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Summer Curriculum Work 2011

Unit Template
All of the units designed to align with the Common Core standards will be formatted in
the same manner in order to facilitate usage of many teachers over time. The following
template includes five components and provides the required format.

Component 1: Overview
1. Abstract: In this unit, students will be able tocollaborate with each other to
learn about the characteristics, habitats, geographical locations, and behaviors of
different kinds of bugs. Students will also learn about safety precautions when
handling bugs and equipment during observations.
2. Grade Range: 1st-2nd grade
3. Big Ideas/Theme: Bugs, Bugs, Everywhere!
4. Essential Questions:
a. What are the characteristics of an insect?
b. Where do insects live?
c. Name the parts of an insect.
d. How are insects the same/different?
e. What is the life cycle of an insect?
f. Describe symmetry
5. Scope: Content/Skills/Assessments/ 21st Century Skill Theme
6.
Content: Reading, Science, Writing
Skills: Reading: listen to and re-tell important facts about spiders and
insects.
Science: various insect/spider observations
Writing: Compare and contrast insects and spiders, write a parent
questionnaire, effectively communicate learned knowledge
Assessments: *Individual assessments will align with each lesson
Readingpredications, comprehension questions, compare and
contrast
Sciencehands-on observations and activities
Writingstory writing, parent questionnaire, journals
21st Century Theme: Environmental Literacy
7. Sequence: Approximately 4 weeks

Component 2: Standards/ Desired Outcomes


*See each lesson plan for appropriate and specific standards
Component 3: Lesson Plans
The lesson plans provided in the unit should be varied and designed in such a way as
to engage all students in the learning process.
Requirements: LESSON PLANS
Inquiry LessonBugs, Bugs, Everywhere! Lets talk about spiders and bugs
(Lesson 1-week 1)
Inquiry LessonBugs, Bugs, Everywhere! What Insect Am I? (Lesson 2-week 1)
Inquiry Lesson-Bugs, Bugs, Everywhere! Habitat Collage (Lesson 3-week 2)
Direct Instruction-Bugs, Bugs, Everywhere! The Very Hungry Caterpillar
(Lesson 4-week 2 and 3)
SIOP-Bugs, Bugs, Everywhere! Caterpillars to Butterflies (Lesson 5-week 3)
SIOP-Bugs, Bugs, Everywhere! Bees and Ants (Lesson 6-week 4)
Notes on Differentiation
Explain how the following components of differentiation are incorporated in the
unit:
1. Use of a meaningful pre-assessment: pre-assessments will be administered before all
lessons in order to obtain prior knowledge and reading levels. This will be done through,
whole class discussions, journal writing, and T-charts.
2. Combination of whole-class, flexible groups, and individual instruction will occur
throughout the unit. Students will be engaged in small group, hands-on experiments and
activities.
3. Variety of materials used and learning styles addressed through viewing United
Streaming videos, hands-on experiments, small group interactions, whole group
activities, writing journals, art and dancing will be incorporated.
4. Balance between teacher-assigned and student-selected activities: Introduction to the
unit and new vocabulary and concepts will be done during whole group instruction. The
remaining experiments and insect observations will be done by students in groups.
5. Interventions and extensions/modifications as appropriate: see each lesson for
specifics.

Notes on 21st Century Skills


21st Century Theme: Environmental Literacy
21st Century Skill/s: Learning and Innovation Skills
Communication and Collaboration

Use communication for a range of purposes (e.g. to inform, instruct, motivate and
persuade)
Articulate thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written, and nonverbal
communication skills in a variety of forms and contexts
Utilize multiple media and technologies, and know how to judge their
effectiveness a priori as well as assess their impact
Assume shared responsibility for collaborative work, and value the individual
contributions made by each team member
Work creatively with others
Demonstrate ability to work effectively and respectfully with diverse teams

Student application of 21st Century skills during this unit:


o synthesize and make connections between information
o interpret information and draw conclusions

FIVE E LESSON PLAN-INQUIRY


LESSON TITLE: Bugs, Bugs Everywhere-Lets Talk About Spiders and Bugs
TYPE OF LESSON:

Inquiry

TARGET GRADE(S):

Grades 1-2

LEARNING GOAL:
Students will be learning about spiders and insects. We
will focus on their differences and how spiders are not really considered true insects.
KEY QUESTION:

How are spiders and insects different?

TARGET AND RELATED STANDARDS:


GRADE 1

Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K5


Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration Grade 1
Standard:
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse
partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small
and larger groups.
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to
others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts
under discussion).
b. Build on others talk in conversations by responding to the
comments of others through multiple exchanges.

Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 1


Standard:
5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when
appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
6. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and
situation.

GRADE 2

Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K5


Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration Grade 2

Standard:
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse
partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small
and larger groups.
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the
floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a
time about the topics and texts under discussion).
b. Build on others talk in conversations by linking their
comments to the remarks of others.

Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 2


Standard:
6. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and
situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification.
GRADE 1
Strand: Writing Standards K-5
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes Grade 1
Standard (Detail, grade specific):
2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a
topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of
closure.
5. With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic,
respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to
strengthen writing as needed.

TEACHER NOTES:
Materials:
*Glass jars filled with collected live bugs (2 different types of
spiders and a grasshopper and a June bug)
*patterns for drawing a spider and a grasshopper
*construction Paper
*scissors
*glue
*markers and crayons
*Grasshopper diagram (Appendix A)
*Spider diagram (Appendix B)
Safety Precautions:
Remind the students to keep the jar lids on and that by tampering
with the lids, they run the risk of letting the specimens out and thus
disturbing the lesson planned for the day. It may be wise also to

have a "keep the jar on the table" policy to reduce the risk of
dropping the jars and them breaking.
Websites: www.enchantedlearning.com

ENGAGE:

Begin by asking the students some questions that relate to insects


and spiders and their experiences with them. "Who has seen
something in your house or outside that we might call a bug or
spider?" "Do bugs and spiders look the same?" "Does anyone
know how to tell the difference between a spider and a fly?"
Now it is time to bring out the jars with the insects and spiders in
them. Put a jar on each one of the tables that the children are sitting
around. It is important here to not only tell the children to observe
their own "bug" but understand that they will be rotating to each
table so that they will get a chance to see all of them. This will
eliminate any frustrations that the children might have about not
getting to see the other specimens.

EXPLORE:

EXPLAIN:

Now it is time for the students to do all of their observing. A good


suggestion might be to let them spend 2-3 minutes at each table
depending on how many students are at each table. It is important
that each student gets an opportunity to observe the specimens. For
a larger class you may want to extend the time to 5-7 minutes. Ask
them questions while they are looking about their own experiences
and if they have seen any "bugs" like these before.
After the children have all rotated tables and had an opportunity to
observe all the specimens, begin your explanation with the
question "Did anyone notice any differences between the spiders
and the other two insects?" Now it is time to explain further the
differences they may or may not have seen. First explain the fact
that spiders only have two body segments and the grasshopper and
June beetle have three. This can lead you into the fact that this is
one difference that separates the true insect from the spider or
arachnid. Now you would want to go on further to describe the
general differences between the two. Spiders do not have wings or
antenna and they have eight legs. Insects on the other hand have
two sets of wings, six legs and antenna. Now you may want them
to rotate tables again quickly to compare the differences they have
learned about. Also encourage the students to note that even
though the grasshopper and June beetle look differently, they have

the same general characteristics. Ask them if they can see these
similar characteristics in the two insects.

ELABORATE:

Encourage students to observe in their own houses and yards these


two different organisms. Have them write up a questionnaire for
their parents to take to see if they know the general differences
between spiders and insects.
For a language arts activity, have the students write a story about
either a spider or an insect of their choice. For an art activity, have
the students make a mobile with insects and spiders that they have
made with construction paper

EVALUATE:

Make up a handout with drawings of the spiders and insects and


have them list all the differences that are visible between the two.
Have them list the similarities between the two spiders and the two
insects. Another activity would be to make up incomplete drawings
of the two specimens on handouts and have the children draw in
the parts that are missing. If the children all score 85% or better on
these handouts, the lesson will be considered successful.

FIVE E LESSON PLAN-INQUIRY


LESSON TITLE: Bugs, Bugs Everywhere: What Insect Am I?
TYPE OF LESSON:
TARGET GRADE(S):

Inquiry
Grades 1-2

LEARNING GOAL:

The students will be able to identify different types of


insects as they process information given to them.
Students will be able to discuss the different types of
habitats insects are found from visual observation.

KEY QUESTION:

What are the different body parts of an insect?


How are insects different?

TARGET AND RELATED STANDARDS:


GRADE 1
Strand: Writing Standards K-5
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes Grade 1
Standard:
3. Write narratives in which they recount two or more
appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what
happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some
sense of closure.
8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information
from experiences or gather information from provided sources to
answer a question.
GRADE 2

Strand: Writing Standards K-5


Cluster: Text Types and Purposes Grade 2
Standard:
3. Write narratives in which they recount a well elaborated event
or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions,
thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and
provide a sense of closure.
8. Recall information from experiences or gather information
from provided sources to answer a question.

TEACHER NOTES:
Materials:
Jars with lids
Insects to place in jars
Index cards
Background information
Insect worksheets (Appendix pages C-G)
Safety Precautions:
Dont allow students to open the jars.
Find insects that are not harmful.
Set rules for the students as they observe the jars.
Place holes on the lids of the jars so the insects can breathe.
Basic classroom rules apply.
Getting Ready:

For this activity everything must be prepared ahead of time. The jars
can be simple jars that are found at home (ex. baby food jars).
Make sure the lids have holes in them so the insects can breathe.
Insects are found everywhere so it is best to collect them using a
swooping net and place them in the jars. Try to get insects that the
students are familiar with, such as, butterflies, caterpillars,
grasshoppers, etc. In the jars place small amounts of grass, or
something that the insect can feed on. Place the jars in the room
where all the students can see and observe. Also, try and place the
jars in certain categories such as insects with antennae, insects with
wings, etc. for further instruction. Look for background
information on the insects that were collected. This information
can be found in basic insect books. Look for basic information
describing the characteristics of the insects. Place this information
on index cards.

ENGAGE:

Begin by going over with the students their basic body parts by dancing
along to "Head, shoulders, knees, and toes". Afterward discuss how we are not the only
ones that have body parts, and introduce the topic of insects. As you talk about how the
insects body parts are different, show the students the insects in the jars, allow them to
observe and familiarize themselves with the insects. Students can record information on
the Insect Chart. (Appendix C)

EXPLORE:

Play the game "What Insect Am I?" Have the jars with the insects in front
of the students. Using the index cards with the information about each insect, describe
each one and allow the students to guess which insect you are describing. For example," I

have large eyes, two pairs of wings that can be clear, colored, or marked with black
patterns, very long abdomen (body), long legs: what insect am I?" The students are able
to visually see the insects and identify them easily. As the students identify each insect go
into further discussion on where they are found, and what they need to survive.

EXPLAIN:

This activity will help the students familiarize themselves with the
different parts of the insects, and how insects are different. At this point the teacher
should instruct the students with basic knowledge about the insects. Have a class
discussion on what the students know from prior knowledge. Provide them with other
details that are interesting to them. Students will complete insect worksheets with body
parts information. (Appendixes D and F)

ELABORATE: This is where class discussion continues. Allow the students to pick up
the insects and observe them, and talk about what else they see. Compare and contrast the
insects. Discuss how each insect uses their body parts, such as, the use of the antennae.

EVALUATE: Since this is mainly a game and a class discussion the main evaluation
would be through observation of the students. After the game place
the jars in the science center with pictures of the parts of the
insects for further observation and instruction. Appendix G can be
used as a post assessment for insect body parts.

FIVE E LESSON PLAN-INQUIRY


LESSON TITLE: Bugs, Bugs Everywhere--Habitat Collage
TYPE OF LESSON:
TARGET GRADE(S):

Inquiry
Grades 1-2

LEARNING GOAL:

Familiarize the students to different habitats, and the


insects that are found in each one. Students will put
together a collage of habitats in which insects are found.

KEY QUESTION:

What do insects need to live?


How does where the insects live have to do with their survival?

TARGET AND RELATED STANDARDS:


GRADE 1

Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K5


Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration Grade 1
Standard:
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse
partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small
and larger groups.
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to
others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts
under discussion).
b. Build on others talk in conversations by responding to the
comments of others through multiple exchanges.

Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 1


Standard:
5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when
appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
6. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and
situation.

GRADE 2

Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K5


Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration Grade 2

Standard:
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse
partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small
and larger groups.
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the
floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a
time about the topics and texts under discussion).
b. Build on others talk in conversations by linking their
comments to the remarks of others.
TEACHER NOTES:
Materials:
phonebook
flowers
butcher paper
crayons

grass
construction paper
markers

Safety Precautions:
*Observe the environment before taking the students. Watch out for dangerous areas.
*Treat the outdoor activity as a field trip and have parents and volunteers help.
*Have rules for the students in order to provide extra safety.
Teacher Preparation:
Investigate certain areas around the school in which to take the students to observe.
Make sure the area us safe for students. Pick certain things that are found in the
environment like flowers, grass, leaves, etc. These things should be things that can be
dried and easy to glue. Place these things in a phone book for a few days in order to dry
out. Then on butcher paper make a rough sketch of the area to be observed. This will be
the beginning of the collage in which the students will complete.

ENGAGE:

Begin by having a small discussion on what they had for breakfast


that morning. Then, discuss how breakfast is important, and bring
in what other things are important for our survival. From there
begin with the discussion of what they think insects need to live
and how where they are found has to do with their survival.
Next, take them outside to the area for observation. Have them
take paper and pencil to draw what they see. Instruct them to
observe the insects and their habitats. Draw a picture of each insect
and where they found them. Let them observe for at least 30
minutes. Videotape if possible for further investigation.

EXPLORE:

The students will now use the pictures and observations to make
the collage with the teacher's help. On this rough sketch of the area
drawn the students will put together the rest of the environment
using the flowers, grass, etc. whatever they need for the insects
they saw, and their habitat. At this time they will also draw the
insects they saw in the habitats that they found them. Let the
collage dry and place it in the cafeteria for the school to see.

EXPLAIN:

This activity will help the students learn about what insects need in
order to survive through observation. They will then in turn take
this observation into the classroom and explore on it by making the
collage. As they make the collage you can discuss with them, as
you help them, why bees are found around flowers, or why you
find grasshoppers in open fields, any information that will help
them understand insect survival more. Books about insects will
provide vast amount of information.

ELABORATE:

In extending the activity a teacher can go into a further discussion


and relate it back to our everyday lives, such as our homes, food,
clothing, etc. Allow the students to grow an appreciation for
insects, and learn how valuable they are in our world.

EVALUATE:The assessment will begin when the students go out and observe. Criteria
is as follows:
Great Work
Good Work
What
Happened

3: The students observed, drew pictures, had a vast amount of interest, and
did their part in the collage.
2: The students observed, did not draw pictures, and rarely participated in
making the collage.
1: Rarely observed, did not draw pictures, no interest, and did not take part
in the collage activity.

Lesson Plan (Direct Instruction)


The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Teacher Name:

School:

Grade:

Date:

Subject or Course: Butterflies


Learning Objective: (What do you want students to know and be able to do? What is the intended
learning?)

o
o
o
o
o

Learn Symmetry of a butterfly


Review the parts of an insect
Learn the parts of a Butterfly
Learn the life cycle of a Butterfly
Sequence a story (The Very Hungry Caterpillar)

Resources:
Book: The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
Link to Common Core Standards: (How is the learning objective related to the Common Core
Standards?)

Strand: Reading Standards for Literature K-5


Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 1
Standard:
1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate
understanding of their central message or lesson.
3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story,
using key details.
Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 1
Standard: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its
characters, setting, or events.
GRADE 2
Strand: Reading Standards for Literature K-5

Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 2


Standard:
1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what,

where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key


details in a text.

Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 2


Standard:
7. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a
print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters,
setting, or plot.
Grade 1
Strand: Reading Standards for Informational Text K5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 1
Standard:
1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2. Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 1
Standard:
7. Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key
ideas.
Grade 2
Strand: Reading Standards for Informational Text K5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 2
Standard:
1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when,
why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
Materials: (What materials are needed for students? What modifications to the materials are needed for
special needs learners and accelerated learners? Attach any handouts that will be used.)

Egg Cartons
Paper Bag
Assorted paint
Graham Crackers
Icing
Large Sequins
Insect worksheets (appendix E, H-L)
Pre-assessment:
Show the students the title of the book and ask them to predict what events will happen in
the story. Record the predictions on the chart paper. Later, compare the predictions with
what actually happened in the book?

Students will draw, list or write in their student journals How is a butterfly born?
Anticipatory Set: (How will the students be hooked to the learning?)
Ask the students if they know what the word symmetry means. Can anyone give an
example of symmetry? Introduce symmetry by putting a piece of masking tape from a
students forehead down the middle. Then discuss the symmetry example (an eye on
each side for example).
Teaching/presentation:
Input: In a whole group setting, explain to students that symmetry is defined as:
having two parts (cut by an imaginary line) that are exactly the same. The life
cycle of the butterfly will be explained and discussed using appendix H-I.
Modeling: The book, The Very Hungry Caterpillar will be read out loud by the
teacher to begin the dialogue of the life cycle. The illustrations will be used to
reinforce the concept of symmetry. Examples of the symmetrical butterfly craft
activity will be displayed at the art center.
Checking for Understanding: The predictions from The Very Hungry
Caterpillar will be compared at the end of the story. Student work will be
monitored daily to ensure success and guarantee that all students comprehend the
information needed.
Guided Practice:
1. Read the first three pages of the book and then stop. Tell the children some foods you
would look for if you were hungry. Let a few children volunteer their favorite foods.
Then have students turn to their neighbor and exchange favorite food ideas. This allows
all children to become actively involved and provides opportunity for oral
communication. After students share out, read remainder of book.
2. The Life Cycle of a butterfly will be taught to the students using
www.unitedstreaming.com The Lives of Butterflies.
3. Story props will be used (pictures taped onto popsicle sticks) to sequence the events in
the story (Appendix O-O.2)
Independent Practice: (How will students practice the intended learning?)
1. Students will complete appendix J-K to demonstrate symmetry.
2. Appendix H will be used to reinforce the life cycle.
3. Sequencing the story The Very Hungry Caterpillar (appendix L)
4. Students will make Symmetrical Sandwiches. The children will get a graham cracker.
He or she will snap it in half so the cracker is symmetrical. The child will spread white

icing on both pieces of the graham cracker. With various skittles, the child will decorate
his or her edible insect.
Post-Assessment: (How will you know students have acquired the intended learning? How will
students be involved in ongoing assessment? Attach any materials that you will use in the summative
assessment process.)

Students will use precut butterfly patterns and large size sequins to demonstrate
symmetry. The butterflies will be used to decorate the classroom.
Appendix I will be used to demonstrate knowledge of the butterfly life cycle.
Measurement Tool: (How will the intended learning be measured? What are the measurable criteria
that will be used?)

Students will meet the following criteria on their symmetry art project:
1. Exact colors and design are used on both sides of the butterfly.
2. Project is completed with minimal assistance.
Extensions: Students will work cooperatively to make a big book as a culminating
activity (Appendix N)
Closure: (At the end of the lesson, how will the intended learning be summarized by the students?)
Predictions that were made at the beginning of the lesson will be revisited and checked
for accuracy.
Students will verbally explain the Butterfly Life Cycle to a partner.

Lesson Plan Template (SIOP)


Bugs, Bugs EverywhereCaterpillars to Butterflies
Topic:
Insects

Grade Range:
Grades 1-2

Time Frame:
2-3 Days

Common Core Standards:


GRADE 1
Strand: Reading Standards for Literature K-5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 1
Standard:
1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate
understanding of their central message or lesson.
Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 1
Standard:
4. Identify words and phrases in stories or poems
that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.
5. Explain major differences between books that tell stories and
books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of
text types
Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 1
Standard: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7.
Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its
characters, setting, or events.
GRADE 2
Strand: Reading Standards for Literature K-5

Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 2


Standard:
1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what,
where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key
details in a text.
Grade 1
Strand: Reading Standards for Informational Text K5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 1

Standard:
1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2. Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
3. Describe the connection between two individuals, events,
ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 1
Standard:
4. Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the
meaning of words and phrases in a text.
6. Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other
illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 1
Standard:
7. Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key
ideas.
9. Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts
on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
Grade 2
Strand: Reading Standards for Informational Text K5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 2
Standard:
1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when,
why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 2
Standard:
6. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author
wants to answer, explain, or describe.
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 2
Standard:
7. Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a
machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.
9. Compare and contrast the most important points presented by
two texts on the same topic.
GRADE 1
Strand: Writing Standards K-5

Cluster: Text Types and Purposes Grade 1


Standard:
1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name
the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for
the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a
topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of
closure.
5. With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic,
respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to
strengthen writing as needed.
GRADE 2

Strand: Writing Standards K-5


Cluster: Text Types and Purposes Grade 2
Standard:
1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book
they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support
the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect
opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a
topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a
concluding statement or section.
5. With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a
topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
Learning Objective/Outcome: (What do you want students to know and be able to do? What is the
intended learning?)

Students will observe and record stages in the life cycle.


Key Vocabulary:
egg
chrysalis
caterpillar
butterfly
dwelling
antennae

Materials:
Book: The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
Book: A Butterfly is Born by Melvin Berger
panty Hose
Scissors
large Wiggly Eyes
Paint
green Poster Board
grass seed
potting soil
butterfly cut out pattern
fabric paint
t-shirt
pipe cleaners
writing continuum (appendix Q)

Higher Order Questions:


Where does a butterfly come from?
What stages does a caterpillar go through before becoming a butterfly?

Lesson Activities:
Building Background/Motivation: (Hook?

Why are students learning this material? What is the real-

world connection?)

How many of you have ever seen a real butterfly? Where do you think it comes from?
Today we are going to hear a story and we will see if you are right?
Presentation: (How is the new material being introduced? Strategies? Scaffolding? Steps in lesson)
Lesson 1: Teacher reads The Very Hungry Caterpillar out loud to students. Looking
back through the story, we will recall the stages a caterpillar must go through before it
becomes a butterflyegg, caterpillar, chrysalis, butterfly.
Lesson 2: Teacher reads A Butterfly is Born by Melvin Berger.
Student Activities: (Meaningful activities, interactions, structures/strategies, practice and application,
feedback)

Lesson 1:
Students will use hand motions to help recall the stages of a butterfly:
Egg: hand clutched tight like a fist
Caterpillar: index finger extended, scrunched, extended, scrunched
Chrysalis: index finger of one hand wrapped by other hand (like a hotdog)
Butterfly: with thumbs interlocked, fingers wiggle and do flying motion
Next, students do the stages with their whole body:
Egg: child in fetal position
Caterpillar: inch worm across the floor
Chrysalis: standing up the child covers face with hands and spins in a circle
Butterfly: with arms extended, the child flies across the room and all around
Activity 1: Students will construct a caterpillar on a leaf:
Pre-cut green poster board into the shape of a leaf. This is going to be the dwelling
for each childs caterpillar. The leaf will have the childs name on it to distinguish
one caterpillar from another.
Each child will be given one hose. The student will fill the hose with soil and grass
mixture. The caterpillar is then tied off at the end.
Teacher will hot glue on wiggle eyes and pipe cleaner antennae for the caterpillar.
When finished, caterpillar is place on paper towel on green cardboard leaf in a sunny
spot.
Child is allowed to water caterpillar.
Activity 2: Students will make a butterfly t-shirt with his or her own hand and foot print.
The childs foot will be the center of the butterfly with hand prints on both sides
as the wings. The antennae will be drawn on with fabric marker.
A poem will be written on the back of the shirt with the fabric marker:
They flit. They fly. They flutter by. Each one is differenta butterfly.
Activity 3: Search for a butterfly

Ask children where a good place might be to find a butterfly. Why is this a good
location? Children and teacher go outside and look for a butterfly.
Lesson 2:
Students will be given a manila piece of paper that has been divided into four equal
sections (one for each stage of the butterflies development). Each section is labeled as
follows:
In the upper left rectangle, a small number one is in the bottom left corner. To the
right of the number the words, the egg are displayed.
In the upper right rectangle, a small number two is in the bottom left corner. To
the tight of the number the words, the caterpillar are displayed.
In the bottom left rectangle, a small number three is in the bottom left corner. To
the right of the number the words, "the Chrysalis" are displayed.
In the bottom right rectangle, a small number four is in the bottom left corner. To
the right of the number the words, "the butterfly" are displayed.
With paper ready, the children will use markers to illustrate the different stages of
development.
Review and Assessment: (Review of objectives and vocabulary, assess learning, measurement tools)
Recall all of the activities and how they relate to the very hungry caterpillar.
Follow up questions might include:
Where did the egg come from?
Could this story really happen or is it make believe? How do you know?
What did the caterpillar do that caterpillars really do?
What does a caterpillar do when he is inside the chrysalis?
Students will write Would you rather be a caterpillar or a butterfly.why? The writing
continuum (appendix Q) will be used as the measurement tool for this assessment.

Lesson Plan Template (SIOP)


Bugs, Bugs EverywhereBees and Ants
Topic:
Grade Range:
Insects: Comparing bees and Grades 1-2
ants
Common Core Standards:
GRADE 1

Time Frame:
3-5 Days

Strand: Reading Standards for Literature K-5


Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 1
Standard:
1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate
understanding of their central message or lesson.
3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story,
using key details.
Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 1
Standard:
4. Identify words and phrases in stories or poems
that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.
5. Explain major differences between books that tell stories and
books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of
text types
6. Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.
Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 1
Standard: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its
characters, setting, or events.
9. Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of
characters in stories.
GRADE 2
Strand: Reading Standards for Literature K-5

Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 2


Standard:
1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what,
where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key
details in a text.
2. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse

cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.


3. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events
and challenges.

Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 2


Standard:
4. Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats,
alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a
story, poem, or song.
5. Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing
how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the
action.
6. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters,
including by speaking in a different voice for each character when
reading dialogue aloud.

Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 2


Standard:
7. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a
print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters,
setting, or plot.
9. Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story
(e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures.
Grade 1
Strand: Reading Standards for Informational Text K5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 1
Standard:
1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2. Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
3. Describe the connection between two individuals, events,
ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 1
Standard:
4. Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the
meaning of words and phrases in a text.
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 1
Standard:
7. Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key
ideas.
8. Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a
text.

9. Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts


on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
Cluster: Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Grade 1
Standard:
10. With prompting and support, read informational texts
appropriately complex for grade 1.
Grade 2
Strand: Reading Standards for Informational Text K5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details Grade 2
Standard:
1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when,
why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
Cluster: Craft and Structure Grade 2
Standard:
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text
relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.
6. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author
wants to answer, explain, or describe.
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 2
Standard:
7. Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a
machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.
9. Compare and contrast the most important points presented by
two texts on the same topic.
Cluster: Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Grade 2
Standard:
10. By the end of year, read and comprehend informational
texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in
the grades 23 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as
needed at the high end of the range.
GRADE 1

Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K5


Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration Grade 1
Standard:
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners
about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and

larger groups.
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to
others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts
under discussion).
b. Build on others talk in conversations by responding to the
comments of others through multiple exchanges.
c. Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and
texts under discussion.
2. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read
aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
3. Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order
to gather additional information or clarify something that is not
understood.
GRADE 2

Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K5


Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration Grade 2
Standard:
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners
about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and
larger groups.
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the
floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a
time about the topics and texts under discussion).
b. Build on others talk in conversations by linking their
comments to the remarks of others.
c. Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about
the topics and texts under discussion.
2. Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud
or information presented orally or through other media.
3. Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order
to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen
understanding of a topic or issue.
Learning Objective/Outcome:
Students will compare the behavior, habitat, and communication skill of ants and bees.
Insect body parts will be reviewed.
Key Vocabulary:
communication
pheromones
beehive
aspirator (bug sucker)
anthill

Materials:
glue
scissors
markers/crayons
crepe paper
hole punch
construction paper
film canisters containing cotton balls soaked with:
pickle juice
peanut butter

lemon extract
peppermint extract
(any other smells children will recognize)
Resource materials:
Books:
World of Ants by Melvin Berger
The Honeybee and the Robber by Eric Carle
Songs:
The Honeybee Song by Gayle Howard
The Ants Go Marching One by One (folk song)
Higher Order Questions:
How do bees and ants eat? How does this differ?
How do they communicate?
Where do they live?
What are the body parts of an ant? A bee? How do they differ?
Lesson Activities:
Building Background/Motivation:
Who can name the insects we have talked about so far? What do they have in common?
Next we are going to talk about ants and bees. Ants and bees are very interesting to
observe, but we will need to be careful when we are around them.
Presentation:
Activity 1: Read: The Honeybee and the Robber

Discuss with children that bees have 3 body parts, like all insects. However, bees
also have 4 wings. Review concepts from books such as: guard bees, worker bees,
and queen bees and the jobs that each type performs

Activity 2: Pheromone activity (smelling activity)

Discuss concepts from book with children: "How do you think the guard bee
recognized the other bees that were coming and going from the hive? How do
bees recognize each other? How do people recognize each other?" (With our
eyes.)
"Ants and bees recognize each other by using smells, called pheromones."
Show children how to play the Secret Smell Partner game. "We are going to find
our Secret Smell Partner using our noses to find our partner, like bees do!"
Give each child a film canister (or other non-see through container) containing a
cotton ball with some type of smelly substance on it (lemon juice, peppermint,
pickle juice, and peanut butter). There will be two canisters containing each
scent. Children must find their Secret Smell Partner by smelling each others

canister until they find the other child who has the same scent as their own.
Activity 3: Beehive observation

Teacher will transition from how bees recognize each other by smelling to where
bees live. "Now that we know how bees recognize each other (by smelling), let's
think about where they live. Have you ever seen a bee's home? Does anyone
remember what the bees' home was called in The Honeybee and the Robber? It's
called a beehive. "
Show children an empty beehive with no bees in it. Let them feel how papery it is.
"This is what the outside of some beehives look like. What does it feel like?"
(Feels papery)
"Would you like to see the inside of a beehive? Here on the observation table
there is a very special beehive that we can look into without getting stung."
Show children a working beehive that they can observe, if one is available. If not,
use a book showing bees and beehive activities or view a video, "The Magic
School Bus: Buzzes a Hive" about bees.
Let children observe the bees for a few minutes to see what they discover on their
own. The students will be able to see the bees doing the waggle dance and also be
able to see the pollen sacs on the bees' legs. Then point out bees that are
communicating with each other.
"Look at those bees! Do you see how this one is circling around, and how these
other bees have circled all around and are watching him? That is another way that
bees talk to each other. They use movements to act out a message. It's called a
Waggle Dance. Can you say that? It's a funny word, isn't it?"

Activity 4: Waggle dance: Bee communication

Discuss the waggle dance that bees use to communicate. Show an example of
waggling.
Each child will have a food source-a flower made out of construction paper. Each
child bee will take turns hiding the flower.

Activity 5: Read World of Ants

"We have a wonderful book about ants to read together. But before we do that,
let's talk about what we know about ants so far. We know that they can bite. What
else do you know? Where do you think ants live? Where do people live? Do you
think ants talk to each other?"
"Let's read our book now. Maybe we will find out the answers to some of our
questions about ants."
During the book, guide observations about ant homes and communication.

Activity 6: Ant Observation and Collection: Suck-a-Bug

Go outside and observe anthills with children.

Student Activities:
Activity 2: Give each child a film canister (or other non-see through container)
containing a cotton ball with some type of smelly substance on it (lemon juice,
peppermint, pickle juice, and peanut butter). There will be two canisters containing each
scent. Children must find their "Secret Smell Partner" by smelling each other's canisters
until they find the other child who has the same scent as their own.
Activity 4:
Each bee will then take turns doing the waggle dance to let the rest of the group know
where the food source is. The bee team will show the group where the food is by
waggling forward and backward, and in left and right circles to direct the group to the
food. (Ex: To direct the group to go left, the bee team will make a left circle, waggling as
they circle. To direct the group to go right, they will waggle in a circle to the right.) The
first student to locate the food source gets to be the bee next. (The waggle dance is a
wiggling motion that bees do when they come back to the hive from the field where they
have found a food source. The other bees all gather around the bee that is "waggling."
The bee communicates where it found the food by directions it waggles in reference to
the sun. If the bee waggles up the hive, it means the food source is north of the hive. If
the bee waggles in a circle to the left, the food source is to the west of the hive, right in a
circle means to the east and down means to the south.
Activity 5: The Honey Bee(song)
By: Gayle Howard (to the tune "Mary had a Little Lamb")
The honeybee goes, buzz, buzz, buzz
Buzz, Buzz, Buzz
Buzz, Buzz, Buzz
The honeybee goes buzz, buzz, buzz
On a summer day
It's taking pollen to the hive, to the hive, to the hive,
It's taking pollen to the hive,
Not's so far away

The bee makes honey that is sweet, that is sweet, that is sweet,
The bee makes honey that is sweet,
As sweet as sweet can be
The bee keeps honey in the hive, in the hive, in the hive
The bee keeps honey in the hive,
And shares a bit with me!
Activity 6: Ant Observation and Collection: Suck-a-Bug

Instructors will pair off with the children, and show them how to use aspirators
(Bug Suckers) to collect ants. We will take some soil from around the anthill, and
place the soil and ants in a clear glass jar to observe for the rest of the week.

Activity 7: Sing The Ants Go Marching

Hold up fingers to count along with children the number of ants as they go
through the song.

Review and Assessment:


Who can tell me something about bees and ants?
Cue children to orally review how many body parts bees and ants have (3), what
group of organisms they belong to (insects), how they talk to each other
(pheromones and waggling), where they live (anthills and beehives), and what
kind of yummy food bees make (honey).
Assessment: Formative assessments will include teacher observation/anecdotal records
kept throughout the various lessons.
Interventions/Extensions: (How are you reaching every learner?)
Bee Windsock
Bend black construction paper and into a cylinder shape and glue it in place to
create the body.
Glue squiggly eyes onto side of cylinder toward one end for the bee's eyes. (Can
also make eyes out of construction paper.)
Cut wings out of white construction paper and glue onto sides of cylinder for the
wings.
Cut long strips of yellow and black crepe paper, and glue the ends inside one end
of the cylinder with the other end streaming out so that they can blow in the wind.
Create two antennae with black pipe cleaners, and attach them to the front end of
the cylinder. Use hole punch to make hole to twist the pipe cleaners into.

Use hole punch again to make two holes across from each other toward the front
end of the cylinder. Cut a piece of string and tie each end to one of the holes for a
hanger.

Honey of a snack: what bees make with pollen

Observe bees in the garden or school campus, going from flower to flower and
collecting pollen. Look at the bees' pollen sacks, loaded with yellow pollen.
(Could also go back to the Discovery Room to observe pollen sacks on bees' legs.)
"Who knows what bees do with the nectar and pollen they collect from flowers?
That's right, they make honey! Who likes honey? Me, too!"
Back inside, give children a slice of bread and spread with honey and eat.

Marshmallow Ants

"Do you remember what the ants that we saw looked like? How many body parts
do they have? How many body parts do all insects have?"
Children will make their own ants using large marshmallows for the three body
parts, and pretzel sticks to hold the body parts together and for the legs and
antennae. M&M's can be used for the eyes.

Review ant (and insect) body parts as children construct their ants.

Component 4: Assessments
Assessment for Learning (formative):
Describe and/or include the formative assessments used throughout the unit to monitor
student progress toward the specific achievement targets that were established for the
unit.
T-Chart
Questions and Answers (whole group discussions)
Teacher Observations
Story writing
Parent questionnaire
Journals
Group work
Insect/spider mobile
Handouts
Compare/contrast chart
Insect chart
Predictions
Sequencing of story
Partner work
Assessment of Learning (summative):
o Insect parts
o Would you rather be(story writing)
o Butterfly project ideas (final)
Report
Poster/chart
Model
Habitat
Picture with parts explained
What will students do for the final product(s)?
What knowledge (pre-assessments) are they to use?
Students will need to have knowledge of a butterflys lifecycle, habitat, and other
pertinent facts learned throughout the unit.
What are they to perform or create?
Students will choose a culminating project from Appendix M
What conditions are they to adhere to?
See measurement tools for final project for specific conditions within each project.
How much time will they have?

Teacher will determine time to complete each project and presentation time. This
will be different for each project chosen and dependent on class dynamics year to year.

Describe your performance assessment:


Butterfly Project (student choice from a menu of options-see Appendix M)
Describe your measurement tool (attachments)
Rubric for Poster/Chart (Appendix P)
Writing Continuum (Pre-Benchmark 1) (Appendix Q)
Criteria list (Appendix R)

Component 5: Resources and Materials


This section is to assist the teacher in planning for the unit. Include as appropriate:

Basic Supplies/Materials List for the Unit


o See attached lesson plans for specific materials for each lesson
o Computer with access to the Internet

Web Sites for Teachers


o www.enchantedlearning.com
o www.unitedstreaming.com
o www.abcteach.com
The Magic School Bus: Buzzes a Hive (video)

Web Sites for Students


o www.enchantedlearning.com

Books for Teachers


o The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
o A Butterfly is Born by Melvin Berger
o The Honeybee and the Robber by Eric Carle
o World of Ants by Melvin Berger
o The Ants go Marching
o Thematic Unit-Creep Crawlies (Teacher Created Materials ISBN:
1-55734-268-7)
Books for Students
o Visit your school library to obtain various books on insects, and insect life
cycles
Guest speakers and/or field trips
o school field tripwalk around grounds

Created by:
Blanca Cunha (bcunha@amphi.com) and Brenda Kreidler (bkreidler@amphi.com)
Attachments: