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Are you paying attention?
2
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Good.
3
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If you're not listening
carefully you will miss things.
4
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Important things.
5
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I will not pause,
I will not repeat myself
6
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and you will not interrupt me.
7
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If you think that
because you're sitting where you are
8
00:02:02,873 --> 00:02:04,295
and I am sitting where I am
9
00:02:04,374 --> 00:02:08,550
that you are in control
of what is about to happen,
10
00:02:09,755 --> 00:02:11,302
you're mistaken.
11
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I am in control,
12
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because I know things
that you do not know.
13
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Manchester Police Department.
Please hold.
14
00:02:23,060 --> 00:02:24,562

Looks like a break-in.


15
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Residence of Turing, Alan.
16
00:02:26,897 --> 00:02:28,945
Window's broken. Home's been ransacked.
17
00:02:29,524 --> 00:02:31,071
Send a detective down, will you?
18
00:02:32,235 --> 00:02:33,953
What I will need from you now
19
00:02:34,029 --> 00:02:36,031
is a commitment.
20
00:02:36,114 --> 00:02:40,870
You will listen closely and you will not
judge me until I am finished.
21
00:02:41,745 --> 00:02:44,840
If you cannot commit to this,
then please leave the room.
22
00:02:46,083 --> 00:02:47,084
Come in.
23
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But if you choose to stay,
remember, you chose to be here.
24
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What happens from this moment
forward is not my responsibility.
25
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It's yours.
26
00:03:00,222 --> 00:03:01,724
Pay attention.
27
00:03:14,986 --> 00:03:16,158
What's all this, then?
28
00:03:16,238 --> 00:03:18,957

Turing, Alan.
Professor at King's.
29
00:03:19,950 --> 00:03:22,669
- Seems to have been a burglary.
- Oh? What of?
30
00:03:22,786 --> 00:03:24,629
Well, that's just it.
Nothing missing, really.
31
00:03:26,164 --> 00:03:27,837
What's he doing in Manchester?
32
00:03:28,667 --> 00:03:30,965
Something with machines.
33
00:03:38,552 --> 00:03:40,520
The project at the NPL.
34
00:03:40,679 --> 00:03:43,182
I checked
but he won't say what it's on.
35
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Professor Turing?
36
00:03:46,977 --> 00:03:49,071
Detective Nock, Manchester Police.
37
00:03:53,567 --> 00:03:56,161
Sergeant Staehl here tells me
you had a burglary last night.
38
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Professor Turing?
39
00:03:59,489 --> 00:04:02,538
Take a step back
and don't breathe heavily.
40
00:04:02,868 --> 00:04:05,212
- Breathe?
- Undiluted cyanide.
41
00:04:05,328 --> 00:04:08,673
It wouldn't take more

than a thimbleful to kill you.


42
00:04:09,708 --> 00:04:10,755
Ah.
43
00:04:12,502 --> 00:04:14,721
- Disappointing.
- Pardon?
44
00:04:15,380 --> 00:04:17,849
I had hoped for a bit more.
45
00:04:17,924 --> 00:04:21,125
Sergeant Staehl, is it just me or do you
get the sense that we're being insulted?
46
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Last night you had a break-in.
47
00:04:23,680 --> 00:04:26,183
Your neighbour Mr Springborn
called to report the noise.
48
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He said there was quite a ruckus.
49
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Only you say nothing was taken.
It's odd.
50
00:04:30,645 --> 00:04:33,319
So how about you tell us what happened
and we'll find the chap who did this.
51
00:04:33,398 --> 00:04:35,526
Gentlemen,
52
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I don't believe that you could find
the chap that did this
53
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if he walked up to you
and spat in your face.
54
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What I could use right now is not

a bobby but a really good cleaning lady.


55
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So unless one of you has an apron
in your car,
56
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I suggest you file your reports
and leave me alone.
57
00:04:54,127 --> 00:04:55,970
As you say, Professor Turing.
58
00:05:00,050 --> 00:05:02,473
Best of luck with your cyanide.
59
00:05:03,470 --> 00:05:05,990
I'll give you a quid if you
can name me a more insufferable sod.
60
00:05:06,056 --> 00:05:07,933
Seemed a bit forced, though, didn't it?
61
00:05:08,016 --> 00:05:09,563
Don't know what you mean.
62
00:05:09,643 --> 00:05:11,111
Well, if you didn't
want a pair of bobbies
63
00:05:11,186 --> 00:05:12,529
digging around in your personal affairs,
64
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that'd have been a stellar way
to make sure they don't.
65
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Tell me you don't think
this is suspicious.
66
00:05:18,360 --> 00:05:19,681
I don't think this is suspicious.
67
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A mysterious professor who won't admit

68
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he's had something stolen
from his house?
69
00:05:25,534 --> 00:05:28,128
I think Alan Turing's hiding something.
70
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War declared!
800,000 children evacuated!
71
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German bombs on their way!
72
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Get your papers here.
73
00:05:45,011 --> 00:05:46,103
Fresh off the press.
74
00:05:46,179 --> 00:05:47,431
War declared!
75
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800,000 children evacuated!
76
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German bombs expected soon!
77
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Get your papers here.
78
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Fresh off the press.
79
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This morning,
the British Ambassador in Berlin
80
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handed the German government
a final note,
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stating that unless we heard from them

82
00:06:28,388 --> 00:06:30,106
by 11 o'clock,
83
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a state of war would exist between us.
84
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I have to tell you now
85
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that no such undertaking
86
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has been received.
87
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And that consequently,
88
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this country is at war with Germany.
89
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For the second time
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00:07:14,017 --> 00:07:15,985
in the lives of most of us,
91
00:07:16,728 --> 00:07:19,572
we are at war.
92
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We have tried to find
93
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a peaceful way out...
94
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Papers, please.
95
00:08:07,320 --> 00:08:10,824
- What are you doing here?
- Uh, the lady told me to wait.
96
00:08:11,116 --> 00:08:12,459
In my office?

97
00:08:13,785 --> 00:08:16,185
Did she tell you to help yourself to tea
while you were here?
98
00:08:16,746 --> 00:08:18,248
Uh... No, she didn't.
99
00:08:18,915 --> 00:08:21,759
She obviously didn't tell you
what a joke was then, either, I gather?
100
00:08:22,335 --> 00:08:23,587
Was she supposed to?
101
00:08:25,588 --> 00:08:27,966
- Who are you?
- Alan Turing.
102
00:08:30,010 --> 00:08:33,514
- Ah, Turing. The mathematician.
- Correct.
103
00:08:33,596 --> 00:08:35,269
However could I have guessed?
104
00:08:35,348 --> 00:08:37,388
You didn't.
You just read it on that piece of paper.
105
00:08:39,477 --> 00:08:41,024
King's College, Cambridge.
106
00:08:41,187 --> 00:08:44,316
Now it says here you were a bit
of a prodigy in the Maths Department.
107
00:08:44,441 --> 00:08:47,320
I'm not sure I can evaluate that, Mr...
108
00:08:47,610 --> 00:08:49,578
- How old are you, Mr Turing?
- Uh, 27.
109
00:08:49,654 --> 00:08:51,974
And how old were you when you
became a fellow at Cambridge?

110
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Twenty-four.
111
00:08:53,283 --> 00:08:55,331
And how old were you
when you published this paper
112
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that has a title
that I can barely understand?
113
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Uh, 23.
114
00:08:59,289 --> 00:09:02,133
And you don't think that qualifies you
as a certified prodigy?
115
00:09:02,459 --> 00:09:05,429
Well, Newton discovered Binomial Theorem
aged 22.
116
00:09:05,503 --> 00:09:09,178
Einstein wrote four papers that changed
the world by the age of 26.
117
00:09:09,299 --> 00:09:12,644
As far as I can tell, I've...
I've barely made par.
118
00:09:13,219 --> 00:09:15,938
- My God, you're serious.
- Would you prefer I made a joke?
119
00:09:16,014 --> 00:09:18,312
Oh, I don't think you know
what those are.
120
00:09:18,391 --> 00:09:19,938
Hardly seems fair
that that's a requirement
121
00:09:20,018 --> 00:09:21,486
for employment here, Mr...
122
00:09:21,561 --> 00:09:23,313

Commander Denniston, Royal Navy.


123
00:09:23,396 --> 00:09:24,943
All right, Mr Turing, I'll bite.
124
00:09:25,023 --> 00:09:27,321
Why do you wish to work
for His Majesty's Government?
125
00:09:27,984 --> 00:09:29,201
Oh, I don't, really.
126
00:09:30,570 --> 00:09:32,197
Are you a bleeding pacifist?
127
00:09:32,739 --> 00:09:35,367
I'm agnostic about violence.
128
00:09:35,575 --> 00:09:38,203
But you do realise that 600 miles
away from London
129
00:09:38,328 --> 00:09:40,330
there's this nasty little chap
called Hitler
130
00:09:40,413 --> 00:09:42,381
who wants to engulf Europe in tyranny?
131
00:09:42,499 --> 00:09:45,048
Politics isn't really my area
of expertise.
132
00:09:45,168 --> 00:09:46,545
Really?
133
00:09:46,669 --> 00:09:48,512
Well, I believe
you've just set the record
134
00:09:48,588 --> 00:09:51,216
for the shortest job interview
in British military history.
135
00:09:51,341 --> 00:09:52,843
Oh, uh...

136
00:09:52,926 --> 00:09:54,566
Mother says I can be
off-putting sometimes
137
00:09:54,594 --> 00:09:57,114
on account of being one of the best
mathematicians in the world.
138
00:09:57,430 --> 00:09:59,524
- In the world?
- Oh, yes.
139
00:10:00,934 --> 00:10:03,687
Do you know how many people
I've rejected for this programme?
140
00:10:03,770 --> 00:10:05,022
- No.
- That's right.
141
00:10:05,105 --> 00:10:06,823
Because we're a top secret programme.
142
00:10:06,898 --> 00:10:09,026
But I'll tell you,
just because we're friends,
143
00:10:09,192 --> 00:10:13,572
that only last week I rejected
one of our great nation's top linguists.
144
00:10:13,696 --> 00:10:15,994
Knows German better than Bertolt Brecht.
145
00:10:16,074 --> 00:10:17,917
- I don't speak German.
- What?
146
00:10:19,702 --> 00:10:22,046
I don't speak German.
147
00:10:22,122 --> 00:10:25,046
Well, how the hell are you supposed
to decrypt German communications
148
00:10:25,125 --> 00:10:27,628
if you don't...

I don't know, speak German?


149
00:10:27,752 --> 00:10:29,872
Well, I'm really quite excellent
at crossword puzzles.
150
00:10:30,255 --> 00:10:31,757
Margaret!
151
00:10:31,881 --> 00:10:35,511
German codes are a puzzle.
A game just like any other game.
152
00:10:35,593 --> 00:10:37,095
- Margaret, where are you?
- I'm really very good at games,
153
00:10:37,220 --> 00:10:38,221
uh, puzzles.
154
00:10:38,304 --> 00:10:40,807
And this is the most difficult puzzle
in the world.
155
00:10:40,890 --> 00:10:42,392
Margaret!
156
00:10:42,475 --> 00:10:43,897
For the love of God.
157
00:10:44,310 --> 00:10:45,562
This is a joke, obviously.
158
00:10:46,729 --> 00:10:50,233
I'm afraid I don't know what those are,
Commander Denniston.
159
00:10:50,900 --> 00:10:52,902
Have a pleasant trip back
to Cambridge, Professor.
160
00:10:52,986 --> 00:10:53,987
Enigma.
161
00:10:54,404 --> 00:10:55,656
You called for me?

162
00:11:04,247 --> 00:11:08,548
That's what you're doing here.
The top secret programme at Bletchley.
163
00:11:08,626 --> 00:11:11,800
You're trying to break
the German Enigma machine.
164
00:11:12,589 --> 00:11:14,262
What makes you think that?
165
00:11:15,091 --> 00:11:17,093
It's the greatest encryption device
in history
166
00:11:17,177 --> 00:11:20,431
and the Germans use it
for all major communications.
167
00:11:20,513 --> 00:11:23,642
If the Allies broke Enigma, well,
168
00:11:25,518 --> 00:11:28,317
this would turn into
a very short war indeed.
169
00:11:28,646 --> 00:11:31,195
Of course that's what you're working on.
170
00:11:31,274 --> 00:11:32,651
You also haven't got anywhere with it.
171
00:11:32,775 --> 00:11:35,619
If you had, you wouldn't be hiring
cryptographers out of university.
172
00:11:35,695 --> 00:11:38,164
You need me a lot more than I need you.
173
00:11:38,698 --> 00:11:41,372
I... I like solving problems, Commander.
174
00:11:42,827 --> 00:11:46,127
And Enigma is the most difficult
problem in the world.
175

00:11:46,497 --> 00:11:48,625


Oh, Enigma isn't difficult.
It's impossible.
176
00:11:48,958 --> 00:11:51,131
The Americans,
the Russians, the French,
177
00:11:51,544 --> 00:11:54,514
the Germans.
Everyone thinks Enigma is unbreakable.
178
00:11:55,131 --> 00:11:58,806
Good. Let me try,
then we'll know for sure, won't we?
179
00:12:01,471 --> 00:12:03,144
Welcome to Enigma.
180
00:12:05,642 --> 00:12:11,149
The details of every surprise attack,
every secret convoy,
181
00:12:11,981 --> 00:12:15,485
and every U-boat in the bloody Atlantic
go into that thing
182
00:12:16,653 --> 00:12:18,826
and out comes gibberish.
183
00:12:20,490 --> 00:12:21,867
It's beautiful.
184
00:12:22,492 --> 00:12:25,166
It's the crooked hand of death itself.
185
00:12:26,079 --> 00:12:29,674
Our Wrens intercept thousands
of radio messages a day.
186
00:12:30,500 --> 00:12:33,299
And to the lovely young ladies
of the Women's Royal Navy,
187
00:12:33,378 --> 00:12:34,675
they're nonsense.
188

00:12:35,338 --> 00:12:38,512


It's only when you feed them back
into Enigma that they make any sense.
189
00:12:38,591 --> 00:12:40,264
But we have an Enigma machine.
190
00:12:40,343 --> 00:12:43,017
Yes, Polish Intelligence
smuggled it out of Berlin.
191
00:12:43,096 --> 00:12:44,143
So what's the problem?
192
00:12:44,222 --> 00:12:46,622
Just put the intercepted messages
back into the Enigma and...
193
00:12:46,683 --> 00:12:49,687
Look, it's not that simple. Is it?
194
00:12:49,769 --> 00:12:53,694
Just having an Enigma machine
doesn't help you to decode the messages.
195
00:12:54,524 --> 00:12:56,367
Very good, Mr Turing.
196
00:12:56,442 --> 00:12:59,867
To decode a message, you need
to know the machine's settings.
197
00:13:00,280 --> 00:13:04,660
Now, the Germans switch settings
every day, promptly at midnight.
198
00:13:04,742 --> 00:13:08,212
We usually intercept our first message
around 6:00am.
199
00:13:08,788 --> 00:13:13,635
Which gives you exactly
18 hours every day to crack the code
200
00:13:13,710 --> 00:13:16,054
before it changes and you start again.
201

00:13:16,629 --> 00:13:19,724


Five rotors. 10 plugboard cables.
202
00:13:20,383 --> 00:13:22,135
- That's one million...
- 1,000 million.
203
00:13:22,218 --> 00:13:23,845
- No, it's... I've got it.
- It's a million million.
204
00:13:23,928 --> 00:13:25,408
Well, it's in the millions,
obviously.
205
00:13:25,471 --> 00:13:28,475
There's over 150 million million million
possible settings.
206
00:13:28,766 --> 00:13:30,234
Very good.
207
00:13:30,476 --> 00:13:33,901
One hundred and fifty-nine,
if you want to be exact about it,
208
00:13:33,980 --> 00:13:37,234
1-5-9 with 18 zeros behind it.
209
00:13:37,567 --> 00:13:38,910
Possibilities.
210
00:13:39,652 --> 00:13:40,904
Every single day.
211
00:13:40,987 --> 00:13:43,456
Gentlemen, meet Hugh Alexander.
212
00:13:43,906 --> 00:13:46,785
I personally selected him
to run this unit.
213
00:13:46,909 --> 00:13:47,956
Didn't you...
214
00:13:48,077 --> 00:13:50,238
Mr Alexander won Britain's

national chess championship.


215
00:13:51,080 --> 00:13:52,957
- Twice.
- You're not the only one
216
00:13:53,082 --> 00:13:55,756
who's good at games round here, Turing.
217
00:13:55,918 --> 00:13:59,297
Are we to work together, then?
I prefer to have my own office.
218
00:13:59,422 --> 00:14:00,983
You're a team and you will work as one.
219
00:14:01,007 --> 00:14:04,181
I don't have time to explain myself
as I go along
220
00:14:04,260 --> 00:14:06,763
and I'm afraid these men
would only slow me down.
221
00:14:07,764 --> 00:14:09,016
If you can't play together,
222
00:14:09,098 --> 00:14:11,226
then I'm afraid
we can't let you play at all.
223
00:14:11,309 --> 00:14:13,232
This is Stewart Menzies. MI6.
224
00:14:13,311 --> 00:14:15,905
There are only five divisions
of Military Intelligence.
225
00:14:15,980 --> 00:14:18,699
- There is no MI6.
- Exactly.
226
00:14:18,775 --> 00:14:20,277
That's the spirit.
227
00:14:21,694 --> 00:14:24,288
Mr Turing, do you know

how many British servicemen have died


228
00:14:24,364 --> 00:14:25,616
because of Enigma?
229
00:14:26,032 --> 00:14:28,034
- Uh, no, I don't.
- Three.
230
00:14:29,285 --> 00:14:31,287
While we've been having
this conversation.
231
00:14:33,539 --> 00:14:35,041
Oh, look, there's another.
232
00:14:36,209 --> 00:14:38,007
I rather hope he didn't have a family.
233
00:14:39,003 --> 00:14:41,381
This war Commander Denniston's
been going on about,
234
00:14:42,131 --> 00:14:43,508
we're not winning it.
235
00:14:44,133 --> 00:14:46,477
Break the code,
at least we have a chance.
236
00:14:49,806 --> 00:14:52,650
Shall we leave the children alone
with their new toy?
237
00:14:58,022 --> 00:14:59,490
All right, gentlemen...
238
00:15:03,027 --> 00:15:04,404
let's play.
239
00:15:07,532 --> 00:15:10,160
The game was quite a simple one.
240
00:15:12,787 --> 00:15:14,915
Every single German message,
241

00:15:14,997 --> 00:15:17,841


every surprise attack,
every bombing run,
242
00:15:17,917 --> 00:15:18,964
every, uh...
243
00:15:19,043 --> 00:15:21,341
...imminent U-boat assault.
244
00:15:26,342 --> 00:15:28,561
They were all floating
through the air.
245
00:15:38,521 --> 00:15:39,898
Radio signals that,
246
00:15:41,190 --> 00:15:44,945
well, any schoolboy
with an AM kit could intercept.
247
00:15:48,281 --> 00:15:50,625
The trick was that they were encrypted.
248
00:16:00,543 --> 00:16:03,888
One hundred and fifty-nine
million million million
249
00:16:04,005 --> 00:16:05,848
possible Enigma settings.
250
00:16:07,175 --> 00:16:09,519
All we had to do was try each one.
251
00:16:12,722 --> 00:16:15,441
But if we had 10 men
checking one setting a minute
252
00:16:15,558 --> 00:16:19,904
for 24 hours every day
and seven days every week,
253
00:16:21,355 --> 00:16:26,407
how many days do you think it would take
to check each of the settings?
254
00:16:29,280 --> 00:16:31,908

It's not days, it's years.


255
00:16:33,743 --> 00:16:36,747
It's 20 million years.
256
00:16:38,247 --> 00:16:39,624
To stop a coming attack,
257
00:16:39,749 --> 00:16:44,095
we would have to check
20 million years' worth of settings
258
00:16:44,962 --> 00:16:46,589
in 20 minutes.
259
00:17:13,991 --> 00:17:16,039
I'm famished. Lunch?
260
00:17:17,495 --> 00:17:20,294
Good Lord, what is it about women
with little hats?
261
00:17:27,547 --> 00:17:30,517
The boys...
We're going to get some lunch.
262
00:17:34,804 --> 00:17:36,272
Alan?
263
00:17:36,430 --> 00:17:38,899
- Yes?
- I said we're going to get some lunch.
264
00:17:42,728 --> 00:17:44,355
- Alan?
- Yes?
265
00:17:44,647 --> 00:17:46,866
- Can you hear me?
- Yes.
266
00:17:47,650 --> 00:17:49,323
I said we're off to get some...
267
00:17:49,735 --> 00:17:51,487
This is starting to get
a little bit repetitive.

268
00:17:51,571 --> 00:17:52,663
What is?
269
00:17:52,738 --> 00:17:54,536
I had asked if you wanted
to come to lunch with us.
270
00:17:54,657 --> 00:17:56,204
Er, no, you didn't.
271
00:17:56,325 --> 00:17:58,419
You said you were going
to get some lunch.
272
00:17:59,078 --> 00:18:00,546
Have I offended you in some way?
273
00:18:00,663 --> 00:18:02,040
Why would you think that?
274
00:18:02,915 --> 00:18:04,476
Would you like to come
to lunch with us?
275
00:18:04,500 --> 00:18:05,547
What time's lunchtime?
276
00:18:05,668 --> 00:18:08,512
- Christ, Alan, it's a bleeding sandwich.
- What is?
277
00:18:09,088 --> 00:18:11,637
- Lunch.
- I don't like sandwiches.
278
00:18:11,716 --> 00:18:13,184
Never mind.
279
00:18:14,010 --> 00:18:17,810
You know, to pull off
this irascible genius routine,
280
00:18:17,888 --> 00:18:19,765
one actually has to be a genius, Alan.
281

00:18:19,849 --> 00:18:22,272


And yet we're the ones
making progress here, aren't we?
282
00:18:22,351 --> 00:18:23,773
You are?
283
00:18:23,894 --> 00:18:25,362
Yes, we are.
284
00:18:26,355 --> 00:18:29,325
We have decrypted a number
of German messages
285
00:18:29,400 --> 00:18:31,903
by analysing the frequency
of letter distribution.
286
00:18:33,029 --> 00:18:35,031
Oh, even a broken clock is right
twice a day.
287
00:18:35,114 --> 00:18:37,367
That's not progress.
That's just blind luck.
288
00:18:37,450 --> 00:18:41,375
I'm designing a machine that will
allow us to break every message,
289
00:18:41,746 --> 00:18:44,249
every day, instantly.
290
00:18:46,459 --> 00:18:47,881
Who's hungry?
291
00:18:48,794 --> 00:18:51,047
- Let's go.
- I'm hungry.
292
00:18:53,382 --> 00:18:56,101
- What?
- Peter asked who was hungry.
293
00:18:56,218 --> 00:18:57,595
Can I have some soup, please?
294

00:20:25,182 --> 00:20:27,025


What do you mean, classified?
295
00:20:28,018 --> 00:20:30,612
No, I am aware of the literal meaning
of the word "classified",
296
00:20:30,688 --> 00:20:32,315
what I'm asking is
why would a maths professor
297
00:20:32,398 --> 00:20:34,492
have his military records classified?
298
00:20:36,652 --> 00:20:38,529
Yeah, well, I will come down.
299
00:20:59,341 --> 00:21:01,810
Pardon me, I'd like to see
some documents, if I may.
300
00:21:01,886 --> 00:21:05,311
Service records of a Mr... Turing, Alan.
301
00:21:06,849 --> 00:21:08,226
Foreign Office sent me.
302
00:21:14,523 --> 00:21:16,196
This is unacceptable.
303
00:21:17,109 --> 00:21:18,827
If you wish to discuss a complaint,
304
00:21:18,903 --> 00:21:20,325
I suggest you make a proper appointment.
305
00:21:20,404 --> 00:21:22,031
Alexander... Complaint?
306
00:21:22,698 --> 00:21:27,078
No. No, Hugh Alexander has denied
my requisition for parts and equipment
307
00:21:27,203 --> 00:21:28,625
that I need to build the machine
I have designed.

308
00:21:28,704 --> 00:21:31,082
Your fellow code-breakers
are refusing to work with you
309
00:21:31,207 --> 00:21:32,834
and they've filed a formal complaint.
310
00:21:32,917 --> 00:21:34,677
It is inspired
by an old Polish code machine,
311
00:21:34,710 --> 00:21:37,338
only this one is
infinitely more advanced.
312
00:21:37,421 --> 00:21:38,941
If you don't respond to the complaint,
313
00:21:38,964 --> 00:21:40,844
I shall have to take it up
with the Home Office.
314
00:21:40,883 --> 00:21:42,305
Put those files by my desk.
315
00:21:42,384 --> 00:21:43,852
Fine. My response is they're all idiots,
316
00:21:43,928 --> 00:21:45,976
fire them and use the savings
to fund my machine.
317
00:21:46,055 --> 00:21:48,433
I only need about 100,000.
318
00:21:49,975 --> 00:21:51,227
100,000?
319
00:21:52,978 --> 00:21:54,605
Why are you building a machine?
320
00:21:55,231 --> 00:21:57,950
It's highly technical,
you wouldn't understand.
321
00:21:58,067 --> 00:22:00,286

I suggest you make the effort to try.


322
00:22:02,238 --> 00:22:05,959
Enigma is an extremely
well-designed machine.
323
00:22:06,075 --> 00:22:09,124
Our problem is that
we're only using men to try to beat it.
324
00:22:09,245 --> 00:22:12,749
What if only a machine
can defeat another machine?
325
00:22:13,582 --> 00:22:15,004
Well, that's not very technical.
326
00:22:15,584 --> 00:22:17,552
Hugh Alexander
is in charge of your unit.
327
00:22:17,628 --> 00:22:19,096
He said no and that is that.
328
00:22:19,463 --> 00:22:20,965
I simply don't have time for this.
329
00:22:21,590 --> 00:22:23,684
Have you ever won a war, Turing?
330
00:22:24,927 --> 00:22:27,100
I have. Do you know how it's done?
331
00:22:27,680 --> 00:22:30,183
Order. Discipline. Chain of command.
332
00:22:30,766 --> 00:22:32,484
You're not at university any longer.
333
00:22:32,601 --> 00:22:35,730
You are a very small cog
in a very large system
334
00:22:35,813 --> 00:22:38,987
and you will do
as your commanding officer instructs.

335
00:22:42,945 --> 00:22:45,289
Who... Who is your commanding officer?
336
00:22:46,824 --> 00:22:50,499
Winston Churchill,
Number 10 Downing Street, London SW1.
337
00:22:50,953 --> 00:22:54,173
You have a problem with my decision,
you can take it up with him.
338
00:23:00,796 --> 00:23:03,299
Mr Menzies. Mr Menzies!
339
00:23:06,844 --> 00:23:08,687
Are you going to London?
340
00:23:09,805 --> 00:23:13,651
- Possibly.
- Would you deliver a letter for me?
341
00:23:20,190 --> 00:23:22,488
Look, I'm sorry, but are you joking?
342
00:23:22,985 --> 00:23:24,987
Churchill's put Alan in charge?
343
00:23:25,070 --> 00:23:27,448
- This is a terrible idea.
- No, no, no...
344
00:23:27,531 --> 00:23:29,875
So I can give these men orders now?
345
00:23:30,492 --> 00:23:31,960
I hate to say it but yes.
346
00:23:32,036 --> 00:23:34,004
Excellent. Keith and Charles,
you're both fired.
347
00:23:34,914 --> 00:23:36,712
- Excuse me?
- What?
348
00:23:36,832 --> 00:23:39,506

You're mediocre linguists


and positively poor code-breakers.
349
00:23:39,585 --> 00:23:42,008
Alan, you can't just fire
Keith and Charles.
350
00:23:42,171 --> 00:23:43,468
Well, he just said I could.
351
00:23:43,547 --> 00:23:45,015
No, I did no such thing.
352
00:23:45,174 --> 00:23:46,596
But Churchill did.
353
00:23:56,852 --> 00:23:58,354
Go to hell.
354
00:24:03,525 --> 00:24:06,028
Well, this is inhuman.
355
00:24:07,029 --> 00:24:08,451
Even for you.
356
00:24:13,410 --> 00:24:15,208
Popular at school, were you?
357
00:24:21,043 --> 00:24:22,636
The problem began, of course,
358
00:24:22,711 --> 00:24:24,213
with the carrots.
359
00:24:25,130 --> 00:24:26,552
The carrots are orange.
360
00:24:27,633 --> 00:24:31,103
The peas are green. They mustn't touch.
361
00:24:56,161 --> 00:24:58,289
Do you know why people like violence?
362
00:24:59,581 --> 00:25:02,505
It is because it feels good.

363
00:25:04,003 --> 00:25:06,256
Humans find violence deeply satisfying.
364
00:25:08,090 --> 00:25:11,435
But remove the satisfaction
365
00:25:12,428 --> 00:25:15,682
and the act becomes hollow.
366
00:25:22,479 --> 00:25:23,696
Turing?
367
00:25:24,606 --> 00:25:26,108
Come on.
368
00:25:26,442 --> 00:25:27,819
Don't be such a kike about it.
369
00:25:29,987 --> 00:25:31,864
Leave him to bloody rot.
370
00:25:38,203 --> 00:25:40,672
I didn't learn this on my own,
of course.
371
00:25:40,789 --> 00:25:42,166
I had help.
372
00:25:43,667 --> 00:25:45,465
Christopher helped.
373
00:25:48,005 --> 00:25:49,473
Alan, are you all right?
374
00:25:55,512 --> 00:25:59,142
It's not my fault.
The carrots got in with the peas and...
375
00:26:00,476 --> 00:26:02,478
I'm sorry, I won't let them do it again.
376
00:26:02,561 --> 00:26:03,983
They're getting worse.
377
00:26:04,730 --> 00:26:07,153

They only beat me up


because I'm smarter than they are.
378
00:26:07,232 --> 00:26:09,155
No, they beat you up
because you're different.
379
00:26:09,818 --> 00:26:12,697
- Mother says I'm just an odd duck.
- And she's right.
380
00:26:13,697 --> 00:26:15,449
But you know, Alan,
381
00:26:15,532 --> 00:26:18,581
sometimes it's the very people
who no one imagines anything of
382
00:26:19,411 --> 00:26:21,880
who do the things no one can imagine.
383
00:26:28,170 --> 00:26:29,843
So what do we do now?
384
00:26:31,381 --> 00:26:35,102
- We're short on staff.
- Well, we, uh, we get more staff, then.
385
00:26:35,928 --> 00:26:38,431
And how do you propose to do that?
386
00:29:06,370 --> 00:29:09,874
Erm, Alan Turing
to see Stewart Menzies.
387
00:29:09,998 --> 00:29:11,500
Very good, sir.
388
00:29:11,875 --> 00:29:13,343
So who are they?
389
00:29:13,418 --> 00:29:16,888
Oh, all sorts, really.
A teacher. An engineer.
390
00:29:17,005 --> 00:29:18,507
A handful of students.

391
00:29:18,840 --> 00:29:20,342
And you think
they're qualified for Bletchley
392
00:29:20,425 --> 00:29:22,026
'cause they're good
at crossword puzzles?
393
00:29:22,094 --> 00:29:24,893
Well, they say they're good
and now we shall find out, won't we?
394
00:29:26,515 --> 00:29:27,892
In order to aid your efforts,
395
00:29:28,016 --> 00:29:30,610
there is, to the right of you,
a green scratch card book.
396
00:29:30,686 --> 00:29:33,155
You are to make notes in that.
Gentlemen, you have six minutes
397
00:29:33,230 --> 00:29:36,074
in which to complete the puzzle,
at which point I will...
398
00:29:38,735 --> 00:29:40,336
Pardon me, ma'am,
this room's restricted.
399
00:29:40,362 --> 00:29:43,036
Oh, apologies for my tardiness.
The bus caught a flat tyre.
400
00:29:44,116 --> 00:29:45,709
May I continue, please? Thank you.
401
00:29:46,702 --> 00:29:49,455
- You're not allowed in here, ma'am.
- Oh, but I'm only a few minutes late...
402
00:29:49,538 --> 00:29:52,883
The secretaries are to head upstairs.
This room's for the candidates.
403

00:29:53,041 --> 00:29:55,043


May I get on with this now, please?
404
00:29:56,378 --> 00:29:58,380
- Uh, I am a candidate.
- For what position?
405
00:29:58,463 --> 00:29:59,885
The letter didn't say, precisely.
406
00:29:59,965 --> 00:30:01,433
Yes, the secretaries
are to head upstairs.
407
00:30:01,550 --> 00:30:03,268
It did say that it was top secret.
408
00:30:03,760 --> 00:30:05,433
What is going on?
409
00:30:05,554 --> 00:30:08,182
I... I solved a crossword puzzle
in the newspaper
410
00:30:08,265 --> 00:30:09,687
and I got this letter saying
411
00:30:09,766 --> 00:30:11,939
that I was a candidate
for some sort of mysterious job.
412
00:30:12,227 --> 00:30:13,729
My name's Joan Clarke.
413
00:30:13,979 --> 00:30:16,732
Miss, did you really solve
this puzzle yourself?
414
00:30:19,735 --> 00:30:21,408
What makes you think
I couldn't solve the puzzle myself?
415
00:30:21,486 --> 00:30:22,829
I'm really very good at...
416
00:30:22,904 --> 00:30:24,225
Ma'am, I'll have to ask you to...

417
00:30:24,281 --> 00:30:29,253
Miss Clarke, I find tardiness
under any circumstance unacceptable.
418
00:30:32,748 --> 00:30:35,968
Take a seat so that we may continue.
419
00:30:39,171 --> 00:30:40,593
Thank you.
420
00:30:41,757 --> 00:30:43,384
Now, as I was saying,
421
00:30:43,467 --> 00:30:47,768
you have six minutes
to complete the task in front of you.
422
00:30:48,764 --> 00:30:50,437
Erm, gentlemen, and lady...
423
00:30:50,932 --> 00:30:52,309
begin.
424
00:31:20,796 --> 00:31:22,173
Six minutes.
425
00:31:23,298 --> 00:31:26,347
- Is that even possible?
- No, no. Takes me eight.
426
00:31:27,052 --> 00:31:28,770
This isn't about crossword puzzles.
427
00:31:28,845 --> 00:31:31,849
It's about how one approaches
solving an impossible problem.
428
00:31:32,974 --> 00:31:35,727
Do you tackle the whole thing
at once or divide it into small...
429
00:31:38,021 --> 00:31:39,147
You've finished?
430
00:31:39,314 --> 00:31:40,691

Yes.
431
00:31:55,247 --> 00:31:56,874
Five minutes and 34 seconds.
432
00:31:57,833 --> 00:31:59,585
You said to do it in under six.
433
00:32:00,877 --> 00:32:02,345
Congratulations.
434
00:32:02,879 --> 00:32:05,098
My warmest welcome
to His Majesty's Service.
435
00:32:05,674 --> 00:32:07,847
If you speak a word
of what I'm about to show you,
436
00:32:07,926 --> 00:32:09,678
you will be executed for high treason.
437
00:32:11,221 --> 00:32:13,440
You will lie to your friends,
your family
438
00:32:13,515 --> 00:32:16,519
and everyone you meet
about what it is you really do.
439
00:32:18,437 --> 00:32:20,690
And what is it that we're really doing?
440
00:32:21,022 --> 00:32:24,196
We're going to break an unbreakable
Nazi code and win the war.
441
00:32:25,694 --> 00:32:27,196
Oh.
442
00:32:37,038 --> 00:32:38,756
What's that you're reading?
443
00:32:39,875 --> 00:32:42,754
- It's about cryptography.
- Like secret messages?

444
00:32:44,212 --> 00:32:47,216
Not secret. That's the brilliant part.
445
00:32:47,924 --> 00:32:50,552
Messages that anyone can see
but no one knows what they mean
446
00:32:50,886 --> 00:32:52,559
unless you have the key.
447
00:32:58,268 --> 00:33:00,566
How's that different from talking?
448
00:33:01,480 --> 00:33:03,232
- Talking?
- When people talk to each other,
449
00:33:03,315 --> 00:33:06,194
they never say what they mean,
they say something else.
450
00:33:06,276 --> 00:33:09,200
And you're expected
to just know what they mean.
451
00:33:09,279 --> 00:33:10,826
Only I never do.
452
00:33:11,323 --> 00:33:12,791
So...
453
00:33:13,283 --> 00:33:14,830
how's that different?
454
00:33:16,244 --> 00:33:19,293
Alan, I have a funny feeling
you're going to be very good at this.
455
00:33:45,440 --> 00:33:46,862
Goodnight, Alan.
456
00:33:51,863 --> 00:33:53,365
Goodnight.
457
00:34:12,801 --> 00:34:15,395
Careful, will you? It's not a toy.

458
00:34:15,845 --> 00:34:17,813
Funny. Looks like a toy.
459
00:34:18,181 --> 00:34:22,152
Bloody great 100,000 one.
Your new minion's arrived.
460
00:34:22,978 --> 00:34:25,322
- Jack Good. We met...
- Well, where's Miss Clarke?
461
00:34:29,067 --> 00:34:30,660
Lovely, isn't he?
462
00:34:30,735 --> 00:34:35,411
It's not just a usual
humdrum production mill factory.
463
00:34:35,490 --> 00:34:40,371
I mean, well, as I was saying,
it's a very important radio factory.
464
00:34:40,453 --> 00:34:42,296
It's not, actually.
465
00:34:42,372 --> 00:34:47,720
On the spectrum of radio
factories, this one is particularly...
466
00:34:58,513 --> 00:35:01,141
Why are you not at Bletchley?
467
00:35:01,308 --> 00:35:03,811
Thank you so much for your visit,
Mr Turing.
468
00:35:03,977 --> 00:35:06,337
- Was your trip pleasant?
- Gather your things and let's go.
469
00:35:07,147 --> 00:35:09,275
I'm sorry but I'm unable
to accept your offer.
470
00:35:09,566 --> 00:35:12,945
We feel that such a position

would hardly be appropriate.


471
00:35:13,403 --> 00:35:15,622
You earned a double first
in mathematics.
472
00:35:15,864 --> 00:35:18,583
But sadly, wasn't granted
the opportunity to become a fellow.
473
00:35:19,034 --> 00:35:20,661
You belong at Bletchley.
474
00:35:21,244 --> 00:35:24,839
I'm sorry, but for someone
in my position to live, to...
475
00:35:25,457 --> 00:35:28,711
to work in a radio factory
so far from home,
476
00:35:28,835 --> 00:35:32,135
with all your men, erm, it would be...
477
00:35:33,715 --> 00:35:35,137
indecorous.
478
00:35:36,801 --> 00:35:39,805
What in the world does that even mean?
479
00:35:44,601 --> 00:35:48,947
We have a group of young ladies
who tend to all of our clerical tasks.
480
00:35:49,022 --> 00:35:50,865
Assistants, translators.
481
00:35:50,940 --> 00:35:53,568
They live, erm, together in town.
482
00:35:53,652 --> 00:35:57,031
Would that be
a more suitable environment?
483
00:35:57,697 --> 00:36:01,497
Hmm. So... So I would be working
amongst these women?

484
00:36:01,743 --> 00:36:03,165
Yes.
485
00:36:06,373 --> 00:36:07,670
Wonderful ladies.
486
00:36:07,749 --> 00:36:11,174
They even organise social events
at St Martin's church down the road.
487
00:36:11,252 --> 00:36:13,801
Really, the whole thing is quite, er,
488
00:36:14,172 --> 00:36:16,140
um, decorous.
489
00:36:21,221 --> 00:36:23,815
Now, you won't have
proper security clearance, of course,
490
00:36:23,890 --> 00:36:26,484
so we'll have to improvise things a bit.
491
00:36:26,559 --> 00:36:28,027
Why are you helping me?
492
00:36:28,103 --> 00:36:31,482
Because there is only one thing that
matters in this entire world right now,
493
00:36:31,564 --> 00:36:33,487
do you understand?
And that is breaking Enigma.
494
00:36:33,817 --> 00:36:35,285
But... But Mr Turing...
495
00:36:37,404 --> 00:36:38,906
Why are you helping me?
496
00:36:39,906 --> 00:36:41,408
Oh, um...
497
00:36:43,451 --> 00:36:46,000
Sometimes it's the very people

who no one imagines anything of


498
00:36:46,162 --> 00:36:49,166
who do the things
that no one can imagine.
499
00:37:07,976 --> 00:37:09,444
Sir.
500
00:37:09,978 --> 00:37:13,824
- What this?
- Alan Turing's classified military file.
501
00:37:15,024 --> 00:37:16,742
- Bloody empty.
- Exactly.
502
00:37:17,444 --> 00:37:19,663
- It's an empty manila envelope.
- Yeah.
503
00:37:21,114 --> 00:37:23,287
You've cracked the case wide open, then,
haven't you?
504
00:37:23,366 --> 00:37:25,744
Alan Turing's war records
aren't just classified,
505
00:37:25,827 --> 00:37:27,295
they're non-existent.
506
00:37:28,037 --> 00:37:31,837
That means someone's got rid of them,
erased them, burnt them.
507
00:37:31,916 --> 00:37:35,045
And that same person broke
into his house and stole nothing?
508
00:37:36,504 --> 00:37:38,347
Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean.
509
00:37:39,090 --> 00:37:41,889
- What, the spies from the papers?
- Soviet spies.
510

00:37:42,510 --> 00:37:44,854


But first they were professors,
weren't they?
511
00:37:45,597 --> 00:37:48,396
Radicalised at Cambridge,
then they joined the Communist Party,
512
00:37:48,475 --> 00:37:49,647
then the Foreign Office,
513
00:37:49,726 --> 00:37:51,945
then leaked information to Stalin
during the war.
514
00:37:52,020 --> 00:37:54,523
Now, can you think of anyone else
we know who was at Cambridge,
515
00:37:54,606 --> 00:37:57,860
then took up something murky
and top secret when the war broke out?
516
00:37:58,276 --> 00:38:01,371
You think this Alan Turing
might be a Soviet agent?
517
00:38:01,988 --> 00:38:06,289
I think something very serious
is happening right here under our noses.
518
00:38:07,410 --> 00:38:09,913
Wouldn't you like
to find out what it is?
519
00:38:42,445 --> 00:38:44,948
Welcome, ladies.
If you'd like to follow me.
520
00:38:47,242 --> 00:38:50,041
Some people thought
we were at war with the Germans.
521
00:38:50,119 --> 00:38:51,166
Incorrect.
522
00:38:51,246 --> 00:38:53,340
We were at war with the clock.

523
00:38:53,498 --> 00:38:55,876
Britain was literally starving to death.
524
00:38:56,751 --> 00:39:01,097
The Americans sent over 100,000 tonnes
of food every week
525
00:39:01,464 --> 00:39:04,764
and every week the Germans would
send our desperately needed bread
526
00:39:04,843 --> 00:39:06,470
to the bottom of the ocean.
527
00:39:06,553 --> 00:39:10,057
Our daily failure was announced
at the chimes of midnight.
528
00:39:10,431 --> 00:39:13,810
And the sound would haunt
our unwelcome dreams.
529
00:39:14,477 --> 00:39:16,320
Tick, tock.
530
00:39:16,855 --> 00:39:18,072
Tick.
531
00:39:24,529 --> 00:39:26,031
Damn it!
532
00:39:28,366 --> 00:39:30,539
- What just happened?
- Midnight.
533
00:39:31,077 --> 00:39:33,671
All the work we've done today
is useless.
534
00:39:33,788 --> 00:39:35,335
Oh, but don't worry, we've a few hours
535
00:39:35,540 --> 00:39:37,793
before tomorrow's messages
start flooding in,

536
00:39:38,501 --> 00:39:40,299
then we start all over again.
537
00:39:42,380 --> 00:39:44,724
- From scratch.
- I'm so sick of this.
538
00:39:44,841 --> 00:39:47,720
Four hours rewiring
his plugboard matrix.
539
00:39:47,802 --> 00:39:50,305
Three hours yesterday
on his rotor positions.
540
00:39:50,680 --> 00:39:53,308
- Don't go over there.
- Look, John, no.
541
00:39:53,516 --> 00:39:56,486
If this job wasn't already impossible
before, it bloody well is now.
542
00:39:56,561 --> 00:39:57,983
Hugh, don't.
543
00:40:06,613 --> 00:40:08,866
Damn you and your useless machine.
544
00:40:09,824 --> 00:40:13,044
My machine is how we are going to win.
545
00:40:13,244 --> 00:40:14,666
Really?
546
00:40:15,204 --> 00:40:16,672
This machine?
547
00:40:17,874 --> 00:40:20,172
Are you talking about
this bloody machine?
548
00:40:20,418 --> 00:40:21,886
- Hugh!
- Hugh, don't! Don't!
549

00:40:21,961 --> 00:40:24,305


- Stop!
- You arrogant bastard.
550
00:40:24,464 --> 00:40:25,932
You could help us.
551
00:40:26,007 --> 00:40:28,260
You could make this go faster
but you won't.
552
00:40:30,386 --> 00:40:31,888
Get off.
553
00:40:37,560 --> 00:40:38,982
He's right, Alan.
554
00:40:41,064 --> 00:40:44,944
There are actual soldiers out there
trying to win an actual war.
555
00:40:45,818 --> 00:40:48,662
My brother protects
food convoys in the Navy.
556
00:40:48,738 --> 00:40:51,412
My cousins fly RAF patrols.
557
00:40:51,491 --> 00:40:56,042
All my friends, they're all making
a difference while we just
558
00:40:56,788 --> 00:40:59,837
while away our days producing nothing.
559
00:41:01,417 --> 00:41:02,885
Because of you.
560
00:41:04,295 --> 00:41:07,890
My machine will work.
561
00:41:09,842 --> 00:41:11,389
Come on, Peter.
562
00:41:51,426 --> 00:41:52,928
Okay.

563
00:42:22,582 --> 00:42:24,676
Joan!
564
00:42:50,651 --> 00:42:53,691
Could you have made a bit more noise?
I'm not quite sure my landlady woke up.
565
00:42:53,738 --> 00:42:55,911
- Oh, sorry.
- Oh, uh, look.
566
00:42:56,365 --> 00:42:59,494
I think that's the best I can do.
No male visitors after dark.
567
00:43:00,620 --> 00:43:04,124
- So, what did you bring me?
- Erm...
568
00:43:04,582 --> 00:43:06,505
- There you go.
- Here.
569
00:43:07,877 --> 00:43:09,595
Some men try flowers, you know.
570
00:43:10,171 --> 00:43:14,017
These are actual decrypted Enigma
messages direct from Nazi High Command.
571
00:43:16,260 --> 00:43:19,355
"0600 hours, weather today is clear.
572
00:43:19,597 --> 00:43:21,691
"Rain in the evening. Heil Hitler."
573
00:43:22,850 --> 00:43:25,730
Well, clearly that vital piece of
information is going to win us the war.
574
00:43:25,812 --> 00:43:27,906
It's the relationship
between the encrypted
575
00:43:28,272 --> 00:43:30,695
and decrypted messages
that interests me.

576
00:43:31,484 --> 00:43:34,658
Can we find a clue here
that we can build into Christopher?
577
00:43:34,737 --> 00:43:37,286
- Who's Christopher?
- Oh, he's my machine.
578
00:43:38,199 --> 00:43:39,667
You named him?
579
00:43:40,368 --> 00:43:41,836
Is that a bad name?
580
00:43:43,162 --> 00:43:44,630
No.
581
00:43:45,623 --> 00:43:47,045
No, never mind.
582
00:43:53,673 --> 00:43:55,675
Are you trying to build
your universal machine?
583
00:43:58,094 --> 00:43:59,812
I read your paper at university.
584
00:43:59,887 --> 00:44:02,060
- Is it already being taught?
- No.
585
00:44:02,140 --> 00:44:04,689
No. No, I was precocious.
586
00:44:04,767 --> 00:44:08,692
So, you theorised a machine
that could solve any problem?
587
00:44:08,771 --> 00:44:10,944
It didn't just do one thing,
it did everything?
588
00:44:11,023 --> 00:44:13,151
It wasn't just programmable,
it was re-programmable?

589
00:44:13,234 --> 00:44:14,326
Mmm.
590
00:44:14,944 --> 00:44:16,696
Is that your idea behind Christopher?
591
00:44:18,030 --> 00:44:22,206
Human brains can compute large sums
very quickly, even Hugh can do that,
592
00:44:22,285 --> 00:44:24,208
but I want Christopher to be smarter.
593
00:44:25,079 --> 00:44:29,004
To make a calculation
and then to determine what to do next.
594
00:44:30,042 --> 00:44:31,510
Like a person does.
595
00:44:32,420 --> 00:44:33,922
Think of it.
596
00:44:34,213 --> 00:44:35,760
An electrical brain.
597
00:44:36,340 --> 00:44:37,808
A digital computer.
598
00:44:39,051 --> 00:44:40,473
Digital computer?
599
00:44:42,221 --> 00:44:43,723
Hmm.
600
00:44:57,403 --> 00:44:58,871
What's going on?
601
00:44:59,405 --> 00:45:00,827
What's happening?
602
00:45:01,782 --> 00:45:03,705
- No, no, no. Don't touch that.
- Stay back.
603

00:45:03,784 --> 00:45:04,910


That's my desk.
604
00:45:06,078 --> 00:45:09,173
Thank goodness. I'd hate to think
we were searching the wrong one.
605
00:45:09,248 --> 00:45:10,795
What are you doing? What's going on?
606
00:45:12,001 --> 00:45:14,174
There is a spy in Bletchley Park.
607
00:45:14,253 --> 00:45:16,847
The Navy thinks that one of us
is a Soviet double agent, Alan.
608
00:45:17,423 --> 00:45:18,845
Why?
609
00:45:19,967 --> 00:45:22,561
Our boys intercepted this
on its way to Moscow.
610
00:45:22,762 --> 00:45:24,230
Look familiar?
611
00:45:28,226 --> 00:45:29,648
It's a Beale cipher.
612
00:45:29,727 --> 00:45:32,856
Encrypted with a phrase from a book
or a poem or...
613
00:45:38,527 --> 00:45:39,995
You...
614
00:45:40,780 --> 00:45:43,374
You don't seriously think I did this,
do you?
615
00:45:44,659 --> 00:45:46,161
Double agents are such bastards.
616
00:45:47,078 --> 00:45:51,049
Isolated loners.
No attachments to friends or family.

617
00:45:51,207 --> 00:45:52,754
Arrogant.
618
00:45:53,251 --> 00:45:54,844
Know anybody like that?
619
00:45:58,297 --> 00:45:59,765
I...
620
00:45:59,924 --> 00:46:02,427
Hmm. I know you don't like me
621
00:46:02,510 --> 00:46:05,639
but that does not make me a Soviet spy.
622
00:46:06,639 --> 00:46:08,061
Nothing out of the ordinary, sir.
623
00:46:10,434 --> 00:46:12,402
Really? Hmm, all right.
624
00:46:15,439 --> 00:46:17,612
The Home Office
may be protecting you now
625
00:46:17,692 --> 00:46:19,820
but sooner or later,
you will make a mistake.
626
00:46:21,237 --> 00:46:23,080
And I needn't bother firing you.
627
00:46:23,406 --> 00:46:25,454
They will hang you for treason.
628
00:46:47,221 --> 00:46:48,689
Hello.
629
00:46:50,308 --> 00:46:51,981
I heard about what happened.
630
00:46:52,059 --> 00:46:54,312
It's all the girls in Hut 3
can talk about.

631
00:46:56,772 --> 00:46:58,945
I have an idea of what
might cheer you up.
632
00:47:03,446 --> 00:47:05,619
So, because no letter can be
encoded as itself,
633
00:47:05,698 --> 00:47:08,578
there's already a handful of settings
that can be rejected at the outset.
634
00:47:13,706 --> 00:47:15,800
- Is that your team?
- Uh, yes.
635
00:47:15,875 --> 00:47:17,343
- Shall we say hello?
- No.
636
00:47:17,418 --> 00:47:18,840
Hello.
637
00:47:19,170 --> 00:47:20,968
I told you not to do that.
638
00:47:22,631 --> 00:47:24,053
Alan.
639
00:47:24,175 --> 00:47:26,598
- Uh, Hugh, hello.
- Didn't know you drank.
640
00:47:26,677 --> 00:47:28,850
He doesn't, really.
He just sort of sips at the foam.
641
00:47:28,971 --> 00:47:30,611
I'll let you
into a little secret, Miss...
642
00:47:30,890 --> 00:47:32,358
- Clarke.
- Miss Clarke.
643
00:47:32,433 --> 00:47:34,856
- Please.

- Foam's my favourite part, too.


644
00:47:35,269 --> 00:47:37,567
- Is it really?
- Come and join us for a drink.
645
00:47:37,646 --> 00:47:40,274
- We'll be there in a moment.
- Miss Clarke.
646
00:47:47,031 --> 00:47:48,374
Well, he likes you.
647
00:47:48,449 --> 00:47:49,951
- Yes.
- You, uh...
648
00:47:51,452 --> 00:47:53,750
You got him to like you.
649
00:47:55,039 --> 00:47:56,712
- Yes.
- Why?
650
00:47:57,666 --> 00:47:59,168
Because I'm a woman in a man's job
651
00:47:59,251 --> 00:48:01,470
and I don't have the luxury
of being an arse.
652
00:48:02,922 --> 00:48:05,846
Alan, it doesn't matter
how smart you are,
653
00:48:06,217 --> 00:48:08,015
Enigma is always smarter.
654
00:48:09,345 --> 00:48:11,939
If you really want to solve your puzzle,
655
00:48:12,181 --> 00:48:14,149
then you're going to need
all the help you can get
656
00:48:14,225 --> 00:48:18,196
and they are not going to help you

if they do not like you.


657
00:48:25,778 --> 00:48:27,200
What are those?
658
00:48:27,279 --> 00:48:29,782
- Apples.
- No.
659
00:48:29,865 --> 00:48:32,334
Oh, they really are. Um, I've...
660
00:48:32,410 --> 00:48:34,959
Well, Miss Clarke...
Joan, actually, um,
661
00:48:36,288 --> 00:48:38,006
said that it would be nice
662
00:48:38,082 --> 00:48:40,301
if I was to bring you all something.
663
00:48:40,376 --> 00:48:42,219
So here we are.
664
00:48:42,294 --> 00:48:44,092
- Thank you.
- I like apples.
665
00:48:45,381 --> 00:48:46,849
My best to Miss Clarke.
666
00:48:46,924 --> 00:48:51,225
Uh, there are two people in a wood
and, um, they run into a bear.
667
00:48:51,637 --> 00:48:53,935
The first person gets down
on his knees to pray.
668
00:48:54,014 --> 00:48:55,891
The second person
starts lacing up his boots.
669
00:48:55,975 --> 00:48:57,818
The first person asks the second person,

670
00:48:57,893 --> 00:49:01,067
"My dear friend, what are you doing?
You can't outrun a bear."
671
00:49:01,147 --> 00:49:02,820
To which the second person responds,
672
00:49:02,898 --> 00:49:06,493
"I don't have to,
I only have to outrun you."
673
00:49:17,246 --> 00:49:20,250
I'll be with Christopher
if anyone needs me.
674
00:49:20,332 --> 00:49:24,758
If we assume that the
square root of two is a rational number,
675
00:49:25,671 --> 00:49:30,552
then we can say that
the square root of two is A over B,
676
00:49:31,635 --> 00:49:34,229
where A and B are whole numbers
677
00:49:34,847 --> 00:49:37,191
and B is not zero.
678
00:49:37,475 --> 00:49:40,649
- Mr Turing, passing notes, are we?
- No, sir.
679
00:49:46,901 --> 00:49:50,496
Only Turing would pass notes
written in gibberish.
680
00:49:55,743 --> 00:49:57,211
All right, gentlemen.
681
00:49:57,286 --> 00:49:59,914
Do not forget your algebra
over the break.
682
00:50:01,081 --> 00:50:03,004
Have a pleasant holiday.

683
00:50:03,083 --> 00:50:06,428
And we'll resume your irrationals
when you return.
684
00:50:38,244 --> 00:50:39,587
Mmm.
685
00:50:41,747 --> 00:50:44,591
But Euler's Theorem
gives you that immediately.
686
00:50:44,667 --> 00:50:46,340
Erm...
687
00:50:55,678 --> 00:50:57,555
Here, look at this.
688
00:50:59,932 --> 00:51:02,481
If you run the wires across
the plugboard matrix diagonally,
689
00:51:02,560 --> 00:51:05,279
it will eliminate rotor positions
500 times faster.
690
00:51:06,689 --> 00:51:10,614
That's, uh,
actually not an entirely terrible idea.
691
00:51:13,279 --> 00:51:14,906
I think that was Alan for "thank you".
692
00:51:18,742 --> 00:51:21,962
- That's my sandwich.
- You don't like sandwiches.
693
00:51:36,635 --> 00:51:38,057
Are you nervous?
694
00:52:00,909 --> 00:52:02,582
What happens now?
695
00:52:04,079 --> 00:52:07,458
Well, it should work out
the day's Enigma settings.
696

00:52:22,389 --> 00:52:23,857


How long?
697
00:52:41,825 --> 00:52:44,795
The German Army
has fanned out across Europe,
698
00:52:44,870 --> 00:52:48,841
from Poland to Serbia,
Lithuania to Denmark, Norway to France.
699
00:52:48,916 --> 00:52:52,966
The Nazi ag now flies from more
than two dozen national capitals.
700
00:52:53,045 --> 00:52:56,970
Their campaign mounts in fury
as a free Europe crumbles.
701
00:53:38,006 --> 00:53:39,883
Oh, it's still going.
702
00:53:39,967 --> 00:53:41,935
- Good morning, sir.
- Morning, Margaret.
703
00:53:42,219 --> 00:53:45,348
Gears keep spinning on and on.
Rotors on and on.
704
00:53:46,056 --> 00:53:47,478
It's endless.
705
00:53:48,267 --> 00:53:51,862
- With no result in sight?
- No.
706
00:54:05,325 --> 00:54:06,702
Turing.
707
00:54:18,756 --> 00:54:20,679
Turing, open the bloody door.
708
00:54:21,091 --> 00:54:22,513
No. No.
709
00:54:24,553 --> 00:54:26,476

Open the door or we'll break it down.


710
00:54:26,555 --> 00:54:28,353
I can't let you in.
711
00:54:28,432 --> 00:54:30,025
I cannot let you interfere.
712
00:54:30,517 --> 00:54:31,939
Go on, then.
713
00:54:39,443 --> 00:54:40,865
Turn that thing off!
714
00:54:41,361 --> 00:54:43,204
No. Don't, please.
715
00:54:43,447 --> 00:54:45,370
Please, please, please!
716
00:54:45,449 --> 00:54:48,202
No. No, don't! No, no!
717
00:54:52,206 --> 00:54:56,712
Well, then, it seems that your great
big expensive machine doesn't work.
718
00:54:58,128 --> 00:54:59,550
It does.
719
00:55:00,047 --> 00:55:03,221
Wonderful.
So you've broken Enigma, then?
720
00:55:03,884 --> 00:55:05,386
It was just...
721
00:55:06,303 --> 00:55:08,226
Still working.
722
00:55:09,473 --> 00:55:11,396
This is my associate
from the Home Office.
723
00:55:12,100 --> 00:55:15,400
You see,

100,000 is rather a lot of money


724
00:55:15,479 --> 00:55:17,902
and he's here to see
what you have to show for it.
725
00:55:17,981 --> 00:55:21,360
You will never understand
726
00:55:21,443 --> 00:55:24,947
the importance of what
I am creating here!
727
00:55:26,657 --> 00:55:29,251
Have you decrypted any German messages?
728
00:55:30,118 --> 00:55:31,620
A single one?
729
00:55:32,788 --> 00:55:35,632
Can you point to anything at all
that you've achieved?
730
00:55:36,333 --> 00:55:37,926
Hmm.
731
00:55:38,001 --> 00:55:41,801
Your funding is up
and our patience has expired.
732
00:55:42,297 --> 00:55:46,518
It's with such great pleasure
that I am finally able to say this.
733
00:55:46,635 --> 00:55:48,808
Alan Turing, you're fired.
734
00:55:50,264 --> 00:55:52,608
Please escort Mr Turing
from the premises.
735
00:55:53,976 --> 00:55:55,478
No.
736
00:55:57,104 --> 00:55:58,822
I beg your pardon?

737
00:56:03,610 --> 00:56:06,113
If you fire Alan,
738
00:56:07,322 --> 00:56:09,450
well, then, you'll have to fire me, too.
739
00:56:09,950 --> 00:56:11,372
What on earth are you saying?
740
00:56:12,327 --> 00:56:13,954
Trust me when I tell you there is no one
741
00:56:14,037 --> 00:56:16,381
who would rather say this
less than I do but...
742
00:56:18,208 --> 00:56:21,303
he's right. Alan is right.
743
00:56:21,461 --> 00:56:25,557
His machine can work and it's probably
the best chance that we've got.
744
00:56:26,466 --> 00:56:28,139
God, it's beyond belief.
745
00:56:28,886 --> 00:56:32,140
If you fire them,
you'll have to fire me, too.
746
00:56:32,848 --> 00:56:34,350
And me.
747
00:56:34,641 --> 00:56:37,235
We're the best
cryptographic minds in Britain.
748
00:56:37,978 --> 00:56:39,400
Are you going to fire us all?
749
00:56:40,188 --> 00:56:42,816
Commander, at least
give us some more time.
750
00:56:43,150 --> 00:56:46,654
Six months. And if the machine doesn't

produce any results that we need,


751
00:56:46,737 --> 00:56:49,490
then we'll go back to doing things
the old way. How about that?
752
00:56:56,580 --> 00:56:58,002
One month.
753
00:56:58,332 --> 00:57:01,211
And then so help me God,
you're all gone.
754
00:57:02,336 --> 00:57:03,883
Oh, leave him.
755
00:57:11,929 --> 00:57:15,103
- Thank you.
- You're welcome.
756
00:57:16,683 --> 00:57:18,936
Oh, and, Alan, your machine,
757
00:57:22,105 --> 00:57:23,607
it had better bloody work.
758
00:57:31,431 --> 00:57:33,125
Hugh...
759
00:57:34,076 --> 00:57:35,544
I swear,
760
00:57:36,620 --> 00:57:38,213
I'm not a spy.
761
00:57:39,915 --> 00:57:42,035
Oh, for God's sake,
of course you're not a bloody spy.
762
00:57:42,709 --> 00:57:45,553
- What?
- Denniston gave me the Beale cipher
763
00:57:45,629 --> 00:57:48,052
and guess what? I cracked it.
764

00:57:48,882 --> 00:57:52,056


"Ask, and it shall be given to you;
seek and ye shall find."
765
00:57:52,135 --> 00:57:54,058
Matthew 7:7. That was the key.
766
00:57:55,806 --> 00:57:58,059
Far too simple for the likes of you.
767
00:57:59,977 --> 00:58:01,820
Pity Denniston disagrees.
768
00:58:12,447 --> 00:58:13,915
Come in.
769
00:58:16,576 --> 00:58:18,749
Sir, I think I've got Turing.
770
00:58:19,788 --> 00:58:23,634
I tailed him to a pub last night where
he met a bloke. Exchanged an envelope.
771
00:58:24,418 --> 00:58:27,763
So I follow this other fella,
pick him up, gave him a good shake.
772
00:58:29,339 --> 00:58:32,764
- He's a poofter. He confessed.
- What?
773
00:58:33,593 --> 00:58:35,971
The man admitted it. Arnold Murray.
774
00:58:36,096 --> 00:58:38,440
Hangs around that pub,
men pay him for a go.
775
00:58:39,599 --> 00:58:41,192
Turing's one of the men that paid.
776
00:58:41,268 --> 00:58:43,111
Only Mr Murray here
then has the bright idea
777
00:58:43,186 --> 00:58:45,780
of robbing Turing's house after,

with a friend.
778
00:58:46,481 --> 00:58:47,983
That's what Turing's hiding.
779
00:58:48,483 --> 00:58:50,485
Well, he's a poof, not a spy.
780
00:58:50,610 --> 00:58:52,032
- No.
- What's the matter?
781
00:58:52,446 --> 00:58:54,540
We can charge a university professor
with indecency.
782
00:58:54,614 --> 00:58:57,743
No, this is... It's bloody rubbish.
Turing's up to something important.
783
00:58:57,826 --> 00:59:00,045
He's committed a crime
and he's broken the law.
784
00:59:00,120 --> 00:59:01,542
And with a bloke.
785
00:59:01,621 --> 00:59:03,248
Jesus Christ, it's bloody disgusting.
786
00:59:03,331 --> 00:59:05,132
This isn't the investigation
I was conducting.
787
00:59:05,876 --> 00:59:07,298
Bring him in.
788
00:59:07,711 --> 00:59:09,179
Wait.
789
00:59:10,130 --> 00:59:13,384
Let me interrogate him. Please.
Give me half an hour alone
790
00:59:13,467 --> 00:59:16,016
and then I swear, I'll spend
the next month running errands

791
00:59:16,136 --> 00:59:18,355
on as many rubbish cases as you like.
792
00:59:19,139 --> 00:59:20,311
Fine.
793
00:59:20,390 --> 00:59:22,984
Now, will someone get me a warrant
for the arrest of Alan Turing?
794
00:59:39,993 --> 00:59:41,119
Alan?
795
00:59:41,203 --> 00:59:43,706
Christopher's simply not
moving fast enough.
796
00:59:44,414 --> 00:59:46,917
- We should talk.
- And even with the diagonal board,
797
00:59:47,000 --> 00:59:49,253
he's still not eliminating settings
as quickly as we need him to...
798
00:59:49,336 --> 00:59:51,714
- I'm leaving.
- But you've just walked in.
799
00:59:52,380 --> 00:59:55,350
No. No, Bletchley.
800
00:59:56,009 --> 00:59:57,932
- What?
- It's my parents.
801
00:59:58,762 --> 01:00:01,686
I'm 25, I'm unmarried,
I'm living alone and they want me home.
802
01:00:02,224 --> 01:00:04,352
That's just ridiculous.
803
01:00:04,893 --> 01:00:06,361
That's my parents.

804
01:00:06,561 --> 01:00:09,690
You... You can't leave. I won't let you.
805
01:00:10,357 --> 01:00:11,734
"I'll miss you."
806
01:00:11,858 --> 01:00:14,059
That's what a normal person
might say in this situation.
807
01:00:14,069 --> 01:00:16,071
I don't care what is normal.
808
01:00:16,196 --> 01:00:17,869
What am I supposed to do, Alan?
809
01:00:20,033 --> 01:00:23,537
I... I will not give up my parents.
810
01:00:24,371 --> 01:00:25,372
You...
811
01:00:25,455 --> 01:00:29,380
You have an opportunity here
to make some actual use of your life.
812
01:00:29,793 --> 01:00:31,716
And end up like you? No, thanks.
813
01:00:33,046 --> 01:00:37,552
I'm sorry you're lonely
but Enigma will not save you.
814
01:00:38,051 --> 01:00:40,474
Can you decipher that,
you fragile narcissist?
815
01:00:40,554 --> 01:00:43,398
Or would you like me to go and fetch
your precious Christopher to help?
816
01:00:49,312 --> 01:00:50,780
I'm sorry.
817
01:00:57,404 --> 01:01:00,499
I want you...

I want you to stay because I like you.


818
01:01:01,158 --> 01:01:03,627
I like talking to you.
819
01:01:04,911 --> 01:01:06,584
I like talking to you, too, Alan.
820
01:01:12,419 --> 01:01:15,923
And what if you weren't alone?
What if you had a husband?
821
01:01:17,799 --> 01:01:19,267
Do you have one in mind?
822
01:01:20,010 --> 01:01:21,512
I do.
823
01:01:22,179 --> 01:01:23,681
Hugh?
824
01:01:24,264 --> 01:01:25,686
Hugh's terribly attractive,
I'll give you that,
825
01:01:25,765 --> 01:01:28,018
but I don't really think
he's the marrying kind.
826
01:01:28,101 --> 01:01:30,945
No, I... I wasn't thinking of Hugh.
827
01:01:31,104 --> 01:01:33,983
Or Peter. Peter's so quiet.
828
01:01:39,613 --> 01:01:41,035
Oh, my God.
829
01:01:41,865 --> 01:01:44,618
- But this makes sense.
- Did you just propose to me?
830
01:01:44,951 --> 01:01:47,295
Well, it is the logical thing to do.
831
01:01:47,621 --> 01:01:48,622

This is ridiculous.
832
01:01:48,788 --> 01:01:49,789
This is your parents.
833
01:01:49,873 --> 01:01:52,376
I can't believe
that this is happening.
834
01:01:57,005 --> 01:01:58,473
Joan...
835
01:01:59,841 --> 01:02:01,514
Is your middle name
Caroline or Catherine?
836
01:02:01,635 --> 01:02:02,636
Elizabeth.
837
01:02:02,719 --> 01:02:06,144
Erm, Joan Elizabeth Clarke, erm...
838
01:02:09,559 --> 01:02:11,357
will you marry me?
839
01:02:20,362 --> 01:02:21,989
It's beautiful.
840
01:02:22,239 --> 01:02:25,163
Well, I know it isn't ordinary but...
841
01:02:27,410 --> 01:02:28,912
whoever loved ordinary?
842
01:02:29,412 --> 01:02:31,231
She had it in both hands.
843
01:02:31,706 --> 01:02:34,676
And she looked up at me
with her doe eyes and said,
844
01:02:34,751 --> 01:02:36,799
"Am I supposed to put that in my mouth?"
845
01:02:36,878 --> 01:02:40,098
And I said,

"Yes, you know, the French way."


846
01:02:41,591 --> 01:02:44,265
So she pops it in,
clamps her lips around it,
847
01:02:44,844 --> 01:02:47,347
and starts humming
the bloody Marseillaise.
848
01:02:51,434 --> 01:02:53,074
- Come and have a dance.
- No, no, no, no.
849
01:02:53,186 --> 01:02:54,688
You can dance with your fianc
any time you like.
850
01:02:54,771 --> 01:02:56,569
Right now, this moment...
851
01:02:56,690 --> 01:02:57,657
...my turn.
852
01:03:26,052 --> 01:03:27,725
What's the matter?
853
01:03:33,226 --> 01:03:34,899
What if...
854
01:03:40,734 --> 01:03:45,786
What if I don't fancy being with Joan
in that way?
855
01:03:48,742 --> 01:03:50,836
Because you're a homosexual?
856
01:03:54,581 --> 01:03:56,003
I suspected.
857
01:03:57,417 --> 01:04:01,672
Well, should I tell her
that I've had affairs with men?
858
01:04:03,089 --> 01:04:07,094
You know, in my admittedly
limited experience,

859
01:04:07,594 --> 01:04:11,599
women tend to be a bit touchy about
accidentally marrying homosexuals.
860
01:04:12,849 --> 01:04:16,274
Perhaps not spreading this information
about might be in your best interest.
861
01:04:19,773 --> 01:04:22,117
I care for her, I truly do. I...
862
01:04:26,112 --> 01:04:29,366
I... I just don't know if I can, erm...
863
01:04:30,450 --> 01:04:32,953
- pretend about...
- You can't tell anyone, Alan.
864
01:04:33,995 --> 01:04:35,463
It's illegal.
865
01:04:36,623 --> 01:04:39,718
And Denniston is looking
for any excuse he can to put you away.
866
01:04:40,460 --> 01:04:42,804
- I know.
- This has to stay a secret.
867
01:04:43,296 --> 01:04:44,798
Come on, it's your turn.
868
01:04:45,215 --> 01:04:46,637
Ah, okay.
869
01:05:31,845 --> 01:05:34,098
It's a sport for girls!
870
01:05:34,180 --> 01:05:36,524
It's not a sport for girls!
871
01:06:09,591 --> 01:06:12,435
- Cup of tea?
- No, thank you.
872

01:06:26,608 --> 01:06:28,076


Mr Turing, can I tell you a secret?
873
01:06:29,152 --> 01:06:30,620
I'm quite good with those.
874
01:06:30,904 --> 01:06:32,451
I'm here to help you.
875
01:06:35,116 --> 01:06:36,584
Oh, clearly.
876
01:06:43,958 --> 01:06:45,631
Can machines think?
877
01:06:46,085 --> 01:06:49,089
Oh, so you've read some
of my published works?
878
01:06:49,339 --> 01:06:50,932
What makes you say that?
879
01:06:51,758 --> 01:06:54,261
Well, because I'm sitting
in a police station
880
01:06:54,344 --> 01:06:56,847
accused of entreating
a young man to touch my penis
881
01:06:56,930 --> 01:07:00,685
and you just asked me
if machines can think.
882
01:07:02,519 --> 01:07:04,112
Well, can they?
883
01:07:05,688 --> 01:07:09,113
Could machines ever think
as human beings do?
884
01:07:10,109 --> 01:07:11,861
Most people say not.
885
01:07:12,445 --> 01:07:14,118
You're not most people.

886
01:07:16,699 --> 01:07:19,999
Well, the problem is
you're asking a stupid question.
887
01:07:20,995 --> 01:07:22,417
I am?
888
01:07:22,497 --> 01:07:26,218
Of course machines
can't think as people do.
889
01:07:27,502 --> 01:07:30,551
A machine is different from a person.
890
01:07:32,799 --> 01:07:34,801
Hence they think differently.
891
01:07:38,471 --> 01:07:40,849
The interesting question is
just because something,
892
01:07:40,974 --> 01:07:43,022
er, thinks differently from you,
893
01:07:43,142 --> 01:07:45,691
does that mean it's not thinking?
894
01:07:47,814 --> 01:07:51,819
Well, we allow for humans to have
such divergences from one another.
895
01:07:55,488 --> 01:07:57,741
You like strawberries.
I hate ice-skating.
896
01:07:57,824 --> 01:08:00,623
You cry at sad films.
897
01:08:00,702 --> 01:08:02,875
I am allergic to pollen.
898
01:08:04,664 --> 01:08:07,918
What is the point
of different tastes, different...
899
01:08:09,085 --> 01:08:12,464

...preferences if not to say


that our brains work differently,
900
01:08:12,547 --> 01:08:14,766
that we think differently?
901
01:08:17,093 --> 01:08:19,016
And if we can say
that about one another,
902
01:08:19,095 --> 01:08:22,144
then why can't we say
the same thing for brains
903
01:08:22,223 --> 01:08:25,022
built of copper and wire, steel?
904
01:08:26,352 --> 01:08:31,233
And that's this big paper you wrote?
What's it called?
905
01:08:32,525 --> 01:08:34,118
The Imitation Game.
906
01:08:34,193 --> 01:08:36,537
Right, that's... That's what it's about?
907
01:08:42,201 --> 01:08:43,578
Would you like to play?
908
01:08:44,370 --> 01:08:46,748
- Play?
- It's a game.
909
01:08:46,873 --> 01:08:48,295
A test of sorts.
910
01:08:49,709 --> 01:08:54,556
For determining whether something
is a... a machine or a human being.
911
01:08:55,214 --> 01:08:58,718
- How do I play?
- Well, there's a judge and a subject.
912
01:08:59,719 --> 01:09:03,565
And the judge asks questions

and depending on the subject's answers,


913
01:09:03,640 --> 01:09:08,897
determines who he is talking with, er,
what he is talking with and, um,
914
01:09:10,813 --> 01:09:13,316
all you have to do
is ask me a question.
915
01:09:19,155 --> 01:09:20,828
What did you do during the war?
916
01:09:20,907 --> 01:09:23,080
I worked in a radio factory.
917
01:09:25,411 --> 01:09:27,459
What did you really do during the war?
918
01:09:31,918 --> 01:09:33,761
Are you paying attention?
919
01:09:52,939 --> 01:09:54,361
Damn it!
920
01:10:01,864 --> 01:10:04,538
We're soon out of time. Our month.
921
01:10:05,785 --> 01:10:07,378
So that's it, then, is it?
922
01:10:07,453 --> 01:10:09,813
Oh, the trouble is it doesn't matter
how much we improve it.
923
01:10:09,831 --> 01:10:11,378
The machine's never
going to be able to process
924
01:10:11,457 --> 01:10:13,755
159 million million million
possibilities in time.
925
01:10:13,835 --> 01:10:15,462
It's just bloody hopeless.
926

01:10:16,462 --> 01:10:18,180


It's searching. It's just...
927
01:10:19,674 --> 01:10:21,847
It doesn't know what it's searching for.
928
01:10:22,677 --> 01:10:24,304
If we knew what the messages
were going to say...
929
01:10:24,387 --> 01:10:25,934
If we knew what the messages
were going to say,
930
01:10:26,013 --> 01:10:27,614
we wouldn't have to decrypt them at all.
931
01:10:33,062 --> 01:10:34,484
Who's Alan's friend?
932
01:10:35,481 --> 01:10:37,825
Hugh? He's a bit of a cad, actually.
933
01:10:38,735 --> 01:10:40,157
So my type, then?
934
01:10:40,236 --> 01:10:42,330
- Well, I'll introduce you.
- No...
935
01:10:43,030 --> 01:10:44,452
He'll come over.
936
01:10:44,532 --> 01:10:46,375
- Are you sure?
- Yes.
937
01:10:46,492 --> 01:10:49,336
I smiled at him 15 minutes ago
and haven't looked back since.
938
01:10:52,039 --> 01:10:53,666
- Who's that with Joan?
- Mmm?
939
01:10:54,834 --> 01:10:57,053
Er, Helen. Works with her.

940
01:10:57,170 --> 01:10:58,638
She's really pretty.
941
01:10:58,713 --> 01:11:00,181
She wants me to come over.
942
01:11:01,090 --> 01:11:02,888
What? How... How on earth
can you know that?
943
01:11:03,009 --> 01:11:05,853
She smiled at me a while back
and she hasn't looked again since.
944
01:11:12,185 --> 01:11:13,562
And got him.
945
01:11:14,020 --> 01:11:17,365
Now, why is this, that when
I was single I found it very boring,
946
01:11:17,440 --> 01:11:20,034
but now that I'm engaged,
I just find it dreadfully fun?
947
01:11:22,779 --> 01:11:24,201
Bingo, she's in.
948
01:11:24,280 --> 01:11:25,907
Alan, introduce us.
949
01:11:26,032 --> 01:11:27,909
What? Why me?
950
01:11:30,203 --> 01:11:31,830
Because there's nothing
like a friend's engagement
951
01:11:31,913 --> 01:11:34,007
to make a woman want to do
something she'll later regret
952
01:11:34,081 --> 01:11:37,051
with the fianc's
better-looking chum. Let's go.

953
01:11:42,548 --> 01:11:45,643
Half a crown says
Alan bollockses this up entirely.
954
01:11:45,718 --> 01:11:47,186
No bet.
955
01:11:47,261 --> 01:11:49,434
- Alan Turing has a theory.
- He has many.
956
01:11:50,223 --> 01:11:52,442
He believes that the regulations
against men and women
957
01:11:52,558 --> 01:11:54,981
working side by side are sound
958
01:11:55,061 --> 01:11:57,530
because such proximity
will necessarily lead to romance.
959
01:11:57,605 --> 01:12:00,950
- Er, what? No, I don't. I...
- However, I disagree.
960
01:12:01,067 --> 01:12:02,569
- You do?
- Yeah.
961
01:12:02,652 --> 01:12:05,030
I think that if I were working
beside a woman all day long,
962
01:12:05,112 --> 01:12:07,831
I could appreciate
her abilities and intellect
963
01:12:07,907 --> 01:12:09,580
without taking her to bed.
964
01:12:11,244 --> 01:12:12,621
I'm sorry, have we met?
965
01:12:13,246 --> 01:12:15,340
I don't recall.
But let's assume we haven't.

966
01:12:15,414 --> 01:12:17,087
Helen Stewart, Hugh Alexander.
967
01:12:17,166 --> 01:12:19,043
So who do you agree with?
Alan or myself?
968
01:12:19,126 --> 01:12:20,753
Well, Alan, of course.
969
01:12:21,587 --> 01:12:23,885
I'm very flattered really, but I...
I don't think that...
970
01:12:23,965 --> 01:12:25,512
Rubbish.
971
01:12:25,591 --> 01:12:27,889
Well, I work beside a man every day
972
01:12:27,969 --> 01:12:30,222
and I can't help but have developed
a bit of a crush on him.
973
01:12:30,304 --> 01:12:32,181
Well, who is this man?
So I can kick his arse.
974
01:12:32,265 --> 01:12:34,188
Oh, there's no need to worry,
it's been chaste.
975
01:12:34,267 --> 01:12:37,191
We've never even met. He's a German.
976
01:12:37,270 --> 01:12:39,398
Now I really want to kill him.
977
01:12:39,480 --> 01:12:43,280
Er... How... How do you mean
you work alongside a German?
978
01:12:43,985 --> 01:12:47,410
Well, each of us intercepts messages
from a specific German radio tower.

979
01:12:47,488 --> 01:12:48,990
So we have a counterpart
on the other side
980
01:12:49,115 --> 01:12:50,537
who's tip-tapping out the messages.
981
01:12:50,616 --> 01:12:52,289
Everyone types a touch differently,
982
01:12:52,368 --> 01:12:54,496
so you get to know
the rhythm of your counterpart.
983
01:12:54,620 --> 01:12:56,372
It's strangely intimate.
984
01:12:56,455 --> 01:12:58,332
I feel as if I know him so well.
985
01:12:58,457 --> 01:12:59,754
It's a pity he has a girlfriend
986
01:12:59,834 --> 01:13:02,383
but that's why I disagree
with you, Mr Alexander,
987
01:13:02,545 --> 01:13:04,388
because I'm in love
with a co-worker of sons
988
01:13:04,463 --> 01:13:05,885
and we've never even met.
989
01:13:06,340 --> 01:13:09,260
Well, allow me to buy you another pint
and I'll tell you why you're wrong.
990
01:13:09,802 --> 01:13:11,179
Let's.
991
01:13:11,637 --> 01:13:13,264
Excellent.
992
01:13:15,641 --> 01:13:17,188
Thanks.

993
01:13:17,643 --> 01:13:21,193
Erm... Pints and a sloe gin.
994
01:13:24,317 --> 01:13:26,677
In case you were wondering,
that's what flirting looks like.
995
01:13:26,694 --> 01:13:28,162
Helen!
996
01:13:29,488 --> 01:13:31,536
- Alan!
- Yes, Alan?
997
01:13:32,074 --> 01:13:35,294
Why do you think your German
counterpart has a girlfriend?
998
01:13:35,369 --> 01:13:36,871
It's just a stupid joke.
Don't worry about it.
999
01:13:36,996 --> 01:13:38,498
No, no, no, no, no. Tell me.
1000
01:13:39,999 --> 01:13:42,218
Well, each of his messages
begins with the same five letters.
1001
01:13:42,335 --> 01:13:44,383
C-I-L-L-Y.
1002
01:13:44,837 --> 01:13:47,181
So I suspect that Cilly
must be the name of his amore.
1003
01:13:47,256 --> 01:13:49,457
But that's impossible.
The Germans are instructed to use
1004
01:13:49,508 --> 01:13:51,556
five random letters
at the start of every message.
1005
01:13:51,677 --> 01:13:53,270
Well, this bloke doesn't.

1006
01:13:53,763 --> 01:13:55,936
Love will make a man
do strange things, I suppose.
1007
01:13:56,515 --> 01:13:58,108
In this case,
1008
01:13:58,184 --> 01:14:00,061
love just lost Germany
the whole bloody war!
1009
01:14:00,895 --> 01:14:02,772
- Oh!
- Go, Peter.
1010
01:14:04,690 --> 01:14:06,067
Sorry.
1011
01:14:07,860 --> 01:14:09,783
Alan!
1012
01:14:09,862 --> 01:14:12,536
Alan!
1013
01:14:12,615 --> 01:14:14,617
- Whoa, whoa!
- Stop!
1014
01:14:16,202 --> 01:14:17,875
- No, no, no...
- Stop! Stop! Stop! Stop!
1015
01:14:19,538 --> 01:14:22,792
Hugh Alexander. John Cairncross.
Peter bloody Hilton.
1016
01:14:23,042 --> 01:14:24,794
Alan?
1017
01:14:24,961 --> 01:14:26,429
What...
1018
01:14:29,090 --> 01:14:31,388
What... What if...
1019

01:14:31,467 --> 01:14:35,893


What if Christopher doesn't have to
search through all of the settings?
1020
01:14:36,097 --> 01:14:38,475
What if he only has to search through
1021
01:14:38,557 --> 01:14:41,982
ones that produce words we already
know will be in the message?
1022
01:14:42,061 --> 01:14:44,905
- Repeated words. Predictable words.
- Exactly.
1023
01:14:47,733 --> 01:14:49,326
Look. Look, like this one.
1024
01:14:49,402 --> 01:14:51,905
"0600 hours. Weather today is clear.
Rain in the evening.
1025
01:14:51,988 --> 01:14:53,410
"Heil Hitler."
1026
01:14:55,074 --> 01:14:56,576
Oh, that's it.
1027
01:14:56,701 --> 01:14:58,078
Exactly.
1028
01:14:58,202 --> 01:15:01,422
They send a weather report
every day at 6:00 a.m.
1029
01:15:01,998 --> 01:15:03,750
So that's... That's three words we...
1030
01:15:03,833 --> 01:15:06,086
we know will be
in every 6:00 a.m. message.
1031
01:15:06,168 --> 01:15:08,842
Er, "weather", obviously and...
1032
01:15:08,921 --> 01:15:11,265
- Heil bloody Hitler?

- Heil bloody Hitler!


1033
01:15:12,717 --> 01:15:14,390
Here's the 6:00 message
from this morning.
1034
01:15:21,767 --> 01:15:24,441
Hugh, the, er, the right-hand
letter wheels. Set them to...
1035
01:15:24,520 --> 01:15:25,942
Yes, yes, I know.
"Weather" and "Hitler".
1036
01:15:26,022 --> 01:15:27,444
- Peter, John.
- Yes.
1037
01:15:27,523 --> 01:15:29,867
Run voltages through those letters,
through the back scramblers.
1038
01:15:29,942 --> 01:15:31,444
- So we'll use the loops?
- Yes.
1039
01:15:31,569 --> 01:15:33,617
Joan, what was the last
6:00 a.m. message?
1040
01:15:33,696 --> 01:15:35,289
- L.
- L.
1041
01:15:36,699 --> 01:15:38,121
- H.
- H.
1042
01:15:38,701 --> 01:15:40,703
- W.
- W.
1043
01:15:40,786 --> 01:15:42,538
- A.
- A.
1044
01:15:43,039 --> 01:15:44,461
Q.

1045
01:15:46,876 --> 01:15:48,298
Done.
1046
01:16:05,644 --> 01:16:07,988
Come on. Come on, Christopher.
1047
01:16:24,622 --> 01:16:25,999
Oh, my God.
1048
01:16:33,005 --> 01:16:34,507
What... What happened?
1049
01:16:36,592 --> 01:16:38,265
- Did it work?
- Alan?
1050
01:16:38,344 --> 01:16:40,392
Alan! Alan!
1051
01:16:43,432 --> 01:16:44,854
I need a new message.
1052
01:16:44,934 --> 01:16:46,356
The latest intercept.
1053
01:16:50,606 --> 01:16:52,028
Thanks.
1054
01:16:53,109 --> 01:16:54,827
E...
1055
01:16:56,112 --> 01:16:58,035
O... T.
1056
01:16:58,114 --> 01:16:59,286
- Ready?
- Yes.
1057
01:16:59,365 --> 01:17:00,366
- M.
- M.
1058
01:17:00,491 --> 01:17:01,538
- Y.
- Y.

1059
01:17:01,617 --> 01:17:02,618
- M.
- M.
1060
01:17:02,701 --> 01:17:03,793
- S.
- S.
1061
01:17:03,869 --> 01:17:04,870
- A.
- A.
1062
01:17:04,995 --> 01:17:06,042
- I.
- I.
1063
01:17:06,163 --> 01:17:07,289
- C.
- C.
1064
01:17:07,373 --> 01:17:08,374
- T.
- T.
1065
01:17:08,457 --> 01:17:09,458
- R.
- R.
1066
01:17:09,542 --> 01:17:10,543
- I.
- I.
1067
01:17:10,626 --> 01:17:11,627
- S.
- S.
1068
01:17:11,710 --> 01:17:12,711
- O.
- O.
1069
01:17:12,795 --> 01:17:13,796
- A.
- A.
1070
01:17:13,879 --> 01:17:14,880
- Y.
- Y.

1071
01:17:14,964 --> 01:17:16,056
- R.
- R.
1072
01:17:16,132 --> 01:17:17,554
- I.
- I.
1073
01:17:23,347 --> 01:17:27,477
"KMS Jaguar ist aufpunkt... is directed
to 53 degrees 24 minutes north
1074
01:17:27,560 --> 01:17:31,155
"and aufpunkt one degree west."
1075
01:17:32,648 --> 01:17:34,070
Heil Hitler.
1076
01:17:39,238 --> 01:17:42,833
Turns out that's the only German
you need to know to break Enigma.
1077
01:17:50,833 --> 01:17:52,255
Yes!
1078
01:18:10,936 --> 01:18:12,438
Come here.
1079
01:18:45,638 --> 01:18:47,140
M.
1080
01:18:47,223 --> 01:18:48,645
A.
1081
01:18:48,724 --> 01:18:50,146
Y.
1082
01:18:50,226 --> 01:18:51,648
- I.
- I.
1083
01:18:51,727 --> 01:18:54,230
- T. R.
- R.
1084

01:18:54,313 --> 01:18:55,815


- O.
- T.
1085
01:18:55,898 --> 01:18:57,320
T.
1086
01:18:57,483 --> 01:18:58,575
- A.
- A.
1087
01:18:58,651 --> 01:18:59,777
- H.
- H.
1088
01:19:00,986 --> 01:19:02,488
- Q.
- Q.
1089
01:19:04,156 --> 01:19:05,829
- U.
- U.
1090
01:19:07,660 --> 01:19:10,755
R.
1091
01:19:12,665 --> 01:19:14,417
My God, you did it.
1092
01:19:15,000 --> 01:19:18,846
You just defeated Nazism
with a crossword puzzle.
1093
01:19:18,921 --> 01:19:20,343
There are five people
in the world
1094
01:19:20,422 --> 01:19:22,462
who know the position
of every ship in the Atlantic.
1095
01:19:22,925 --> 01:19:25,428
- They're all in this room.
- Oh, good God.
1096
01:19:25,511 --> 01:19:28,355
Oh, I don't think even He has
the power that we do right now.

1097
01:19:28,472 --> 01:19:31,476
No, there's going to be an attack
on a British passenger convoy.
1098
01:19:32,184 --> 01:19:33,936
- Right there.
- Oh, God, you're right.
1099
01:19:34,019 --> 01:19:36,272
All those U-boats
are only 20, 30 minutes away.
1100
01:19:36,355 --> 01:19:38,608
Civilians. Hundreds of them.
We can save their lives.
1101
01:19:38,691 --> 01:19:40,113
I'll phone Denniston's office
1102
01:19:40,192 --> 01:19:41,614
- so that he can alert the Admiralty.
- No.
1103
01:19:41,694 --> 01:19:42,866
Do you think there's enough time
to save them?
1104
01:19:42,945 --> 01:19:44,618
There should be if we can get
a message to that convoy.
1105
01:19:44,697 --> 01:19:46,449
Commander Denniston's office, please.
It's urgent.
1106
01:19:46,532 --> 01:19:48,955
- No.
- What the hell are you doing?
1107
01:19:49,034 --> 01:19:50,786
You... You... You can't call Denniston.
1108
01:19:50,869 --> 01:19:53,042
You... You can't tell him
about the attack.
1109

01:19:53,122 --> 01:19:54,544


What are you talking about?
1110
01:19:54,623 --> 01:19:56,296
We can have air support
over that convoy in 10 minutes.
1111
01:19:56,375 --> 01:19:58,878
- Let the U-boat sink the convoy.
- Look, it's been a big day,
1112
01:19:59,003 --> 01:20:00,801
maybe you're suffering
from a bit of shock...
1113
01:20:00,879 --> 01:20:02,802
- We don't have time for this.
- No!
1114
01:20:05,050 --> 01:20:06,893
- That's enough! That's enough!
- Stop, Hugh!
1115
01:20:07,011 --> 01:20:08,388
John, the attack is in minutes.
1116
01:20:10,139 --> 01:20:11,641
Yes, no, I'm fine. I'm fine.
1117
01:20:12,141 --> 01:20:13,563
I'm fine.
1118
01:20:15,019 --> 01:20:16,987
Do you know why
people like violence, Hugh?
1119
01:20:18,731 --> 01:20:20,859
It's because it feels good.
1120
01:20:22,359 --> 01:20:26,660
Sometimes we can't do what feels good.
We have to do what is logical.
1121
01:20:27,239 --> 01:20:28,411
What's logical?
1122
01:20:29,074 --> 01:20:32,078

Hardest time to lie to somebody


is when they're expecting to be lied to.
1123
01:20:32,745 --> 01:20:35,089
- Oh, God.
- What?
1124
01:20:35,205 --> 01:20:38,254
If someone's waiting for a lie,
you can't just, er, give them one.
1125
01:20:39,918 --> 01:20:41,591
Oh, damn it, Alan's right.
1126
01:20:42,588 --> 01:20:44,010
What?
1127
01:20:44,089 --> 01:20:47,935
What would the Germans think
if we destroy their U-boats?
1128
01:20:48,010 --> 01:20:49,683
Nothing. They'll be dead.
1129
01:20:49,762 --> 01:20:53,187
No. No, you can't be right.
1130
01:20:53,265 --> 01:20:56,519
So our convoy suddenly veers off course.
1131
01:20:57,561 --> 01:20:59,359
A squadron of RAF bombers
1132
01:20:59,438 --> 01:21:02,942
miraculously descends on
the coordinates of the U-boats.
1133
01:21:04,109 --> 01:21:06,862
What will the Germans think?
1134
01:21:09,198 --> 01:21:12,452
The Germans will know
that we have broken Enigma.
1135
01:21:12,951 --> 01:21:16,546
They'll stop all radio
communications by midday

1136
01:21:16,622 --> 01:21:19,045
and they'll have changed
the design of Enigma by the weekend.
1137
01:21:19,124 --> 01:21:20,592
Yes.
1138
01:21:21,919 --> 01:21:23,387
Two years' work.
1139
01:21:24,213 --> 01:21:27,217
Everything that we've done here,
it will all be for nothing.
1140
01:21:28,717 --> 01:21:30,811
There are
500 civilians in that convoy.
1141
01:21:31,720 --> 01:21:33,438
Women, children.
1142
01:21:35,140 --> 01:21:36,562
We're about to let them die.
1143
01:21:36,642 --> 01:21:40,237
Our job is not to save
one passenger convoy,
1144
01:21:40,312 --> 01:21:42,235
it is to win the war.
1145
01:21:42,314 --> 01:21:45,443
- Our job was to crack Enigma.
- Well, we've done that.
1146
01:21:47,319 --> 01:21:48,992
Now for the hard part.
1147
01:21:50,781 --> 01:21:52,749
- Keeping it a secret.
- Carlisle.
1148
01:21:53,826 --> 01:21:55,499
What?
1149

01:21:55,577 --> 01:21:58,171


The convoy you're about to...
It's, er...
1150
01:21:58,288 --> 01:22:00,632
The HMS Carlisle is one of the ships.
1151
01:22:02,751 --> 01:22:05,174
We can't act on every
piece of intelligence.
1152
01:22:05,295 --> 01:22:06,842
So, fine, we won't.
1153
01:22:07,923 --> 01:22:09,345
Just this one.
1154
01:22:09,758 --> 01:22:11,601
Peter, what's the matter with you?
1155
01:22:12,636 --> 01:22:14,354
My... My brother's...
1156
01:22:14,471 --> 01:22:16,348
Well, he's on the Carlisle.
1157
01:22:18,851 --> 01:22:20,524
A gunnery ensign.
1158
01:22:23,647 --> 01:22:25,024
I'm...
1159
01:22:27,192 --> 01:22:28,660
I'm so sorry.
1160
01:22:31,363 --> 01:22:33,661
Who the hell do you think you are?
1161
01:22:34,491 --> 01:22:35,868
This... This is my brother.
1162
01:22:38,370 --> 01:22:39,850
Look, he's my big brother, all right?
1163
01:22:39,872 --> 01:22:41,832
And you have a few minutes

to call off his murder.


1164
01:22:42,458 --> 01:22:44,335
We can't.
1165
01:22:46,044 --> 01:22:47,512
He's right.
1166
01:22:48,672 --> 01:22:50,140
Alan...
1167
01:22:51,049 --> 01:22:52,517
Joan...
1168
01:22:54,386 --> 01:22:56,388
Hugh... John.
1169
01:22:58,557 --> 01:23:00,559
Oh, please, I...
1170
01:23:00,642 --> 01:23:02,485
The Germans, they won't get suspicious
1171
01:23:02,561 --> 01:23:04,063
just because we stop one attack.
1172
01:23:04,646 --> 01:23:06,068
No one will know.
1173
01:23:07,024 --> 01:23:09,527
I'm asking you as your friend.
1174
01:23:11,153 --> 01:23:12,575
Please.
1175
01:23:16,241 --> 01:23:17,709
I'm so sorry.
1176
01:23:19,077 --> 01:23:22,331
You're not God, Alan, you don't
get to decide who lives and who dies.
1177
01:23:23,332 --> 01:23:24,709
Yes, we do.
1178

01:23:28,045 --> 01:23:29,262


Why?
1179
01:23:29,379 --> 01:23:31,677
Because no one else can.
1180
01:24:20,055 --> 01:24:21,477
Why are you telling me this?
1181
01:24:22,808 --> 01:24:27,985
We need your help to keep this a secret
from Admiralty, Army, RAF.
1182
01:24:29,815 --> 01:24:34,616
No one can know we broke Enigma.
Not even Denniston.
1183
01:24:35,654 --> 01:24:37,622
Who's in the process
of having you fired.
1184
01:24:38,073 --> 01:24:39,495
You can take care of that.
1185
01:24:40,117 --> 01:24:42,245
While we develop a system
to help you determine
1186
01:24:42,327 --> 01:24:45,331
how much intelligence to act on.
1187
01:24:45,414 --> 01:24:47,792
Which, er, attacks to stop,
which to let through.
1188
01:24:48,500 --> 01:24:50,343
Statistical analysis.
1189
01:24:50,419 --> 01:24:54,094
The minimal number of actions
it would take for us to win the war
1190
01:24:55,340 --> 01:24:59,766
but the maximum number we can take
before the Germans get suspicious.
1191
01:25:00,512 --> 01:25:03,686

And you're going to


trust all this to statistics?
1192
01:25:05,183 --> 01:25:06,685
- To maths?
- Correct.
1193
01:25:06,768 --> 01:25:10,363
And then MI6 can come up with
the lies that we tell everybody else.
1194
01:25:10,439 --> 01:25:12,612
You'll need a believable
alternative source
1195
01:25:12,691 --> 01:25:15,285
for all the pieces
of information you use.
1196
01:25:15,360 --> 01:25:17,454
A false story so that we can explain
1197
01:25:17,529 --> 01:25:20,453
how we got our information
that has nothing to do with Enigma.
1198
01:25:20,532 --> 01:25:23,627
And then you can leak those
stories to the, er, the Germans.
1199
01:25:23,702 --> 01:25:25,295
And then to our own military.
1200
01:25:31,543 --> 01:25:35,639
Maintain a conspiracy of lies
at the highest levels of government?
1201
01:25:44,139 --> 01:25:45,812
Sounds right up my alley.
1202
01:25:49,728 --> 01:25:53,073
Alan, I so rarely
have cause to say this,
1203
01:25:53,148 --> 01:25:56,573
but you are exactly the man
I always hoped you would be.

1204
01:26:10,582 --> 01:26:13,426
They codenamed it Ultra.
1205
01:26:13,543 --> 01:26:18,014
It became the largest store
of military intelligence
1206
01:26:18,090 --> 01:26:19,717
in the history of the world.
1207
01:26:26,765 --> 01:26:29,769
It was like having a tap
on Himmler's intercom.
1208
01:26:30,602 --> 01:26:32,070
I-E-O...
1209
01:26:33,397 --> 01:26:34,774
T-X-X...
1210
01:26:34,898 --> 01:26:37,117
Secrecy became
the primary concern
1211
01:26:37,192 --> 01:26:40,071
and for some reason, they...
They trusted me.
1212
01:26:41,947 --> 01:26:46,453
Peter, do you have the, er...
the 6:30 decrypt?
1213
01:27:27,159 --> 01:27:28,661
It's a Beale cipher.
1214
01:27:28,785 --> 01:27:30,253
Encrypted with a phrase from a...
1215
01:27:30,328 --> 01:27:33,172
"Ask, and it shall be given
to you; seek and ye will find."
1216
01:27:33,248 --> 01:27:35,671
Matthew 7:7. That was the key.
1217
01:27:35,792 --> 01:27:38,011

Peter will come around eventually.


1218
01:27:46,678 --> 01:27:48,521
Jack?
1219
01:27:48,597 --> 01:27:50,520
Could you give Alan
and me a moment, please?
1220
01:28:02,444 --> 01:28:05,323
The Soviets and us,
we're on the same side.
1221
01:28:06,323 --> 01:28:08,872
What I'm doing will help Britain.
1222
01:28:08,992 --> 01:28:11,495
I have to tell Denniston.
1223
01:28:12,537 --> 01:28:13,789
No, you don't.
1224
01:28:15,123 --> 01:28:17,217
Because if you tell him my secret,
1225
01:28:18,210 --> 01:28:19,553
I'll tell him yours.
1226
01:28:22,047 --> 01:28:24,641
Do you know what they do to homosexuals?
1227
01:28:25,884 --> 01:28:28,888
You'll never be able to work again.
Never be able to teach.
1228
01:28:29,012 --> 01:28:30,389
Your precious machine?
1229
01:28:31,556 --> 01:28:33,558
I doubt you'll ever see him again.
1230
01:28:49,741 --> 01:28:51,084
Hello. Can I...
1231
01:28:51,159 --> 01:28:54,003
um, speak to Stewart Menzies,

please? It's urgent.


1232
01:28:54,079 --> 01:28:56,002
One moment, please.
1233
01:28:59,417 --> 01:29:00,919
Hello. Menzies.
1234
01:29:04,339 --> 01:29:07,218
Some advice
about keeping secrets.
1235
01:29:09,761 --> 01:29:13,436
It's a lot easier if you
don't know them in the first place.
1236
01:29:14,599 --> 01:29:18,854
Were they steaming my letters,
tapping my telephone?
1237
01:29:18,937 --> 01:29:21,190
Trailing my nervous walks?
1238
01:29:22,399 --> 01:29:23,696
You know, I...
1239
01:29:24,776 --> 01:29:26,619
I never did find out.
1240
01:29:27,445 --> 01:29:28,913
Joan?
1241
01:29:33,243 --> 01:29:34,916
Joan? What's...
1242
01:29:37,873 --> 01:29:40,092
Oh. Where's Joan?
1243
01:29:41,626 --> 01:29:43,253
Military prison.
1244
01:29:45,797 --> 01:29:47,720
What have you done?
1245
01:29:47,799 --> 01:29:49,301
Decoded Enigma intercepts.

1246
01:29:49,426 --> 01:29:51,224
I found a pile of them
in the bedside table.
1247
01:29:51,303 --> 01:29:54,477
No, no. I... I gave those to her
over a year ago
1248
01:29:54,598 --> 01:29:56,396
when I was trying to figure out
1249
01:29:56,474 --> 01:29:58,317
- a link between...
- I'm sure you did.
1250
01:29:58,435 --> 01:30:00,403
Denniston's been looking
for a Soviet spy.
1251
01:30:00,478 --> 01:30:01,946
He's been looking inside Hut 8.
1252
01:30:03,982 --> 01:30:05,404
I know who the spy is.
1253
01:30:07,110 --> 01:30:08,953
It... It's not Joan. It's...
1254
01:30:10,655 --> 01:30:12,749
It's Cairncross.
1255
01:30:12,824 --> 01:30:15,953
I... I found the Beale cipher,
the Bible.
1256
01:30:17,329 --> 01:30:19,627
God, I wish you'd been the spy.
1257
01:30:21,291 --> 01:30:23,089
You'd be so much better
at this than he is.
1258
01:30:24,794 --> 01:30:26,592
You knew it was him?
1259

01:30:26,671 --> 01:30:28,514


Of course I bloody knew.
1260
01:30:28,590 --> 01:30:30,684
I knew before he came to Bletchley.
1261
01:30:31,593 --> 01:30:33,154
Why do you think I had him placed here?
1262
01:30:33,178 --> 01:30:35,806
But we have an Enigma machine.
1263
01:30:36,139 --> 01:30:37,436
Yes, Polish Intelligence smuggled...
1264
01:30:37,515 --> 01:30:38,937
So what's the problem?
1265
01:30:39,017 --> 01:30:43,523
You placed a...
a Soviet agent at Bletchley Park?
1266
01:30:43,605 --> 01:30:46,825
It's really quite useful to be able to
leak whatever we want to Stalin.
1267
01:30:48,610 --> 01:30:50,863
Churchill's too damn paranoid.
1268
01:30:50,946 --> 01:30:54,871
He won't share a shred
of intelligence with the Soviets.
1269
01:30:54,991 --> 01:30:57,289
Not even information that
will help them against the Germans.
1270
01:30:57,369 --> 01:31:00,213
There's... so much secrecy.
1271
01:31:02,123 --> 01:31:05,127
Cairncross has no idea
we know, of course.
1272
01:31:05,210 --> 01:31:07,713
He's really not the brightest bulb.

1273
01:31:09,172 --> 01:31:11,391
Which is why I need your help.
1274
01:31:11,508 --> 01:31:13,135
I want to know what to leak to John,
1275
01:31:13,218 --> 01:31:15,892
what to feed to the Soviets
as well as the British.
1276
01:31:16,012 --> 01:31:17,480
I...
1277
01:31:18,056 --> 01:31:20,525
I'm not a... I'm not a spy. I'm...
1278
01:31:21,309 --> 01:31:23,903
I'm just a mathematician.
1279
01:31:23,979 --> 01:31:26,073
I know a lot of spies, Alan.
1280
01:31:27,315 --> 01:31:30,319
You've got more secrets
than the best of them.
1281
01:31:34,656 --> 01:31:38,160
You... You have to promise me
that you will release Joan.
1282
01:31:38,994 --> 01:31:40,416
Yes, Joan's at the market.
1283
01:31:40,495 --> 01:31:42,748
She's going to be back
in an hour. I lied.
1284
01:31:44,916 --> 01:31:46,759
I'd better hold on to these.
1285
01:31:46,876 --> 01:31:50,722
If anybody finds out about them,
prison will be the least of her worries.
1286
01:31:53,216 --> 01:31:54,593
Oh, Alan,

1287
01:31:56,052 --> 01:31:58,680
we're going to have
such a wonderful war together.
1288
01:32:18,116 --> 01:32:19,709
I need you to leave Bletchley.
1289
01:32:19,784 --> 01:32:20,876
What?
1290
01:32:20,952 --> 01:32:23,375
It's Menzies.
I don't trust him.
1291
01:32:23,455 --> 01:32:25,128
It's not safe here.
1292
01:32:25,206 --> 01:32:26,846
Do you think
it's any safer anywhere else?
1293
01:32:26,875 --> 01:32:29,298
You need to get away.
You need to get very far away from me.
1294
01:32:29,377 --> 01:32:30,799
Alan, what's happened?
1295
01:32:35,300 --> 01:32:37,894
We can't be engaged any more. You...
1296
01:32:37,969 --> 01:32:41,473
Your parents need to take you back
and find you a husband elsewhere.
1297
01:32:43,391 --> 01:32:45,485
What's wrong with you?
1298
01:32:46,436 --> 01:32:49,280
I have something, er, to tell you.
1299
01:32:49,647 --> 01:32:50,819
I'm...
1300
01:32:53,985 --> 01:32:55,612

I'm a homosexual.
1301
01:32:58,740 --> 01:33:01,835
- All right.
- No, no. Men, Joan.
1302
01:33:03,578 --> 01:33:05,330
- Not women.
- So what?
1303
01:33:06,498 --> 01:33:08,000
Well, I... I just told you.
1304
01:33:08,124 --> 01:33:09,501
So what?
1305
01:33:12,670 --> 01:33:14,843
I had my suspicions, I always did.
1306
01:33:16,174 --> 01:33:20,020
But we're not like other people.
We love each other in our own way
1307
01:33:20,136 --> 01:33:22,184
and we can have the life together
that we want.
1308
01:33:22,305 --> 01:33:24,649
You... You won't be the perfect husband.
1309
01:33:25,600 --> 01:33:28,854
Well, I can promise you, I harbour
no intention of being the perfect wife.
1310
01:33:28,937 --> 01:33:33,443
I'll not be fixing your lamb all day
while you come home from the office.
1311
01:33:33,525 --> 01:33:35,027
I'll work.
1312
01:33:35,944 --> 01:33:37,366
You'll work.
1313
01:33:39,030 --> 01:33:41,032
And we'll have each other's company.

1314
01:33:41,866 --> 01:33:44,164
We'll have each other's minds.
1315
01:33:44,661 --> 01:33:47,335
That sounds like a better
marriage than most.
1316
01:33:49,707 --> 01:33:51,334
Because I care for you.
1317
01:33:52,877 --> 01:33:54,470
And you care for me.
1318
01:33:56,548 --> 01:33:58,221
And we understand
one another more than...
1319
01:33:58,299 --> 01:34:00,722
more than anyone else ever has.
1320
01:34:02,554 --> 01:34:03,976
I don't.
1321
01:34:07,725 --> 01:34:09,352
- What?
- Care for you.
1322
01:34:10,228 --> 01:34:11,650
I never did.
1323
01:34:11,729 --> 01:34:14,733
I... I just needed you to break Enigma.
1324
01:34:14,858 --> 01:34:17,657
I've done that now, so... So you can go.
1325
01:34:23,491 --> 01:34:25,539
I'm not going anywhere.
1326
01:34:26,870 --> 01:34:28,668
I've spent entirely too much of my life
1327
01:34:28,746 --> 01:34:30,248
worried about what you think of me
1328

01:34:30,331 --> 01:34:32,254


or what my parents think of me
1329
01:34:32,333 --> 01:34:34,427
or the boys in Hut 8
or the girls in Hut 3.
1330
01:34:34,502 --> 01:34:36,095
And do you know what? I'm done.
1331
01:34:37,672 --> 01:34:40,926
This is the most important
work I will ever do
1332
01:34:41,009 --> 01:34:44,388
and no one is going to stop me,
least of all you.
1333
01:34:47,265 --> 01:34:49,688
Do you know what? They were right.
1334
01:34:50,602 --> 01:34:52,775
Peter, Hugh, John.
1335
01:34:56,399 --> 01:34:58,026
You really are a monster.
1336
01:35:17,003 --> 01:35:21,725
The war dragged on
for two more solitary years
1337
01:35:24,135 --> 01:35:27,856
and every day we performed
our blood-soaked calculus.
1338
01:35:30,099 --> 01:35:33,444
Every day we decided
who lived and who died.
1339
01:35:33,519 --> 01:35:38,366
Every day we helped the Allies
to victories and nobody knew.
1340
01:35:42,570 --> 01:35:44,038
Stalingrad.
1341
01:35:44,906 --> 01:35:47,830

The Ardenne. The invasion of Normandy.


1342
01:35:48,993 --> 01:35:51,166
All victories that would not
have been possible
1343
01:35:51,246 --> 01:35:53,374
without the intelligence
that we supplied.
1344
01:35:54,749 --> 01:35:57,673
And people talk about the war
1345
01:35:57,752 --> 01:36:01,723
as this epic battle
between civilisations.
1346
01:36:03,549 --> 01:36:06,974
Freedom versus tyranny.
Democracy versus Nazism.
1347
01:36:08,638 --> 01:36:12,768
Armies of millions
bleeding into the ground.
1348
01:36:12,850 --> 01:36:16,024
Fleets of ships
weighing down the oceans.
1349
01:36:16,104 --> 01:36:20,029
Planes dropping bombs from the sky
until they obliterated the sun itself.
1350
01:36:22,151 --> 01:36:24,574
The war wasn't like that for us.
1351
01:36:27,615 --> 01:36:29,083
For us it was just...
1352
01:36:31,035 --> 01:36:33,003
half a dozen crossword enthusiasts
1353
01:36:33,079 --> 01:36:35,582
In a tiny village
in the South of England.
1354
01:36:38,710 --> 01:36:40,462

...your victory.
1355
01:36:40,545 --> 01:36:42,013
It is the victory
1356
01:36:43,256 --> 01:36:47,557
of the cause of freedom in every land.
1357
01:36:51,973 --> 01:36:55,352
This is a solemn but glorious hour.
1358
01:36:56,811 --> 01:37:01,237
I wish that Franklin D Roosevelt
had lived to see this day.
1359
01:37:02,275 --> 01:37:03,902
Was I God? No.
1360
01:37:04,569 --> 01:37:07,288
Because God didn't win the war,
1361
01:37:08,656 --> 01:37:10,124
we did.
1362
01:37:22,628 --> 01:37:24,596
So what happens now?
1363
01:37:26,215 --> 01:37:29,435
Is it back to university for us,
I suppose?
1364
01:37:30,219 --> 01:37:31,641
Yes, pretty much.
1365
01:37:31,721 --> 01:37:33,314
But you've one other thing left to do
1366
01:37:33,389 --> 01:37:35,608
before your service
to your government is concluded.
1367
01:37:35,683 --> 01:37:38,607
- What's that?
- Burn everything.
1368
01:37:38,686 --> 01:37:40,154

Burn? Why?
1369
01:37:40,229 --> 01:37:43,278
You were told when you started
this was a top secret programme.
1370
01:37:43,358 --> 01:37:44,985
Did you think we were joking?
1371
01:37:45,818 --> 01:37:47,286
But the war is over.
1372
01:37:47,362 --> 01:37:49,615
This war is.
But there'll be others.
1373
01:37:49,697 --> 01:37:52,041
And we know how to break a code
1374
01:37:52,116 --> 01:37:54,744
that everybody else
believes is unbreakable.
1375
01:37:55,620 --> 01:37:57,042
Precisely.
1376
01:37:58,706 --> 01:38:00,424
Tear it down, light it up.
1377
01:38:00,500 --> 01:38:03,845
Sweep away the ashes.
None of you have ever met before.
1378
01:38:03,920 --> 01:38:07,174
None of you have ever
even heard the word "Enigma".
1379
01:38:09,425 --> 01:38:11,143
Have a safe trip home.
1380
01:38:14,597 --> 01:38:16,315
Behave.
1381
01:38:16,391 --> 01:38:18,109
With a bit of luck,
you'll never have to see me

1382
01:38:18,184 --> 01:38:20,733
or one another again
for the rest of your lives.
1383
01:38:36,244 --> 01:38:37,746
That's unbelievable.
1384
01:38:39,914 --> 01:38:41,837
Now, Detective,
1385
01:38:43,835 --> 01:38:45,508
you get to judge.
1386
01:38:48,089 --> 01:38:49,557
So tell me,
1387
01:38:51,342 --> 01:38:52,810
what am I?
1388
01:38:54,637 --> 01:38:58,483
Am I a machine? Am I a person?
1389
01:39:00,351 --> 01:39:01,944
Am I a war hero?
1390
01:39:04,605 --> 01:39:06,448
Am I a criminal?
1391
01:39:10,486 --> 01:39:12,159
I can't judge you.
1392
01:39:15,450 --> 01:39:16,918
Well, then.
1393
01:39:20,329 --> 01:39:23,253
You're no help to me at all.
1394
01:39:26,294 --> 01:39:27,887
Come in.
1395
01:39:32,258 --> 01:39:34,306
You wanted to see me, sir?
1396
01:39:34,385 --> 01:39:36,103
Turing. Sit down.

1397
01:39:48,483 --> 01:39:49,905
Is something the matter?
1398
01:39:50,902 --> 01:39:53,451
You and Christopher Morcom
are quite close.
1399
01:39:53,529 --> 01:39:55,406
I wouldn't say that.
1400
01:39:55,490 --> 01:39:56,992
Well, your mathematics teacher says
1401
01:39:57,074 --> 01:39:58,714
the two of you
are positively inseparable.
1402
01:39:58,784 --> 01:40:00,752
We're the best students in the class.
1403
01:40:01,704 --> 01:40:03,706
He caught you passing
notes the other day.
1404
01:40:03,789 --> 01:40:06,838
Cryptography, to pass the time.
The class is too simple.
1405
01:40:06,918 --> 01:40:10,798
You and your friend solve
maths problems during maths class
1406
01:40:10,880 --> 01:40:12,553
because the maths class is too dull?
1407
01:40:13,424 --> 01:40:15,142
He's not my friend.
1408
01:40:15,218 --> 01:40:18,597
- Well, I'm told he's your only friend.
- Who said that?
1409
01:40:21,724 --> 01:40:24,443
Something's come up concerning Morcom.
1410

01:40:25,269 --> 01:40:26,816


Why am I here?
1411
01:40:29,607 --> 01:40:31,359
Christopher is dead.
1412
01:40:39,909 --> 01:40:41,502
I don't understand.
1413
01:40:41,577 --> 01:40:45,627
His mother sent word this morning.
The family were on holiday, you see.
1414
01:40:50,169 --> 01:40:51,762
I don't understand.
1415
01:40:51,837 --> 01:40:55,717
Well, he had bovine tuberculosis,
as I'm sure he told you.
1416
01:40:56,926 --> 01:41:02,274
So this won't come as a shock
but still, all the same, I'm sorry.
1417
01:41:04,433 --> 01:41:06,060
You're mistaken.
1418
01:41:07,687 --> 01:41:09,155
Did he not tell you?
1419
01:41:10,356 --> 01:41:12,779
Well, he's been sick for a long time.
1420
01:41:12,858 --> 01:41:14,906
He knew this was coming soon.
1421
01:41:16,320 --> 01:41:18,163
But he had a stiff upper lip about it.
1422
01:41:18,239 --> 01:41:19,741
Good lad.
1423
01:41:21,826 --> 01:41:23,874
- Are you all right, Turing?
- Yes. Of course.
1424

01:41:23,953 --> 01:41:26,797


Like I said,
I didn't know him very well.
1425
01:41:26,872 --> 01:41:30,126
Ah, I see. Very well.
1426
01:41:34,630 --> 01:41:37,008
May I leave, Headmaster?
1427
01:41:51,230 --> 01:41:53,028
Congratulations, sir.
1428
01:42:20,718 --> 01:42:22,186
Sorry.
1429
01:42:26,682 --> 01:42:29,686
I would have come.
I would have testified.
1430
01:42:30,853 --> 01:42:34,653
And what would you have said?
That I... I wasn't a homosexual?
1431
01:42:34,732 --> 01:42:38,202
Alan, this is serious.
They could send you to jail.
1432
01:42:38,277 --> 01:42:39,699
Oh, damn it.
1433
01:42:43,032 --> 01:42:46,127
- Your hands, you're twitching.
- No. No, I'm not.
1434
01:42:46,202 --> 01:42:47,624
- Alan.
- Er...
1435
01:42:49,789 --> 01:42:51,541
It's the medication.
1436
01:42:52,708 --> 01:42:54,130
The medication?
1437
01:42:55,544 --> 01:42:59,174
Well, the judge gave me, um, a choice.

1438
01:42:59,256 --> 01:43:03,432
Either two years in prison or
hor... hormonal therapy.
1439
01:43:03,511 --> 01:43:04,933
Oh, my God.
1440
01:43:05,971 --> 01:43:08,394
- Oh, my God!
- Yes, yes, that's right.
1441
01:43:08,474 --> 01:43:11,023
Chemical castration.
1442
01:43:11,102 --> 01:43:15,073
To, er, to cure me of my, um,
homosexual predilections.
1443
01:43:16,857 --> 01:43:19,360
Well, of course I chose that.
I mean, I couldn't...
1444
01:43:20,695 --> 01:43:22,697
work in prison and...
1445
01:43:23,698 --> 01:43:25,120
All right.
1446
01:43:26,951 --> 01:43:28,874
Now, I'm going to speak to your doctors.
1447
01:43:28,953 --> 01:43:31,706
- I'm going to speak to your lawyers.
- I'm... I'm fine.
1448
01:43:31,789 --> 01:43:33,541
- Please let me help you.
- No, I...
1449
01:43:33,624 --> 01:43:36,093
I don't need your help, thank you.
1450
01:43:36,627 --> 01:43:38,504
Alan, you do not have to do this alone.
1451

01:43:39,839 --> 01:43:41,432


I'm not alone.
1452
01:43:45,094 --> 01:43:46,687
Never have been.
1453
01:43:51,183 --> 01:43:53,652
Christopher's become so smart.
1454
01:43:56,856 --> 01:44:00,986
If I don't continue
my treatment, then they'll...
1455
01:44:04,697 --> 01:44:07,496
They'll take him away from me.
1456
01:44:08,242 --> 01:44:09,664
You...
1457
01:44:12,621 --> 01:44:16,467
You... You... You can't let them
do that. You can't.
1458
01:44:17,626 --> 01:44:20,425
You... You can't let them
leave me alone.
1459
01:44:23,591 --> 01:44:25,264
I don't... I don't want to be alone.
1460
01:44:25,342 --> 01:44:26,844
I don't want to be alone.
1461
01:44:26,927 --> 01:44:28,850
All right, all right.
1462
01:44:28,929 --> 01:44:30,931
All right.
1463
01:44:31,932 --> 01:44:34,060
It's all right, come and sit down.
1464
01:44:37,438 --> 01:44:39,566
It's all right. Come and sit down.
1465
01:44:43,444 --> 01:44:44,912

It's all right.


1466
01:44:55,498 --> 01:44:58,968
Oh, well...
1467
01:44:59,043 --> 01:45:02,343
That's a much nicer ring
than the one I... I made you.
1468
01:45:02,421 --> 01:45:04,094
Yes.
1469
01:45:04,173 --> 01:45:05,925
His name's Jock.
1470
01:45:06,008 --> 01:45:08,761
He's an army man,
if you can believe it.
1471
01:45:08,844 --> 01:45:11,267
We work together.
1472
01:45:14,350 --> 01:45:16,899
Why don't we do a crossword puzzle?
1473
01:45:18,229 --> 01:45:20,106
It'll only take us five minutes.
1474
01:45:20,189 --> 01:45:21,736
Or in your case, six.
1475
01:45:26,821 --> 01:45:28,243
There.
1476
01:45:51,720 --> 01:45:53,722
Perhaps later.
1477
01:45:55,057 --> 01:45:56,525
Yes, of course.
1478
01:46:02,439 --> 01:46:04,533
You got what you wanted, didn't you?
1479
01:46:05,651 --> 01:46:07,244
Work, a husband.

1480
01:46:08,571 --> 01:46:10,039
Normal life.
1481
01:46:20,416 --> 01:46:22,919
No one normal could have done that.
1482
01:46:27,006 --> 01:46:29,054
Do you know, this morning,
1483
01:46:30,217 --> 01:46:34,563
I was on a train that went
through a city that wouldn't exist
1484
01:46:34,638 --> 01:46:36,640
if it wasn't for you.
1485
01:46:38,309 --> 01:46:42,689
I bought a ticket from a man
who would likely be dead
1486
01:46:42,771 --> 01:46:45,024
if it wasn't for you.
1487
01:46:45,107 --> 01:46:46,950
I read up on my work,
1488
01:46:48,319 --> 01:46:51,869
a whole field of scientific inquiry
1489
01:46:51,947 --> 01:46:54,996
that only exists because of you.
1490
01:46:58,162 --> 01:47:01,132
Now, if you wish
you could have been normal,
1491
01:47:03,459 --> 01:47:05,678
I can promise you, I do not.
1492
01:47:07,838 --> 01:47:10,637
The world is an infinitely better place
1493
01:47:10,716 --> 01:47:13,060
precisely because you weren't.
1494

01:47:16,847 --> 01:47:18,269


Do you...
1495
01:47:19,016 --> 01:47:20,859
Do you really think that?
1496
01:47:22,394 --> 01:47:23,862
I think
1497
01:47:25,022 --> 01:47:28,822
that sometimes it is the people
who no one imagines anything of
1498
01:47:28,901 --> 01:47:33,452
who do the things
that no one can imagine.