks:
th
1. David L. Nelson, Michel M. Cox (2008) Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry,4
Edn., Palgrave Macmilan, W H Freeman Publisher, Newyork, USA
th
2. Jereny M. Berg, John L. Tymoczko, Lubert Stryer (2006) Biochemistry, 6 Edn. W H
Freeman Publisher, New York, USA.

CIE

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Internal
assessme
nt tests

Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Assignme
nt

Twice

10

Assignme
nt reports

1&3

Once

10

Quiz
answers

1,2&3

End of course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

End of course

Questionnaire

-----

Surprise
quiz
SEE

UNIT-4
Lipid Metabolism: Biosynthesis of fatty acids, Fatty acid synthase, Biosynthesis of
cholesterol, phospholipids, glycolipids. Biodegradation of fatty acids-beta oxidation
pathway and its energetics.

Direct Assessment Methods

UNIT-3
Carbohydrate Metabolism: Glycolysis Aerobic and anaerobic pathway and energetics,
TCA cycle and its regulation, Calvin Cycle, Glyoxylate cycle, Pentose Phosphate Pathway.
Electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation, Gluconeogenesis regulation of
gluconeogenesis. Biosynthesis of polysaccharides.

Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome


What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency in
the course)

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

UNIT-2
Bioenergetics & Transport Mechanism: Energy, energy flow cycle, Structure and
properties of ATP. High energy compounds, Coupling reactions of ATP and NAD.
Biological membranes: structure, permeability, properties, passive transport and active
transport, facilitated transport, energy requirement, mechanism of Na+ / K+, glucose
and amino acid transport. Organization of transport activity in cell.

Student
s

Standard
examinat
ion

End of course
survey

Student
s

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components

S.No

Blooms Category

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Semester-End
Examination

Remember

30

20

10

20

Understand

40

30

30

30

Apply

30

30

30

30

Analyze

20

20

10

Evaluate

10

10

Create

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to:1. Classify the macromolecules and analyze their biological and chemical
properties.
2. Differentiate between the biological transport processes and the bioenergetics
accompanied.
3. Analyze and interpret the importance of carbohydrate metabolism in human
body.
4. Understand the importance of Lipid, aminoacid and nucleotide metabolism in
human body.
Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes
Program Outcome
Course Outcomes

Classify
the
macromolecules
and analyze their
biological
and
chemical
properties.
Differentiate
between
the
biological

PO
1

PO
2

PO
3

P
O
4

PO
5
X

PO
6

PO
7

P
O
8

PO
9

PO
10

PO1
1

PO1
2

transport
processes
and
the bioenergetics
accompanied.
Analyze
and
interpret
the
importance
of
carbohydrate
metabolism
in
human body.
Understand the
importance
of
Lipid, aminoacid
and nucleotide
metabolism
in
human body

MICROBIOLOGY
Sub Code
Credits

: BT 305
: 4:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Nil
Course coordinator: Dr. Ahalya N and Dr. Dhamodhar P
Objectives of the course: This will give knowledge on
1. To understand the different types of microorganisms, their classification,
modes of reproduction and significance.
2. To learn the role of microorganisms in diseases, biofertilisers, food, etc.
3. To evaluate and apply the proper methods of microbial control.
4. To develop hands on laboratory skills in microbiological techniques.
UNIT-1
Introduction: The Scope of Microbiology, History of Microbiology, Microbial diversity
and Taxonomy, Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes, Types of Microorganisms - Bacteria,
Viruses, Fungi, Protozoa, Algae - their Structure, Classification, Modes of Reproduction &
Significance.
UNIT-2
Methods in Microbiology: Basic principles of Microscopy, Bright-Field Microscopy, DarkField Microscopy, Phase-Contrast Microscopy, Fluorescence Microscopy, Electron
Microscopy SEM, TEM. Pure culture Techniques (streak-plate, spread plate, pour
plate), Cultural characteristics, staining of Microorganisms (Simple staining, differential
staining), types of stains, theories of staining, Enumeration of Microorganisms (Direct
Microscopic Count, by Pour plate technique, Streak plate, membrane filtration,
Electronic Methods, etc), Characterization: Biochemical tests and 16-s rRNA homology
studies.
UNIT-3
Microorganisms- Bacteria: The morphology and fine structure of Bacteria, Cultivation of
Bacteria, Media and types of media Nutritional requirements, Reproduction and
Growth, Factors affecting growth, Measurement of growth. Microbial Metabolism:
Aerobic and anaerobic growth, Metabolic pathways.
UNIT-4

Control of Microorganisms: Control of Microorganisms by physical methods (heat,


filtration, radiation), Control by chemical methods (phenol & phenolic compounds,
Alcohols, Halogens, Dyes, Detergents, Aldehydes, Heavy metals, etc), Antibiotics and
other chemotherapeutic agents.
UNIT-5
Applications of Microbiology: Microbiology of soil, Biofertilizers, Microbes in
Bioremediation, Traditional microbial processes using yeasts and bacteria, Microbes as
source of protein, Microbial Insecticides, Enzymes from microbes, primary and
secondary metabolites. Clinical Microbiology. Pathogenesis of microorganisms, Human
diseases caused by microbes viruses (HIV), bacteria (TB, Cholera and E.coli), Protozoans
(Malaria and amebiasis).
Textbooks:
th
1. Prescott LM, Harley JP, Klein DA (2002) Microbiology, 5 Edn. McGraw- Hill
Publications, USA
th
2. Pelczar MJ, Chan ECS, Kreig NR (1993) Microbiology, 5 Edn. Tata Mc-Graw Hill,
India.
3. Channarayappa (2006) Molecular Biotechnology: Principles and Practices,
Universities Press (India) Pvt. Ltd., CRC Press Worldwide.
Reference Books
1. Channarayappa (2010) Cell Biology: Universities Press (India) Pvt Ltd.
th
2. Black J (2008) Microbiology: Principles and Explorations, 6 Edn. John Wiley and
Sons,USA,
th
3. Tortora GJ, Funke BR, and Case CL (2006) Microbiology: An Introduction, 4 Edn.,
Benjamin-Cummings Pub Co, USA.
rd
4. Ingraham JA, Ingraham CA (2004) Introduction to Microbiology, 3 Edn. Int
Thomson Computer Press, USA
th
5. Cappuccino J.G, Sherman N (1999) Microbiology: A Laboratory Manual, 4 Edn.,
Addison-Wesley International Student.
6. Prescott, Harley and Klein (2008) Laboratory Exercises in Microbiology, 7th Ed
Harley, McGraw-Hill, USA
7. Pollack RA, Walter F, Mondschein W, Modesto R (2004) Laboratory Exercises in
nd
Microbiology, 2 Edn.John Wiley Publication.
Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and power point presentations
What
To
When/
Max
Evidence
Contributing
whom
Where
marks collected
to Course
(Frequency in
Outcomes

CIE

Internal
assessm
ent tests

Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Classroom
open
book
assignm
ent

Twice(
Average of
the two will
be computed)

10

Assignmen
t reports

1,2,3&4

Surprise
quiz

Once

10

Quiz
answers

1,2,3&4

Standar
d
examina
tion

End of course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

SEE

Direct Assessment Methods

the course)

End of course
survey

Student
s

Student
s

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

Questionnaire

1,2,3&4,
Assessment
methods

100

End of course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
S.No

Blooms Category

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Semester-End
Examination

Remember

40

40

30

30

Understand

30

40

30

30

Apply

25

15

30

25

Analyze

05

05

10

Evaluate

05

05

Create

05

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to1. Explain the core principles of microbiology.
2. Differentiate among different categories of microbes
3. Perform aseptic technique and demonstrate appropriate laboratory safety
skills for working with microbes and mastery of basic microscopic staining
techniques required for visualization of microbes.
4. Understand the relationship between microbes and biotechnology, including
environmental, industrial, and medical applications
Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes
Program Outcome
Course
PO PO PO PO PO PO PO
Outcomes
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Explain the
core
principles of
microbiology.
Differentiate
among
different
categories of
microbes
Perform
aseptic
technique
and
demonstrate
appropriate
laboratory
safety skills
for working
with
microbes and
mastery
of
basic
microscopic

PO
8

PO
9

P
O
10

P
O
11

P
O
12

Cell Structure & Function: Introduction and scope of cell biology; Evolution of
prokaryotic & eukaryotic cells; Structural details. Plasma membrane: structural
composition, organization and functions. Cytoskeleton eukaryotic & prokaryotic;
eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins types, structural organization and functions. Cell-Cell
junctions.

staining
techniques
required for
visualization
of microbes.
Understand
the
relationship
between
microbes and
biotechnolog
y, including
environment
al, industrial,
and medical
applications

X
UNIT-2
Cell Organelles: Structural organization and functions of cell organelles: Nucleus,
Mitochondria, Chloroplast, Endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi bodies, Ribosomes, Lysosomes,
Peroxisomes, Vacuoles.
UNIT-3
Cell Cycle & Cell Signaling: Cell cycle; Mitosis and Meiosis. Introduction to cell signalingpara, endo and autocrine; different Receptors: cell surface, ion channel linked;
neurotransmitter, G protein linked; beta adrenergic receptor, cAMP and enzyme linked;
Ras-DAG, calmodulin.

Sub Code
Credit

CELL BIOLOGY AND GENETICS


: BT 306
CIE
: 3:1:0
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Nil
Course coordinator: DR. Ravi kumar Y. S. and DR. Prabha M.
Objectives of the course: This will give the Knowledge on:
1) The structural and functional unit of life: The Cell-evolution, organization of
plasma membrane, cytoplasm and other organelles.
2) The study of cell cycle phases and cell division, cell signaling with different
types of receptors and secondary messengers.
3) The basic background about the genetics: Mendelians principles, genes
behavior, alleles and types of chromosomes and disorders.
4) The subject to understand the random changes in genetic material: Mutation,
the causes and its types with population genetics and benefits of HardyWeinberg principle.
UNIT-1

UNIT-4
Mendelian Principles and Heredity: Introduction & scope of Genetics; Mendels
principles. Gene interaction and linkage; Multiple alleles blood groups and Rh factor.
Chromosome: Fine structure of chromosome-solenoid model; Euchromatin and
heterochromatin; Sex determination in plants & animals; Sex chromosomes in human;
Sex linked disease- hemophilia; Autosomal linked disease-color blindness; Sex limited
and sex influenced traits. Problems-- on Mendelian genetics, gene interactions, multiple
alleles; sex linked inheritance.
UNIT-5
Mutation and Population Genetics: Mutation- types of mutations; chemical, physical
and transposon as mutagens; significance of mutation. Chromosomal aberrationsStructural & Numerical. Point mutations & frame shift mutations. Population genetics Hardy-Weinberg principle closed and open populations; allele, genotype and genotype
frequencies; MN blood group. Problems-Hardy-Weinberg principle.
Textbooks:
1. Channarayappa (2010) Cell Biology: Universities Press (India) Pvt Ltd.
2. Eldon John Gardner et al (2003), Principles of Genetics, VIII Edn. John Wiley & Sons,
Singapore.
3. Susan Elord & William Stansfield (2005) Genetics, V Edition, Tata-McGraw-Hill
Publishing Co.Ltd., West Patel Nagar, New Delhi.

Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class

CIE
SEE

Direct Assessment Methods

Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome


What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency in
the course)

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Internal
assessme
nt tests

Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)

30

Blue
books

1,2,3, & 4

Classroom
open
book
assignme
nt

Twice(
Average of
the two will
be computed)

10

Assignmen
t reports

1,2,3, & 4

Case
analysis

Once

Case
solutions

1,2,3, & 4

Surprise
quiz

Once

Quiz
answers

1,2,3, & 4

Standard
examinat
ion

End of course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

1,2,3, & 4

Student
s

Indirect
Assessmen
t Methods

Reference Books
1. Bruce Alberts et al (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell, V Edition, Taylor & Francis
Group, New York
2. William Stanfield et al (2005) Molecular Biology & Cell Biology, Tata-McGraw-Hill
Publishing Co.Ltd., West Patel Nagar, New Delhi
3. Freifelder D (2002) Molecular Biology, ,III Edition, Narosa Publishing House, Madras.
4. Gupta PK (2005) Cell & Molecular Biology, III Edn. Rastogi Publications, Meerut.
5. Lodish et. al. (2003) Molecular Cell biology, V Edition, W.H. Freeman & company,
New York.
6. Benjamin Lewin (2006) Gene IX by, Jones & Bartlett Publishers, Singapore.

End of course
survey

Student
s

End of course

1,2,3, & 4
Assement
methods

Questionnaire

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL NO.
Blooms Category
Semester-End Exam
1
2
3
4
5
6

Remember
Understand
Apply
Analyze
Evaluate
Create

20
20
35
20
5
0

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability:1) To learn the importance of the cell, its origin, the organelle structure and
function.
2) To get the basic information to understand the steps behind the cell division,
signal transduction with messengers and receptors.
3) To gain the knowledge of phenotypic and genotypic characters of genes and
reasons behind chromosomal disorders.
4) To know the information in the significance and functions of mutations and
Hardy-Weinberg principle for population genetics.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Program Outcome
Course Outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
To learn the importance of X
X
X
X
the cell, its origin, the
organelle structure and
To
get
the
basic X
X
X
X
X
information to understand
the steps behind the cell
division,
signal
transduction
with

Sub Code
Credit

11. Constant pressure / constant rate filtration using leaf filter.


12. Verification of Stokes law in Free/Hindered Settling.
13. Size reduction using Ball mill
14. Size reduction using crusher

Note: Any 12 experiments must be performed

UNIT OPERATIONS LAB


: BT307L
CIE
: 0:0:1
SEE

Reference Books
rd
1. Badger, Banchero and Walter (1955) Introduction to Chemical Engineering, 3
Edn., McGraw-Hill Publications, USA
2. Alan S Foust, Wenzel LA, Clump CW, Maus L, and Anderson LB (2008) Principles of
Unit Operations. 2nd Edn., John Wiley & Sons, USA.
th
3. Coulson and Richardsons (2006); Chemical Engineering, Vols I & II., 5 Edn., Reed
Educational and Professional Publishing Ltd., USA
: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Unit operations


Course coordinator: Mr. Samrat K and Mr. Gokulakrishnan M
Objectives of the lab: This will give the Knowledge on:
1. To measure the flow rate of the fluids using variable head meters.
2. To calculate the frictional losses in pipes.
3. To separate the particles based on size.
4. To calculate the area of filtration and sedimentation equipments.
LABORATORY
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Friction in circular pipes.
2. Flow rate measurement using orificemeter
3. Flow rate measurement using Venturimeter
4. Flow through annulus.
5. Study of pump Characteristics.
6. Flow through helical coil.
7. Losses across joints & fittings
8. Sieve analysis.
9. Determination of screen effectiveness.
10. Determination of minimum thickener area using Batch sedimentation tests.

Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching and interaction through Laboratory
sessions
Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome
Max
What
To
When/
marks
whom
Where
(Frequency
in the
course)

CIE

SEE

Direct Assessment
Methods

To gain the knowledge of


phenotypic and genotypic
characters of genes and
reasons
behind
chromosomal disorders.
To know the information in
the
significance
and
functions of mutations and
Hardy-Weinberg principle
for population genetics.

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Internal
assessment
tests

Once

30

Blue books

1,2,3&4

Lab
Assesment

Continuous

10

Attendanc
e

1,2,3&4

Record

Continuous

10

Record

1,2,3&4

Standard
examinatio
n

End of
course

50

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

Studen
ts

Program Outcome
Course
Outcomes

Indirect
Assessmen
t Methods

Calculate the
pressure drop
through
circular
conduits,
pipes and
fittings and
annulus.
Estimate the
flow rate
using variable
head meters
and study the
pump
characteristics
.
Analyze the
particle size
and predict
the surface
area of the
particles.
Predict the
settling
regime and
calculate the
thickener
area.

PO
1

PO
2

PO
3

PO
4

PO
5

PO
6

PO
7

PO
8

PO
9

P
O
10

P
O
11

PO
12

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL NO.
Blooms Category
Lab Exam
SEE
1

Remember

20

20

Understand

20

20

Apply

20

20

Analyze

30

30

Evaluate

10

10

Create

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to:1.
Calculate the pressure drop through circular conduits, pipes and fittings and
annulus.
2.
Estimate the flow rate using variable head meters and study the pump
characteristics.
3.
Analyze the particle size and predict the surface area of the particles.
4.
Predict the settling regime and calculate the thickener area.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes

X
Sub Code
Credit

BIOCHEMISTRY LAB
: BT308L
CIE
: 0:0:1
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Engineering chemistry


X

End of course
survey

Studen
ts

End of
course

Course coordinator: Dr. Sharath, R. and Dr. P.Dhamodhar

Questionnaire

---

Objectives of the lab: This will give the Knowledge on:


1. To learn fundamental approaches for experimentally investigating biochemical
problems
2. Understand the applicability of the biochemical methods to realistic situations.
3. To enhance the practical approaches in estimation of carbohydrates, proteins
and lipids
LABORATORY

LIST OF EXPERIMENTS:
1. Qualitative tests for Carbohydrates
2. Qualitative tests for Amino acids and Proteins.
3. Titration of Amino acids- Sorensons formal titration.
4. Estimation of phenol by FC method.
5. Estimation of reducing Sugar by O-Toludine / DNS method.
6. Estimation of inorganic Phosphate by Fiske-Subbarao method.
7. Estimation of Amino acid by Ninhydrin method.
8. Estimation of Protein by Lowrys method/Biuret method
9. Estimation of Urea by Diacetyl Monoxime method.
10. Estimation of Iron by Wongs method.
11. Determination of Saponification value of Lipids.
12. Determination of Iodine value of Lipid.
13. Determination of Peroxide value.
14. Determination of total carbohydrate by Anthrone method

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

SEE

Assesmen
t

Reference Books
1. Sadasivam S, Manickam A (2005) Biochemical Methods. Revised Second
Edition, New Age International Pvt. (L.)Publisher.
2. Artinigam, ArchanaAyyagari(2008). Lab Manual in Biochemistry,
Immunology and Biotechnology, Tata Mac Graw Hill- Publishing
company Ltd.
Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching and interaction through Laboratory
sessions
Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome

CIE

Direct
Assessmen
t Methods

Internal
assessme
nt tests
Lab

Record

Continuous

10

Record

1,2,3&4

Standard
examinati
on

End of
course

50

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

Questionnaire

1,2,3&4 and
assessment
methods

End of course
survey

Student
s

End of
course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL NO.
Blooms Category
Semester-End Exam

Note: Any 12 experiments must be performed

What

To
whom

When/
Where
(Frequency
in the
course)

Max
marks

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Student
s

Once

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Continuous

10

Attendanc

1,2,3&4

1
2
3
4
5
6

Remember
Understand
Apply
Analyze
Evaluate
Create

10
10
10
30
40

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to:1. To understand the experimental methods used in the biochemistry research
laboratory
2. To acquaint with the properties of biomolecules such as amino acids, peptides,
proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates.
3. Understand the applicability of the biochemical methods to realistic situations.
4. To enhance the practical approaches in estimation of carbohydrates, proteins
and lipids

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Program Outcome
Course
PO
PO2
PO
PO
PO
PO
PO
objective
1
b
3
4
5
6
7

PO
8

PO
9

P
O

P
O

10
To understand
the
experimental
methods used
in
the
biochemistry
research
laboratory
To acquaint
with
the
properties of
biomolecules
such as amino
acids,
peptides,
proteins,
lipids,
and
carbohydrates
.
Understand
the
applicability of
the
biochemical
methods
to
realistic
situations.
To
enhance
the practical
approaches in
estimation of
carbohydrates
, proteins and
lipid

11

Sub Code
Credit
Prerequisite: Microbiology

: BT309L
: 0:0:1

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Course coordinator: Dr. Ahalya N and Dr. Dhamodhar P

Objectives of the lab: This will give the Knowledge on:


1. Provide students with an understanding of important facts, concepts, and the
investigative procedures of a microbiology laboratory.
2. Train students in aseptic technique, and the proper methods relating to the
safe maintenance of microorganism.
3. Train students in fundamental laboratory methodology to include the use of
differential media, and associated reagents.
4. Provide students with a hands-on familiarity with basic research procedure for
identification of unknown microorganismal specimens.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Media preparation, plugging and sterilization.
2. Microscopic observation of Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic cells (bacteria, fungi,
yeasts and moulds).
3. Hanging drop experiment to study motility.
4. Enumeration of total count (haemocytometer) and viable count of bacteria.
5. Identification of bacteria by size, shape, Gram reaction.
6. Isolation of bacteria by serial dilution, pour plate and streak plate techniques.
7. Biochemical tests- IMViC tests, Starch hydrolysis, Catalase activity.
8. Isolation, culturing and identification of microorganisms from air.
9. Isolation, culturing and identification of microorganisms from water.
10. Isolation, culturing and identification of microorganisms from soil.
11. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of a bacterium.
12. Alcoholic and mixed acid fermentation.(Wine, Lactic acid).
13. Growth curve of bacteria (Demonstration).
14. Endospore staining.
Note: Any 12 experiments must be performed

MICROBIOLOGY LAB

Reference Books
th
1. Prescott LM, Harley JP, Klein DA (2002) Microbiology, 5 Edn. McGraw- Hill
th
2. Cappuccino J.G, Sherman N (1999) Microbiology: A Laboratory Manual, 4
Edn., Addison-Wesley International Student.

3.

Prescott, Harley and Klein (2008) Laboratory Exercises in Microbiology, 7th Ed


Harley, McGraw-Hill, USA
Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching and interaction through Laboratory
sessions

CIE

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

10

10

Apply

20

10

Analyze

30

30

Evaluate

30

40

Create

Once

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Marks distribution:

Lab
Assessment

Continuous

10

Attendanc
e

1,2,3&4

CIE: 50 Laboratory internal tests will be conducted 30 marks. Lab


Assessment/Record will be conducted 20 marks.

Continuous

10

Record

1,2,3&4

End of
course

50

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

End of
course

Questionnaire

1,2,3&4 and
assessment
methods

Student
s

Standard
examination

SEE

Evidence
collected

Understand

Internal
assessment
tests

Record

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

Direct Assessment Methods

Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome


Max
What
To
When/
marks
whom
Where
(Frequency
in the
course)

End of course
survey

Student
s

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various
educational components

ASSESSMENT PATTERN:
SL NO.

Blooms Category

Lab Internal test

Semester-End
Exam

Remember

10

10

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to:1. Operate equipment used in microbiology laboratory.
2. Identify microorganisms using morphological and physiological tests.
3. Prepare growth media and isolate microorganisms from various sources
4. Perform aseptic transfers.
Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes
Program Outcome
Course outcome PO PO PO PO PO PO PO PO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Operate
X
X
X
X
equipment used
in microbiology
laboratory
Identify
X
X
microorganisms
using
morphological
and physiological
tests.
Prepare growth X
X
media and isolate

PO
9

PO
10
X

PO
11

PO
12

microorganisms
from
various
sources
Perform aseptic
transfers

Standard error, Central limit theorem, Testing of Hypothesis, Level of significance,


Confidence limits, One tailed and two tailed tests, Test of significance for small samples,
t- distribution, F distribution and Chi-square distribution.
X

Sub Code
Credit

BIOSTATISTICS AND BIO MODELING


: BTMAT401
CIE
: 50 Marks
: 4:0:0
SEE
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Numerical and mathematical biology

Unit IV
ANOVA and Optmization models: Analysis of variance (One way and Two-way
classifications) : Case studies of statistical designs of biological experiments (RCBD and
RBD), Single and double blind experiments, Limitations of experiments. Optimization
models in Biology and Medicine Medical diagnosis problem, Hospital diet problem.
Unit V
Biomodeling: Microbial growth in a chemostat, Growth equations of
microbial
populations, Models of commensalisms, Mutualism, Predation and Mutation. Lotka Volterras model for n Interacting species. Basic models for inheritance, Selection and
Mutation models, Genetic inbreeding models Selfing, Sipmating

Course coordinator: Dr. Monika Anand & Dr. G. Neeraja


Objectives of the course: The course will provide
1. Study of Biostatistics, curve fitting and correlation and regression.
2. Learn the concept of basic probability and random variables.
3. Learn different probability distributions and stochastic process.
4. Study of genetic applications of probability.
Unit I
Statistics and Probability: Scope of Biostatistics, Correlation and regression analysis
(Simple and Linear) Curve fitting (Linear, Parabolic and Geometric curves)
Probability: Classical definition, Axioms, Addition rule, Multiplication rule, Conditional
probability, Bayes theorem.
Unit II
Random variables and Probability distributions: Random variables: Discrete and
continuous random variables, Mean and variance, Binomial distribution, Poisson
distribution, Geometric distribution, Exponential distribution, Uniform distribution,
Normal distribution.Stochastic Process : Classification, Unique fixed probability vector,
Regular stochastic matrix, Transition probability matrix, Markov chain.
Unit III
Genetic application of probability and Statistical inference: Genetic Applications of
Probability, Hardy - Weinberg law, Estimation of probabilities for multi-locus/multiallele finger print systems. Sampling and Statistical inference : Sampling Distributions,

Text Books:
1. Marcello Pagano and Kimberlee Gauvreu Principles of Biostatistics
nd
Thompson Learning 2 edition 2004.
2. Ronald N. Forthofer, Eun Sui Lee Introduction to Biostatistics Academic
press 2006.
3. J. N. Kapur Mathematical Models in Biology and Medicine- East-West Press
Private Ltd. New Delhi 2000.
Reference Books:
1. Warren J. Ewens, Gregory R. Grant Statistical methods in Bioinformatics
nd
Springer publications 2 edition 2006.
2. P. S. S. Sundar Rao and J. Richard An Intrduction to Biostatistics- Prentice Hall
th
of India 4 edition 2006.
3. Wayne W. Daneil Biostatistics: A foundation for Analysis in the Health
th
sciences John Wiley & Sons 7 edition 2000.
Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class
Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome
What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency
in the
course)

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Thrice(Avera
ge of the
best two will
be
computed)

CIE

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

SEE

Direct Assessment Methods

Internal
assessm
ent tests
Classroom
open
book
assignme
nt

Student
s

Once

30

10

3.
4.

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Assignme
nt reports

1,2,3&4

Surprise
Test

Once

10

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Standard
examinat
ion

End of course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

End of course

Questionnaire

1,2,3&4,
Assesment
methods

End of course
survey

Student
s

Apply different types of tests to test the hypothesis relating to small samples.
Modeling of growth of micro organisms in a chemostat.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcome


Program Outcome
Course Outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Fit a suitable curve
X
X
X
for the tabulated
data by the method
of least squares
X
X
Predict
the
probable
characteristics
possessed by the off
springs
of
nth
generations
Apply
different
X
X
X
X
X
types of tests to
test the hypothesis
relating to small
samples.
Modeling of growth X
X
X
X
of micro organisms
in a chemostat

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL NO.
Blooms Category
Semester-End Exam
1
2
3
4
5
6

Remember
Understand
Apply
Analyze
Evaluate
Create

20
20
30
25
5

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability:1. Fit a suitable curve for the tabulated data by the method of least squares.
2. Predict the probable characteristics possessed by the off springs of nth
generations.

Sub code
Credit

: BT 402
: 3:1:0

HEAT & MASS TRANSFER


CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Unit operations


Course coordinator: Mr. Samrat K and Dr Chandraprabha MN
Objectives of the course: The course will provide
1. To study the modes of heat transfer and thermo-physical properties and
application of energy conservation equation for thermal problems and heat
flux in one and dimensional conduction.

4.

UNIT-1
Introduction to Heat Transfer: Modes of heat transfer; Conduction steady state heat
conduction through uni-layer and multilayer plane wall sphere, cylinder; Insulation
types, critical radius, Optimum thickness of insulation. Forced and Natural convection;
Significance of Dimensionless numbers (Nu, Gr, Pr, Re, Pe numbers only); Heat transfer
without phase change, heat transfer in laminar and turbulent flow inside closed
conducts, concepts of film heat transfer coefficients.
UNIT-2
Heat Transfer Equipments: Equations and numerical problem for calculations of film
heat transfer coefficients, Heat transfer with phase change - Condensation film wise
and drop wise; Boiling types of boiling. Co current and counter current flow. Individual
and overall Heat transfer coefficients, LMTD, Elementary design of double pipe heat
exchanger and shell and tube heat exchanger.
UNIT-3
Basics of Mass Transfer: Diffusion - Ficks law of diffusion. Measurement of diffusivity,
Mass transfer coefficients and their correlations. Two film theory, Individual and Overall
Mass Transfer Co-efficients.
Distillation: Vapour liquid equilibrium, T-xy, P-xy, x-y equilibrium diagram, Raoults Law,
Azeotropic mixures, steam distillation. Numerical problems.
UNIT-4
Mass Transfer operations: Distillation Methods of distillation Simple, Flash distillation
of binary mixtures relative volatility, fractionation of binary mixtures -McCabe Thiele
method, Extractive and Azeotropic distillation, numericals.
UNIT-5
Other Mass Transfer operations: Drying, Drying rate, Drying curve and calculations,
Principles of: Extraction, Adsorption, and Absorption, Typical equipments.
Textbooks:

1.
2.
3.

McCabe WL, Smith JC and Harriott (2005) Unit operations in Chemical Engineering,
th
7 Edn., McGraw-Hill Publications, USA
rd
Treybal RE (2012) Mass Transfer Operations, 3 Edition, McGraw-Hill Publications,
USA.
th
Gavhane KA (2011) Unit Operations I & II, 25 Edn., Nirali Prakashan, India.

Reference Books
rd
1. Badger, Banchero and Walter (1955) Introduction to Chemical Engineering, 3 Edn.,
McGraw-Hill Publications, USA .
2. Alan S Foust, Wenzel LA, Clump CW, Maus L and Anderson LB (2008) Principles of
Unit Operations, 2nd Edn., John Wiley & Sons, USA.
th
3. Coulson and Richardsons (2006) Chemical Engineering, Vols I & II, 5 Edn., Reed
Educational and Professional Publishing Ltd., USA.
nd
4. Kern (2001) Process Heat Transfer, 2 Edn., McGraw-Hill Publications, USA.
th
5. Perry RH and Green DW (2008) Perrys Chemical Engineering Hand Book, 8 Edn.,
McGraw-Hill Publications.
Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class
Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome
Max
What
To
When/
mark
whom
Where
(Frequency
s
in the
course)

Evidence
collected

Contributin
g to Course
Outcomes

Thrice(Avera
ge of the
best two will
be
computed)

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Assignment

Once

10

Assignme
nt reports

1,2,3&4

Surprise/Tut
orial Test

Once

10

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Internal
assessment
tests
Studen
ts

CIE

3.

Evaluate heat transfer rate and to calculate heat transfer area and
effectiveness of different heat exchangers.
To study the various modes of mass transfer, to determine mass transfer rates
and to estimate diffusion coefficients.
To study principles of distillation, absorption drying and extraction operations.

Direct Assessment
Methods

2.

SEE
Asse
ssme
nt

Standard
examination

End of course
survey

Studen
ts

End of
course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

End of
course

Questionnaire

----

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL
Blooms
Test 1
Test 2
Test 3
Semester-End Exam
NO.
Category
1
2
3
4
5
6

Remember
Understand
Apply
Analyze
Evaluate
Create

20
25
25
20
10
0

20
20
20
25
15
0

20
15
15
30
20
0

10
20
20
30
20
0

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability:1. To determine the temperature and heat flux distribution using energy
conservation and/or Fourier heat law and to determine the heat flux and
temperature distribution in steady state one-dimensional problems using
thermal resistance concept.
2. To determine the heat flux in turbulent flows using empirical equations
and to estimate the heat transfer rate for different heat exchangers.
3. To determine mass transfer rates and mass transfer coefficients and
relation between individual and overall mass transfer coefficients.
4. To determine various parameters of mass transfer operations.
Mapping of course outcomes with program outcome
Program Outcome
Course
PO PO PO PO PO PO PO PO
Outcomes
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
To
X
X
X
X
X
X
determine
the

PO
9
X

PO1
0

PO1
1

PO1
2

temperatu
re
and
heat flux
distributio
n
using
energy
conservati
on and/or
Fourier
heat law
and
to
determine
the heat
flux and
temperatu
re
distributio
n
in
steady
state onedimension
al
problems
using
thermal
resistance
concept.
To
X
determine
the heat
flux in
turbulent
flows using
empirical
equations
and to
estimate
the heat
transfer
rate for

different
heat
exchangers.
To
X
determine
mass
transfer
rates and
mass
transfer
coefficient
s
and
relation
between
individual
and
overall
mass
transfer
coefficient
s.
To
determine
various
parameter
s of mass
transfer
operations
.

Objectives of the course: The course will provide:


1. A systematic and comprehensive understanding of the principles of modern
bioanalytical techniques
2. The ability to critically evaluate methodologies and experimental bioanalytical
data
3. Exposure to principles, instrumentation & application of various instruments &
techniques used in biological field.
4. Ability to choose an appropriate analytical approach for specific problem
solving.

UNIT-1
Introduction: Types & Basic concepts of analytical methods, instruments for analysis,
electromagnetic radiation - its properties and interaction with matter. Emission of
radiation. Preparation of standard solutions and buffers, pH and Oxygen electrodes. An
introduction to absorption spectroscopy, photometry, beer lamberts law.

UNIT-2
Spectroscopy: UV, visible, IR spectrophotometry theory and instrumentation,
Turbidometry & Nephelometry: Principles & Applications, Spectrofluorimetry: Principles
& Applications. Flame Emission and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: Principles &
Instrumentation. NMR Spectroscopy: Principles, Instrumentation, Applications Raman
Spectroscopy: Principles, Instrumentation, Applications

UNIT-3
Mass Determination:. Mass Spectrometry: Principles, Instrumentation, and
applications. Centrifugation Principles of centrifugation, concepts of RCF, different
types of instruments and rotors, preparative, differential and density gradient
centrifugation, analytical ultra-centrifugation, determination of molecular weights and
other applications, subcellular fractionation.

BIOANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES
Sub code
: BT 403
Credits
: 4:0:0
Prerequisite: Engineering Physics & Engineering Chemistry
Course coordinator: Dr Ahalya N and Dr Sravanti G

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

UNIT-4
Chromatography: Distribution coefficient, modes of chromatography like Paper, Thin
Layer, Molecular Exclusion chromatography: Principles, Instrumentation, Applications,
Ion Exchange and Affinity chromatography Principles & Applications Gas liquid
chromatography: Principles, Instrumentation, Applications. High Pressure Liquid
Chromatography (HPLC): Principles, Instrumentation, Applications.
UNIT-5

Electrophoresis: General principles, Support media, Electrophoresis of proteins SDS


PAGE, Native PAGE, Gradient gel electrophoresis, 2D gel electrophoresis, Isoelectric
focusing, Electrophoresis of Nucleic acids- Agarose Gel Electrophoresis.
Textbooks:
th
1. Keith W and John W (1995) Practical Biochemistry Principles & Techniques, 5
Edn., Cambridge University Press, USA.
2. Avinash U, Kakoll U & Nirmalendu N (1996) Biophysical Chemistry Principles &
Techniques, , Himalaya Pulbishing House., Delhi, India.
Reference Books
st
1. Campbell ID and Durek RA (1984) Biological Spectroscopy, 1 Edn., BenjaminCummings Publishing Company, USA.
2. John Kenkel (1994) Analytical chemistry for technicians, Lewis publishers, Boca.
rd
3. Sharma BK Instrumental methods of chemical analysis, 3 Edn., Goel Publishing
Company, India
rd
4. Sadasivam S and Manickam A (1991) Biochemical Methods, 3 Edn., New Age
International Publishers, India.
5. Plummer DT (2004) Practical Biochemistry, Tata McGraw Hill Publications, India
6. Channarayappa (2006) Molecular Biotechnology: principles and practices,
Universities Press (India) Pvt. Ltd., CRC Press Worldwide.
Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class

Internal
assessmen
t tests
CIE

Direct Assessment Methods

Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome


What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
mark
(Frequency in
s
the course)

Assignmen
t

Surprise

Student
s

Evidence
collected

Contributin
g to
Course
Outcomes

Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Twice(
Average of
the two will
be
computed)

Assignme
nt reports

1,2,3&4

Once

Quiz

1,2,3&4

Indirect
Assessme
nt

SEE

quiz

answers
End of course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

Standard
examinatio
n

End of course
survey

Student
s

End of course

100

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

Questionnaire

1,2,3&4,
Assessment
Methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
S.No

Blooms Category

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Semester-End
Examination

Remember

40

40

30

30

Understand

30

40

30

30

Apply

25

15

30

25

Analyze

05

05

10

Evaluate

05

05

Create

05

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to1. understand the new emerging technologies in the field
2. Select the appropriate analytical technique for a particular biological, chemical
or environmental sample.
3. Outline the theoretical basis for selected analytical techniques and describe the
instrumentation required.
4. Ability to choose an appropriate analytical approach for specific problem
solving.

relations, Maxwells relations, Clapeyron equation, entropy-heat capacity relation,


Effect of temperature on U, H & Entropy (S), relationships between Cp & Cv, GibbsHelmholtz equation. Fugacity, fugacity coefficient, Determination of fugacity of pure
gases, fugacities of solids and liquids. Activity and activity coefficient, Thermodynamic

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes

BIOCHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS
Sub Code
: BT 404
Credit
: 3:1:0
Prerequisite: Bioprocess principles & Calculations

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Course coordinator: Dr. Chandraprabha M N & Mr. Gokulakrishnan M


Objectives of the course: The course will provide:
1. To provide an introduction to fundamental concepts of the laws of
thermodynamics,
2. To acquire the students with the knowledge for thermodynamic treatment of
pure fluids as well as fluid mixtures and solutions
3. To predict the thermodynamics of phase equilibria
4. To predict the chemical reaction equilibria.
UNIT-1
Introduction: System, surrounding & processes, closed and open systems, intensive &
extensive properties, state and path functions, equilibrium state, reversible and
irreversible processes. First Law of Thermodynamics: General statement of first law of
thermodynamics, first law for cyclic process, Non-flow process, flow process.
UNIT-2
Second law of thermodynamics & P-V-T behaviour: General statement of the second
law, concept of entropy, the Carnot principle, calculation of entropy changes, Clausius
inequality, entropy and irreversibility, third law of thermodynamics. P-V-T behaviour of
pure fluids, equations of state and ideal gas law, processes involving ideal gas law:
constant volume, constant pressure, constant temperature, adiabatic and polytropic
processes. Equations of real gases, principles of corresponding states, compressibility
charts.
UNIT-3
Thermodynamic Properties of Pure Fluids: Derived properties, work function, Gibbs
free energy, relationships among thermodynamic properties. Fundamental property

Course
PO PO PO
Outcomes
1
2
3
understand the X
X
X
new emerging
technologies in
the field
Select
the X
appropriate
analytical
technique for a
particular
biological,
chemical
or
environmental
sample.
Outline
the X
X
theoretical
basis
for
selected
analytical
techniques and
describe
the
instrumentation
required.
Ability
to
X
choose
an
appropriate
analytical
approach
for
specific
problem solving
diagrams. Properties of solutions.

Program Outcome
PO PO PO PO PO
4
5
6
7
8
X
X
X

PO
9

PO
10
X

UNIT-4

PO
11

PO
12

Properties of Solutions & Phase Equilibria: Partial molar properties, Chemical potential,
Gibbs-Duhem equation & its applications, Henrys law & Raoults law. Criteria of phase
Equilibria, criterion of stability, Duhem's theorem, Vapour- Liquid Equilibria: VLE in ideal
solutions, Consistency test for VLE data, calculation of activity coefficients using Gibbs Duhem equation, Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium diagrams.

Reference Books
1. Rao YVC (1992) Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, New Age International,
India.
nd
2. Segel IH (1993) Biochemical Calculations, 2 Edn., John Wiley & Sons, USA.
nd
3. Shuler ML and Kargi F (2001) Bioprocess Engineering, 2 Edn., Prentice Hall
International, NJ, USA.
nd
4. Bailey JE and Ollis DF (2010) Biochemical Engg. Fundamentals, 2 Edition, McGraw
Hill, New York, USA.

Assess
ment
Method

Textbooks:
1. Smith JM and Van Ness HC (2004) Introduction to Chemical Engineering
th
thermodynamics, 6 Edition, McGraw Hill Publications, USA.
2. Narayanan KV (2001) A Textbook of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics,
Prentice Hall Publication, India.

SEE

UNIT-5
Biochemical Energetics: Coupled reactions, Reaction Stoichiometry, criteria of
biochemical reaction equilibrium, equilibrium constant and standard free energy
change, effect of temperature, pressure on equilibrium constants and other- factors
affecting equilibrium conversion.

nt reports

Surprise
Test/
Tutorial
Test

Once

10

Blue
books

3&4

Standard
examinatio
n

End of course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

End of course

Questionnaire

End of course
survey

Student
s

CIE and SEE evaluation


S.No

Blooms Category

Test 1

Test 2

Test 3

Semester-End
Examination

Remember

10

10

10

10

Understand

30

20

20

20

Apply

60

50

40

40

Analyze

Evaluate

20

30

30

Create

Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class

Direct
Assessment
Methods
CIE

Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome


What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
mark
(Frequency in
s
the course)
Internal
assessmen
t tests
Assignmen

Student
s

Evidence
collected

Contributin
g to
Course
Outcomes

Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Once

10

Assignme

2,3&4

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to:1. Utilize the knowledge of the fundamental concepts of the laws of
thermodynamics and apply the first and second laws of thermodynamics to
identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.
2. To estimate the thermodynamic properties, such as enthalpies, entropies,
Gibbs energies, fugacity coefficients, and activity coefficients of pure fluids as
well as fluid mixtures.
3. To predict equilibrium compositions of mixtures under phase
4. To predict the feasibility and equilibrium constant of chemical reactions.

Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes


Program Outcome
Course outcome
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
X
X
Understand the
fundamental
concepts of the
laws
of
thermodynamics
and apply the first
and second laws
of
thermodynamics
to
identify,
formulate
and
solve engineering
problems.
Understand the X
X
X
procedures
for
estimating
the
thermodynamic
properties, such
as
enthalpies,
entropies, Gibbs
energies, fugacity
coefficients, and
activity
coefficients
of
pure fluids as well
as fluid mixtures.
Predict
X
X
X
X
equilibrium
compositions of
mixtures under
phase
To predict the
X
X
feasibility
and
equilibrium
constant
of
chemical
reactions.

h
X

k
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

X
Sub Code
Credit

: BT 405
: 3:1:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Cell Biology & genetics


Course coordinator: Dr. Channarayappa and Dr. P. Dhamodhar

Objectives of the course: The course will provide to:


1. Learn the fundaments of molecular biology
2. Understand the principle and mechanism of transcription
3. Understand the principle, mechanism and regulation of translation
4. Study the biological significance of gene expression regulation and genome
modifications
UNIT-1
Introduction to Molecular Biology: Scope of molecular biology. Genomes: genetic
material, gene structure and functions. Concept of central dogma of molecular biology.
DNA replication: Principle, General features of DNA replication; DNA replication in
prokaryotes: prokaryotic DNA polymerases, mechanism of E. coli DNA replication and
other DNA replication models (rolling circle model, unidirectional replication). DNA
replication in eukaryotes: eukaryotic: DNA polymerases, mechanism of DNA replication
and chromosome-end replications, replication fidelity, DNA damage & Repair: causes,
types of mutations, repair mechanisms (direct reversal, excision, and SOS).

UNIT-2
Transcription: What is transcription? Structure and sequences of prokaryotic and
eukaryotic genes. Components of transcription unit. Bacterial and eukaryotic RNA
polymerases, transcription factors, mechanism of transcription in prokaryotes and
eukaryotes, transcriptional apparatus. Posttranscriptional processing of RNA: 5 and 3
end modifications, splicing (type-I, type II and spliceosome-mediated), alternative
splicing and its biological significance, exon shuffling and RNA editing.
UNIT-3
Translation: Principle, genetic code and codons. Components of translation. Activation
of tRNA. Mechanism of translation: initiation, elongation and termination of protein
synthesis. Main differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic translation. Post

Text Books:
1. Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, Raff M, Roberts K, and Walters P (2002) Molecular
th
biology of the cell, 4 edn. Garland Science. New York & London.
2. Lodish H, Berk A, Matsudaira P, Kaiser CA, Krieger M, Scott M.P, Zipursky S.L, and
th
Darnell J (2004) Molecular biology, 5 edn. W.H. Freeman and Company, New York.
3. Channarayappa (2010) Cell Biology: Universities Press (India) Pvt Ltd.
4. Channarayappa (2013) Molecular Biology: Universities Press (India) Pvt Ltd. (in
print)
Reference Books:
1. Friedberg EC, Walker GC and Siede W (1995) DNA repair and Mutagenesis.
Washington, DC: ASM Press.
th
2. Karp G (2005) Cell and Molecular Biology: concepts and experiments, 4 edn., John
Wiley & Sons, Inc.
th
3. Cooper GM and Hausman RE (2006) The Cell: A Molecular Approach, 4 edn. ASM
Press and Sinauer Associates
4. Freifelder D (2007) Molecular Biology. Narosa Publishing House
5. Channarayappa (2006) Molecular Biotechnology: Principles and Practices,
Universities Press (India) Pvt. Ltd., CRC Press Worldwide.

CIE
SEE

UNIT-5
Genome Modifications: Genetic recombination in bacteria and viruses, site-specific
recombination as in meiosis, illegitimate recombination. Recombination repair
mechanisms. Role of recombination and transposition in evolution of new genes.
Transposons and mechanism of transposition, insertion sequences in bacteria, mobile
elements of maize (McClintocks work). Biological significance of transposition.

Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome


What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
mark
(Frequency
s
in the
course)

Direct Assessment Methods

UNIT-4
Gene Expression Regulation: Regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes: Operon
model: significance of operons, lac and trp operons; positive versus negative regulation.
Role of sigma factors in gene expression regulation. Gene rearrangements in gene
expression regulation. Eukaryotic gene expression regulation: Role of upstream
activating sequences and regulatory proteins. Transcriptional and translational control
of gene expression. mRNA turnover kinetics, Gene silencing: anti-sense RNA, RNAi.
Posttranslational regulation, protein degradation and turnover.

Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class

Indirect
Assessme
nt

translational modifications: cleavage, methylation, sulfur-sulfur bridges, protein splicing,


folding, glycosylation, myristilation. Protein targeting: signal hypothesis and
cotranslational processing, transportation. Inhibitors of transcription and protein
synthesis.

Evidence
collected

Contributi
ng to
Course
Outcomes

Internal
assessmen
t tests

Thrice(Avera
ge of the
best two will
be
computed)

30

Blue books

1,2,3&4

s-room
open book
assignmen
t

Once

10

Assignment
reports

1,2,3&4

Surprise
Test

Once

10

Blue books

1,2,3&4

Standard
examinati
on

End of
course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

Questionnai
re

1,2,3&4,
Assessmen
t methods

End of course
survey

Student
s

Student
s

End of
course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL
Blooms
Test 1
Test 2
Test 3
Tutorial
CIE/SEE
NO. Category
1
2
3

Remember
Understand
Apply

25
25
30

25
25
30

20
30
20

30
20
10

20
20
35

4
5
6

Analyze
Evaluate
Create

15
5
0

15
5
0

20
10
0

25
10
5

20
5
0

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to:1. Emphasize on the basic aspects of molecular biology; the key areas, the
conventions followed, and the scope of molecular biology.
2. Acquire working knowledge on the mechanism of transcription and translation
stepwise and their applications in the research.
3. Execute different techniques to genetically engineer the gene expression
regulation that is very essential for controlled protein production in the
industry.
4. Evaluate different causes and mechanisms responsible for genetic
modifications and their consequences on human health and environment.
Mapping of course outcomes with program outcomes
Program Outcome
Course Outcomes
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Understand the basic X
X
X
X
X
aspects of molecular
biology; the key areas,
the
conventions
followed, and the scope
of molecular biology.
Acquire
working
knowledge
on
the
mechanism
of
transcription
and
translation stepwise and
their applications in the
research.
Execute
different
techniques
to
genetically engineer the
gene
expression
regulation that is very
essential for controlled
protein production in

the industry.
Evaluate
different
causes and mechanisms
responsible for genetic
modifications and their
consequences
on
human
health
and
environment.

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
Sub code : BT 406
Credit
: 3:0:0

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Prerequisite: Cell biology and genetics


i

Course coordinator: Dr. Prabha M and Mr. Lokesh K. N.


Objectives of the course: The course will provide to:
1. The anatomy and physiology of tissue organization within the human body and
their relation with the importance of homeostasis to health.
2. The structure and function of muscle tissue and muscle cell contraction related
to function of the heart.
3. The study on major endocrine glands and tissues of the body, reproductive
system and their functions.
4. The maintenance of various organs and knowledge of tissues such as nervous
system coordination, digestion, respiration and excretion.
UNIT-1
Tissue Organization, Haemopoitic and Circulatory System: Basic types, location, types
and function, epithelial, connective tissues (Blood, Bones, cartilages), muscular tissues,
Specialized cells (Nerve cells), properties, mechanism of muscle contraction and
relaxation,. Lymph and Lymphatic system, anatomical features of heart and their
accessory blood vessels, Heart Beat. Blood Pressure, ECG.
UNIT-2
Digestive and excretory system: Overview of digestive system, functional anatomy of
digestive systems and their accessory organs, Physiology of Digestion and Absorption of

carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Kidneys; Anatomy and physiology, Nephron -its
structure & Functions. Mechanism and regulation of urine formation.

Textbooks:
1. Waugh A & Grant A (2000) Ross & Wilsons Anatomy and Physiology in Health and
th
Illness, 9 Edn., Churchill Livingstone Publications, USA.
rd
2. Sembulingam K & Prema S (2002) Essentials of Medical Physiology, 3 Ed., Jaypee
Publications, Delhi, India.
Reference Books
th
1. Sujit K Chaudhari, (2003) Concise Medical Physiology, 5 Edn., New Central Book
Agency Pvt. Ltd., Delhi, India
rd
2. Sembulingam and Prema SK (2002) Essentials of Medical Physiology, 3 Edn.,
Jaypee Publications, India.
th
3. Daniel DC (2006) Human Biology, 5 Edn., Jones and Barlette Publishers Pvt. Ltd.,
USA.
4. Channarayappa (2010) Cell Biology: Universities Press (India) Pvt Ltd.
Course Delivery: Regular black Board teaching and interaction through tutorial class
Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome
What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency in

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

CIE
SEE

UNIT-5
Nervous System: Introduction; Role of nervous system; Types of neurons. Types of glial
cells and its function. Main properties of nervous tissue Mode of action of nerves;
Conduction of nerve impulses; Central nervous system; The brain; The spinal cord;
Peripheral nervous system.

Direct Assessment Methods

UNIT-4
Endocrine system: Introduction; Pituitary gland; Thyroid gland; Parathyroid gland;
Pancreas; Adrenal glands and its hormone regulation; Sex glands; Gastrointestinal
mucosa; Thymus gland; Pineal gland; Summary of different endocrine glands their
hormones and functions.

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

UNIT-3
Respiratory system& Skeletal System: Introduction; structure of respiratory organs;
Mechanism of breathing; pulmonary air volumes, Gas exchange in the lungs. Kinds of
respiration; Transport of respiratory gases in the blood, skeletal system.

the course)
Internal
assessme
nt tests

Thrice(Averag
e of the best
two will be
computed)

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Classroom
open
book
assignme
nt

Twice(
Average of
the two will
be computed)

10

Assignmen
t reports

1,2,3&4

Case
analysis

Once

Case
solutions

1,2,3&4

Surprise
quiz

Once

Quiz
answers

1,2,3&4

Standard
examinati
on

End of course
(Answering 5
of 10
questions)

100

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

Questionnaire

1,2,3&4
assessment
methods

End of course
survey

Student
s

Student
s

End of course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL NO.
Blooms Category
Semester-End Exam
1

Remember

20

Understand

20

Apply

35

Analyze

20

Evaluate

Create

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability:1. To focus on the anatomy and physiology relationship in the human body
function and vital processes of the various tissue structures in the
understanding of human body parts, systems and their homeostatic functions.
2. To identify fundamental movements of human body relating to muscles and
joints. The cardiovascular system transports oxygen and nutrients to the cells
and transports wastes away from the cells.
3. To understand the basic physiological effects of endocrine glands, which
enables the cells to function, grow, reproduce which are essential for the
survival of the species.
4. To know how the nervous system coordinates, integrates the functions of body
systems so that the regulation of function is maintained normally in digestion,
respiration and excretion that regulates metabolic processes to maintain a
relatively constant internal environment, yet meet the changing needs of the
body.
Mapping of course outcome with program outcomes
Program Outcome
Course Outcomes

To focus on the anatomy and physiology


relationship in the human body function and
vital processes of the various tissue
structures in the understanding of human
body parts, systems and their homeostatic
functions
To
identify fundamental movements of
human body relating to muscles and joints.
The cardiovascular system transports oxygen
and nutrients to the cells and transports
wastes away from the cells.
To understand the basic physiological effects
of endocrine glands, which enables the cells
to function, grow, reproduce which are
essential for the survival of the species.

To know how the nervous system


coordinates, integrates the functions of body
systems so that the regulation of function is
maintained normally in digestion, respiration
and excretion that regulates metabolic
processes to maintain a relatively constant

HEAT & MASS TRANSFER LAB


Sub Code
: BT407L
Credit
: 0:0:1
Prerequisite: Heat & Mass transfer

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Course coordinator: Mr. Samrat K & Dr.Chandraprabha M N


Objectives of the lab: The course will provide to
1. To analyze and interpret the results of their experimental work.
2. To study the individual and overall heat transfer coefficients of condenser and
heat exchangers.
3. To analyze the distillation, absorption and extraction operations.

k
LABORATORY
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Critical radius
2. Vertical condenser.
3. Horizontal condenser.
4. Heat transfer in packed bed.
5. Heat transfer in jacketed vessel
6. Heat transfer in Shell & Tube heat exchanger
7. Diffusion of organic vapors in air.
8. Simple Distillation.
9. Steam Distillation.
10. Drying Characteristics.
11. Adsorption studies.
12. Packed Column Distillation
13. Single & Multi stage extraction
14. Single & Multi stage leaching
Note: Any 12 experiments must be performed

Reference Books
1. Alan S Foust, Wenzel LA, Clump CW, Maus L and Anderson LB (2008) Principles of
Unit Operations, 2nd Edn., John Wiley & Sons, USA.
th
2. Coulson and Richardsons (2006) Chemical Engineering, Vols I & II, 5 Edn., Reed
Educational and Professional Publishing Ltd., USA.
Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching and interaction through Laboratory
sessions

CIE

Direct Assessment Methods

Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome


What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency
in the
course)

SEE

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Internal
assessmen
t tests

Once

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Lab
Assesmen
t

Continuous

10

Attendanc
e

1,2,3&4

Continuous

10

Record

1,2,3&4

End of
course

50

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

End of
course

Questionnaire

---

Record

Asse
ssme
nt

Evidence
collected

Student
s

Standard
examinati
on

End of course
survey

Student
s

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL NO.
Blooms Category
Lab exam
Semester-End Exam
1
2
3
4

Remember
Understand
Apply
Analyze

20
20
35
20

20
20
35
20

5
6

Evaluate
Create

5
0

5
0

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to:1. Predict the individual and overall heat transfer coefficients of condenser and
heat exchangers.
2. Estimate the heat transfer rate in jacketed vessel and packed bed.
3. Determine mass transfer coefficient of mass transfer operations.
4. Estimate the efficiency of extraction, distillation units
Mapping of course outcome with program outcomes
Program Outcome
Course
PO PO PO PO PO PO PO PO
Outcome
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
s
X
Predict
X
X
X
the
individual
and
overall
heat
transfer
coefficien
ts of
condense
r and
heat
exchange
rs.
Estimate
the heat
transfer
rate in
jacketed
vessel
and

PO
9

PO1
0

PO1
1

PO1
2

3.

packed
bed.
Determin
e mass
transfer
coefficien
t of mass
transfer
operation
s.
Estimate
the
efficiency
of
extraction
,
distillatio
n units

4.

To introduce students to the procedures required to efficiently and effectively


utilize the quantitative instrumental analytical instrumentation commonly used
in industrial and research laboratories.
The tools and techniques by which biological molecules are isolated, separated,
identified, and analyzed

LABORATORY
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Calibration of pH meter and preparation of Buffers and standard solutions
2. Thin layer Chromatographic separation of sugars / amino acids
3. Column Chromatography
4. Two dimensional paper chromatography of amino acids
5. Electrophoresis separation of Proteins
6. Elution from chromatography column and estimation
7. DNA separation by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis
8. Native PAGE
9. Spectrophotometric estimation of biomolecules
10. Separation and estimation of chlorophyll
11. Fractionation of cellular components
12. Isolation of chloroplasts.
13. Separation of amino acids/ Nucleic acids by using HPLC
14. Separation of lipids using GLC

Note: Any 12 experiments must be performed

BIOANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES LAB


Sub Code : BT408L
Credit
: 0:0:1
Prerequisite: Bioanalytical Techniques

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Course coordinator: Dr. Ahalya N & Dr Sravanti V


Objectives of the course:
1. To Introduce students to the basic experimental techniques
2. To develop students abilities to obtain accurate and concordant quantitative
analytical results.

Reference Books
rd
1. Sadasivam S and Manickam A (1991) Biochemical Methods, 3 Edn., New Age
International Publishers, India.
2. Plummer DT (2004) Practical Biochemistry, Tata McGraw Hill Publications, India
3. Channarayappa (2006) Molecular Biotechnology: principles and practices,
Universities Press (India) Pvt. Ltd., CRC Press Worldwide.
Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching and interaction through Laboratory
sessions
Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome
What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency
in the
course)

Evidence
collected

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

CIE

Direct Assessment Methods

Internal
assessme
nt tests

Once

Lab
Assesme
nt

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

SEE

Record

Student
s

Standard
examinati
on

End of course
survey

Student
s

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Continuous

10

Attendanc
e

1,2,3&4

Continuous

10

Record

1,2,3&4

End of
course

50

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

Questionnaire

1,2,3&4 and
assessment
methods

End of
course

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
ASSESSMENT PATTERN:
SL NO.

Blooms Category

Lab Internal test

Semester-End Exam

Remember

10

10

Understand

10

10

Apply

20

10

Analyze

20

30

Evaluate

20

20

Create

20

20

Marks distribution:

CIE: 50 Laboratory internal tests will be conducted 30 marks. Lab


Assessment/Record will be conducted 20 marks.

Course Outcome: On completion of this course student will have improved ability to
1. Identify the most useful technique for a given bioanalytical problem,
2. Interpret and use the results from a given bioanalytical technique,
3. Understand the physical, chemical and instrumental fundamentals underlying
these measurements
4. Critically assess advances within the field of bioanalytical chemistry.
Mapping of course outcome with program outcomes
Program Outcome
Course
PO PO PO PO PO PO PO
outcome
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Identify the
most useful
technique for
a
given
bioanalytical
problem
Interpret and
use the
results from
a given
bioanalytical
technique
Understand
the physical,
chemical and
instrumental
fundamental
s underlying
these
measuremen
ts
Critically
assess
advances

PO
8

PO
9

P
O
10
X

P
O
11

P
O
12

14. Extraction of DNA figments from Agarose gel (column or solution based
method)

within the
field of
bioanalytical
chemistry.

Note: Any 12experiments must be performed

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY LAB


Sub Code
: BT409L
Credit
: 0:0:1
Prerequisite: cell biology and genetics

CIE
SEE

: 50 Marks
: 50 Marks

Course coordinator: Dr. Sharath, R. and Dr. Channarayappa


Course Objective
1. Describe the general structures of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.
2. Involve the use of recombinant DNA technology and other Common gene
analysis techniques.
3. Will develop basic knowledge and skills in cell and molecular biology and
become aware of the complexity and harmony of the cell.
LAB SESSIONS

Reference Books
1. Channarayappa (2013) Molecular Biology: Universities Press (India) Pvt Ltd.
2. Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, Raff M, Roberts K, and Walters P (2002)
th
Molecular biology of the cell, 4 edn. Garland Science. New York & London
th
3. Karp G (2005) Cell and Molecular Biology: concepts and experiments, 4 edn.,
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
th
4. Cooper GM and Hausman RE (2006) The Cell: A Molecular Approach, 4 edn.
ASM Press and Sinauer Associates
Course Delivery: Regular black board teaching and interaction through Laboratory
sessions
Assessment and Evaluation Vis--vis Course outcome
What
To
When/
Max
whom
Where
marks
(Frequency
in the
course)

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

CIE

Study of cell structure (Prokaryotes & Eukaryotes).


Study of mutants of Drosophila and maintenance /special chromosome
Study of Mitotic stages by Squashing Technique (Onion root tips).
Study of Meiotic stages in Allium cepa
Isolation of genomic DNA (plant / animal/ microbial sources any one).
Quantification of nucleic acids by spectrophotometric, Gel and by densitometry
methods.
Polymerase Chain Reaction (Programming and working).
Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA.
Restriction mapping (Single or double digestion).
Isolation of plasmid DNA
Replica plating method
DNA Ligation
Bacterial conjugation

Contributing
to Course
Outcomes

Internal
assessme
nt tests

Once

30

Blue
books

1,2,3&4

Lab
Assesmen
t

Continuous

10

Attendanc
e

1,2,3&4

Continuous

10

Record

1,2,3&4

End of
course

50

Answer
scripts

1,2,3&4

Record
SEE

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Direct Assessment Methods

LIST OF EXPERIMENTS

Evidence
collected

Standard
examinati
on

Student
s

Indirect
Assessme
nt
Methods

End of course
survey

Student
s

End of
course

Questionnaire

1,2,3&4 and
assessment
methods

Questions for CIE and SEE will be designed to evaluate the various educational
components
SL NO.

Blooms Category

Semester-End Exam

1
2
3
4
5
6

Remember
Understand
Apply
Analyze
Evaluate
Create

10
20
10
30
30

Course Outcome
1. Understand, and perform, the most important methods in molecular biology.
2. It prepares students for careers in fields that require advanced knowledge of
molecular biology, in particular those that relate to human health and welfare.
3. Understand the significance of molecular biology of human health, disease and
treatment.
4. Will gain insight into the most significant molecular and cell-based methods
used today to expand their understanding of biology.
Mapping of course outcome with program outcomes
Program Outcome
Course
PO PO PO3 PO
PO PO6 PO PO8
Outcomes
1
2
4
5
7
Understand, X
X
and
perform, the
most
important
methods in
molecular
biology.

PO
9
1

PO
10

PO
11

It prepares
students for
careers
in
fields that
require
advanced
knowledge
of molecular
biology, in
particular
those that
relate
to
human
health and
welfare.
Understand
the
significance
of molecular
biology of
human
health,
disease and
treatment.
Will
gain
insight into
the
most
significant
molecular
and
cellbased
methods
used today
to expand
their
understandi
ng of biology