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Physiotherapy

School of Science & Health

400983
Orthopaedic Physiotherapy
1H 2014

Edition: Autumn 2011


Copyright: University of Western Sydney, 2011

HOW TO USE THIS LEARNING GUIDE


ICON KEY

This learning guide supplements the unit outline and is designed to help you navigate through

Important
information

the unit. It will help you focus on what you need to do to for classes, independent learning and

Warning

the various assessment tasks. A standard set of icons is used throughout the learning guide to

Hint

make navigation easier. Use the icons to quickly identify important information, things you need
to do and hints for doing them.
The learning guide also offers some study tips to assist you in developing the skills and
techniques of an effective learner. University level study requires students to become adult
learners in order to adequately prepare them for the workplace. This means that you will need
to take control of your own learning and make the most of opportunities offered to ensure your
own success. This learning guide has been specifically designed to help you achieve this.

STAFF
Unit Coordinator

Dr Amitabh Gupta

Point of first contact

Building 24.4.103, Campbelltown campus


Phone: 4620 3757

Teaching Staff

Email: a.gupta@uws.edu.au

Dr Amitabh Gupta
Building 24.4.103, Campbelltown campus
Phone: 4620 3757

Email: a.gupta@uws.edu.au

TBA
Campbelltown Campus (Wednesday only)
Phone: TBA

Email: TBA

CONSULTATION ARRANGEMENTS
Campbelltown
campus

Dr Amitabh Gupta (Unit Coordinator) is available by appointment. For bookings and/or requests
for consultation please send an email.

TEXT BOOKS
Solomon, L., Warwick, D., & Nayagam, S. (2010). Apley's System of Orthopaedics and

Fractures (9th ed.). London: Hodder Arnold.


Robertson, V., Ward, A., Low, J., & Reed, A. (2006). Electrotherapy Explained (4th ed.): Elsevier:
Butterworth-Heinemann Ltd.

Table of contents
SECTI ON

ONE

SECTI ON

About Orthopaedic Physiotherapy

An introduction to this unit

Approach to teaching

Overview of resources, assessments and learning


outcomes in this unit
SECTI ON

FOUR

Expectations

TWO

Assessment

What is expected of you

Workload

Attendance

Student responsibilities and conduct

What you can expect from the teaching team

11

Changes to unit as a result of student feedback

11

Learning outcomes

Contact protocol

12

Assessment summary

Policy and how it affects you

12

Deferred Exams

What is academic misconduct?

12

Re-Sit Exams

What is non-academic misconduct?

13

Assessment 1: Practical A (40%)

Special Consideration Application

13

Overview

Raising concerns

14

Details

Marking criteria and standards

Assessment 2: Practical B (10%)

Overview

Details

Assessment 3: Online Exam (50%)

Overview

Details

Marking criteria & standards

SECTI ON

THREE

Learning resources

Overview of learning resources

Recommended reading

Other resources that might help with university life

SECTI ON

FI VE

Teaching activities

Schedule of activities

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Section 1: About Orthopaedic Physiotherapy


This unit builds on the knowledge and skills developed in the first 2 years of your physiotherapy
study. It focuses on client assessment and evidence-based management in acute orthopaedic
physiotherapy contexts. This will require strong communication skills, ethical and professional
behaviour and an appreciation of interprofessional care. Professional competencies addressed in
this unit include introductory skills in orthopaedic physiotherapy assessment, interpretation and
prioritisation of findings along with the implementation and evaluation of appropriate treatment
strategies.

Approach to teaching
An emphasis is placed on communication and problem-solving to enhance learning. We have
created a forum to achieve learning outcomes via interactive lectures, small group activities and
discussion, practical skill sessions and use of the e-learning environment. Teaching and learning
activities have been linked to the methods of assessment to provide a continuous opportunity for
engagement and learning throughout the semester.

Overview of resources, assessments and learning outcomes

LEARNING RESOURCES

Textbook

ASSESSMENT

Practical Viva A
(40%)

LEARNING
OUTCOMES

WEEK DUE

1 to 6
(see page 2-4)

Week beginning 24
March 2013

1 to 6
(see page 2-4)

Week beginning 9
June or 23 June 2013
(TBA)

1 to 6
(see page 4-5)

Written Exams weeks


beginning 17 Feb &
10 Mar 2013

Independant learning, lecture &


tutorial material
Practical Viva B
Learning guide

Library resources

(10%)

Written Examination
(50%)

vUWS

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Section 2: Assessment details


Learning outcomes
The learning outcomes for this unit are:
1.

Display effective communication skills, ethics and professionalism

2.

Conduct a subjective and objective assessment

3.

Develop a prioritised problem list and treatment plan

4.

Implement appropriate and effective management strategies

5.

Monitor and evaluate and progress treatments as indicated

6.

Demonstrate safe work practices

Assessment summary
To pass this unit, you must pass all of the assessable items listed below. You may or may not be offered reassessment depending on your academic performance. If you are offered a re-assessment of an essential
assessment item, your final grade will be converted from an R (Re-assessable Fail) to a Pass or Fail as per the
UWS Assessment Policy.
ASSESSMENT ITEM AND DUE DATE

LEARNING OUTCOMES

VALUE

1.

Practical Viva A

1-6

40%

2.

Practical Viva B (Electrophysiological Agents)

1-6

10%

3.

Written Examination

1-6

50%

Note: To pass this unit you must:


1.

Pass all assessment items.

2.

Achieve a 50% pass overall.

Deferred Exams
If you are not able to attend assessments that include a written exam or a practical viva exam, due to an
unforseen event, emergency or misadventure you need to apply for special consideration during teaching
session. If special consideration is granted, then the student will be offered a deferred written exam in place of
the original written exam that was missed or a deferred practical viva in place of the original practical viva that
was missed. The date of the deferred assessment task will be a minimum of 28 days after the original
assessment task was due to be held.
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Special Consideration Application


Applications for Special Consideration to request accommodations for a specific assessment task must be
submitted to the student centre with appropriate supporting documentation no later than 5pm on the 2nd
working day after the due date of the assessment. Students should be aware that an application for Special
Consideration does not automatically mean that it will be granted. Please refer to the UWS Special
Consideration policy for further details.

Re-Sit Exams
In the event that you have failed (<50%) an assessment task such as a written or practical viva exam, you will
only be offered a re-sit exam if you have achieved a borderline fail for the assessment task.

You will be awarded either a pass or fail for the re-sit assessment task. If you pass you will be awarded 50% of
the available marks for the assessment task. If you fail the re-sit exam you will fail the assessment task and the
unit of study. The date of the re-sit assessment task will be a minimum of 28 days after the original assessment
task was due to be held.

Assessment 1: Practical A (40%)


Overview
Practical viva A will be focused on and will aim to assess the students ability to practice orthopaedic
physiotherapy in the context of a clinical scenario. If you fail this assessment task you will be provided with
feedback. If you achieved a borderline fail you may be provided an opportunity to undertake a re-sit practical
viva. If you pass the re-sit practical viva, you will be awarded a mark of 20/40. Failure to pass means that you
will not pass this assessment and you will not pass this unit of study.

Details
The practical viva will take place in a scheduled session at the end of a 9 week teaching block in
session 1H of 2013. The practical viva will consist of tasks in which the student will need to
demonstrate the ability to practice the following skills in the context of practicing orthopaedic
physiotherapy in the acute setting: communication skills, subjective assessment, objective
assessment treatment/management strategies re-assessment and planning for ongoing patient care
in an interprofessional setting. There may be more than one question or skill that students are
required to answer or demonstrate. The question(s) at the station will be randomly selected from a
range of topics. The examination period for each practical viva will take up to 30 minutes for each
student; however, all students will be required to be available and act as a patient for other students.
Note: In the case of cheating or collusion, UWS policies will be followed. A detailed copy of the

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policies can be found in the UWS Student Handbook or electronically at


http://apps.uws.edu.au/uws/policies/ppm/doc/000051.html

Marking criteria and standards


Students will be assessed in practical viva examinations according to a marking schema based on
the Assessment of Physiotherapy Practice (APP) standards.
An immediate fail will be given if criteria relating to ensuring safety to the student and the client is/are
not met or if informed consent is not obtained.

Assessment 2: Practical B (10%)


Overview
Practical viva B will be focused on and will aim to assess the students ability to prescribe and apply
electrophysiological (EPA) management strategies safely, in a clinical context. If you fail this
assessment task you will be provided with feedback. If you achieved a borderline fail you may be
provided an opportunity to undertake a re-sit practical viva. If you pass the re-sit practical viva, you
will be awarded a mark of 5/10. Failure to pass means that you will not pass this assessment and
you will not pass this unit of study.

Details
The practical viva will take place in a scheduled session during session 1H of 2013. The practical
viva will consist of tasks in which the student will need to demonstrate the ability to practice the
following skills in the context of electrophysiological agents in physiotherapy: communication skills,
subjective assessment, objective assessment, prescription and application of electrophysiological
treatments, re-evaluation of the effect of EPAs and planning for ongoing patient care. There may be
more than one question or skill that students are required to answer or demonstrate. The question(s)
at the station will be randomly selected from a range of topics. The examination period for each
practical viva will take up to 20 minutes for each student; however, all students will be required to
remain in a holding area for the examination period for all students.
Note: In the case of cheating or collusion, UWS policies will be followed. A detailed copy of the
policies can be found in the UWS Student Handbook or electronically at
http://apps.uws.edu.au/uws/policies/ppm/doc/000051.html

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Assessment 3: Written examination (50%)


Overview
This assessment task will aim assess your ability to understand and apply the principles of
orthopaedic physiotherapy in client management in an acute care setting.

Details
There will be two closed book exams (week beginning 18 February & 11 March) scheduled at a set
time at the Campbelltown Campus. Each exam will be 1 hour long with the 10mins of reading time
included within the 1 hour. Each written exam will include a mixture of multiple choice and short
answer questions. Each written exam will be worth 25%.The final result for each exam will be
summed and converted to a mark out of 50. All material presented in lectures, tutorials and
independent learning activities will be examinable. If you fail the first written exam you will have the
opportunity to achieve a score in the second written exam that brings your total mark for this
assessment to 50% or over, to be able to pass this assessment task. If you fail this assessment task
you will be provided with feedback. If you achieved a borderline fail you may be provided an
opportunity to undertake a re-sit written exam. If you pass the re-sit exam, you will be awarded a
mark of 25/50. Failure to pass means that you will not pass this assessment and you will not pass
this unit of study.

Marking criteria and standards


GRADE

DESCRIPTION

Fail

Less than 50% of marks awarded

Pass

Correctly answered 50-64.9% of all marks

Credit

Correctly answered 65-74.9% of all marks

Distinction

Correctly answered 75-84.9% of all marks

High Distinction

Correctly answered 85% or more of all marks

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Section 3: Learning resources


Overview of learning resources
RESOURCE

Teaching team

ASSESSMENTS 1 & 2: Practical Viva Exams

ASSESSMENT 3: Written Examination

Attend all lectures and tutorials and be prepared to

Write weekly summary notes for lectures, tutorials and

actively participate

independent learning tasks. Link to learning outcomes

Practice assessment and management/treatment

Come ready to participate in the interactive lectures and

strategies during and outside practical sessions

practicals
The final lecture will be used to summarise key concepts by
applying them to case scenarios

Hint If you still have unanswered questions, despite following the above guidelines, make an appointment to speak
with the unit coordinator. Consultation times and locations are listed at the front of this learning guide.
Library

Consult Librarian Online and use home page search box


Book into relevant library tutorials online to gain skills in
accessing relevant textbooks, journal articles and video
resources to assist with your learning

Textbook

vUWS

An electronic reference list is available for this unit (follow


the links on vUWS to access)
Multiple copies of the recommended textbook are held in
the library and a single copy is held in e-reserve

Review the relevant contents of each chapter

Summarise the contents of assigned pre-reading material

Make sure content is understood

Integrate material from lectures and tutorials

Keep up-to-date via unit announcements

Keep up-to-date via unit announcements

Access resources for assignment

Download lecture and tutorial notes

Complete independant learning

Access independent learning activities and reading

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Reading
Recommended

Solomon, L., Warwick, D., & Nayagam, S. (2010). Apley's System of Orthopaedics and Fractures (9th ed.). London:
Hodder Arnold.
Robertson, V., Ward, A., Low, J., & Reed, A. (2006). Electrotherapy Explained (4th ed.): Elsevier: ButterworthHeinemann Ltd.

Suggested

Adams, J.C. (2001). Outline of orthopaedics (13th ed.). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.
Brody, L. T., & Hall, C. M. (2011). Therapeutic Exercise. Moving Toward Function (3rd ed.). Sydney: Lippincott Williams
& Wilkins.
Clarkson, H. (2000). Musculoskeletal assessment: Joint range of movement and muscle strength (2nd ed). Baltimore:
Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.
Andrew, J. G., Herrick, A. L., & Marsh, D. R. (2000). Musculoskeletal Medicine and Surgery. Sydney: Churchill
Livingstone.
Atkinson K., Coutts F. And Hassenkamp A.-M. (2005. Physiotherapy in Orthopaedics: A problem-solving approach (2nd
ed). Elsevier: Sydney.
Greenspan, A. (2010). Orthopaedic Imaging. A Practical Approach (5th ed.): Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Hoppenfeld, S. (1976). Physical Examination of the spine and extremities. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall
International.
Kendall, F., McCreary, E., Provance, P., Rodgers, M. & Romani, W. (2005). Muscles: Testing and function with posture

and pain (5th ed.). Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Khurana, J. S. (2009). Bone Pathology (2nd ed.). Philadelphia: Humana Press.
Lewis, C. & Bottomley, J.(2008). Geriatric rehabilitation: A clinical approach. (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, New
Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall.
McRae, R. (2010). Clinical Orthopaedic Examination (6th ed.): Churchill Livingstone. Elsevier.
Palmer, M.L., Epler, M.E. (1998) Fundamentals of Musculoskeletal Assessment Techniques (2nd ed). Baltimore:
Williams and Wilkins.
Pierson F.M. & Fairchild S.L. (2008). Principles & techniques of patient care (4th ed). Philadelphia: Saunders Elsevier.
Swain, J. And Bush, K.W. (2009). Diagnostic Imaging for Physical Therapists. Elsevier: Sydney.
The textbook for this unit can be purchased from UWS Connect bookstore at Campbelltown campus or else online at
http://orders.connectbooks.com.au/WebStore/ViewBook.aspx?id=I%01IJCSKVTMW. Apleys retails for $199.95 and Electrotherapy
Explained retails for $100.00. A 10% discount is available for students if purchased from Connect books.

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Other resources that might help with university life


University life

Find out about life outside the lecture theatre news and events, services and facilities, career information and more:
http://www.uws.edu.au/currentstudents/current_students/university_life.

E-Learning

Check your vUWS sites regularly for unit announcements and learning resources such as lecture and tutorial notes.
There is a specific vUWS site for this unit (400983) as well as for the physiotherapy program (4662). Login to access
these at http://vuws.uws.edu.au. If you do not have access to vUWS, please contact e-learning for help on
http://elearning.uws.edu.au.

Student Support and

Student support information is available at www.uws.edu.au/students/ods. Students with a disability should also visit:

Disability Service

http://www.uws.edu.au/currentstudents/current_students/getting_help/disability_services

Course and Unit

This site provides information on pre-requisites, co-requisites and other matters concerning how your course is

Rules

structured: http://www.uws.edu.au/students/stuadmin/enrolments/enrolmentrequirements.

Student Learning
Unit (SLU)
Policies

The SLU has developed some excellent online resources to assist students with skills necessary for studying at
university: http://currentstudents.uws.edu.au/students/ods/lsu/learningresources_lsumaterial.

This site details policies that apply to you as a UWS student: http://www.uws.edu.au/policies/a-z.
You should play particular attention to:
Assessment and Examinations Policy
Special Consideration and Review of Grade Policy
Assessment Practice Fundamental Code
Student Academic Misconduct Policy
Student Non-academic Misconduct Policy
Enrolment Policy
Bullying Prevention Policy and Guidelines
Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy

Students are required to check their university student email account daily during semester and weekly outside of
teaching periods as this is the formal communication channel at UWS.

Academic misconduct may involve plagiarism, collusion or cheating. This will be dealt with severely as per
university policy.

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Section 4: You and this unit


What is expected of you
Workload
For a 10 credit point unit, students are expected to work a minimum of 10 hours per week. With four
hours of class time each week, you are therefore expected to work for 6 hours out of class.
Independent learning activities will guide your study, as will assessment requirements.

Attendance
Students should attend all lectures and tutorials during the semester. During lectures, content is
discussed along with examples and applications to assist learning. The notes provided on vUWS are
designed to therefore supplement, rather than replace, lectures. Tutorials will assist you in
developing essential practical skills required in this unit. Students will be required to show just cause
in writing as to why a fail grade should not be allocated if more than 3 tutorials have been missed
entirely or in part. Students with a poor attendance record may find themselves at risk of not passing
this assessment. Tutors will keep a record of student attendance which may be taken into account
where a students grade is marginal in any way.

Student responsibilities and conduct


Student
responsibilities

Familiarise yourself with University policies on assessment and examinations.


Ensure that you understand the requirements, including timetables, for examinations and other assessments tasks.
Ensure you read and understand the assessment requirements and note the submission dates, and seek assistance from the
lecturer and/or unit coordinator when needed.
Notify relevant staff (e.g. lecturer, unit coordinator, disability adviser) as soon as possible prior to, or at the beginning of, the
semester to have special requirements accommodated.
Submit your own individual and unassisted assessment work, except as otherwise permitted. Cheating, plagiarism, fabrication
or falsification of data will be severely dealt with.
Behave ethically and appropriately, avoiding any action or behaviour which would unfairly disadvantage or advantage another
student.
Complete independant study and be proactive in gaining feedback to improve performance.

Student conduct

Attend all lectures and tutorials failure to attend is often the main cause for low final grades.
Pay attention in lectures and tutorials these provide key information for all examinable material.

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Do not use mobile phones during the lecture and tutorials and do not have ongoing conversations with fellow students during
the lecture or if another student is presenting work in the tutorials.
Please use laptops/notebooks for taking notes, not surfing the net or checking email.
If issues arise with other students, or teaching staff, please see the unit coordinator in the first instance rather than broadcasting
your concerns in a public forum.
It is expected that you respect the needs of other students who are participating in any class activities. This includes
professional interaction at all times and draping during disrobing activities.
You will be required to participate fully in tutorial activities. You therefore need to be prepared to disrobe to suitable
underwear. Otherwise you could be asked to leave out of fairness to other students.
Students are required to comply with the UWS Practical Room Code of Conduct during tutorials.
This includes:
-

No smoking, eating or drinking, running, blocking exits with equipment, bags or other items, removal of
equipment, intentional damage of equipment or facilities

No handling or use of equipment unless instructed to do so by academic supervisor

Understanding and adherence to emergency evacuation procedures

Knowledge of the location of fire extinguishers, emergency telephone numbers

Reporting of all accidents, hazards and breakages immediately to academic supervisor and appropriate
paperwork filled out according WH&S policy

Storage of bags and personal items in orderly fashion in the designated bag storage area

Washing your hands with soap and water between activities

Covering any open wounds with waterproof dressings

Using gloves as indicated, that is, where any contact with body fluids may exist

At the conclusion of each class or activity:


i)

clean, with 0.05% hypochlorite, all chairs, plinths and sinks which were used

ii)

dispose of all used consumables, such as tissues, into the waste bins provided

iii)

return all plinths, chairs, other equipment (e.g. pillows and blankets) and liquids (e.g. hypochlorite)
to their original place of storage

iv)

place soiled or dirty linen in linen basket to be laundered

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What you can expect from the teaching team


Academic staff carry out their teaching responsibilities under the authority of the Dean of School of
Science & Health. The responsibilities of staff are outlined below.
Staff responsibilities

Assess students' work fairly, objectively and consistently and when in doubt consult with the unit coordinator or Director of
Academic Program.
Provide students with appropriate, helpful and explanatory feedback on all work submitted for assessment.
Make reasonable accommodation (e.g. length of time to complete) in assessment tasks and examinations for students with
special requirements and to seek assistance from the Disability Advisor and Counsellor where appropriate and needed.
Ensure deadlines for the submission of examination papers to the Academic Registrar are met.
Immediately report to the unit coordinator any instances of student cheating, collusion and/or plagiarism and non-academic
misconduct.

Changes to unit as a result of student feedback


The University values student feedback in order to improve the quality of its educational programs.
At the completion of each unit you will be asked to provide formalised feedback on the unit and
teaching.

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Contact protocol
It is important to manage communications in a way that is efficient and equitable at university. To
this end, please ensure that you observe the following protocol:

I HAVE A
QUESTION...

The question is about me


(i.e. it is private/personal
or otherwise confidential)

The question is about this


unit (e.g. an assessment
task, content, general
administration)

Have I
checked the
unit outline?

No check
the unit
outline

Yes

Have I found
the answer to
my question?

Have I found
the answer to
my question?

No

Yes

No

Yes

Email the unit


coordinator or
tutor

Have I checked the


vUWS site for
information to answer
the question?

No check
vUWS

Have I found
the answer to
my question?

Yes

Have I found
the answer to
my question?

No

Yes

Contact the unit


coordinator

No

Yes

Policy and how it affects you


University policy details can be found at http://www.uws.edu.au/policies/a-z . You should pay particular
attention to student academic and non academic misconduct policies as breaches can have serious
consequences.

What is academic misconduct?


Academic misconduct may involve plagiarism, collusion or cheating. Plagiarism involves submitting
or presenting work in a unit as if it were the student's own work when, in fact, it was not. Collusion
includes inciting, assisting, facilitating, concealing or being involved in plagiarism, cheating or other
academic misconduct with others. Cheating includes dishonest conduct (or attempted dishonest
conduct) in exams.
For the full definition of academic misconduct and the consequences of such behaviour, you are
advised to read the Misconduct Student Academic Misconduct Policy in its entirety (refer to
http://policies.uws.edu.au/view.current.php?id=00051).

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There are many resources to help you avoid academic misconduct. Library staff can help you with
referencing and the Student Learning Unit can assist with academic writing and plagiarism. If you
are unsure about any of your work you should also ask your tutor or lecturer for advice and
feedback. The University also has text matching software (called Turnitin) which can help you check
to see if your work might have problems. You can access Turnitin on the vUWS site for this unit.

What is non-academic misconduct?


Non-academic misconduct includes unlawful activities and crimes, falsifying documents (like a
medical certificate or academic records), harassing other students (or staff), stealing or damaging
university property (like library books or computers) and disrupting other students or staff. These are
just some of the types of academic misconduct and while these things are rare they do happen.
If you believe you have been the victim of non-academic misconduct or you are aware of any
academic misconduct it is very important that you report it. You should report all matters of nonacademic misconduct directly to the Dean of the School of Science & Health, Professor Gregory
Kolt, or the head of the relevant section of the University. For example, you can report matters to the
Manager of Security on your campus or to the Campus Provost. You must do this in writing.

Special Consideration Application


Students can complete a Special Consideration during Teaching Session form if they were unable to
apply for an assessment extension three days before the due date of the assignment. They can find
this form at http://pubsites.uws.edu.au/student/forms/#Assess.

Applications for Special Consideration to request accommodations for a specific assessment task
must be submitted to the student centre with appropriate supporting documentation no later than
5pm on the 2nd working day after the due date of the assessment. Students should be aware that an
application for Special Consideration does not automatically mean that it will be granted. Please
refer to the UWS Special Consideration policy for further details. Where special consideration is
sought for circumstances where more than one lecture or tutorial has been missed in this unit,
students should also complete a Special Consideration during Teaching Session form. For special
consideration for part or the whole of the teaching session, the application should be submitted to
the Unit Coordinator as soon as the student is aware that he/she has extenuating circumstances that
will affect studies for the session. Supporting evidence must be provided for all applications for
Special Consideration.
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Raising concerns
If you have a concern about this unit, please contact your unit coordinator, Dr Amitabh Gupta in the
first instance (see inside front cover for contact details). If you would prefer to speak to someone
else, you are advised to contact your Director of Program. Concerns can also be raised directly with
the Dean of the School, Professor Gregory Kolt.
More information about resolving complaints is available on the UWS website:
http://uws.clients.squiz.net/opq/planning_and_quality/complaints_management_and_resolution
The University also has a confidential Complaints Resolution Unit (see link above for contact
details). You may contact this unit of the University at any time however we would appreciate the
opportunity to resolve the complaint in the first instance.

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Section 5: Teaching activities


Schedule of activities
WEEK

INDEPENDANT

LECTURE

PRACTICAL

LEARNING

(1 hour)

(3 hours)

1 (21 Jan)

Quiz: Subjective & objective

Wk 4 of 1H

assessment, gait aids, anatomy,

muscle strength & neurological

biomechanics & pathology.

examination.

2 (28 Jan)

Fracture management:

Wk 5 of 1H

immobilisation (conservative

Principles of physiotherapy assessment.

Principles of physiotherapy management.

Assessment in orthopaedics: joint ROM,

Problem lists & patient goals.


Management/Treatment strategies.

(POP, splints, braces) v surgical


(ORIF)).
Fracture healing: conservative v
surgical and UL v LL
3 (4 Feb)

Fractures & dislocations of the

Management of fractures and dislocations of

Management of common fractures and

Wk 6 of 1H

appendicular skeleton.

the appendicular skeleton.

dislocations of the appendicular skeleton

4 (11 Feb)

Complex fractures & dislocations

Management of fractures and dislocations of

Advanced Simulation Lab

Wk 7 of 1H

of the appendicular skeleton.

the appendicular skeleton.

Radiology

Part B

Practice Written Exam

Physiotherapy in joint arthroplasty.

Patient Management following joint

Part A

5 (18 Feb)

Joint arthroplasty.

Wk 8 of 1H

arthroplasty and common fractures in


the acute care setting (include CPM for
knee).
Written Exam (Friday 21st February) (25%)

6 (25 Feb)

Spinal fractures and injury.

Physiotherapy in spinal fractures & injury.

Wk 9 of 1H

Management of the spinal patient.


Braces & splints.
Clinical pathways.

7 (4 Mar)

Common elective surgeries.

Wk 10 of 1H
8 (11 Mar)

Acute emergency care & triage.

Wk 11 of 1H

Physiotherapy management following

Post-op care for elective arthroscopic

common elective surgeries.

joint and tissue salvage/repair surgery.

Physiotherapy in the acute and emergency

Applying the principles of acute care

setting.

management in orthopaedics.

Written Exam (Friday 14th March) (25%)


9 (18 Mar)

Review of practical and clinical

Wk 12 of 1H

reasoning skills.

10 (25 Mar)

Case study series.

Case studies: Revision for practical viva.

Practical Viva A Exam (40%)

Wk 13 of 1H

15

4 0 0 9 8 3

WEEK

INDEPENDANT

O R T H O P A E D I C

P H Y S I O T H E R A P Y

WORKSHOP (EPA)

LEARNING
(3 June)

Reading: Robertson & Ward

Students not on clinical education: Workshop: EPA modalities including: heat therapy,

Wk 23 of 1H

cryotherapy, ultrasound, interferential, intermittent positive pressure therapy, TENS.

(10 June)

Practical Viva B (10%)

Wk 24 of 1H
(17 June)

Reading: Robertson & Ward

Students not on clinical education: Workshop: EPA modalities including: heat therapy,

Wk 25 of 1H

cryotherapy, ultrasound, interferential, intermittent positive pressure therapy, TENS.

(24 June)

Practical Viva B (10%)

Wk 26 of 1H

Note:
1.

Tutorials in Week 4 (week beginning 10 Feb) will be held in the Advanced Simulation Lab in Building 7
rather than the clinical teaching laboratory. Check timetabling for your allocated room.

2.

Written exams will be held in weeks beginning 18 February and 1 March on the Friday of each week.

3.

You will attend only one block of 2 weeks for the EPA workshop.

4.

You will be required to disrobe in practicals and the workshop. Please wear appropriate attire to attend
class (see Unit expectations)

5.

Completing independent learning activities before class will make a big difference to your performance
in this unit. You are expected to complete these to pass this unit.

16

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