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photo: Riccardo Giordano

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photo: Mathieu Richard-Arcouette

Re-inventing instant film for vintage Polaroid cameras

Polaroid re-positioned itself from an analog Instant


Film Production Company to a global Consumer Electronics and Digital Imaging company, with new high quality
mass products. Shutting down factories in Mexico and
Netherlands in June 2008, production of integral Polaroid
film was globally stopped.
In October 2008, the company of Impossible B.V. founded the Impossible project and acquired the complete
production plant in Enschede (Netherlands). They engaged the most experienced team of Integral Film experts
worldwide, aiming to re-invent and re-produce analog
instant film. Since some important components of Polaroid film do not exist anymore, this impossible project
is focusing on the development of completely new film
that could also be used on vintage Polaroid cameras. The
first prototype is expected as soon as October 2009, and
production is planned to start beginning of 2010.
Blur magazine is proud to be an exclusive media sponsor of the Impossible Project. The magazine supporting
and celebrating artistic photography, it is always a pleasure for us to encourage such courageous and historically
important undertakings which will, we are convinced, not
only succeed but lead to a true cultural revolution in the
world of photography. In this issue you can read an exclusive interview with Florian Kaps, executive director of
the project, and find out all the facts related to the Impossible Project as well as how to contribute to its success.
More on this on page 112. In addition, our next issues will
continue covering this topic we will inform you about
the development of the project itself, survey the history
of Polaroid film, current projects done using this specific
technique and introduce the work of one Croatian Polaroid photographer.
For further information related to the Impossible Project, please visit the official web page:
http://www.the-impossible-project.com/

BLUR MAGAZINE Exlusive media partner of The Impossible Project


BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Keep sending us your comments, compliments and wishes for our improvement from now on our new Facebook page!
ONE BIG THANK YOU
For such an independent, specific internet magazine, it is a big honour to know it is being read by around 10 thousand people in 110 countries. Howvere,
there is no better recognition then readers sending
personal compliments, comments and suggestions,
because these not only give us an energy kick, they
also provide ideas for further development and improvement. Thank you for all of your participation so
far!

Loredana Guinicelli | Italy | Wow :) My favorite magazine


ever!
Sophie Schwery | Fantastic choices. Fantastic editing! Just
love it. Thanks for inspiring me so much!
Milan | Serbia | Congrats for the magazine, I am reading it for
some time now and I am truly impressed. You are great!
Gaetano Belverde | Italy | My compliments!! Wonderful magazine. I prefer the pdf version because the ability to download and read off-line.
Arkadius Zagrabski | Germany | Yep! Love it too, keep up
the good work :)

VISIT OUR FACEBOOK GROU


In view of changes already explained and a kind of
new beginning for Blur magazine, we would like to
have even better interaction with our readers. This
is why we created our Facebook network, through
which we will give updates concerning Blur magazine, and where you can provide your feedback and
speak your mind, and which will be a place for all of
you to meet, exchange ideas and, perhaps, collaborate. What connects all of us is common love of photography, an art for trespassing all time any territorial borders, which is exactly why we want to create a
community which will unite incurable photography
and Blur buffs.
Join Facebook group Blur magazine !

Ameer Hamza | For me a new and a wonderful finding. Keep


it up! My compliments for the magazine. Its been a while
since I was so impressed! Thank you!
Drako Velimirovi | My compliments for the magazine. Its
been a while since I was so impressed! Thank you!
Mick Ryan | Thanks a lot! It looks great!
Hasan Jaber | Lebanon | Keep it up amigos!
Predrag Zec | BIH | Hello, I have recently discovered your
mag and I like your work a lot. I am from Gradika, BIH and
I am a professional photographer, but what you are doing
has changed my perspective of photography as a hobby or
job. Keep it up!

KEEP ON WRITING
Dont hesitate a moment, keep us posted on what
you like and what you believe should be improved.
You can send your comments by e-mail or the Facebook group and we will publish most interesting
ones in our next issue. Bellow you can find some of
many comments we already received.

Darko Markanovi | Croatia | My compliments for your idea


and magazine form. Only potential for improvement would
be adding of exif data for photos, where it is possible. Once
again congratulations on your excellent work!
Doug | Found your magazine by accident, well done! Hope
to see it in print one day.
Marlon Asuncionus | Bulb mag, you have a lot of interesting
and very creative photos. Keep it up!
Dejan Jevremovi | Serbia | Thank you for this beautiful free
magazine!
Sirichok Sitthisan | Bulb is a cool magazine. Thanks for making Bulb!

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

EDITORIAL COLUMN
...every change hurts a bit. We all somehow subconsciously know this, which is the
reason why we are afraid of changes and often unnecessarily try to postpone them.
Despite possibly creating wounds that slowly heal or leave bitter aftertaste, changes are necessary because they are the only path to improvement and progress

They claim a picture says a thousand words, as in the case of


our current front page, where a photograph by author Mathieu Richard-Arcouette perfectly symbolizes the new situation
our magazine faces. But, if you havent already noticed the
new design of our web page, you must have seen the domain name. In case you proceeded automatically, as most of
us do while we surf, merely to download the latest issue, we
have a surprise for you.
Is there anything strange about the logo you are so used to?
Same dimensions, identical typography, equal number of
letters, however - a different name, which is a bit more blurry
than before. Even three letters match, but they are in a different order. Why, what for, and what happened?
It is quite obvious that, despite the change, we didnt want to
break the links to our, now former, Bulb magazine. Otherwise,
we would have chosen a completely new name, visual identity and made whatever changes. On the contrary, we decided
to nourish the tradition and if you take a look to what the editorial staff blurb says, you can see almost all collaborators are
still there. Our family even grew so that our common project
could do better and have greater results.
Snake has always been a symbol of change, and as it sheds its

skin when it becomes too small, we too had to make certain


changes in order to improve. However, every change hurts a
bit. We all somehow subconsciously know this, which is the
reason why we are afraid of changes and often unnecessarily
try to postpone them. Despite possibly creating wounds that
slowly heal or leave bitter aftertaste, changes are necessary
because they are the only path to improvement and progress. Kreimir, co-founder of Bulb magazine, will no longer be
on the Blur team and will face new challenges by running the
Bulb association. Given that Kreimir was the one who suggested the Bulb name, and us being such gentlemen, we let
him keep it. We would like to thank him for all the effort and
work. In front of us there are now new goals and paths which
will, we are convinced, justify necessary changes.
But let us go back to our first thought that a picture says a
thousand words. Is it always so, is this an undisputable rule?
Imagine, for example, a photograph where you see two lovers hugging, an aesthetic and artistic love scene that hides
more than it reveals. Everything fits perfectly, a photograph
worth admiring.
Suddenly, as the seed of doubt arises, followed by a negative clich of a half empty instead of a half full glass, the perception of the same love scene changes. All of our moralistic,

philosophical and diabolic alter egos have something to say.


Perhaps this is a man that cheats on his wife, or vice versa?
Maybe its a man with 2 women? What if one of them changed his/her sex, or if this is actually a man with a blow-up
doll If it would make any sense, or if we had more time and
space, I am convinced we could gather more than one thousand words.
On the other hand, we are completely immune to and not affected by important things which we should constantly question, react on and think about, yet we remain utterly apathetic. We can not but wonder if photography and photographs
should act in this manner as well?
Despite the difficult economic situation, time when
everybody cares but for material interests, when there is no
class and everything seems so tacky, while media constantly
bomb us with rubbish and depression, a bunch of workaholics volunteer and try to further improve this magazine.

Robert Gojevic, urednik


robert.gojevic@blur-magazine.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

impressum

O BLURU
HARD FACTS - BLUR HISTORY

Robert Gojevic
founder | editor in chief | design | dtp
e-mail: robert.gojevic@blur-magazine.com
Ivana Krnjic
marketing & PR | translator
e-mail: ivana.krnjic@blur-magazine.com
Anamarija Kovac
translator
Petra Nenadic
translator
Isidora Vujosevic
journalist | proofreading
Ivan Zidar
journalist
Vedran Korusic
proofreading
Davor Juricic
proofreading
Ivan Pekarik
Globulb | translator
Dario Devcic
web master
Zlatko Drusko
illustrator

Blur magazine is project founded and run by photography enthusiasts, and volunteers from all parts of Croatia. Aiming at achieving high quality content, the magazine is published quarterly in PDF format so it can easily be downloaded, saved and
browsed through every now and then. It is available through the Internet exclusively,
in order to avoid high cost distribution fees, break territorial borders and reach every
single part of the Earth, free of charge. It is because of its cosmopolitan nature that
Blur is edited simultaneously in Croatian and English. Though initially established under the name of Bulb at the close of 2007, in September 2009, it changed its editorial
board, refreshed its team of collaborators and, using a bit more blurry name, Blur
now heads for new challenges.
SOFT FACTS - BLUR VISION
When it comes to presentation, photographers have great expectations from the
Internet. Virtual exhibition rooms replaced expensive and highly privileged galleries
and at one point it seemed an easy tool for one to be noticed and recognized without
investing a lot of money. However, nobody expected such hysterical interest for photography, a mass industry that constantly persuades us we always need to be aware
of latest technological novelties.
A large amount of photo portals appeared, which led to quality dropping and criteria being downgraded, forcing photographers to spend more time online than actively do what they should - take photos. Recognition mostly became a consequence
of constant communication and active and thoughtful commenting the work of other
photographers, while those less active remained unnoticed in spite of their quality.
We are surrounded by photography every step of the way but it however sadly
mostly co-exists with capitalism the way of life which but ruins the values without
which we only feel empty and incomplete. Everything is seen through the eye of the
dollar and material interest.
Blur magazine chooses to resist to these trends. Apart from the fact it is free, unbelievable to most, we omit what we subjectively feel should be less important and more
blurry when it comes to excellent photography on purpose. Our readers are free from
technical information which camera/lens was used, what was the focal length and
the rest of unimportant facts that fill most of photo related magazines and web portals. Or focus is purely on creative photography, with a strong personal mark by authors that deserve to be highlighted. We want to slow down production rhythm, and
make readers and photographers strongly reconsider photography. We wish to be
experienced more as a book and less like a movie.
BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Cover

01

Contents

06

Newsletter

55

Mare Milin column

PR

02

Info

07

Project: Soul tales II

56

History of the Polaroid

106

Readers corner

03

Gallery 24

08

Portfolio: Ana Lorencin

72

108

Editorial column

04

Photo submission

33

Vox populi

92

Impossible project: Hard


fackts

Impressum / about us

05

Interview: Stanko Abadzic

35

Globulb: Bombay Flying Club 93

CONTENTS

96

Portfolio: Ivan Zidar

132

Interview: Impossible project 112


Polaroid: Memory keepers

128

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

by clicking on the top of each page, you will be directed to the content!

The easiest way to read


Blur magazine is in Full
Screen Mode. In case
you are no longer in
it, press

Ctrl+L

on

your keyboard.

QUICK WAY TO WANTED INFORMATION!


Blur magazine contains hyper links through which you can directly go to wanted page,
and from every page go back to the content. By clicking thumbs on Gallery 24 you can
immediately see the page with photography you clicked on and also return. Every URL
address mentioned in the text is at the same time a hyper link for the wanted web page.
This makes reading of our magazine easier, quicker, more simple & pleasant.

Gondole
gallery

24

BISERKO FERCEK
Hrvatska | http://spare-bibo.deviantart.com/

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Agata
gallery

24

ADAM SEWASTIANOWICZ
POLAND | http://franekchrzonszcz.deviantart.com/

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Halcyon
gallery

24

AMANDA VALLOZA
USA | http://www.maebird.synthasite.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

24

Love

IVAN PEKARIK
Hrvatska | http://john-pecko.deviantart.com/

Christopher Hibbert
France | www.christopher-hibbert.com

24
gallery

24
gallery
gallery

der Lachende Vagabund

Love
Christopher Hibbert
France | www.christopher-hibbert.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Gondole
gallery

24

BISERKO FERCEK
Hrvatska | http://spare-bibo.deviantart.com/

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Dylan
gallery

24

ANDREWF
ENGLAND | http://www.andrewf.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Lucifers toy
gallery

24

PETRA NENADIC
HRVATSKA | http://toolost.deviantart.com/

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

gallery

24

IME I PREZIME?????

If
PIOTR MALKIEWICZ
POLAND | http://przypadek.deviantart.
BLUR MAGAZINE 15
com/gallery/

24
gallery

Delicate
MUSE
England | http://www.imageofmuse.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Alice In Wonderland
gallery

24

PANJI INDRA PERMANA


Indonesia | http://panjiindra.viewbook.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

24
gallery

Two good friends


VAGGELIS E FRAGIADAKIS
USA | http://vaggelis.deviantart.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Muszka
gallery

24

SONIA SZSTAK
Poland | http://muszka.deviantart.com/

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Couture rider
gallery

24

ROBIN ALFIAN
Indonesia | http://www.robinpika.deviantart.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Unobservant
gallery

24

JOHAN LIND
Sweden | http://jo-lind.daportfolio.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

24
gallery

mandy morbid
NATHAN APPEL
USA | http://nathanappel.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

24
gallery

The dog
UZENGIA ALEKSANDAR NEDIC
Hrvatska | http://www.uzengia.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

24
gallery

Black
DAMIR GAVRANOVIC
BiH | http://www.flickr.com/photos/damirgavranovic/ | BiH

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

24
gallery

The shamanic healer


HLNE DEROUBAIX
France | http://helenina.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

24
gallery

Slap
DUAN GRBAC
Hrvatska | http://fotozine.org/index.php?omen=dg

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

24
gallery

Nude Girl
JOS FERREIRA
Portugal | http://www.joseferreiraphoBLUR MAGAZINE 15
tographer.com

24
gallery

Amateur
JURIY RONZHIN
Russia | http://juriyronzhin.
BLUR MAGAZINE 15
portfolio.artlimited.net/

Running away
gallery

24

MIKE BAILEY-GATES
USA | http://www.flickr.com/photos/mbg_photos/

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

24
gallery

Moving
MAXIMILIAN BAEUCHLE
Germany | -

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ice Machine
gallery

24

NICHOLAS VROMAN
JAPAN | http://nickvroman.wordpress.com/

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Idrophobia
gallery

24

STELLA ASIA CONSONNI AKA APHNEA


ITALY | www.aphnea.carbonmade.com

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Gallery 24 submission of photographs


Send us 3 photos per issue maximum.
Send each photograph in a separate e-mail
Name the photograph: name-surname-photograph name.jpg
Send photographs as a .jpg file
Every photograph has to be 1,000 pixels in its wider side / resolution: 72 dpi
Maximum photograph size is 1MB.
http://www.blur-magazine.com/submission/photo-submission/

The main mission of Blur magazine is to promote and


celebrate artistic photography and to ensure coverage
of all photographers, professional and amateur alike,
who capture motifs that intrigue them in fascinating,
innovative and fresh ways.
Gallery 24 is a collection, or even better, an exhibition of all of those individual, unique and successful photographs which are not grouped by a given theme, but
are based on their quality, specific characteristics and
the wow effect. Your work can be part of this collection
too and thus be seen by several thousand people from
all over the world. Robert, the editor of Blur and selector of Gallery 24, describes below which photographs we
look for and prefer. If your work matches the description,
dont hesitate a moment but submit immediately using
the (link!).
I must admit it is very difficult for me to find the right
words to describe which photographs we prefer in Blur ma-

gazine. Although visually I know what I want and what not


exactly, it is hard to put this into words. One thing is sure - we
do not want to follow the mainstream and become boring
and predictable, both in the selection of photographers and
their work and when it comes to magazine question itself.
As a big supporter of individualism and uniqueness, it would
be easiest to say that I prefer simplicity. Meaning, we look for
those photographs that can easily be connected to a certain
artist, as they carry their personal and recognizable mark.
I could try presenting this uniqueness as a reflection of
creativity, imagination, highly esthetic taste and intellect
of the person that stands behind the camera. Therefore the
attempt to capture something in an ordinary, unoriginal,
unimaginative way that has been seen so many times before is not what impresses me.
On the other hand, sometimes it is very hard to judge because the visual appearance of photography can easily fool
and seduce, so that I simply ignore everything said above

and decide to publish it. Selection is a subjective process, led


by inner impulses and feelings.
Finally, I am constantly looking for originality, creativity,
style and lots of other elements that are joined together in
unique ratios. Some authors succeed here more, some less,
as some photographs leave stronger or weaker impression
on readers.
Surrounded by beautiful photographs in different places, I
sometimes do not have the time or patience to wait if we get
the photographs I wish to publish. Therefore, when I see an
interesting photograph, wanting to show it to a wider audience, I do not hesitate to contact the author himself/herself
and ask him/her for permission to publish it. I sincerely hope
that soon the day will come when we will receive sufficient
photographs worth admiring and that I will no longer have
the need to contact anybody, leading to growth of Gallery
24 to Gallery 28 :)
Robert, selector of Gallery 24

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Interview

Abadis father gave him his first Russian camera SMENA 8, which the photographer has kept to this very day,
emphasizing that it made him realize good photos are
not only made with expensive cameras. As a student, he
took pictures of weddings and soccer clubs in order to
earn some pocket money. At the same time he took numerous pictures of Vukovar, and thus developed a poetic
sensitivity for its heritage, the old streets, rooftops, roads,
melancholic views of time stopped sensitivity of a boy
who loved the past.

Nudes
Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr/
BLUR MAGAZINE 15

RECORDING THE SOLITUDE OF HISTORY


Abadi was inspired by the French photographer Willy Ronis, who listens to Bach before taking photos, in developing his own romantic pilgrimages and rituals, in visiting mysterious little hideouts. He liked to go
to the Literarna kavarna in Tynska street, which was hidden from the city
bustle. At the market in Havelska street he would first buy a cantaloupe
and then have an espresso and a glass of mineral water in Tynska street.
And still, he was mostly drawn to the mysterious surroundings of the royal
palace of Hradani, where the streets are cobbled and the spring air is filled with the scent of the locust tree and flowering violets.

The last adventure of the 20th century


belonged to photographers witnesses
of distressful moments of an epoch equally filled with both beauty and terror.
Wars, catastrophes, upheavals and
revolutions times in which human life
loses all sense, and thereby its pivotal
connection with God have been recorded thanks to photographers. On the
other hand, the infinite beauty of the
world, human faces lined with memories, frantic megalopolises with towers
reaching the skies, they all remember
these loners who, camera in hand that
natural extension of their curious being
collect important moments into a universal scrapbook of life.
To save a particle of time from oblivion indeed means to save it from sure
death. It is also a search for traces of remaining beauty, the beauty that will, so

says Dostoevsky, save the world.


A member of these last adventurers of
the century, that nomadic tribe, is also a
famous Croatian photographer Stanko
Abadi, a teacher of German, a citizen
of Prague, Zagreb and Krk, in short a
citizen of the world. In Vukovar, the town
where he was born, a baroque wonder
on the Danube, a town that gave a hearty welcome to all people, he learnt how
to love the world. Recognizing the sensibility of his 15-year-old son, Abadis
father gave him his first Russian camera
SMENA 8, which the photographer has
kept to this very day, emphasizing that
it made him realize good photos are
not only made with expensive cameras.
As a student, he took pictures of weddings and soccer clubs in order to earn
some pocket money. At the same time
he took numerous pictures of Vukovar,

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

and thus developed a poetic sensitivity


for its heritage, the old streets, rooftops,
roads, melancholic views of time stopped sensitivity of a boy who loved
the past.
During high school the artist took
part in extracurricular technical education. He was also member of the Photoclub Borovo and had several joint and
independent exhibitions in Borovo and
Vukovar. His journeys throughout the
world began in Tunisia, on Malta and in
Istanbul, where he worked as a reporter
for Vjesnik, a national daily. More than
3,000 negatives that were on file from
that time, as well as his boyhood photos
of Vukovar were destroyed and lost forever during the terrible devastation of
the city.
From 1995 till 2002 Abadi lived in
Prague a capital of the world, which
had been turned into the most mysterious city in Europe by its educated rulers
Charles IV and Rudolph II. Eight hundred
towers adorn the capital of the most beautiful part of Middle Ages, the town
to which the Habsburg ruler Rudolph
II invited not only leading European intellectuals, but also magicians, mystics
and alchemists who were to search for
the elixir of youth and the secret to the
transformation of gold.
This was more than enough to attract
a sensitive and curious photographer
with a taste for ancient streets, bridges
and towers. Abadi worked in Prague
as a free-lance photographer, partly also
for the Superposter company, taking
pictures of billboards on the streets for
the companys archives. It is worth no-

ting that in three days he made more


money than he did teaching German
during his first year in Prague. He socialized with students of FAMU and visited
their exhibitions at the Velryba gallery.
He was never interested in the touristy Prague, but in silent Kafkian views,
in the somewhat gloomy, melancholy
streets that bear silence in their oldfashioned streetlights, old pavements,
deep shadows, shops with old mirrors
and typewriters.
Abadi was inspired by the French
photographer Willy Ronis, who listens
to Bach before taking photos, in developing his own romantic pilgrimages
and rituals, in visiting mysterious little
hideouts. He liked to go to the Literarna
kavarna in Tynska street, which was hidden from the city bustle. At the market
in Havelska street he would first buy a
cantaloupe and then have an espresso
and a glass of mineral water in Tynska
street. And still, he was mostly drawn
to the mysterious surroundings of the
royal palace of Hradani, where the
streets are cobbled and the spring air
is filled with the scent of the locust tree
and flowering violets.
A series of photographs is devoted
to walls with old-fashioned streetlights
that encompass Hradani. In the manner of James Stewart in Rear Window
he especially liked to watch a small square, its changes, its people, its transformations of light... And yes, this admirer
of Prague could not keep away from Zlata ulika from where he brings us a very
unusual sight part of a rooftop and a
window with a child peeking through

it. The snow-covered streets of Prague


offer us a wide range of remembrance,
unlocking the spaces of our own memories and dreams.
On the terrace of the Bazar caf,
Abadi took a photo of a man sweeping the floor next to the fountain, deeply lost in his own thoughts. He took
another picture of the square in winter.
Apart from the loneliness of places and
people, Abadi is also interested in the
quiet pulsing of life, as the great U.S.
writer Henry Miller would call it, so he
photographed a Czech woman playing
the harmonica next to a wall, a painter
working alone in a square, two rabbis

in the ancient Jewish ghetto and a welldressed man reading in the light of an
old-fashioned lamp.
These are all scenes that revive an old
era, one might say, scenes that keep repeating themselves through the centuries. They also prove that cities live in various times, in the antiquity, the Middle
Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and
not only in the frantic pace of the 21st
century. This is also proven by Abadis
photos of Prague windows through
which one can see old-fashioned dolls.
Most attractive are old stores, cafs and
breweries with poster-adds resurrected
from the 1920s. Photographs of crum-

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

bling old walls covered in ivy, of parks


with rain puddles also give forth this
air of aging.
In the suburbs of Prague, Abadi
took pictures of the forgotten a man
carrying tires and behind him the shiny
add for Kleber or a man with a radio
in front of a wall with an old add for
Nivea. In a side street a chimneysweep
gives a light to his colleague. Abadi
also appreciates female beauty, as is
proven by Lenka a portrait of a beautiful young woman under a tree. The
Prague metro, Zliin, is not forgotten, it
is recorded through a grid of shadows.
Yet, most of all, Abadi likes to take
pictures of lonely people having a private dialogue with the city, like the boy
on a lawn standing in front of sheets

drying on the line.


Some photos of Prague are surreal
like the manifold shadows of a bicycle
but most surreal of all is the photograph in which the shadowy pavement
is cut by a beam of light resembling a
keyhole. The photo of a man whose
fruit-laden bicycle fell over Abadi
took from a window, highlighting the
structure of the old pavement, the spilled fruit and the outline of the stooping man.
Abadi visited not only Prague, but
also Budapest, where he took the moving photograph of the stooping old
lady in front of the Goethe Institut, Vienna, from where comes the photo of
the Havelka caf, Krakow and its dilapidated caf Camelot and Zagreb, whe-

re he photographed an old lady walking


past a poster announcing an exhibit of
photographs by Too Dabac!
The island of Krk has also many a
mysterious antique to offer our artist.
The stone buildings are always photographed with a child, filling the photo with joy. Some children run along a
street in Baka, holding bread in their
hands, another scene shows us an old
man with a sheep, four passionate card
players show through their straw hats,
an elderly man happily floats in the sea
with a glass in his hand... Abadis favorite images are the spray of the sea on
bathers, the joy of young lovers playing
on the beach, the lovely bays around
Baka with their straw sunshades.
Naturally, the photographers path finally led him to Dubrovnik
an architectural masterpiece whose
beauty leaves a mark in everybodys heart. In the old town, Abadi records details that tell the story of historic layers,
the spirit, philosophy and history of
maybe the most magnificent European
city; studies of details such as a stone
hand reaching out from a wall, a lovely
womans leg next to an ancient column,
the shadows of passers-by and lamps
on an old wall. And indeed, he did not
forget the churches, ramparts, the port,
cafs, lanes with winding staircases, etc.
In his wanderings along the Adriatic coast, Abadi also took pictures of the hamlet of Lubenice on the island of Cres,
the coastal motorway and the ships,
each time capturing an unusual detail
of a backyard or billboard.
In Rijeka he recorded, like Orson

Welles, the puzzling design of a secessionist stairway, in Istria the fence of


a forgotten place... And finally, let us
mention a photograph so characteristic of Abadi the end of the tourist
season in Baka in which he recorded
an abandoned town with sad metal
scaffolding and puddles underneath... a
most appropriate symbol of the century
showing a magical interweaving of technology and nature.
Abadi records the loneliness of history, he searches for the lost views of
existence. But most of all, his camera is
the means with which he reveals the loneliness of worlds, cities and people stopped in the infinity of time. For, in spite
of the frantic pulsing of life, in spite of
enormous cities and communication technologies, human beings have never
been so lonely. Mass societies and contemporary media have created their paradox. There are lonely women and men
sitting in rooms with their memories. A
boy walking the streets in the artists
photograph is not at all different from a
boy sitting alone in a room. In Abadis
streets we thus sense only silence the
silence of people, of rooftops and of
walls. These photographs are sensuous,
contemplative and melancholic. There
are people walking in them whose loneliness merges with the loneliness of
cities. It is a dialogue of history and individuals. It is the viewpoint of a wandering photographer who one day may
visit you and your city...
Marina Tenera

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

Whats the most important thing you want to show in nude art photographs? The female body, the facial expression of the nude woman or something
entirely different? All mentioned is important. A good nude photo starts
with the face, an interesting radiant face. Then you discover the body. The
atmosphere is very important; I dont think much of sterile art nudes with
neutral backgrounds. They significantly reduce the amount of information
discernable in artistic nude photography. When you see the setting in which your model is situated, this makes for a richer experience, at least in my
opinion. In nude photography, theres always the danger of slipping into
kitsch or vulgarity, and thats why its so difficult to produce a good nude
photo. I think I managed to do quite well with In front of the mirror (Pred
ogledalom), taken in the Czech Republic in 2000, because these were my
only photographs the entire edition of which was sold and is no longer available for purchase.
Are the models in your photographs your acquaintances, and how did you
get them interested in posing? Was it relatively easy or difficult for you to
get models? First of all, the word model should be in quotation marks,
because Ive never photographed professional models. Im not interested
in this because they all play someone else, not themselves. Theyre not authentic; they just copy their poses in thousands of copies. Im not into that.
My models are regular girls I meet in towns or cities where I hold exhibitions. In the Czech Republic, to answer your question, is not very difficult to
find girls for nude photos, because they simply like to be photographed. Its
difficult at first, but then one friend recommends another and thats how it
gets going.

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

What advice would you give to photographers who have no success in their
search for nude models? Patience, confidence
A lot of authors take to nude photography. What makes your effort different? The world consumes photography, but photography also consumes
the world. There isnt a single place on Earth where a photographer hasnt
set foot. In this flood of photographic images, its very difficult to present something new, authentic and your own. This is especially important for nude
photography. Nudity surrounds us: its in the media, the newspapers and on
newsstands, in commercials, on billboards, it jumps on us from TV screens.
There are few products today that arent advertised using the naked female
figure. Ive tried hard to reveal my permanent inspiration with the female
form to the observer of my photography. Ive taken photos of women in
such a way to present them as subjects, not objects of exploitation, as this
is often the case with commercials and the media. I wanted to express my
respect for them, to affirm the beauty and aesthetics of the body. In other
words, I wanted to express the poetic image of the female body.

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

You use analogue cameras only. What equipment do you use, what films
and where do you develop your photos? Yes, unlike some of my colleagues,
I tend to reduce the amount of equipment I use. I own a Pentax 645 N with
a wide-angle 50 mm Carl Zeiss lens, because of its incredible optics. Its a
medium format. Whenever Im able to, I buy Ilford films, and if those arent
available I opt for Fuji. As a correspondent of Vjesnik from Vukovar, where
I was born, I used to develop photos in my own dark room. I dont do that
anymore as years go by and I get older, I but wish to photograph. The films
are now developed by my lab assistant in Prague, who Ive successfully collaborated with for the last 15 years. All my photos are developed on barite
paper, which will be my practice for as long as the medium is available.

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

Whats your opinion on digital photography and have you ever used it?
I admit my attitude towards the digital has softened over the years. I work
with publishing companies (Disput, Meandar, Ljevak, Fraktura, Durieux) on
various book covers, which is the reason why I have lately used digital cameras too. A digital camera has its advantages. Its faster and cheaper than its
analogue counterpart. For one thing, there is no expense for development
and film. In news photography, its irreplaceable you can send in the photos directly from the front lines. Its irreplaceable as well in modern digital
design. But it has its flaws too. The possibility to take endless amounts of
photos lowers down your own personal criteria. Its wrong to operate under the presumption that one good photo out of a hundred is a good deal.
Thats why the most commonly used digital camera button today is delete.
Another negative aspect is the fact that its more difficult to prove and maintain ownership rights to digital photos, because its easier to manipulate
and steal them. Thre were such cases, and well have more of them

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

Youre one of few Croatian photographers that have been internationally recognized. What do you think is the reason for that? I discovered photography in Prague. I never intended to sell my photography, but rather use it to
get through a less than rosy reality of living in exile. I relied on it heavily - this
was my balancing force. And with initial gallery success, I became more and
more confident I wanted to nothing else but photography. This dedication
and concentration, as well as love for photography, produced results. But
in order to get into galleries, you have to push your luck a little, which means be more active during exhibitions, have good web site, be published in
world magazines, etc. Then you have to find a gallery in which your profile
of photography will fit in perfectly. In my case this is classical photography,
so I looked for galleries that fit the description. Of course, speaking several
foreign languages is also very helpful. And once youre networked, exhibitions start happening.

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

In what way are you engaged in helping younger authors? Other than a
couple of lectures and presentations of my work in high schools and the
Zagreb Photo Club, not too much. We all fight our own battles. Thats how
it goes.
Do you keep track of domestic photography, young, professional photographers in particular? Not too much, but I do enjoy seeing a young authors
exhibition every now and then.

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

Do you believe a photographer has to be trained in order to present quality


work and be recognized? If one should judge by my example, no, because I
unfortunately do not have photography training. Ive socialized with FAMU
students in Prague and have seen cases where students dropped out of school and still managed to become famous and recognized authors. On the
other hand, Ive seen people with master degrees who could barely put together a single exhibit. Theres also one more interesting example: Miroslav
Tichy. Aged over 80, a bohemian, living somewhat carelessly; he developed
his own camera from a pair of binoculars and took pictures of women. The
photos were blurry, technically incorrect. This in the chaos he lived in, with
everything lying on the floor, damaged and tainted. Then one day, a Swiss
gallery owner came along, picked everything up from the floor, set up an
exhibition and after that every gallery in the world is competing for Miroslav Tichy. Theyre now making a movie, publishing books The man had
never had a single exhibition before! Personally, Ive seen his photos on sale
for 10.000 dollars each, during the Paris Photo fair. This is an example of the
power modern curators have as well.

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

Did you have any problems with exhibition venues, and were you successful
in setting up exhibits because of your photographs or because of your fame?
I had no problems. On the contrary, Ive exhibited twice in Mimara, although
I had to finance that myself through sponsors. My international success has
surely contributed, but this is the sole factor. Good quality always finds its
way to a suitable exhibition space.

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

Where in the world did you exhibit, and which of the events is your favorite? Ive held independent exhibitions in Croatia, Greece, Turkey, Serbia,
Hungary, Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Germany, France, Portugal, Spain,
Switzerland, Austria, Argentina, Japan and the United States. Japan impressed me the most. Its so much different its almost impossible to forget. Its a
nation of immense curiosity towards other cultures, and they show genuine
respect towards their work, so they are almost incomparable to other countries in this regard.

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Stanko Abadi
Croatia | http://www.sabadzic.net.amis.hr

interview

Nudes

What are your future plans? After the Unterwegs exhibition earlier this year
in August, in the Fototreppe 42 gallery in Hanau, Germany, which features
my photographs taken during my travels through many countries (Croatia,
Germany, Japan, Turkey, etc.), Ill devote my time to a fourth book release
from Meandar, Zagreb, titled Marginalije (Marginal Glosses). If this works
out as planned, Im also thinking of making an exhibition with the photos
from the book. With no people this time. Next year, Im having an arranged exhibition in Santa Fe, USA, as well as in Istanbul, Turkey, in the Pg Art
Gallery.
Finally, Id like to say one more thing Its all beautiful the exhibitions, the
galleries, the curators But I feel the best simply when Im taking photographs. This is a joy I wouldnt trade for anything in the world.

selected and questions: Robert Gojevic


translation: Ivan Pekarik
proofreading: Davor Juricic

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BE CREATIVE,
AL BE IMAGINATIVE
BE YOURSELF!
ART LIMITED COMMUNITY

www.artlimited.net

photography

painting

drawing

design

digital

models

sculpture

Art Limited is an elegant high-featured artist community for artists, art lovers and critics. This site features personal
and original creative works that are well recognized and appreciated. If you wish to only comment on the art and take
advantage of the message center and forums to engage in dialog with the artists (art dealer, gallery director, curator,
artist agent, publisher, gallery representative, image researcher, collector, press, communication),you can do so
through an "observer" account. If the quality of your work is recognized and original, join us now.

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

DONT MISS US..

Make sure you dont miss new Blur magazine issue - sign up for our
newsletter and we will keep you informed!

NEWSLETTER
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This is a story of dreams


coming to life. This is our
story, a dance of souls.

project

Let me introduce you to


a very special project. Its
about some extraordinary
women who speak of their souls using the camera.
Thanks to photography we
nowadays have the opportunity to use great instruments able to capture our
secrets and peculiarities.
For this reason people use
their cameras more and
more often just like poets
used pens in the past.

Soul tales II
Marianne Le Carrour | Andreea Anghel | Alessandra Lanzafame

Marianne Le Carrour
Francuska | http://www.mariannelecarrour.net/

project

Soul tales II

MARIANNE LE CARROUR started as an amateur and despite being completely self thought, is now really appreciated as a professional photographer.
She combines traditional artistic expressions with the contemporary ones
in order to create dreamlike situations, expressed in her portraits and self
portraits. After having lived firstly in Paris, then in London and United States, she continues with her personal research by participating in many collective experiments since 2004.

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Marianne Le Carrour
Francuska
| http://www.mariannelecarrour.net/

project

Soul tales II

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Marianne Le Carrour
Francuska
| http://www.mariannelecarrour.net/

project

Soul tales II

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Marianne Le Carrour
Francuska
| http://www.mariannelecarrour.net/

project

Soul tales II

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Andreea Anghel
Romania | http://cigaro.carbonmade.com/

project

Soul tales II

ANDREEA ANGHEL is 19 years old and she is still attending high school.
In her spare time she started experimenting with photography and photo
manipulation which soon became her passion. Her motives are mostly people and visualization of their degradation, problems they have or provoke,
basically human nature itself. Andrea started exploring these themes when
she was only 16 and wishes to develop in this direction because she believes that human-related motives can transfer deeper messages and manifest
(show) beauty despite all imperfections of life.

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Andreea Anghel
Romania | http://cigaro.carbonmade.com/

project

Soul tales II

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Andreea Anghel
Romania | http://cigaro.carbonmade.com/

project

Soul tales II

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Andreea Anghel
Romania | http://cigaro.carbonmade.com/

project

Soul tales II

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Alessandra Lanzafame
Italy | http://www.myspace.com/alessandralanzafame

project

Soul tales II

ALESSANDRA LANZAFAME was born in Catania on 12th November 1983.


Her mother told her that it snowed that day which made her mother believe that something strange is about to happen in Sicily. Alessandra is a
true art lover, especially of that kind of art that gives her the opportunity to
travel frequently and which can surpass all limits, penetrate under skin and
get stuck inside of mind. Since she was a child she always enjoyed drawing
and painting, and in order to better express her inner world, she attended
Art Institute (gdje?). At the age of 19 she completely fell in love with photography as it gave her the power to freeze every special detail of a single
moment, both realistic and imaginary ones. When she was 21 she moved to
Rome to study Photography at the European Institute of Design (IED), with
the hope to find, not only a good job, but also new inspirations. She considers photography a good traveling mate which helps her express her own
conscience. When the shutter listens to her for an endless second, her body
shakes her soul and makes her trust and dedicate herself to the light which
seeps through the eye of the camera, the most pure eye, in her opinion.
What is the aim of her photographic research? To freeze a moment that may
contain and reveal the infinite of her Being.

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Alessandra Lanzafame
Italy | http://www.myspace.com/alessandralanzafame

project

Soul tales II

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Alessandra Lanzafame
Italy | http://www.myspace.com/
alessandralanzafame

project

Soul tales II

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Alessandra Lanzafame
Italy | http://www.myspace.com/
alessandralanzafame

project

Soul tales II

selected: Loredana Guinicelli


translation: Anamarija Kova

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Gallery 24 project submission


As we already explained in Gallery 24, the aim of this magazine is to provide space for all those amazing
and special photographs, without insisting on certain techniques, tools, instruments or topics. In case
you produced a thematically connected series of photographs, submit your whole photo project!
How? This is very simple:
1. Write some info about your project: where it was taken, what inspired you, what the idea behind was,
which message you are trying to get across and how many photographs there are in your project.
2. Send us your URL where the whole project can be seen.
3. If your project is selected, you will be contacted and asked to provide further detailed information
about the project and yourself (brief biography).
http://www.blur-magazine.com/submission/project-submission/

Which projects do we prefer?


A photo project can be submitted but by an author
that plans and revolves, which makes the photographers professionals. We are talking about a photographer that is no longer an amateur, who no longer explores without control and who manages to crystallize
his ambitions.

After this revealing moment of truth, we start to think


and photograph differently. Endless clicking stops and
there are no more numerous photographs of every single motive that seems nice and interesting. Hunting
time starts. Goal - predefined theme.

This probably happens in the moment when we critically observe all of our photographs and find out that
our gallery isnt very homogeneous. We usually face this
when creating our own web photo gallery and when we
get stuck with how to divide links and themes. Dozens
of our successful photographs suddenly seem as a work
of a bunch of different authors. In other words, this is
when we notice lack of our individual mark.

Therefore, a project you submit needs to have same


artistic values as those described in Gallery 24. Moreover,
they have to be somehow connected, parts of a meaningful whole. Although we always publish each photo
on a separate page in order to observe and admire it
easily, it is expected that all these photographs are compatible either according to style, theme or a certain story. Furthermore, we expect to find out something ad-

ditional about the author himself/herself through his/


her work, something we cannot read in the biography.
When it comes to choosing a theme, we dont wish to
set any limits. What we value most is a project somehow
visualizing and communicating authors opinion on the
chosen theme.

Robert, selector of Gallery 24

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would probably describe myself as an author in search


of strong details, or timeless angles. Im fascinated by
anything thats black and white to begin with, anything
mysterious, with a comic book touch to it. When I identify
my motifs, I tell myself what I personally feel about them,
and then transfer all those ideas into final post-processing,
which is crucial in expressing wanted atmosphere.

Vladimir Longauer

portfolio

http://www.valdoo.net
http://www.vladimirlongauer.com

Visions
Ana Lorencin
Croatia | http://10343.photography.artlimited.net
selected: Kresimir Zadravec | translation: Anamarija Kovac | proofreading: Vedran Korusic

Ana Lorencin
Croatia | http://10343.photography.artlimited.net

In the beginning, it was all total inexperience and ignorance. The only thing that I had were visions, visions of
some special, different worlds, imaginary situations, parallel realities I mean, my photographic experience
doesnt exactly go way back, but this is a topic Ill deal
with a bit later.
I first did painting, which was, as many people around
me believed, the only real route for me to take. But now,
as I look back, I see myself as one of many young hypedup semi-artists/punkers that sing in bands and spend
more time philosophizing than doing anything original. Back then, my world was dark and gloomy, no one
appreciated or understood me There was the occasional exhibition now and then, followed by comments
ranging from Hey, this sucks, I dont understand any of
this to those benevolent phrases you usually get after
a couple of drinks, like Honey, this is really something
special Can you spare a cigarette?
The paint eventually dried up, education was over and
the artist within me hid away. Something snapped; I
didnt do anything that was remotely related to creativity. God, I even spent some time working in a shoe store,
but not in a charming way, within reason, like people do
cheesy jobs in movies to save up money to go traveling
or study for a year in Paris or something. No, this was
simple, numbing, everyday work with nothing good coming out of it other than meeting a wonderful and dear
friend who I remained close with to this day, laughing
and remembering about those days.
But I digress. As the story should be about photography,

its about time for me to explain how it all began


In 2003, I started going back to my roots, and started
working part-time in a multimedia company as a designer. The part-time gig switched to full-time, my interests and demand for creativity grew, new things came
along, new tools, and so did digital photography which
was, to my great fortune, available to everyone. My first
camera was a solid compact Konica Minolta. I spent days
watching the world around me, perplexed by the way it
consumed me. Spending time in nature became a long
process of studying every cloud, grass and sea shore,
which remains one of my most frequent motifs to this
very day. In the city, I used to photograph people, traffic,
the joys and sorrows, but my art was sometimes wrongly interpreted as Ive come to realize upon getting
whacked on the head with a wet squid by a couple of
old ladies who confused me for a prowling local newspaper photographer. Today, I either ask politely, or shoot
from a safe distance.
I can say that photography has taught me how to look
at the world differently. I know that sounds tacky, but its
really true. The exhilaration you get from a well chosen
and preserved moment is priceless. The feelings of stopping the time and my personal visions always impress
me anew, because, in the end, the main thing you get
out of it is your own gut feeling.
I would probably describe myself as an author in search of strong details, or timeless angles. Im fascinated
by anything thats black and white to begin with, anything mysterious, with a comic book touch to it. When

portfolio

Visions

I identify my motifs, I tell myself what I personally feel


about them, and then transfer all those ideas into final
post-processing, which is crucial in expressing wanted
atmosphere. I rarely prepare and plan my photos, they
come to exist spontaneously, Id even say messily, impulsively. I grab my gear, sit in my car and drive without knowing where, until I just stop and find something
that occupies my attention. But this is mostly a character
thing, I suppose.
In any case, I believe everybody can and must find a way
to express what he/she has within. Anything we do can
be art, be it art of selling shoes, making bread, making
love or in my case I hope photography. Just do what
you do with sincerity, and do it from the heart.

selected: Robert Gojevic


translation: Ivan Pekarik
proofreading: Davor Juricic

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Ana Lorencin
Croatia | http://10343.photography.artlimited.net

portfolio

Visions

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Ana Lorencin
Croatia | http://10343.photography.artlimited.net

portfolio

Visions

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Ana Lorencin
Croatia | http://10343.photography.artlimited.net

portfolio

Visions

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Ana Lorencin
Croatia | http://10343.photography.artlimited.net

portfolio

Visions

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The world of photography is full of subjective and endless discussions: black and white or full
color photography, filters or without, digitally processed or a set of harmonized settings, analogue or digital film... One could go on forever. And, of course, there is personal experience behind
every answer, as well as personal experience, emotional attachment, but also rational argumentation.
We would like to know about your thoughts and opinions. We plan to present a new theme, a
new question in every issue, and you can send us your statements and explanations that support
these or otherwise via e-mail or by using this link directly. We will publish most interesting answers in our next issue.

Send away!

vox.populi@blur-magazine.com

This time we were inspired by a brave Impossible project, founded by a group of enthusiasts
that will reproduce analogue instant film (further info on the here!).
When asked what the reason behind the challenge is and why they believe the project will not
only be possible, but also very successful, they said:

We believe in Polaroid as a strong and unique counterpart to digitalized world that were living in. The
Digital Revolution completely changed the perspectives, possibilities but also the character of photography. After some years of playing and experimenting with their new digital cameras, people began to
miss some aspects of analogue instant photography which they had not been aware of before - or even
complained about.
They started longing for real pictures which they could touch, feel and smell. Looking at all the perfect and clean digital pictures, they remembered more and more the good days when every single picture was an experiment, an unpredictable adventure, slowly developing in the palms of their hands. They
even had to accept the fact that they started missing the high purchase price of analogue Instant film
as they found out that it really helps taking good pictures when carefully pushing the trigger, aware of
every click costing real money. Polaroid film stands for unpredictable visual adventures combined with
a splendid retro-style feeling.

Our questions: do you think instant photography is by certain properties more valuable than digital photography?
What are the advantages of Polaroid cameras when compared to digital ones? There are great numbers of loyal users of
Polaroid technique worldwide. Do you believe the retro aspect of instant film can create a new fashion boom in photography world and increase Polaroid art scene further? Would you, besides your digital camera, also appreciate having
a Polaroid one?
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From a digital magazine to digital media

Galleries, photography
blogs and personal web
pages of successful photographers are often works
of art on their own merit
but, sadly, often unnoticed
by the general public. The
GloBULB Award aims to
spread the awareness of
the importance of interactive and modern Internet
promotion of the art of
photography, which is unjustly ignored by many excellent photographers.
Aware of the fact that
an excellent photographer
might not be an excellent web designer, we will
base the GloBULB Award
primarily on the criteria
of the quality of exhibited
photography on the web
site. Of course, an advantage will be given to those
web sites that add to the
authors originality with an
equally original web presentation,
implemented
technical solutions and
quality of web design.

gloBULB

GloBULB is a monthly recognition to the best web


pages in the domain of photography.

Best Photography
Web Site Award
Ivan Pekarik
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Ivan Pekarik
Danska | http://www.bombayfc.com/

gloBULB

Bombay Flying Club

A project started by three freelance news photographers, Poul Madsen and Henrik Kastenskov from
Denmark and Brent Foster from Canada, mostly thrills by its original idea their website is a representation not only of exceptional photography, not only of exceptional web design, but a representation of
exceptional journalism, journalism suited to the 21st century. Although each of the three photographers
has his own gallery on the site, these are secondary (somewhat hidden behind the navigational links at
the top of the page). The primary focus is on their multimedia photo-journalistic stories, which is incidentally a wonderful usage of modern web technologies. The impressive and emotional combination
of artistic photography, video and narration which is objective at the same time presents different
topics. From the intrigue of an old man who decided to leave behind the modern world and live in an
abandoned bus in the middle of the forest, to disturbing testimonies about Indian death-mines, to a
story that touches the problems of the industrial pollution in the Third World.
Despite journalist ambition, each of the presentations is a visual master piece. The photography is
strong, impressive and technically impeccable, and even the video clips seem like photos brought to life,
with carefully planned framing, lighting and top-notch post production. If these would be presented in
an art gallery, the news stories wouldnt look out of place at all. On the contrary, this is exactly what they
deserve and this website is an ideal replacement for the traditional media, which is the backbone of the
entire project. These photographers had a clear message to send the traditional media do not make full
use of the Internet and modern technologies. So they decided to show the world how its done.
The web site is entirely Flash-based, and the quality of production and photo/video encoding is remarkable using a typical broadband connection, one can watch all the material in high resolution,
even with the browser spread across the full screen. This maximizes the size of the content as well, with
design and navigation elements of the site usually being minimalistic. The visitor can thus be completely
submerged in the shocking and emotional world of true, sincere reporting.
If youve ever wondered what a true photo reporter with news photography as a calling rather than
merely a profession would do without the pressure of editorial policies and marketing agendas, the answer is Bombay Flying Club. Dont miss it for the world!

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Join in!

And nominate your favorites!

If you are aware of an innovative, imaginative and original Web site, of a good photographer, please dont hesitate to send us your
suggestions! Simply send us the link, followed with a short explanation of your proposal, to globulb@blur-magazine.com. Our staff will
take note of your suggestions and add them to our ever growing lists of web pages that qualify for the GloBULB plaque!
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column

When I think about it,


I know that is one of the
best photo things that ever
happened to me. From the
moment when, with a specific buzz, it finds its way
through the tiny passage
in the camera, which kind
of spits it on my palm, and
I watch it as some kind of
miracle, fading in gently.
And I admire it for being
so beautiful at all stages
of the development, changing its density, colors and
contrasts and then becomes something else. So
human-like. Polaroid is being born, it comes to be, it
fades, it dies.

Polaroid
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Polaroid is being born, it comes to be, it fades, it dies
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whats the use etc, etc...


It was a photograph of my brother or a cousin
of mine, it was dark and blurry, elephants eyes
had that strange flare from the flash bulb, the
photographer was a dark tanned man with
huge moustache, who barely spoke Croatian.

How can that all disappear? Where does the


photograph go? How does it die? Why so? I
was only 5 or something. My first encounter
with a Polaroid.
And that was it. Nobody bought that kind of
camera for me, I wasnt the little Einstein of Po-

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Once upon a time, in my childhood, there


was a certain picture of somebody, riding an
elephant at the circus. It was sold to us for a
little fortune and I remember my Mom and
Dad about that for a while. Why did you fall for
that, look at it, it will disappear after a while, so

Polaroid
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it fades, it dies
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winter and summer as well, group photos in


front of various gates, barbecues...
And then, after so many years, when I already
knew what I wanted to do with (and for) my
life, one fine day, one Daniel, God bless him,
brought a silly old camera he owned because

he just didnt know what to do with it. And he


gave to me as a present. It was Polaroid Land
SX 70. True sacrilege. Now I know that. However, there was no film for that kind of camera.
So it stood still for years, again, and was almost
forgotten, until, one fine day, I came across the
last remaining of now late SX 70 film. I found it

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laroid photography, nothing happened. It was


too expensive. The photo from the circus was
all I knew about polaroids for a long time. That
one and some polaroids that nana Nevenka
brought from US and Australia: my relatives living rooms, blue sofas upholstered with nylon,
outdoors swimming pools, Christmas trees in

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it fades, it dies
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could work until I tried it out with one out of


two purchased films (there were only 4 on the
shelf and now I know it was the last time I saw
those). My camera buzzed as soon as it was
fed, it worked, the photos came out looking
good. I was overwhelmed. Unhappy at the
same time, I had only two films. Michael from

Santa Monica told me I could use Polaroid 600


with certain adjustments. Only thing I needed
was my Swiss army knife and it worked again.
The 600 is much mire sensitive than SX 70. It was
no problem for me, I love shooting in the dark.
And when the mania hits you, anything is good.
You get along just fine, plenty of tricks there.

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on the almost sold out shelf of a big camera


and film store in Hollywood. It was in 2006.. my
camera was living in dark for 8 years, already.
Soon, during my stay in US it got a companion, cute, modern Spectra, one of those with a
small LCD screen. There were still loads of film
for that one. I didnt even know my Land SX 70

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with nothing such as that sensitive little package in her purse. And just few months ago,
hoping this could last forever, I spent huge
amounts of 600 on a beautiful project, I guess I was carried away a lot. The project ended
hanging some 4 meters from the floor, which
is actually good. The beauty was printed huge
(I love huge) in digital print (ouch), on the laminated stickers (!). the photographs were
decorated with imprinted logo of the studio
which printed them.
I was happy they were hanging so high, so

only some, sharp-eyed persons could see the


disgrace of somebodys self-promotion on somebody elses artwork. Does it happen only in
Croatia or what?
However, that is some other story. I am writing
a requiem here.
For those who really, but really dont know, the
Polaroid factory slowly faded away, the films
are scarce or out of production for years now.
The other day, I was reading a book (Annie Leibovitz: At Work), and she mentioned, with a

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And that is how my dear Desiree, starting from


that summer, carried serious amounts of 600
and 1200 in her hand luggage, from New York
to Croatia. She would buy it in one amazing
store in NY, which would oddly close on Fridays around 1 or 2 PM, and then reopened on
Sunday. There are still some leftovers of my
stash in the fridge. You cant buy those anymore, no way. Nothing besides Spectra, I checked
on the internet the other day, and the price is
double now. Ouch.
The other day Desiree arrived from the States

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it fades, it dies
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I watch it as some kind of miracle, fading in


gently. And I admire it for being so beautiful
at all stages of the development, changing its
density, colors and contrasts and then becomes something else. So human-like. Polaroid
is being born, it comes to be, it fades, it dies.
I love those tiny images. I stack them. Feast for
my eyes, at all their stages.
I also love the expansion of that small format
to a huge, even immense one. I am talking
meters, it brings out its beautiful, perfect grain. I have always been a big fan of pointillism

in painting, high school art classes with professor ivka.


I love its color spectrum, the contrast of fully
developed picture, an odd precision of details,
despite such a small format, not to mention
half tones. No Photoshop can ever reach that
with a regular digital image, with all the respect for the other important sacrilege.
I love the way it behaves as a pillow, as if it was
stuffed with some evaporating liquid, its surface soft but hard, dry but still wet. Dont take
this too literally.

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lot of love, how there were times where shed


rather shoot polaroid negatives than film negatives. A lot of work that way, but those were
vivid, big, beautiful photographs. I never heard of it, or saw it. And I am so in love with the
media, owning only two cameras, such a small
piece of once huge empire.
When I think about it, I know that is one of the
best photo things that ever happened to me.
From the moment when, with a specific buzz,
it finds its way through the tiny passage in the
camera, which kind of spits it on my palm, and

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it fades, it dies
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woods, waiting for their Prince Charming to


help them get rid of the poisoned apple, stuck
deeply in their throats. So please, keep the fingers crossed for all those Princes,
to succeed in what they are doing, and give all
those sweet Snowhites back to us.
So that the circus guy with big moustache can

keep taking polaroids of elephant riders, and


maybe cast a spell on another little child, for
as long as the first loaded polaroid camera comes along and solves the mystery of a dying
media. Or?

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All in all, strange little media.


And, although this is a kind of requiem, there
will be no wake for the dead.
Some nice people, apparently, are trying to
bring all the late Polaroids back to life.
Some might find this analogy better: they are
all Snowhites, laying there, in the middle of the

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it fades, it dies
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Polaroid
Mare Milin

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it fades, it dies
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Polaroid
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it fades, it dies
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Polaroid
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it fades, it dies
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Edwin Herbert Land inventor and the founder


of the Polaroid

is three year old daughter Jennifer asked why she could not see the
photograph just after being taken. Land decided to please childrens
curiosity and started considering many options while walking for an hour
in Santa Fe.

Great discoveries sometimes come from


ideas encouraged by very quotidian situations. Edwin Herbert Land (1909 1991),
American scientist and innovator, found
himself in one of these situations while vacationing in Mexico in 1944. His three year
old daughter Jennifer asked why she could
not see the photograph just after being taken. Land decided to please childrens curiosity and started considering many options
while walking for an hour in Santa Fe. He
found a few solutions and perfected some
of them during the next three years.
Lands name is connected to 533 innovations which he registered. The impressive
number is paralleled in current American
history only by Thomas Edison.
Even as a boy, Land was fascinated with
kaleidoscopes, so he read different literatu-

re on optics and polarized light in particular. He started studying at Harvard in 1926,


but in order to satisfy his curious nature,
he moved to New York, where he spent his
days in a public library and the laboratory
of Columbia University. While walking one
night through a very busy avenue , blinded
by many city lights, he decided to develop a
thin and cheap polarizer, which he succeeded in after a few attempts, and having registered his first patent, he returns to Harvard
in 1929 to continue his studies. In 1932, he
opened a laboratory in partnership with George Wheelwrightom, where they made a
large shipment of polarizer filters for Kodak.
Professor Clarence Kennedy, their friend, named the filters polaroids, and the name took
on. In 1937, Land founded Pthe olaroid company in order to continue the work began
with Wheelwright. During the war years, the
company produced different military equi-

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History of the Polaroid

LANDS INVENTION
Lands Polaroid film features negative emulsion and
positive paper in one. After triggering, negative and
positive come into mutual
contact. The image on the
positive does not transmit
light through, but chemicals
placed between the positive
and the negative. Positive
appears from silver crystals
unexposed negative that
same silver, which when developing regular negative
film does not react. The mechanical process of combining
the negative and the positive
in a polaroid camera creates
in a way a completely equipped dark chamber.

History of the Polaroid


Ivan Zidar

indispensable effect
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pment, and in 1943, Polaroid turned to photography. In 1947, the first commercial Polaroid Land camera was produced, dubbed
Model 95, which was part of a series produced in between 1947 and 1963. These used
film-type 40. Instant photography was not
supposed to be developed in dark chambers, but developed within a few minutes
immediately after triggering. While improving existing and developing new products,
in 1962, they produced the first colour film
called Polacolor, after which the production
of cheaper Swingers followed, cameras with
plastic cases that were easy to use. A real breakthrough in the market followed in 1972.
With the discovery of pack film, the most
popular model SX-70 was produced, and is
still in use. Many artists use the SX-70 because of the possibility of intervening while
developing, by inserting special extensions
that are creating impressive effects. Film for
SX-70 is quite difficult to obtain, but it is possible to adjust cameras for film-type 600 by
adding ND-filter, which reduces the amount
of light entering camera lens. Film Type 600

was developed in 1980s along with the model 600 that has been successfully produced
up to 1990s. This was a cheaper camera designed for . Plastic cases and lenses were similar to Swingers, but with the ability to use
pack films. Polaroid also developed two SRL
cameras that use film-type 600: SRL 680 and
SRL 690 which are still in demand because of
excellent quality photos they produce.
During 1990s, digital cameras became
more and more popular, and started to
push Polaroid instant film cameras out of
the market. Polaroid also introduced its own
digital camera in 1996 to keep up with the
latest innovations and market demands. In
2008, Polaroid stopped producing instant
film cameras and films. Many Polaroid fans
worldwide hope Polaroid will survive technological trends and manage to survive as
a distinct form. Its effect is indispensable, almost fascinating. Polaroid allows one to monitor the appearance of photographs and
one cannot be completely sure what it will
look like in the end, due to various unexpected effects that the film can produce.

Polarization of light

Light is an electromagnetic wave, the electric and


magnetic particles of which
vibrate each in own plane, under the angle of 90
degrees to the direction of
wave propagation. Polarization of light appears from a
reflection of light or when
vibrating particles break the
medium. Photography also
uses polarization filters - filters that will remove all light
vibrating in planes which
we do not require.

translation: Petra Nenadic


proofreading: Davor Juricic

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USE OF POLAROID
Apart from photographers, many professional groups took to Polaroid.
It is used in investigations by the police, during medical examinations,
different research, measurements and verification of light on movie sets,
etc. Detectives were always able to rely on Polaroid because they were
sure the photographs were successful, while other cameras provided the
uncertainty that lasted until one is out of the dark chamber.

Lands name is connected


to 533 innovations which he
registered. The impressive
number is paralleled in current American history only
by Thomas Edison.

History of the Polaroid


Ivan Zidar

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Hard Facts
WHAT
Polaroid is transforming itself from an analog Instant Film Production Company to a global Consumer Electronics and Digital Imaging company, with new high quality products
for the masses. Because of this re-positioning
and running out of essential components,
Polaroid globally stopped the production of
analog Instant Film in June 2008, closing the
factories in Mexico and the Netherlands. Impossible B.V. acquired the complete production plant in Enschede (NL) from Polaroid and
engaged the most experienced team of Integral Film experts worldwide. The IMPOSSIBLE
company is founded with one concrete aim:
to re-invent and re-produce analog INTEGRAL
FILM for vintage Polaroid cameras. Polaroid is
fully aware and supportive of this goal. The
IMPOSSIBLE mission is NOT to re-build Polaroid Integral film but to develop a new product with new characteristics, consisting of
new optimized components, produced with
a streamlined modern setup. An innovative
and fresh analog material, sold under a new
brand name that perfectly matches the global re-positioning of Integral Film.

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WHY
We believe in Polaroid as a strong and
unique counterpart to the digitalized world
that were living in. The Digital Revolution
completely changed the perspectives, possibilities but also the character of photography.
After some years of playing and experimenting with their new digital cameras, people
began to miss some aspects of analog instant
photography which they had not been aware
of before - or had even complained about.
They started longing for real pictures which
they could touch, feel and smell. Looking at all
the perfect and clean digital pictures, they
remembered more and more the good days
when every single picture was an experiment,
an unpredictable adventure, slowly developing in the palm of their hands. They even had
to accept the fact that they started missing
the high purchase price of analog Instant film
as they found out that it really helps them
to take good pictures when carefully pushing the trigger, aware of every click costing
them real money. Polaroid film stands for unpredictable visual adventures combined with
a splendid retro-style feeling.

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WHO
Managers Andr Bosman, Netherlands (Executive
Director, Head of Operation & Production) Florian
Kaps, Austria (Executive Director, Marketing & Business Development) Marwan Saba, Austria (Non-Executive Director, Finance & Legal)
Employees Gerhard Kamphuis, Kees Teekman, Anne
Bosma, Dick Koopmans, Bennie Evers, Martin Steinmeijer, Nico Dikken, Paul Latka, Henk Minnen

WHERE
Office Headquarters: Impossible b.v. Overcinge 41
7608 AJ Almelo Niederlande
Production: The Polaroid factory at Enschede, Netherlands

WHEN
Launching October 1st, 2008, IMPOSSIBLE will develop this new, modern Integral Film within 15
months, with the aim to start production in 2010.
We plan to produce 1 million films in the first year
(2010), and 3 million films thereafter. We expact a
maximal worldwide demand of 10 million films in
the following years.

PRESS CONTACT
Marlene Kelnreiter
marlene@the-impossible-project.com
+43 (0) 680 318 3077
http://www.the-impossible-project.com/

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interview

Florian Kaps
Executive Director of The Impossible Project
The Netherlands | http://www.the-impossible-project.com/
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Do you remember your first experience with Polaroid?
My first polaroid picture was taken with a holga camera with
polaroid back it started my interest. My first camera was a
SX70 camera from ebay, and this camera changed my life
forever!!!

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Were you an active Polaroid photographer, and what
was your favourite Polaroid camera?
No, I was no active Polaroid photographer before that, I was
I Lomographer before I tasted the real fruit.

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What were you thinking when you heard that Polaroid
instant films are not going to be produced any more?
It was a shock, but also, after some minutes, a clear mission:
it was cristal clear: this is not the end: this is the new beginning.

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Who came to the idea about naming your project, and
has the name any connection with Edwin Land?
Yes, the name is connected to the following quote by Edwin
Land, who said: Dont undertake a project unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible. Furthermore the

name is a result from so many people/companies telling us


that this venture was impossible. Well prove the opposite
that it is possible to save analog instant photography.

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How do people react when you tell them that you are
producing new, Polaroid-like, instant film?
The one half doesnt understand it at all, the other half is
very glad and supportive about it.

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What is The Impossible Project?
The Impossible Project is a result of passion, luck and good
coincidences. The main reason is though that Polaroid is
transforming itself from an analog Instant Film Production
Company to a global Consumer Electronics and Digital

Imaging company, with new high quality products for the


masses. Because of this re-positioning and running out of
essential components, Polaroid globally stopped the production of analog Instant Film in June 2008, closing the
factories in Mexico (Instant Packfilm production) and the
Netherlands

We got the last-minute chance to acquire the complete production plant in Enschede (NL) from Polaroid and engaged
the most experienced team of Integral Film experts worldwide. Now we aim to re-invent and re-produce analog integral film for vintage Polaroid cameras.

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Why do you develop a new product instead of re-building the original Polaroid integral film?
Simply because thats no longer possible. Since 1972, integral film production has followed the exact same recipe,
based on exactly the same components invented almost 40

years ago by Polaroid. Every single pack of Integral Instant


film consists of about 20 components/parts. Some of essential original components used for producing Polaroid Integral film are not available any more, thats why we have to
re-invent and develop new and better solutions for replacing/upgrading problematic/expensive components before

re-starting production.

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If, how will your new film be different from the old Polaroid film?
It will have a new, very unique character as it will be a complete new film, combined with the iconic characteristics
of the traditional Polaroid film (like frame, format,smell,...).
The first film will be a monochrome film, more flavors are
to follow. And the fact that our new medium will be mon-

ochrome already shows what we are doing: developing a


new analog film from the scratch. It was always the first step
to start with monochrome than to switch to color. Polaroid
did it that way. And we will do it that way.
Who is we?

manager of Polaroid and now executive director for development and production, Marwan Saba, non-executive
director of finance & legal - and most important our team
of the most experienced Integral Film experts worldwide. 9
former workers of Polaroid in Enschede (NL) are developing
the new film with us.

Thats me, my partner Andr Bosman, former production

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Will it be possible to name the film Polaroid?

and supportive of this.

Thats not totally sure yet, were currently in negotiations


with the new Polaroid management about that. What is for
sure is that we are allowed to produce instant film for the
usage with Polaroid cameras. Polaroid is completely aware

How is the Impossible Project funded?


Its ten private shareholders, who believe in our vision and

invested into The Impossible Project. In 2009 we will probably incur a loss in 2009, but from 2010 (when we start to
produce films and sell them) we will be profitable. We have
received equity investments from private investors; the
third and probably last investment round is currently being
raised and is already nearly fully subscribed.

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What is, or has been, the biggest challenge you face in
getting instant analog film ready for 2010?
It already was a challenge to get the project started - Polaroid wasnt really interested in me to take over the production of analog instant film. It was not before the closing

event of the factory in Enschede, when I met Andr Bosman


(who was instructed by Polaroid to talk me out of his idea),
the former production manager of Polaroid - and when they
decided to try to keep Polaroid alive and found The Impossible Project.
Within the development of the new film, we had 7 big chal-

lenges ahead, but internally 5 really heavy problems: we had


to develop: new negative // new Positive // battery solution
// new reagent (reagent) // new foils. Now were nearly done
and expect our first prototype in October.

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What types of customers have been fundamental in
keeping Polaroid alive through its later years?
Currently were mostly dealing with a fast growing number
of young (24-47 year old) people (55% male, 45% female) ,
well educated, creative, with high income and deep dedica-

tion to Polaroid. Over 52% are Apple users and over 80%
additionally use digital cameras. 73% of all new costumers
within the last 3 years live in big cities all over the world.
Todays most instant countries are USA, JP, UK, FR, DE, IT,
Canada.

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In your opinion what special qualities has made Polaroid film so loved by you and others?
Of course the most exciting thing about Polaroid was and
still is that you can actually watch the polaroid developing
in your hand, and that you then hold a real thing in your

hand. Its immediateness and peculiarties (depending on


which film you use) make it so exciting to work with Polaroid.

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What is the best way that people can get involved with
the Impossible Project?
1. Buy our beautiful T-Shirs (American Apparel), the net
profit is directly going into the factory, http://polapremium.
com/news?date=2009-07-24 2. Stay tuned to our website -

sometimes our development team is seeking experts when


confronting a problem theyre having troubles with solving
- help them with your knowledge and ideas 3. Buy and enjoy the new film when its out in the beginning of 2010.

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Pop culture icons and trends fade and die out over time
and most, as they should. What makes Polaroid photography different than just a fad, and worth saving? At
this point, is the effort to bring it back into production
going to be worth it both cost-wise and from a culture
standpoint?
In fact there are many pop culture icons and trends that

may fade out but then come back and experience their revival. One of the best examples might be vinyl, which contrary to expectations (CD, mp3 that will take over) is still
alive and searched for, used by and appreciated by lovers.
People nowadays talk about how the economic crisis will
change our ideals and consumption behavior, we start looking for classic, constant, traditional things that we can ad to
our contemporary, globalized and computerized life. With

our new Instant Film were also going to produce a niche


product for people who are tired of our perfect, digitalized
picture world and who want to use something special for
special moments. Polaroid is a way to magic, beautiful and
powerful thing and one of the greatest developments in the
history of photography, therefore it mustnt die out and it
simply deserves another chance.

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What would you say to convince someone to use a Polaroid?
We wouldnt say anything wed give him a loaded Polaroid
camera and send him outside...

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selected and questions: Robert Gojevic

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POLAROID |Memory keepers

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Memory keepers
Hazy veil spread over Polaroid images captures
the moment. It seems that memories are stronger
with Polaroids.

Poetry has haiku, music its miniatures and what about


photography? By drawing a parallel, photography could
be said to have Polaroids, which resemble poetry in images. Those little memory keepers offer emotions of time
past, including the visible patina.
Hazy veil spread over Polaroid images captures the moment. It seems that memories are stronger with Polaroids.
Thanks to this hazy allure, Polaroid makes a special
artistic expression possible this is probably why many
artists fill the cyber world with Polaroid photographs almost every day. Brigitte Heinsch from German Traunstein,
for instance, is one (www.maditi.com). Her creative work
begun after she had discovered the beautiful bluish hues
of Polaroid photos. She soon reached the conclusion that,
film being quite rare and expensive, every Polaroid, no
matter how it turns out, always feels precious.
- I like them to fade, get dusty and imperfect with
time says Brigitte, who is more interested in conveying
atmospheric and unreal imagery than portraying anything concrete or authentic. So it is natural she is inspired
by colours, graphic elements, nature and made-up scenes
mostly, while her favourite motif is anything that gives her
the impulse to take her camera out. - The longer Ive been
working with photography, the fewer pictures Im actually taking. Im trying more to realize images I visualize in
my head than take pictures every day says Heinsch. She
is satisfying her artistic impulse with Polaroids and shes
not the only one. There are many people who express
themselves in this fashion. And they all prove Polaroids,
although from the past, have future as an independent
art-form.
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translation: Ivana Krnjic


proofreading: Davor Juricic

http://www.maditi.com/
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A S O P I S Z A K U LT U R U F OTO G R A F I J E

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar was born in Pula, Croatia, in 1978. During high school he
volunteered in production of Radio Pula programme. Between 1996 and
1998, he worked for Croatian TV studio in Pula and, since 2001, he has
been in new media production. He is the owner of an agency for video
production, graphic design and event management. During the last couple of years he produced numerous documentaries, promotional or
experimental movies out of which the most recent one was shown in
18th Croatian Film Days. He mostly explores photography using Polaroid lenses.

Polaroid
Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

www.ivanzidar.com
http://people.polanoid.net/Ivan

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

Polaroid

BLUR MAGAZINE 15

VOSFBMDPODFQUJPOTDPN

This website is all about conceptual photography. Its about taking photography to the
next level. There has never been so much saturation in the photography market and its
becoming out of control. This site is about the very best conceptual photographers in the
world.
Make no mistake. This is not another website where anyone gets to publish their artwork.
The artists on this website are hand-picked from a number of moderators and myself.

Polaroid
Ivan Zidar
Croatia | http://www.ivanzidar.com/

portfolio

In a time where anyone can be a photographer its time to raise the standards of what
good photography is. I hope and plan that this site grows and generates some well deserved attention to underrated and unknown photographers.
What is conceptual photography?
This is something you need to think about for yourself. Meaning is only the beginning...

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Davor Jurii
Translation and publishing
obrt@davor-juricic.hr
http://www.davor-juricic.hr/

Davor Jurii is a freelance translator/interpreter based in Zagreb, Croatia. He is a professional and opts
for the hit and run tactics business-wise, but a character or two related to his vocation do occasionally
slip in his life, and unfortunately out of as well. Funny thing is he actually has something to say, and therefore writes, mostly short poetry and prose pieces. He is also a postgrad student something he is bad at:
even though his passed exams betray straight As, someone once remarked all exams were silly passed
the age of 24. Most recently, he exhibits amateur liking for graphic design, doing his own annual versions
of basic html code, out of reasons philosophical: he claims ideas will take you only that far.

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http://www.fotosofia.info/

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photo: Riccardo Giordano

www.blur-magazine.com

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