You are on page 1of 16

adjective, idler, idlest.

1.
not working or active; unemployed; doing nothing:
idle workers.
2.
not spent or filled with activity:
idle hours.
3.
not in use or operation; not kept busy:
idle machinery.
4.
habitually doing nothing or avoiding work; lazy.
5.
of no real worth, importance, or significance:
idle talk.
6.
having no basis or reason; baseless; groundless:
idle fears.
7.
frivolous; vain:
idle pleasures.
Expand

verb (used without object), idled, idling.


10.
to pass time doing nothing.
11.
to move, loiter, or saunter aimlessly:
to idle along the avenue.
12.
(of a machine, engine, or mechanism) to operate at a low speed,disengaged fro
m the load.

verb (used with object), idled, idling.


13.
to pass (time) doing nothing (often followed by away):
to idle away the afternoon.
14.
to cause (a person) to be idle:
The strike idled many workers.

15.
to cause (a machine, engine, or mechanism) to idle:
I waited in the car while idling the engine.

noun
16.
the state or quality of being idle.
17.
the state of a machine, engine, or mechanism that is idling:
a cold engine that stalls at idle.
Not only idle, but tattlers also and busybodies, speaking things which they
ought not.
unknown author

Support the sick, but not the idle.

Conceit
noun
1.
an excessively favorable opinion of one's own ability, importance, wit,etc.
2.
something that is conceived in the mind; a thought; idea:
He jotted down the conceits of his idle hours.
3.
imagination; fancy.
4.
a fancy; whim; fanciful notion.
5.
an elaborate, fanciful metaphor, especially of a strained or far-fetchednature.
6.
the use of such metaphors as a literary characteristic, especially inpoetry.
7.
a fancy, purely decorative article.

verb (used with object)


10.
to flatter (especially oneself).
11.
British Dialect. to take a fancy to; have a good opinion of.
12.
Obsolete.

unknown author

a. to imagine.
b. to conceive; apprehend.

Idioms
13.
out of conceit with, displeased or dissatisfied with.
Note : The term ego is often used to mean personal pride and selfabsorption: Losing at chess doesn't do much for my ego.

Examples from the web for ego

West admits that his ego has reached giant proportions.


Avoid having your ego so close to your position that when your positionfal
ls, your ego goes with it.
He is a small man with a big ego.

He is large of ego, full of money and cranky in mien.


All the rest is a matter of ego feeding.
There was no ego involved with anyone in this movie.
They stroked my ego, and I swallowed the bait.
Coffee-table photo books can sometimes come across as ego -strokingdoorstops.
Probably my ego needed deflating, and the deflation wasn't long in coming.

It's not vanity that drives me to ego -surf, as the practice is called.

noun, plural egos.


1.
the I or self of any person; a person as thinking, feeling, and willing,and distin
guishing itself from the selves of others and from objects ofits thought.
2.
Psychoanalysis. the part of the psychic apparatus that experiences andreacts to
the outside world and thus mediates between the primitivedrives of the id and t
he demands of the social and physicalenvironment.
3.
egotism; conceit; self-importance:
Her ego becomes more unbearable each day.
4.
self-esteem or self-image; feelings:
Your criticism wounded his ego.

5.
(often initial capital letter) Philosophy.
a. the enduring and conscious element that knows experience.
b. Scholasticism. the complete person comprising both body and soul.
6.
Ethnology. a person who serves as the central reference point in thestudy of org
anizational and kinship relationships.

[self-i-steem, self-] Spell Syllables


noun
1.
a realistic respect for or favorable impression of oneself; self-respect.
2.
an inordinately or exaggeratedly favorable impression of oneself.

self-esteem
noun
1.
respect for or a favourable opinion of oneself
2.
an unduly high opinion of oneself; vanity

Examples from the web for self-esteem

Not to mention the self esteem gained by actually doing a worth while job
.
It became a tool of escape and defense, making freedom attainable andaf
firming strength, self-reliance and self esteem.
There are so many people out there who are unable to keep from trying t
obolster their self esteem by putting someone else down.
It gives both spouses self esteem and ambition to be successful.
Poor impulse control combined with inadequate self esteem or lower socia
lstanding is enough to create sociopathic behavior.

It builds their confidence and self esteem, and also their regard for you a
ndyour opinion.
Okay, now it is time to use your own logic against you, both destroying y
ourargument and your self esteem.
That's the hook for people with low self esteem or needing a reason for lif
e.
And self esteem no longer comes from how much information you hoard,
orhow may people report to you.

if self-esteem were easy to impart, everyone would have it.


Read more at http://quotes.dictionary.com/search/self+esteem?page=1#Ko3DKovodrH6a3X6.99

distrust
verb (used with object)
1.
to regard with doubt or suspicion; have no trust in.

noun
2.
lack of trust; doubt; suspicion.

Examples from the web for distrust

There can be no doubt that distrust of words is less harmful thanunwarra


nted trust in them.
Historically there has been an element of distrust between turtle ecologist
sand hobbyists.
But these and other agreements languish as mutual distrust continues.
It is a cause of distrust and potentially another round of debilitatingargum
ent.
If you distrust the motivation for the recorder, and are tenured, ask.
The university is a ground of distrust and cynicism.
We were cautiously optimistic, but past experience had trained us todistru
st such feelings.
distrust public statements issued from their serried ranks.
She hasn't done anything from this thread that demonstrates a reason to
distrust her.
By then, the public's distrust of electricity had diminished.

verb (used with object), overrode, overridden, overriding.


1.
to
to
2.
to
to
3.
to
to
4.
to
5.
to
6.
to
7.
to

prevail or have dominance over; have final authority or say over;overrule:


override one's advisers.
disregard, set aside, or nullify; countermand:
override the board's veto.
take precedence over; preempt or supersede:
override any other considerations.
extend beyond or spread over; overlap.
modify or suspend the ordinary functioning of; alter the normaloperation of.
ride over or across.
ride past or beyond.

noun
11.
a commission on sales or profits, especially one paid at the executiveor manage
rial level.
12.
budgetary or expense increase; exceeding of an estimate:
work stoppage because of cost overrides.
13.
an ability or allowance to correct, change, supplement, or suspend theoperation
of an otherwise automatic mechanism, system, etc.
14.
an auxiliary device for such modification, as a special manual control.
15.
an act of nullifying, canceling, or setting aside:
a congressional override of the president's veto.
16.
Radio and Television Slang. something that is a dominant or majorfacet of a pro
gram or series, especially something that serves as aunifying theme:
an entertainment series with a historical override.

Examples from the web for override

During the storm itself, they monitor their birds and override any spurious
commands.
You'll need to roll your own malware to override the manufacturer'sfirmw
are.
Customers could override the utilities' suggested temperatures.
Under this, urgent humanitarian needs may override concerns aboutnatio
nal sovereignty.
Our inability to forego these rewarding aspects of food intake override lon
g-term homeostatic control, contributing to obesity.
But they never follow up on these factors, even though they override allot
hers.
Deals that push them off their land or override customary rights cannot b
ejustified.
To succeed, you must override both a normal impulse to attend to newinf
ormation and curiosity about something forbidden.
First, when subjects form deontological judgments, emotional processes a
resaid to override controlled cognitive processes.
Somehow the visual input helps to override the ongoing interior monologu
ethat's interfering with sleep.

[op-tuh-miz-uh m] Spell Syllables


noun
1.
a disposition or tendency to look on the more favorable side of eventsor conditio
ns and to expect the most favorable outcome.
2.
the belief that good ultimately predominates over evil in the world.
3.
the belief that goodness pervades reality.
4.
the doctrine that the existing world is the best of all possible worlds.

Examples from the web for optimism

But despite the familiar urban problems, there's a goofy, energetic optimi
smafoot.

My heart is filled with optimism for the future of these storied cats.
But the picture is also poignant, in that the boundless optimism it capture
dhas been tempered by tragedies and dead ends.
The principal doctor was lost in the imbecilities of a senile optimism.
He was still optimistic, but it was a less kinetic, a more thoughtfuloptimis
m.
The optimism has been tempered of late by business woes amongtelecom
munication companies, but the technology remains impressive.
There was a catch in his voice, a note of forced optimism.
There is a lot of optimism going around the room as the final hours ofappr
oach are coming to a close.
Gamblers beware: sleep deprivation may increase a sense of optimism,ca
using people to take bigger risks.
My experience is that listening fast is also integral to one's optimism.

Examples from the web for pervade

Offbeat humor pervades the outback, where many conveniences must be


built by hand.
First, she should stand up to the corruption that pervades the loggingsect
or.
Anti-bear sentiment pervades the central range as well.
The culprit was labeled dark energya hypothesized presence that pervadesspace and pushes the pieces of the
universe apart.
We still have no idea how life began, or whether life exists only here on o
urlonely planet or pervades the cosmos.
Unfortunately there persists a scarcity mentality that pervades issuesrega
rding people's perceptions of the natural world.
So it's a metaphor that pervades both language and thought.
Nanotechnology is simply the inevitable end result of a persistent trendto
ward miniaturization that pervades all of technology.
In fact the whole tendency to dualism that pervades human thinking may
befound to be lessened, or changed.
The nothing-to-hide argument pervades discussions about privacy.

pervade
/pved/

verb

1.
(transitive) to spread through or throughout, esp subtly or gradually;per
meate

[in-vent] Spell Syllables


verb (used with object)
1.
to originate or create as a product of one's own ingenuity,experimentation, or c
ontrivance:
to invent the telegraph.
2.
to produce or create with the imagination:
to invent a story.
3.
to make up or fabricate (something fictitious or false):
to invent excuses.
4.
Archaic. to come upon; find.

Examples from the web for invent

In this open city, it seems so easy to feel that you can invent yourself and
create a unique life.
Brilliant engineers invent things and devise solutions that improve the live
sof millions of people.
Dangerous bacteria are developing resistance to existing antibiotics faster
than humans can invent or discover new drugs.
Small companies invent the future, big companies buy it.
Chemists are usually asked to invent a solution, but without consideringh
azardous by-products.
We had to invent our games, invent our toys, because there were no toys
.
Say, for example, you invent a four-legged swivel chair.
As far as the product is concerned, the innovation required in a period ofc
risis is not to invent something different.

The gecko's amazing sticky toes inspired scientists to invent a wallclimbingrobot.


Without patents to protect their creations, invent ors would have littleince
ntive to invent.

invent
/nvnt/
verb

1.
to create or devise (new ideas, machines, etc)
2.
to make up (falsehoods); fabricate

[ik-stend] Spell Syllables


verb (used with object)
1.
to stretch out; draw out to the full length:
He extended the measuring tape as far as it would go.
2.
to stretch, draw, or arrange in a given direction, or so as to reach aparticular po
int, as a cord, wall, or line of troops.
3.
to stretch forth or hold out, as the arm or hand:
to extend one's hand in greeting.
4.
to place at full length, especially horizontally, as the body or limbs.
5.
to increase the length or duration of; lengthen; prolong:
to extend a visit.
6.
to stretch out in various or all directions; expand; spread out in area:
A huge tent was extended over the field.
7.
to enlarge the scope of, or make more comprehensive, as operations,influence,
or meaning:
The European powers extended their authority in Asia.

8.
to provide as an offer or grant; offer; grant; give:
to extend aid to needy scholars.
9.
Finance. to postpone (the payment of a debt) beyond the timeoriginally agreed
upon.
10.
to increase the bulk or volume of, especially by adding an inexpensiveor plentifu
l substance.
11.
Bookkeeping. to transfer (figures) from one column to another.
12.
Law.
a. British. to assess or value.
b. to make a seizure or levy upon, as land, by a writ of extent.
13.
Mange. to bring (a horse) into an extended attitude.
14.
to exert (oneself) to an unusual degree.
15.
Archaic. to exaggerate.
16.
Obsolete. to take by seizure.

Examples from the web for extend

Lights suspended above the tanks extend daylight hours in fall and spring
tokeep the fish feeding longer and growing faster.
Twentynine universities across the country have started a project toextend their
high-speed networks to surrounding communities.
For the first time one of their number had consented to reduce his authori
ty,rather than extend it.
Mounting research shows that optimism could extend your life.
The question is whether it also functions in peopleand might bemanipulated to extend human life.

Start with the plants, then pick your containers that will extend the colort
heme.
The task of government is to extend the tenure of settlement as long asp
ossible.
Moreover, this disparate impact is likely to extend far into the future.
Another would extend a subsidy for health insurance for those who lose it
along with their jobs.
Cloning success in animals doesn't extend to humans.

[n., adj. doo-pli-kit, dyoo-; v. doo-pli-keyt, dyoo-]Spell Syllables


noun
1.
a copy exactly like an original.
2.
anything corresponding in all respects to something else.
3.
Cards. a duplicate game.

verb (used with object), duplicated, duplicating.


4.
to make an exact copy of.
5.
to do or perform again; repeat:
He duplicated his father's way of standing with his hands in hispockets.
6.
to double; make twofold.

verb (used without object), duplicated, duplicating.


7.
to become duplicate.

adjective
8.
exactly like or corresponding to something else:
duplicate copies of a letter.
9.
consisting of or existing in two identical or corresponding parts; double.
10.
Cards. noting a game in which each team plays a series of identicalhands, the w
inner being the team making the best total score.

Idioms

11.
in duplicate, in two copies, especially two identical copies:
Please type the letter in duplicate.

Examples from the web for duplicate

The number of duplicate claims among patents is far too high.


US farmers and ranchers are also plunking down thousands of dollars tod
uplicate prize bulls, cows, and pigs.
The team set out to duplicate the chemistry within interstellar clouds in th
elaboratory.
But you can duplicate this idea without mail ordering.
Please only submit one entry, as duplicate entries will be discarded.
duplicate clubs and rubber bridge clubs normally pursue independent para
lleltracks.
Pay close attention to the tone and style of work published in the journala
nd try to duplicate it in your own work.
They are having to spend increasing amounts of time and effort respondin
gto duplicate inquiries.
But researchers came up empty when they tried to duplicate theexperime
nt.
Her creations have also inspired customers to duplicate her designs or ma
keup their own.

Examples from the web for duplication

By the time you've collected a hundred or so, you can use the rate ofdupli
cation to estimate the total number of cards.
To better understand this range and avoid duplication of earlier contests,c
heck out the archive of previous contests.
Biologically, all future organization has grown out of it, by a process ofdup
lication and interrelationship.
Wasteful duplication and proliferation of lines could easily result if therew
ere no public regulation.
Since everyone of them is designed in their workrooms, you will find nodu
plication here.
Experimental physics requires independent corroboration and duplication.
It means infinite duplication without loss of quality.
Shorter telomeres actually leads to duplication errors and epigeneticirregu
larities.

Prior studies have come up with different duplication rates.


How much is packaged hype, duplication, artificial obsolescence.

synthesis
[sin-thuh-sis] Spell Syllables
noun, plural

syntheses

[sin-thuh-seez] (Show IPA)


1.
the combining of the constituent elements of separate material orabstract entiti
es into a single or unified entity (opposed to analysis,
)the separating of any material or abstract entity into its constituentelements.
2.
a complex whole formed by combining.
3.
Chemistry. the forming or building of a more complex substance orcompound fr
om elements or simpler compounds.
4.
Philosophy. the third stage of argument in Hegelian
dialectic, whichreconciles the mutually contradictory first two propositions, thesi
s andantithesis.
5.
Biology, modern
synthesis, a consolidation of the results of variouslines of investigation from the
1920s through the 1950s that supportedand reconciled the Darwinian theory of
evolution and the Mendelianlaws of inheritance in terms of natural selection acti
ng on geneticvariation.
6.

Psychology, Psychiatry. the integration of traits, attitudes, andimpulses to creat


e a total personality.

Hegelian dialectic
noun
1.
an interpretive method, originally used to relate specific entities or
events to the absolute idea, in which some assertible proposition(thesis) is nec
essarily opposed by an equally assertible andapparently contradictory propositio
n (antithesis) the mutualcontradiction being reconciled on a higher level of tru
th by a thirdproposition (synthesis)

Examples from the web for synthesis

We count papers, compute rankings and indices, and seem not to care on
ewhit about synthesis or overview.
Engineering requires creative, original, synthesis and invention.
Moreover, in practice, a synthesis between the two positions is emerging.
The company also collaborated with other researchers to develop process
esto automate the synthesis of radiotracers.
There seems to be more synthesis of new ideas and information, and for
methis is both more interesting and more satisfying.
It seems you are not too familiar with organic chemical synthesis andphar
macology.
Now astronomers are on the verge of a similar synthesis for galaxies.
One consequence of this is the synthesis of different proteins and enzyme
s.
And incredibly, they don't require laborious synthesis to combine theirmilli
ons of atoms: they literally build themselves.
The gene probably controls the synthesis of a key protein in pacemakerne
urons, which regulate the body's clock.

synthesis
/snss/
noun

(pl) -ses (-siz)

1.
the process of combining objects or ideas into a complex wholeCompare analysi
s
2.
the combination or whole produced by such a process
3.
the process of producing a compound by a chemical reaction or seriesof reaction
s, usually from simpler or commonly available startingmaterials
4.
(linguistics) the use of inflections rather than word order and functionwords to
express the syntactic relations in a language Compareanalysis (sense 5)
5.
(philosophy, archaic) synthetic reasoning
6.
(philosophy)
a. (in the writings of Kant) the unification of one concept with anothernot containe
d in it Compare analysis (sense 7)
b. the final stage in the Hegelian dialectic, that resolves thecontradiction between t
hesis and antithesis