Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 8

Freight Policy CP

1NC
CP Text: The Freight Policy Council should provide a new freight network specifically for
________ (insert what infrastructure they increase) prior to the affs plan and increase
[insert what transportation/what the aff have does]
Freight Policy Council is a pre-requisite to solve case- allows an independent body to focus
on the condition of transportation, reduces traffic congestion, environment impacts,
shipping costs, and provides a more efficient freight network that is critical to economy
Akien Leader Aug 24, 2012 News Source For The Aiken Area U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood
Announces Creation of Freight Policy Council http://aikenleader.villagesoup.com/business/story/u-s-transportationsecretary-ray-lahood-announces-creation-of-freight-policy-council/887915
WASHINGTON - U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood today announced the launch of the

Freight Policy Council which will focus on improving the condition and performance of the national
freight network to better ensure the ability of the United States to compete in todays global
economy. The council will develop a national, intermodal plan for improving the efficiency of
freight movement and will work with states to encourage development of a forward looking state
freight strategy. Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA) joined Secretary LaHood for the announcement at the PCC
Logistics Duwamish Facility in Seattle, WA. Our freight system is the lifeblood of the American economy, moving
goods quickly and efficiently to benefit both businesses and consumers across the country, said Secretary LaHood.

With the launch of the Freight Policy Council, we have an opportunity to make not only our
freight system, but all modes of transportation, stronger and better connected. The recent
transportation bill, Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century, or MAP-21, signed by
President Obama last month, established a national freight policy and called for the creation of a
National Freight Strategic Plan. DOTs Freight Policy Council will implement the key freight
provisions of the legislation. A strong freight transportation system is essential for helping meet
President Obamas goal of doubling U.S. exports by 2015. The Council will be chaired by Deputy
Transportation Secretary John Porcari, and will include DOT leadership from highways, rail, ports
and airports and economic and policy experts from across the Administration. The freight and
logistics industries, consumers and other stakeholders will also play an advisory role, and states will
be asked to offer proposals for improving the freight system in their region. With increasing
competition abroad, Washington businesses require a 21st century approach to moving goods, said U.S. Senator
Maria Cantwell (D-WA). This new Freight Policy Council provides the roadmap our nation needs to

stay competitive and grow our trade economy. Smart freight planning is especially important to
Washington state, where more than one million jobs are in freight-dependent industries. The
nations freight transportation system moves goods on ships, rails and roads. Today, every American is
responsible for 40 tons of freight a year. A more efficient freight network will reduce traffic congestion,
environmental impact and shipping costs, which will lead to lower prices for consumers. The
Department of Transportation continues to invest in freight through our grant and loan programs.
Over $953 million in Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recover (TIGER) funds
have gone to 50 projects that improve freight. More than a third of TIGER funding $354 million
went to 25 port projects from coast to coast. Freight projects are also eligible for the Railroad
Rehabilitation & Improvement Financing (RRIF) program which provides up to $35 billion in
loans and loan guarantees. Under MAP-21, freight projects can also qualify for $1.75 billion in
Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) funding for the next two years.

Solvency

Federalism
The Freight Policy Council solves federalism
AGC New Freight Policy Council Created August 24, 2012 http://news.agc.org/2012/08/24/new-freight-policycouncil-created/ Associated General Contractors. The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) is the
leading association for the construction industry. Operating in partnership with its nationwide network of 95
chartered Chapters, AGC provides a full range of services satisfying the needs and concerns of its members, thereby
improving the quality of construction and protecting the public interest.
Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced this week the formation of a policy group created to improve the condition and performance of
the nations freight network. The group was formed to begin implementation of MAP-21 requirement to develop a National Freight Strategic
Plan. The

new Freight Policy Council, will be chaired by Deputy Transportation Secretary John Porcari
and include Administration representatives covering highways, rail, ports, and airports, as well as
economic and policy experts. States will be asked to offer input to improve the freight system in
their regions, while the freight and logistics industries, consumers, and other stakeholders will serve
in an advisory capacity to the council. AGC will provide input to the Council. According to Secretary LaHood, the Freight
Policy Councils main focus will be to develop a national, intermodal plan for improving the
efficiency of freight movement, and will work with states to encourage development of a freight
strategy to move the nation into the future.

Economy
A freight network is critical to the economy and competitiveness
DOT August 24, 2012 http://fastlane.dot.gov/2012/08/freight-policy-council-will-keep-us-goods-economymoving.html#.UEQxWMFlRK0 Department of Transportation Freight Policy Council will keep
U.S. goods, economy moving

America's freight system is the lifeblood of our economy . When it's healthy, we
can move goods quickly and efficiently to benefit both businesses and consumers across the
country. So I'm pleased to announce that we're launching a Freight Policy Council to focus on improving the
condition and performance of our national freight network to better ensure our ability to compete
in todays global economy. The recent transportation bill--Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century, or MAP21--that President
As I wrote in yesterday's blog post,

Obama signed earlier this summer establishes a national freight policy and calls for the creation of a National Freight Strategic Plan. And DOTs
Freight Policy Council will develop these and work on other key freight provisions in the legislation. A strong freight transportation system is
essential for helping meet President Obamas goal of doubling U.S. exports by 2015. And nowhere is our progress toward the President's goal
better demonstrated than in the State of Washington, where the Ports of Seattle and Tacoma move $20 billion in cargo each year and support more
than 300,000 jobs. Their capacity is complemented by a rail and highway network that in 2010 allowed shippers to move 533 million tons of

We must develop a national strategic vision to get freight where it needs to go . That
means coordinating the way we build our transportation networks and getting roads, rails, rivers,
ports, and planes on the same page. As U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell said, With increasing competition abroad, Washington
businesses require a 21st century approach to moving goods. This new Freight Policy Council provides the roadmap
our nation needs to stay competitive and grow our trade economy ." This approach has been a huge success in the
goods across the state.

State of Washington with its Freight Mobility Investment Board. It's what MAP-21 calls for. And business leaders will tell you it's just the smart
thing to do. America has one of the best freight networks in the world. In fact, every American is responsible for 40 tons of freight a year, so
when you do the math it's plain to see that, across the country, America's shippers are delivering the goods. But we can do better, and we must.
That's why DOT continues to invest in freight through our grant and loan programs. More than $953 million in Transportation Investment
Generating Economic Recover (TIGER) funds have gone to 50 projects that improve freight. More than a third of TIGER funding $354 million
went to 25 port projects from coast to coast. Freight projects are also eligible for the Railroad Rehabilitation & Improvement Financing (RRIF)
program that provides up to $35 billion in loans and loan guarantees. And under MAP-21, freight projects can also qualify for $1.75 billion in

The Freight Policy Council-with leaders from DOT and input from business, industry, and academic stakeholders--is another
step forward in our efforts to keep America's economy moving. This Administration is absolutely committed to
Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) funding for the next two years.

making the U.S. freight system the best in the world. DOT's Freight Policy Council will help us get there.

ATs

AT Perm Do CP
1. The perm is intrinsicthe counter plan advocates a freight networking which is a prerequisite to placing transportation in a spotthis is a voting issueintrinsicness lets them
co-opt neg offense by adding planks to plan text which are key to stable negative strategy
2. Textual competition is bad
A. It allows them to insert any word from the CP into any part of the plan to create
unpredictable permutations that entirely sever the original plans function.
B. The test of competition is itself unpredictable we have to negate the function of the
plan in order to win, not the words in it. Textual competition arbitrarily excludes
counterplans that disprove plans desirability.
C. Justifies language PICs which are worse there are dozens of ways to re-write the plan
to do the exact same thing which restricts their ability to generate offense and eliminates
debate over the substance of the plan, killing policy education.
3. Any reason the CP is good is a reason why this perm is bad.

AT Lie Perm
1. The perm is intrinsicthe counter plan advocates a freight networking which is a prerequisite to placing transportation in a spotthis is a voting issueintrinsicness lets them
co-opt neg offense by adding planks to plan text which are key to stable negative strategy
2. The perm creates an intention to deceive which is morally wrong and corrupts
policymakingperm should be rejected
Murphy 96 (Mark C., 41 Am. J. Juris. 81, The American Journal of Jurisprudence,
Natural Law And The Moral Absolute Against Lying, lexis)
lies certainly are contrary to that good. What
lies infect the decision making process, undermining the good of practical reasonableness.
Thus, the account of the moral absolute against lying defended here does justice to what bothers reflective people
about being the victim of lies. 39 I have argued that although Finnis is right to think that the lie is an act directed against the intrinsic good of knowledge, the wrongfulness of lying is most adequately
explained by reference to the good of practical reasonableness. Lying is absolutely morally forbidden, in last analysis, because refraining from lying is
necessary to show adequate respect for the status of other agents as practical reasoners . On this matter, at the very least, natural law theory should
Bok's remarks capture the insight that what disturbs people about lying is not fundamentally that lies are contrary to the good of knowledge, though
is most troubling about being lied to is that

affirm its agreement with Kant. 40

3. US political system cannot keep secretsthe perm would leak


Shafer, 4 (Jack, June 23, Editor of Slate quoting secrecy czar J. William Leonard who heads the
Information Security Oversight Office, the National Archives branch that develops classification and
declassification policies at the behest of the president, http://slate.msn.com/id/2102855/ )
Don't mistake Leonard for an ACLU firebrand: As Steven Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists (whose excellent listserv
alerted me to the speech) puts it, Leonard "is not an 'openness' advocate or a free-lance critic of government secrecy." He's a career security
professional who deplores the leaks of classified material to the press. Leonard attributes what he calls an "epidemic" of leaks to

the press to the dysfunctional classification system, which has recently taken to using the war as an "excuse to
disregard the basics of the security classification system." Leaks are coming out of the "highest levels of

our government" (the Valerie Plame affair); a former Cabinet secretary is alleged to have handed off classified material to a book
author for publication, and the classification machine is operating so poorly down at Guantanamo Bay that a chaplain was publicly charged
with pilfering secrets on his computer and then released. "The problem [Leonard] has identified is that the currency of

classification is being devalued by questionable, sometimes suspiciously self-serving secrecy


actions," writes Aftergood in e-mail. "This produces an erosion of security discipline, which in turn fosters an
environment in which leaks are more likely to come about. The net result is bad security policy and bad public
policy." Because leaks of classified information make for such great headlines, journalists rarely give much
thought to why something was leaked or why it was classified in the first place . Leonard's speech encourages us to look
for the important story behind every leaked classified-info story and ask these questions: Why was the information classified in the first
place? Who or what was served by its classificationsome self-interested bureaucracy or our national interest? (Think Abu Ghraib.) Who
was served by the leak? Who was damaged? (Think Valerie Plame.) Who is served by declassification delays? The secrecy czar has spoken.
But who's listening? According to Nexis, nobody. I couldn't find a single story about the speech. Maybe he should have leaked it to the press
instead of posting it on the Web.